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[Portrait of Benjamin Paul, a chief]

Creator:
Swanton, John Reed  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative
Culture:
Chitimacha  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Photographs
Scope and Contents:
Published in BAE Bulletin 43, Plate 18-b
Biographical / Historical:
Home: Louisiana
Local Numbers:
BAE GN.1181 A
Genre/Form:
Photographs
See more items in:
Bureau of American Ethnology negatives
Bureau of American Ethnology negatives / Additional Materials / Swanton, John Reed
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3701ab4a1-a1fe-40e1-b0d0-113e8b421228
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-176-ref12409

[Profile of Benjamin Paul, a chief]

Creator:
Swanton, John Reed  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative
Culture:
Chitimacha  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Photographs
Scope and Contents:
Published in BAE Bulletin 43, Plate 18-b
Biographical / Historical:
Home: Louisiana
Local Numbers:
BAE GN.1181 B
Genre/Form:
Photographs
See more items in:
Bureau of American Ethnology negatives
Bureau of American Ethnology negatives / Additional Materials / Swanton, John Reed
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39b0a4cdc-0c30-48a1-85c6-b808d7a7caa7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-photolot-176-ref12410

Basket

Collector:
Lillian T. Samuelson  Search this
Donor Name:
Mrs. Lillian T. Samuelson  Search this
Length:
11 cm
Width:
11 cm
Height:
16 cm
Culture:
American  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Object Type:
Basket
Place:
Charenton, Louisiana, United States, North America
Accession Date:
4 Sep 2007
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
2037467
USNM Number:
E434595-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3ea829113-9816-4059-b720-6cd8d54c75cf
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_12545933
Online Media:

The American South

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
The Olympic Games join athletes from across the globe in the highest levels of competition and excellence. The games have included, since their inception, a cultural component, but never before as extensively as in Atlanta in 1996. The Centennial Olympic Games brought together musical and dramatic performances, exhibitions, and artists from around the world. But most importantly, the Olympic Arts Festival highlighted the American South.

Southern culture was born from the interactions over past centuries of Native Americans, European settlers, and peoples from Africa. In the South, various forms of expression have arisen and transcended boundaries of race, gender, religion, and geography. So powerful have these expressions been - jazz, blues, gospel, rock 'n' roll, civil rights songs, Southern oratory, and food - that they have constituted unique American contributions to world culture. At the 1996 Festival on the National Mall, these forms of expressive culture were celebrated. Later the same summer in Atlanta during the Olympic Games, the program was the core of Southern Crossroads, a festival of Southern culture mounted in the new Centennial Olympic Park - the gathering spot for several hundred thousand visitors a day and billions more through television coverage. An Enhanced-CD Smithsonian Folkways recording with Internet connections and other educational material derived from the Festival program reached countless more after the Olympic Games.

The 1996 program not only exposed regional cultural roots but also showed how many of them have become part of traditions known to America and the world. Technology amplified the stories and songs of Southern rivers and roads, travails and struggles - as documenters recorded, disk jockeys broadcast, and performers toured these cultural expressions, helping them bridge race, gender, class, and ethnicity and producing forms of music now identified with American culture as a whole.

The world of Southern culture celebrated in the 1996 Festival was one of family, home, and community. The program explored new points of juncture and the evolution of new identities. In these could be discovered in today's South the roots of a new, evolving American culture.

Philippa Thompson Jackson was Program Curator and Phyllis K. Kimbrough was Program Coordinator.

The American South was made possible by and was produced in collaboration with The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games Cultural Olympiad and in cooperation with the Southern Arts Federation. Additional support was provided by The Recording Industries Music Performance Trust Funds.
Presenters:
Dori Addison, Tara Browner, Katherine Hagedorn, Joyce Jackson, Worth Long, Derek Lowery, Tim Patridge, Henry Willett Ill, Otis Williams, Joe Wilson
Particpants:
Performance Traditions

