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Bird Carson photographs of Cheyenne River Indian Reservation

Photographer:
Carson, Bird  Search this
Extent:
93 Photographs
Culture:
Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux  Search this
Minneconjou Lakota [Cheyenne River]  Search this
Oohenonpa Lakota [Cheyenne River]  Search this
Itazipacola Lakota [Cheyenne River]  Search this
Hunkpapa Lakota [Cheyenne River]  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
circa 1890-1920
Summary:
This collection contains 93 photographs shot by amateur photographer Bird Carson (1842-1925) depicting daily life on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation, circa 1890-1920. Bird worked as a housekeeper for the local school and her husband John Franklin Carson worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs as a teacher at Cherry Creek Day School on the Reservation.
Arrangement:
Photographs arranged in the original order in which they were organized and donated to NMAI.
Biographical / Historical:
Bertha "Bird" Louise Pickering Carson was born to Hannah Binford Pickering (1842-1925) and Philip Pickering (1837-1909) in Iowa on August 18, 1872. In 1891, she married John Franklin Carson (1860-1935) and they lived on the Cheyenne River Agency at Cherry Creek in South Dakota circa 1890-1920. John Franklin worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs as a teacher on the reservation and census records show that Bird Carson served as a housekeeper. The couple had four children: Catherine Hannah Carson Spain (1895- 1980); Franklin Morris Carson (1898-1941); John Henry Carson (1900-1964); and Philip D. Carson (b. circa 1902).

Bird Carson was an amateur photographer and photographed daily life on the reservation.
-------

[Excerpt below is from the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe website (2022) which borrows text from Cheyenne River Sioux by Donovin Sprague. Arcadia Publishing, Charleston, S.C., 2003.]

The name Sioux is part of the Ojibway/Chippewa/Anishinabe word "Nadoweisiweg," which the French shortened to Sioux. The original word meant "little or lesser snakes/enemies." The Sioux are really three groups comprised of the Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota, each having slightly different language dialects. Geographically, the Lakota are the most western of the groups and there are seven distinct bands. Four of the Lakota bands (Minnicoujou, Itazipco, Siha Sapa, and Oohenumpa) are located on the land known as the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation. The other three (the Oglala of Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Hunkpapa at Standing Rock Reservation, and Sicangu at the Rosebud Indian Reservation and also at Lower Brule Indian Reservation), are all located in western South Dakota. The Standing Rock Reservation also stretches into North Dakota. Some of the Lakota also settled in Canada at Wood Mountain Reserve in Saskatchewan beginning in 1876. Collectively the bands are part of the Oceti Sakowin (Seven Council Fires) of the Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota.

The present land base of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation was established by the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty. Prior to this, the bands placed within this reservation knew no boundary to their territory. They were a hunting people and traveled frequently in search of their main food source, the sacred American bison or buffalo.

The Sioux Agreement Act of 1889 set reservation boundary lines and was named the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation. West of the Missouri River was the waters of the Cheyenne River, known to the Lakota as the Good River (Wakpa Waste'). The "Post at Cheyenne River Agency" was established seven miles above Fort Sully on the Missouri River in 1870 and became known as Fort Bennett. Fort Bennett was next to the village named Cheyenne Agency, and was the quarters for the Indian Agent and soldiers. Separate from the fort was the agency town which housed U.S. Government employees and this location would later be moved to higher ground away from the river. The fort and town would be moved a total of four times in the coming years, with the name Cheyenne Agency attached to the town adjoining Fort Bennett. As reservation land was ceded following the Dawes Act of 1887, the town was moved again since it was now off the new reservation boundaries. After 1891, Fort Bennett was closed by the military and the reservation was believed to be safe without a military fort beside it. The next location of the agency would be between the Cheyenne River (Good River) and the Moreau (Owl) River at the site of Chief Martin Charger's camp. It was called Cheyenne Agency.

The final location of the Agency would be to the town of Eagle Butte in 1959, a move necessitated due to the construction of the Oahe Dam near Pierre, South Dakota, which flooded tribal lands along the Missouri River. When people refer to the Old Agency or Old Cheyenne Agency, they are referring to the Agency location prior to the move to Eagle Butte, which is now the tribal headquarters offices. There is also confusion about the name Cheyenne as people often think the four bands here are of the Cheyenne Tribe. Although the Lakota's have been close allies with the Cheyenne, they are, nevertheless, a separate tribe. The tribal headquarters of the Northern Cheyenne are located in Montana and the Southern Cheyenne are in Oklahoma.

The first towns were Evarts and then LeBeau which were trading posts. LeBeau was established by Antoine LeBeau, a French trader. Evarts and LeBeau became non-existent when railroad service left and the town of LeBeau burned. Both locations are now under the waters of the Missouri River. The old main home camps of the Minnicoujou were in the towns of Cherry Creek, Bridger, and Red Scaffold in the western area of the reservation. Cherry Creek is believed to be the oldest permanent community in South Dakota. The home camps of the Oohenumpa went from Iron Lightning, Thunder Butte, Bear Creek, and White Horse along the Moreau (Owl) River. The Siha Sapa located around the Promise and Blackfoot areas in the northeast part of the reservation. Green Grass and On The Tree communities were home to the Itazipco. Green Grass is the home to the sacred Buffalo Calf Pipe. There would soon be some reshuffling of the band locations as allotments were chosen and intermarriage. Many Itazipco joined the Minnicoujou and the Siha Sapa had earlier camped in close proximity to the Hunkpapa on the neighboring Standing Rock Reservation. Today, other communities on or near the reservation include Eagle Butte, Dupree, Red Elm, Takini, Bridger, Howes, Glad Valley, Isabel, Firesteel, Timber Lake, Glencross, Swiftbird, La Plant, Ridgeview, Parade, and Lantry. There are also many rural areas on the reservation.

There are different spelling preferences by individuals