BEAUSOLEIL AVEC MICHAEL DOUCET

Jimmy Breaux, Acadian accordion, Lafayette, Louisiana

David Doucet, lead and backing vocals, acoustic guitar, Lafayette, Louisiana

Michael Doucet, lead vocals, fiddle, Lafayette, Louisiana

Al Tharp, vocals, banjo, bass, fiddle, Lafayette, Louisiana

Billy Ware, percussion, Lafayette, Louisiana

THE BIRMINGHAM SUNLIGHTS

Reginald Speight, tenor, Birmingham, Alabama

Barry Taylor, bass, Birmingham, Alabama

James Taylor, light tenor, Birmingham, Alabama

Steve Taylor, bass, Birmingham, Alabama

Wayne Williams, tenor, Birmingham, Alabama

CALLIOPE HIGHSTEPPERS

Henry Freeman, dancer, New Orleans, Louisiana

Johnny Stevenson, dancer, New Orleans, Louisiana

James Taylor, dancer, New Orleans, Louisiana

THE FREEDOM SINGERS

Betty Mae Fikes, 1946-, vocals

Rutha Harris, vocals

Charles Neblett, 1941-, vocals

Cordell Hull Reagon, 1943-1996, vocals

GENO DELAFOSE & FRENCH ROCKIN' BOOGIE

Geno Delafose, diatonic, Acadian & piano accordion, vocals, Eunice, Louisiana

Bobby Broussard, guitar, Eunice, Louisiana

John Espre, bass, Eunice, Louisiana

Germaine Jack, drums, Eunice, Louisiana

Steven Nash, rub board, Eunice, Louisiana

IFÉ ILÉ

Philbert Armenteros, congas, Miami, Florida

Rodolfo L. Caballero, vocals, Miami, Florida

Catalino Diaz, dancer, Miami, Florida

Ruben Romeu, congas, Miami, Florida

Luis E. Torres, bata, congas, chekere, Miami, Florida

Neri Torres, lead dancer, Miami, Florida

Tony Littleturtle Clark, Lumberton, North Carolina

Kat and Ray Littleturtle, Lumberton, North Carolina

Willie Lowery, Lumberton, North Carolina

MAGGIE LEWIS WARWICK WITH TILLMAN FRANKS' OLD TIME LOUISIANA HAYRIDE BAND

Maggie Lewis Warwick, guitar, vocals, Shreveport, Louisiana

Jimmy Day, lead guitar, Shreveport, Louisiana

Tillman Franks, acoustic bass, Shreveport, Louisiana

Paul Griffith, drums, Shreveport, Louisiana

John Peck, fiddle, Shreveport, Louisiana

Felton Pruitt, steel guitar, Shreveport, Louisiana

Kenny Bill Stinson, keyboards, Shreveport, Louisiana

NEW COON CREEK GIRLS

Dale Ann Bradley, guitar, Renfro Valley, Kentucky

Kathy Kuhn, fiddle, White Creek, Tennessee

Vicky Simmons, bass, Berea, Kentucky

Ramona Church Taylor, banjo, Wilkesboro, North Carolina

Eddie Pennington, Princeton, Kentucky

Douglas Quimby, 1936-, Brunswick, Georgia

Frankie Quimby, Brunswick, Georgia

Arnold Richardson, London, Kentucky

SKEETER BRANDON & HWY 61

Skeeter Brandon, vocals, keyboards, North Carolina

Chris Grant, bass, North Carolina

Armand Lenchek, guitars, North Carolina

Kelly Pace, drums, North Carolina

Rusty Smith, trombone, North Carolina

Wally West, tenor saxophone, North Carolina

TREME BRASS BAND

Benny Jones, Sr., snare drum, New Orleans, Louisiana

James Andrews, trumpet, vocals, New Orleans, Louisiana

Lionel Baptiste, bass drum, vocals, New Orleans, Louisiana

Kirk Joseph, tuba, New Orleans, Louisiana

Frederick Shepherd, trumpet, vocals, New Orleans, Louisiana

Gregory Veal, trombone, New Orleans, Louisiana

ULALI

Pura Fe Crescioni, Cherokee-Tuscarora, vocals, rattles, hand drum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Jennifer Kreisberg, Cherokee-Tuscarora, vocals, rattles, hand drum, Hartford, Connecticut

Soni Moreno, Aztec-Maya, vocals, rattles, hand drum, Staten Island, New York

Craft Traditions

David Allen, cane carver, Homer, Louisiana

Anna Branham, potter, Rock Hill, South Carolina

Monty Branham, potter, Rock Hill, South Carolina

Nola Campbell, potter, Rock Hill, South Carolina

Melissa Darden, Chitimacha basket weaver, Charenton, Louisiana

Mary Jackson, sweetgrass basket maker, Charleston, South Carolina

Eric Miller, potter, Brent, Alabama

MISSISSIPPI CULTURAL CROSSROADS (MCC)

Essie Buck, quilter, Port Gibson, Mississippi

Patty Crosby, quilter, Port Gibson, Mississippi

Geraldine Nash, quilter, Port Gibson, Mississippi

Mary Ann Norton, quilter, Port Gibson, Mississippi

Shirley Motlow, patchwork clothing, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Donnie Tolson, biblical carver, Winchester, Kentucky

Elsie Trivette, rug maker, Zionsville, North Carolina

Alvin Wood, basket maker, Murfreesboro, Tennessee

Trevle Wood, basket maker, Murfreesboro, Tennessee

Foodways Traditions

Larry Frey, food demonstrations, Eunice, Louisiana

Julietta Garcel, food demonstrations, Miami, Florida

Lucky Grissette, food demonstrations- Mountain View, Arkansas

Johnny Kallus, food demon¬strations, Katy, Texas

Steve Orsak, food demon¬strations, Katy, Texas

Larry Wietstruck, food demon¬strations, Katy, Texas

Sara Wilson, food demonstrations, St. Helena, South Carolina

Gospel Sing

THE CHAPLIERS, UNION CHAPEL BAPTIST CHURCH

Rev. Jimmy Strickland, minister, Pembroke, North Carolina

PROSPECT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH CHOIR

Rev. Bill James Locklear, minister, Maxton, North Carolina

Harold Dean Jacobs, diatonal minister, Maxton, North Carolina

THE SPIRITUAL TONES, WEEPING MARY FULL GOSPEL BAPTIST CHURCH

Rev. Henson F. Brooks, pastor, Salisbury, Maryland

Rev. Russell Campars, Sr., Salisbury, Maryland

Timothy Waters, II, manager, Salisbury, Maryland

WESLEY TEMPLE GOSPEL CHOIR, UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Rev. Grant Johnson, minister, Salisbury, Maryland

Diane West, choir director, Salisbury, Maryland

Mary Winder, pianist, Salisbury, Maryland

Janet Ames, president and business manager, Salisbury, Maryland

WHITE HILLS FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH CHOIR

Rev. Jerry Locklear, minister, Maxton, North Carolina

Eddie Carter, music director, Maxton, North Carolina
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1996 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1996, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1996 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk54efbe008-92f8-4085-aa1f-6e946fa15bab
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1996-ref18

MS 3980 Onomatology of the Catawba River basin

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Names:
Mayo, Margot, 1910-  Search this
Extent:
12 Pages
Culture:
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Euchee (Yuchi)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes Algonquian, Iroquoian, Siouan, Yuchean, Muskhogean, and Chitimachan linguistic families.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3980
Local Note:
autograph document signed
Topic:
Names, place -- Algonquian  Search this
Names, place -- Siouan  Search this
Names, place -- Yuchean  Search this
Names, place -- Muskhogean  Search this
Names, place -- Chitimachan  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquin  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Creek  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 3980, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3980
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3da8af2cd-9c63-4a85-9c11-0bea0bd2681e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3980

MS 1627 Miscellaneous vocabularies of 32 different tribes

Collector:
Bartlett, John Russell, 1805-1886  Search this
Husband, Bruce  Search this
Encinas, Fr  Search this
Whipple, Amiel Weeks, 1817?-1863  Search this
Brown, H. B.  Search this
Heintzelman, Samuel Peter, 1805-1880  Search this
Duralde, Martin  Search this
Informant:
Cawewas, Pedro  Search this
Peraza, Hieronymo  Search this
Alejo, Marcos  Search this
Ortiz, Santiago  Search this
A-he-ba-tu  Search this
Esteban  Search this
Colusio  Search this
Extent:
183 Items (numbered pages )
Culture:
Kiowa  Search this
Nahua  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Tanoan Indians  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Pujunan  Search this
Athapaskan  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Seri  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Tanoan  Search this
Wakashan Indians  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Kulanapan  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Atakapa  Search this
Maya  Search this
San Luis Rey  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Pomo  Search this
Maidu  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
On page 129-134, there is a Comanche vocabulary alongside with Spanish and Luiseno. Follows items called for in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Some Comanche terms lacking.
Contents: Bartlett, John R. "Cochimi language of Lower California obtained through Mr Robinia of Guaymas, Sonora." No date. [post 1852] Autograph document. pages 215-218 in bound volume of vocabularies. Vocabulary written in "American Ethnological Society Circular Number 1, Indian Languages of America, June, 1852," a printed outline of 200 words. Negative microfilm on file. Heintzelman, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Cocopa language. Fort Yuma, Colorado, April 19, 1854. Copy by Bartlett, pages 165-166. Heintzelmam, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Mohavi or Hum-mock-havy taken by Major Heintzelman. Copy by Bartlett, pages 167-176. Copy in another hand in printed outline published by American Ethnological Society, pages 177-180. On negative Microfilm reel #37. Comanche San Luis Rey [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. No informant or date is recorded for the Comanche vocabulary of about 150 words, pages 129-135. All pages are in the handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett. However, penciled note on another copy of the Comanche vocabulary (Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 762) states "probably of J. R. Bartlett." Approximately 5 extra Comanche terms are listed in 1627 which were not copied into the manuscript filed under 762.
Contents: San Luis Rey Comanche [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. San Luis Rey vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 128-135. May 10, 1852. All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in another copy, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 772. According to the discussion, pages 128 and 135, vocabulary was recorded from Pedro Cawewas, an old man called the captain or chief of his tribe, about 150 of which now live where the mission of San Luis Rey is situated. Tiwa: Piro [Bartlett, John R.] Piro vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 53-54, and another copy, pages 67-68. "Language of the Piros," discussion, pages 55-59. No date. [Ca. October 2, 1852: date on "Tigua" (Piro ?) vocabulary immediately following on pages 63-65.] All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-b and 458-c. According to discussion, page 55, vocabulary was recorded from Hieronymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo, principal men of the pueblo of "Sinecu" [Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua] a few miles below El Paso de Norte, on the western bank of the Rio Grande. Tiwa: Senecu del Sur (Piro ?) [Bartlett, John R.] "Tigua" vocabulary of about 200 words, pages 63-65. October 2, 1852. Copy in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but was so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-a and 458-c. Note following heading: "[Language of ?] Indians of Taos, in New Mexico (pronounced Tee-wa) [sic] taken from Santiago Ortiz (A-he-ba-tu) head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. [i. e. Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua; see Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30, II, 509.]" Bartlet's Vocabularies ? 1. Pages 17-19 Sioux vocabulary, translated into Sioux by Bruce Husband, Fort Laramie, February 26, 1849. 2 pages. 2. Pages 21-24 Kiowa vocabulary, from Esteban, a Mexican captive for 7 years among the Comanches and Kiowas in Texas. 5 pages. 3. Pages 25-27 cf. Manuscript 1139- a copy of this. Ceris (Seri) vocabulary taken from a native at Hermosillo, January 1, 1852 (note by Gatschet says 1853). Informant- Colusio. 3 pages. 4. Pages 31-34 Yaqui vocabulary by Fr. Encinas of Ures, December 1851. 4 pages, including notes. 5. Pages 37-39 Opate (Nahuatlan) vocabulary, taken at Ures, Sonora. 3 pages. 6. Pages 43-45; 49-51. Apaches of the Coppermine, taken from Mangus Colorado July, 1851. 3 pages. (also duplicate copy). 7. Pages 53-59; 57 Piro (Tanoaan) vocabulary, taken from two Indians, Hieromymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo. 2 pages. Notes 5 pages. 8. Pages 63-65 "Tigua " [Tiwa] Indians of Taos in New Mexico vocabulary, taken from Santiago Ortiz, head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. 3 pages.
Contents: 9. Pages 71-73 Vocabulary of the language of the Coco-Maricopas of the river Gila (Yumian). 3 pages. 10. Pages 77-81; 85-92; Reel #21 Vocabulary of the Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages; and 11. Los Angeles Indians, Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages. 12. Pages 93-103 Yuman or Cuchan and Comiya (Comeya) vocabulary and notes, 11 pages, including extract from Lt Whipple's diary, October 7, 1849. 13. Pages 105-6; 109-10 13. Vocabulary in the Digger (Pujunan) [Maidu] language, from manuscript in the possession of J. B. Moore obtained by H. B. Brown. 4 pages. 14. Pages 113-116 Napa Valley (Digger) [Pujunan] vocabulary. 3 pages. 15. Pages 117-123 Makah of Cape Flattery and Diggers [Pujunan] of Napa Valley- vocabulary. 6 pages. 16. Pages 125-128 Kechi (Mission of San Luis Rey) vocabulary. Taken from Pedro Cawenas, May 10, 1852, San Luis Rey. Notes. 17. Pages 129-35 San Luis Rey and Comanche vocabulary. 7 pages. Taken from Pedro Cawewas. Includes notes. 18. Pages 137-39. San Luis Obispo vocabulary. 3 pages. 19. Pages 141-144 San Jose Indian vocabulary. 4 pages including notes.
Contents: Bartlett's vocabularies. 20. Pages 145-152 H'hana of Sacramento (Kulanapan) vocabulary, 6 pages. 21. Pages 155-159 Coluse (between Sacramento River and Clear Lake), vocabulary- 6 words only. Erroneously marked Athapaskan in Hewitt's hand. Actually Patwin and Wintun; see word for "Indian"- Note by M. R. Haas. 11/58. Items 21 ans 22: See Pitkin, Harvey and William Shipley, Comparative Survey of California Penutian, IJAL, Volume 24, Number 3, July, 1958, pages 174-88. (Reference from MRH). 22. Coluse and Noema vocabulary. 3 pages. 23. Page 163 Tehama vocabulary. 1 page. 24. Pages 165-66 Cocopa vocabulary. (Fort Yuma, Colorado, Mouth of the Colorado River). 2 pages. April 19, 1854. 25. Pages 167-180 Mohave vocabulary. Major Heintzelman. 14 pages including notes. 26. Pages 181-84 Otomi (Mexico) vocabulary. 3 pages. (1767 and 1826). 27. Pages 186-201 Chitimacha and Attacapa vocabularies and notes. 15 pages. (1848) 28. Pages 203-206 Maya vocabulary. From manuscript dictionary in possession of John Carter Brown. 3 pages. 29. Pages 207-210 Tarahumara vocabulary. 3 pages. (1787 and 1826). 30. Pages 211-214 Cahita (Sonora) vocabulary. 3 pages. 31. Pages 215-18 Cochimi (of Lower California), vocabulary. 3 pages. 32. Pages 219-221 Nevome (Pima of Sonora) vocabulary. 2 pages. (printed). 33. Pages 223-224 Letter to John R. Bartlett from George Gibbs re. to vocabularies. 3 pages.
Contents: Smith, Buckingham. "Vocabulary of the Nevome, As Spoken by the Pima of Moris, A Town of Sonora." 1861, and prior. Printed document. 2 pages. On pages 219 and 221 of this Manuscript. Published excerpt from History Magazine, July, 1861, pages 202-203. Contains grammatical notes, general vocabulary, and the Lord's Prayer in the Nevome dialect of Piman.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1627
Local Note:
Manuscript document
Topic:
Dakota language; Mayo dialect (Piman); Kumiai language; Central Pomo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Seri language  Search this
Yaqui language  Search this
Opata language  Search this
Chiricahua language  Search this
Maricopa language  Search this
Yuma language  Search this
Maidu language  Search this
Makah language  Search this
Luiseño language  Search this
Comanche language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Cocopa language  Search this
Mohave language  Search this
Chitimacha language  Search this
Atakapa language  Search this
Tarahumara language  Search this
Pima Bajo language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Otomi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Athabaskan  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Wakash  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Pima (Akimel O'odham)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1627, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1627
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a26edfb4-2402-46a4-a7d1-b985e6b84b47
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1627
Online Media:

Carriers of Culture: Living Native Basket Traditions

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Across North America and throughout the Hawaiian Islands, Native people are engaged in artistic activities deeply rooted in the everyday and ceremonial traditions of their communities. In the face of dwindling or inaccessible natural resources, loss of elders and their specialized knowledge, the profusion of cheap mass-produced goods, and the use-it-and-throw-away attitude of so many, Native artists are nevertheless gathering natural materials and weaving them into objects of beauty and profound meaning. The 2006 Festival program examined the contemporary state of Native weaving in the United States and the ways in which Native baskets - and their makers - are "carriers of culture."

One of the most important developments in indigenous basket weaving was the formation of Native weaving organizations over the previous fifteen years, bringing together weavers from diverse places to identify and examine problems, build a sense of shared experiences, foster communication and networking, share knowledge and skills, and begin to develop strategies to address some of the most critical issues they face. At local and regional gatherings held by these organizations and at workshops or symposia hosted by other supportive agencies, basket weavers began to find common voice as they articulated their concerns and experiences. At the Festival, visitors could listen to those voices while admiring the work of skilled eyes and hands.

The 2006 Festival program reflected the long-term involvement of numerous Native people and provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine contemporary issues across tribal and geographical lines. It also presented a timely opportunity to reflect on recent efforts by Native basket weavers and others to address these issues; the ways in which weaving traditions continue to be passed on; and the meaning weaving has for artists as people and as members of distinct tribal or Native communities. Most importantly, through demonstrations and discussions at the Festival and in the artists' own words, weavers themselves shared these perspectives first hand with Festival visitors.

For Native baskets to continue to be "carriers of culture" for Native traditions, there are still many challenges to overcome - challenges that were identified and discussed by the weavers themselves. The ever-changing natural and built landscape in the United States is leading to loss of plants essential to weaving. As more land moves into private ownership, weavers encounter increasingly limited access to traditional gathering sites. Non-native land management practices continue to affect the health of plant materials and of weavers themselves. Undoubtedly, other challenges to the continuity of the traditions of living Native basketry in the United States will also emerge. While much progress is being made to revitalize the basket traditions in many Native communities, there are other Native communities where basketry is in rapid decline. This means not just fewer baskets, but the irreplaceable loss of an array of indigenous knowledge linked to the art and a diminution of the diversity and richness of our American experience.

As Festival visitors learned, Native baskets were not antiquated containers or artifacts of a past life; they are very much a part of contemporary Native life and identity. Native baskets truly are "carriers of culture": they embody the knowledge of those who have gone before, those who have respect and reverence for the natural world and the plants that form their baskets, and those who have shared their knowledge with others to keep the chain of indigenous knowledge unbroken.

C. Kurt Dewhurst, Marjorie Hunt, and Marsha MacDowell were Curators, with Arlene Reiniger as Program Coordinator, Betty Belanus as Family Activities Area Coordinator, and Mary Monseur as Marketplace Native Basketry Consultant. Curatorial Advisors were: Jennifer Bates, Salli Benedict, Sally Black, Sheree Bonaparte, Peggy Sanders Brennan, Sue Coleman, Sue Ellen Herne, Sara Greensfelder, Elaine Grinnell, Terrol Dew Johnson, Sabra Kauka, Gloria Lomehaftewa, Fred Nahwooksy, Jennifer Neptune, Theresa Parker, Bernadine Phillips, Teri Rofkar, Robin McBride Scott, Theresa Secord, Tatiana Lomehaftewa Slock, and Laura Wong-Whitebear.

The program was produced in collaboration with the National Museum of the American Indian and Michigan State University Museum. Major support came from the National Museum of the American Indian, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Smithsonian Women's Committee on the occasion of its 40th anniversary. Additional Funding came from Alaska State Council on the Arts, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Michigan State University All-University Research Initiation Grant, Michigan Council for the Arts and Cultural Affairs, Onaway Trust, Hawai'i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts, Fund for Folk Culture, Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund, and the Cherokee Nation.
Researchers:
Researchers and consultants

Brian Bibby, Dawn Biddison, Deborah Boykin, Peggy Sanders Brennan, Tina Bucavalas, Vernon Chimegalrea, Sue Coleman, Marit Dewhurst, Betty DuPree, Carol Edison, Lynn Martin Graton, Sara Greensfelder, Theresa Harlan, Suzi Jones, Amy Kitchener, Jim Leary, Dayna Bowker Lee, Elizabeth Lee, Molly Lee, Richard March, Kathleen Mundell, Jennifer Neptune, Laura Quackenbush, Karen Reed, Teri Rofkar, Elaine Thatcher, Theresa Secord, Malia Villegas, Lois Whitney, Robin K. Wright

Research Assistants

Beth Donaldson, Marie Gile, Je'Keia Murphy
Presenters:
Howard Bass, Betty Belanus, Salli Benedict, Barry Bergey, Peggy Brennan, Schroeder Cherry, C. Kurt Dewhurst, Amy Echo-Hawk, Carol Edison, Rayna Green, Elaine Grinnell, Emil Her Many Horses, Marjorie Hunt, Sabra Kauka, Jared King, Keevin Lewis, Marsha MacDowell, Diana N'Diaye, Helen Maynor Scheirbeck, Pamela Woodis, Laura Wong-Whitebear
Participants:
Native Hawaiian

Gladys Grace, 1919-, Native Hawaiian, Honolulu, Hawai'i

Edwin T. Kaneko, 1930-, Japanese and Native Hawaiian descent, Holualoa, Kona, Hawai'i

Gwendolyn Kamisugi, 1944-, Native Hawaiian, Wahiawa, Oahu, Hawai'i

Sabra Kauka, Native Hawaiian, Lihu'e, Kauai, Hawai'i

Marques Hanalei Marzan, 1979-, Native Hawaiian, Kane'ohe, Hawai'i

Harriet Soong, 1927-, Native Hawaiian, Kailua Kona, Big Island, Hawai'i

Alaska Native

Sheldon Bogenrife, Iñupiaq, Anchorage, Alaska

Delores Churchill, Haida, Ketchikan, Alaska

Holly Joy Churchill, 1955-, Haida, Ketchikan, Alaska

Daisy Demientieff, 1935-, Athabascan, Anchorage, Alaska

Evelyn Douglas, 1947-, Yup'ik, Anchorage, Alaska

June Simeonoff Pardue, 1951-, Alutiiq and Suqpiaq, Wasilla, Alaska

Teri Rojkar, 1956-, Tlingit, Sitka, Alaska

Lisa Telford, 1957-, Haida, Everett, Washington

Northwest

Elaine Timentwa Emerson, 1941-, Colville, Omak, Washington

Pat Courtney Gold, Wasco and Tlingit, Scappoose, Oregon

Elaine Grinnell, 1936-, Jamestown S'Klallam and Lummi, Sequim, Washington

Khia Grinnell, 1985-, Jamestown S'Klallam and Lummi, Sequim, Washington

Nettie Kuneki Jackson, 1942-, Klickitat, White Swan, Washington

Robert Kentta, Siletz, Siletz, Oregon

Bud Lane, 1957-, Siletz, Siletz, Oregon

Theresa Mendoza, 1985-, Makah and Lummi, Neah Bay, Washington

June Parker, 1950-, Makah and Lummi, Neah Bay, Washington

Theresa Parker, 1956-, Makah and Lummi, Neah Bay, Washington

Bernadine Phillips, Colville, Omak, Washington

Craig Phillips, 1989-, Colville, Omak, Washington

Harold "Jimmi" Plaster, 1988-, Lummi, Bellingham, Washington

Lisa Plaster, 1972-, Lummi, Bellingham, Washington

Karen Reed, 1949-, Chinook and Puyallup, Puyallup, Washington

Lynda Squally, 1981-, Chinook and Puyallup, Milton, Washington

Laura Wong-Whitebear, Colville, Seattle, Washington

Great Basin

Elizabeth Brady, 1923-, Western Shoshone, Elko, Nevada

Leah Brady, 1955-, Western Shoshone, Elko, Nevada

Sue Coleman, 1950-, Washo, Carson City, Nevada

Rebecca Eagle, 1964-, Pyramid Lake Paiute, Wadsworth, Nevada

Sandra Eagle, 1961-, Pyramid Lake Paiute, Sutcliff Nevada

California

Jennifer D. Bates, 1951-, Northern Mewuk, Tuolumne, California

Leona Chepo, 1931-, Western Mono, North Fork, California

Lois Jean Conner, 1951-, Chuckchansi, Southern Miwok, and Western Mono, O'Neals, California

Ursula Jones, 1972-, Yosemite Miwok, Mono Lake Paiute, Kashaya Pomo, and Coast Miwok, Mammoth Lakes, California

Julia Parker, 1929-, Kashaya Pomo and Coast Miwok, Mariposa, California

Ruby Pomona, 1925-, Western Mono, North Fork, California

Wilverna Reece, 1946-, Karuk, Happy Camp, California

Eva Salazar, San Diego Kumeyaay, Alpine, California

Linda G. Yamane, 1949-, Ohlone, Seaside, California

Southwest - Navajo

Kayla Black, 1992-, Navajo, Mexican Hat, Utah

Lorraine Black, 1970-, Navajo, Mexican Hat, Utah

Mary Holiday Black, 1934-, Navajo, Mexican Hat, Utah

Sally Black, 1959-, Navajo, Mexican Hat, Utah

Southwest - Apache, Hopi, and Tohono O'odham

Evalena Henry, 1939-, San Carlos Apache, Peridot, Arizona

Esther Jaimes, 1947-, Tohono O'odham, Tucson, Arizona

Dorleen Gashweseoma Lalo, 1965-, Hopi, Hotevilla, Arizona

Joseph Lopez, 1978-, Tohono O'odham, Tucson, Arizona

Wa:k Tab Basket Dancers -- Wa:k Tab Basket DancersCecelia Encinas, 1988-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaKarlette Miguel, 1990-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaVerna E. Miguel, 1947-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaAngelique M. Moreno, 1996-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaCelestine Pablo, 1958-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaLien Pablo, 1991-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaVictoria M. Pablo, 1975-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaWynona Peters, 1989-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaCarolyn M. Reyes, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, ArizonaRhonalee Stone, 1995-, Tohono O'odham, San Xavier District, Arizona

Southeast - Choctaw and Chitimacha

Eleanor Ferris Chickaway, 1958-, Conehatta Choctaw, Conehatta, Mississippi

John Darden, 1960-, Chitimacha, Charenton, Louisiana

Scarlette Darden, 1963-, Chitimacha, Clarenton, Louisiana

Louise Wallace, 1949-, Choctaw, Bogue Homa, Mississippi

Southeast - Cherokee

Peggy Sanders Brennan, 1946-, Cherokee, Edmond, Oklahoma

Louise Goings, 1947-, Eastern Band of Cherokee, Cherokee, North Carolina

Lucille Lossiah, 1957-, Eastern Band of Cherokee, Cherokee, North Carolina

Robin McBride Scott, 1966-, Cherokee, New Castle, Indiana

Kathy VanBuskirk, 1961-, Cherokee, Tahlequah, Oklahoma

Perry VanBuskirk, Cherokee, Tahlequah, Oklahoma

Northeast - Maine

Ganessa Bryant, 1982-, Penobscot, Princeton, Maine

Jeremy Frey, 1978-, Passamaquoddy, Princeton, Maine

George Neptune, 1988-, Passamaquoddy, Princeton, Maine

Molly Neptune Parker, 1939-, Passamaquoddy, Indian Township, Maine

Northeast - Mohawk

Linda Cecilia Jackson, 1954-, St. Regis Mohawk, Akwesasne, New York

Sheila Ransom, 1954-, St. Regis Mohawk, Akwesasne, New York

Great Lakes

Kelly Church, 1967-, Grand Traverse Band of Chippewa and Ottawa, Hopkins, Michigan

Jacob Keshick, 1987-, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa, Pellston, Michigan

Yvonne Walker Keshick, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa, Pellston, Michigan

Cherish Nebeshanze Parrish, 1989-, Gun Lake Band of Potawatomi, Hopkins, Michigan

John Pigeon, 1957-, Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Dorr, Michigan

Johnny Pigeon, Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Dorr, Michigan

Kellogg Cultural Heritage Fellows

Kellogg Cultural Heritage Fellows are young Native people participating "behind-the-scenes" at the 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival and at the National Museum of the American Indian, made possible by a generous grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to the Michigan State University Museum.

Samantha Jacobs, 1983-, Seneca Nation of Indians, Collins, New York

Crystal Marie Keta Mann, 1987-, Tsimshian and Tlingit, Ketchikan, Alaska

Vanessa Manuel, 1985-, Onk Akimel O'odham, Scottsdale, Arizona

Mary Mokihana Martin, 1985-, Native Hawaiian, Honolulu, Hawai'i

Elizabeth Ann Parker, 1988-, Makah, Neah Bay, Washington

Gabe Paul, 1985-, Penobscot, Indian Island, Maine

Laura Sanders, 1980-, Karuk and Yurok, Orleans, California

Ahtkwiroton Skidders, 1982-, Mohawk, Rooseveltown, New York

Lynda Squally, 1981-, Chinook and Puyallup, Milton, Washington

Tony Stevens, 1985-, Wasco, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Warm Springs, Oregon

Carly Tex, 1984-, Western Mono, Rohnert Park, California

Kellogg Next Generation Weavers

Kellogg Next Generation Weavers are young Native people who have demonstrated a strong interest in basketry and will be weaving at the 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival alongside older mentor culture-bearers. Their participation in the Festival is made possible by a generous grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to the Michigan State University Museum.

Kayla Black, 1992-, Navajo, Mexican Hat, New Mexico

Ganessa Bryant, 1982-, Penobscot, Princeton, Maine

Jeremy Frey, 1982-, Passamaquoddy, Princeton, Maine

Khia Grinnell, 1985-, Jamestown S'Klallam and Lummi, Sequim, Washington

Ursula Jones, 1972-, Yosemite Miwok, Mono Lake Paiute, Kashaya Pomo, and Coast Miwok, Mammoth Lakes, California

Jacob Keshick, 1987-, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa, Pellston, Michigan

Joseph Lopez, 1978-, Tohono O'odham, Tucson, Arizona

Marques Hanalei Marzan, 1979-, Native Hawaiian, Kane'ohe, Hawai'i

Theresa Mendoza, 1985-, Makah, Neah Bay, Washington

George Neptune, 1988-, Passamaquoddy, Princeton, Maine

Cherish Nebeshanze Parrish, 1989-, Gun Lake Band of Potawatomi, Hopkins, Michigan

Craig Phillips, 1989-, Colville, Omak, Washington

Johnny Pigeon, Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Dorr, Michigan

Harold "Jimmi" Plaster, 1988-, Lummi, Bellingham, Washington

Lynda Squally, 1981-, Chinook and Puyallup, Milton, Washington
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2006, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk53a0cdcf5-b4fd-4226-b3a8-44ddfc050e4b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2006-ref26

National Heritage Fellowships Program

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
A concern for the continued existence of folk traditions motivated the Festival project since it began in 1967. It also served as the basis of the Smithsonian's cooperation with the Folk Arts Program of the National Endowment for the Arts, a cooperation that resulted in 1982 in a Festival program honoring the recipients of NEA's National Heritage Fellowships. The 1983 Festival saw a similar program, and organizers hoped that future years would as well.

When the Folk Arts Program presented the fellowships, they were signalled by a certificate of honor hailing each of the laureates as "a Master Traditional Artist who has contributed to the shaping of our artistic traditions and to preserving the cultural diversity of the United States."

Sixteen artists were awarded Heritage Fellowships in 1983 during the Festival. Behind each stood a phalanx of other creative Americans, reaching across neighborhoods and back through time. They were the ones from whom the honorees learned, the ones who made the mistakes, tested the limits, confirmed the aesthetic centers. In honoring these sixteen artists, the NEA also honored their forebears, and each one represented not a single creative genius but a linkage of people joined together to produce beauty and truth and meaning, each in their own special way.

The week-long series of events surrounding the awarding of the Arts Endowment's 1983 National Heritage Fellowships were made possible through the generous support of Continental Telecom Inc. In addition, from June 23 through September 5, 1983, an exhibition honoring the 1983 National Heritage Fellowship recipients was on display in the National Museum of American History.

Marjorie Hunt served as National Endowment Exhibit Coordinator and Meg Glaser as NEA Program Assistant.
Participants:
Fellowship Recipients

Sister Mildred Barker, Shaker hymn singing, Poland Spring, Maine

Rafael Cepeda, Afro-Puerto Rican music and dance, Santurce, Puerto Rico

Ray Hicks, 1922-2003, Appalachian storytelling, Banner Elk, North Carolina

Stanley Hicks, 1911-1989, Appalachian instrument making, music and storytelling, Vilas, North Carolina

John Lee Hooker, blues guitar and singing, San Carlos, California

Mike "Papa" Manteo, Sicilian-American puppetry, Staten Island, New York

Narciso Martinez, Texas-Mexican -- conjunto -- accordion, San Benito, Texas

Lanier Meaders, southern pottery, Cleveland, Georgia

Almeda Riddle, Ozark ballads, Greers Ferry, Arkansas

Simon St. Pierre, French-Canadian fiddle, Smyrna Mills, Maine

Joe Shannon, 1920-, Irish-American -- uilleann -- pipes, Chicago, Illinois

Alex Stewart, 1891-1985, Appalachian coopering and woodworking-Sneedville, Tennessee

Ada Thomas, 1924-1992, Chitimacha basket making, Charenton, Louisiana

Lucinda Toomer, 1888-1983, Black quilt making, Columbus, Georgia

Dewey Williams, 1898-1985, Black sacred harp singing, Ozark, Alabama

Lemuel T. Ward, Chesapeake Bay decoy carving, Crisfield, Maryland

Crafts

Mozell Benson, Black quilt making, Waverly, Alabama

Jesus Cepeda, -- pandereta -- (tambourine) making, Santurce, Puerto Rico

Bill Henry, coopering, whittling, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Oliver Lawson, 1938-, duck decoy carving, Crisfield, Maryland

Cleater J. Meaders, Jr., southern pottery, Georgia

Rick Stewart, 1960-, coopering, Sneedville, Tennessee

Music

Sister Frances Carr, Shaker singing, Poland Spring, Maine

Liz Carroll, Irish fiddle, Chicago, Illinois

Brother Arnold Haddad, Shaker singing, Poland Spring, Maine

Pedro Juarez, -- bajo sexto -- , Brownsville, Texas

Brother Theodore Johnson, Shaker singing, Poland Spring, Maine

James Keane, 1948-, accordion, Queens, New York

Johnny McGreevy, 1919-1990, Irish fiddle, Oaklawn, Illinois

Mick Moloney, tenor banjo, mandolin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Robbie O'Connell, 1950-, guitar, vocals, Franklin, Massachusetts

Jerry O'Sullivan, 1959-, Irish -- uilleann -- pipes, Yonkers, New York

Hattie Presnell, 1907-1996, Appalachian music, Banner Elk, North Carolina

Frank Proffitt, Jr., 1946-2005, Appalachian music and storytelling, Todd, North Carolina

Isaiah Ross, 1925-1993, blues guitar and harmonica, Flint, Michigan

Sabino Salinas, -- tololoche -- (bass), Brownsville, Texas

La Familia Cepeda: Afro-Puerto Rican Music and Dance Group -- La Familia Cepeda: Afro-Puerto Rican Music and Dance GroupAlba Rosario CepedaCaridad Brenes CepedaCarlos CepedaJesus CepedaJulia Caridad CepedaLuis CepedaMargarita Sanchez CepedaMario CepedaOrlando CepedaPetra CepedaJosé Lopez, 1959-Milagros MojicaJosé Calderon Pou

Wiregrass Sacred Harp Singers -- Wiregrass Sacred Harp SingersAnnie Joy Belcher, Ozark, AlabamaGladys Bivins, 1933-1992, Ozark, AlabamaPauline Griggs, Dothan, AlabamaBernice Williams Harvey, Ozark, AlabamaHenry Jackson, Ozark, AlabamaWillie Nell Lewis, Winterhaven, FloridaRobert Reynolds, Jr., Abbeyville, AlabamaAlice Williams, Ozark, Alabama
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1983 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1983, Series 5
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1983 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk56c47007b-4495-4e90-bf58-f898d875e966
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1983-ref37

[Correspondence-Gene Behlen & Stephen M. Richmond-Chitimacha baskets]

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 405
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1982
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 5: Smithsonian / 5.2: Exhibits
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3513f3465-1262-495f-a7a4-e23e8e3e297f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref10910

Chitimacha Baskets Hampton Institute 1963 photos

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 506
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1963
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 10: Photographs / 10.9: Miscellaneous - Native Americans
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b0b6206e-e841-4666-ba0d-0a80333a2b14
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref14024

[untitled]

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Folder Oversize Artwork Folder 28, Drawer 4
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
Poster reproduction of a painting. Image of a Chitimacha woman and child, painted by Francois Bernard in 1870
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 11: Artwork
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3415c1535-94ff-4214-ac99-10ba3a6fa2b0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref14956

Chitimacha Baskets

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 132
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1977
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 2: Research Files / 2.2: Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39e2360c5-3b12-4431-bb67-ebcce9b4d739
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref4807

USNM Chitimacha & Choctaw Clothing

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 134
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1969
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 2: Research Files / 2.2: Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3842870f4-9274-4ecb-a40d-fa0dd49b2f29
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref4830

Chitimacha Basketry Revival & the Peabody Museum's Collections

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 258
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2000
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 2: Research Files / 2.14: Miscellaneous
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3302d7045-7ed8-49ea-829d-744fd2acfede
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref7963

Denver Mus. Nat. Hist.-Calusa; Chitimacha; Florida Keys; Koasati

Collection Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Container:
Box 333
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1973
Scope and Contents note:
catalog data
Collection Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
William C. Sturtevant papers / Series 4: Professional Activities / 4.1: Consulting
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw388427561-db1b-4fa4-954a-12a0a7f3af10
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2008-24-ref9431

MS 2013 Cha'hta. The dialect of south-eastern Louisiana [...]. Shetimasha at Charenton, La.

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
32 Pages
Culture:
Choctaw  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
December 1881
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2013
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2013, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2013
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37a93c533-ad56-417c-9a65-c6a58e3df091
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2013

MS 287 Report on Kataba, Chaʹta and Shetimasha Indians and their languages visited and studied in December 1881 and January 1882

Creator:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Extent:
8 Pages
Culture:
Choctaw  Search this
Chitimacha  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Pencil note on page 1 is by J. Owen Dorsey.
Biographical / Historical:
Data collected in South Carolina, Mississippi and Louisiana.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 287
Topic:
Catawba Indians  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 287, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS287
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a23d1f68-5f2d-40c4-aa1d-ec3db99b1980
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms287

North America: Field Notes/Artifact List (Seminole, Mohegan, Nanticoke, Nansemond, Pamunkey, Catawba, Choctaw, Chitimacha, Cherokee, Houma, Koasati) M.R. Harrington

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Director:
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Container:
Box 189, Folder 4
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1908
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 5: Expeditions
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4c4758ab7-9f85-4152-82d8-ea91a0e04418
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref14523

North America: Field Notes/Artifact List (Seminole, Mohegan, Nanticoke, Nansemond, Pamunkey, Catawba, Choctaw, Chitimacha, Cherokee, Houma, Koasati) M.R. Harrington, XEROX Copies

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Director:
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Container:
Box 189, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1908
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 5: Expeditions
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv48a029587-d221-4db1-bab6-542e50aa7ee4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref14525

North America: Shipment Inventories (Seminole, Chitimacha, Houma, Choctaw)

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Director:
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Container:
Box 189, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1908
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 5: Expeditions
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv47e33371f-4383-42fa-8e7b-ab906aa6b038
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref14526

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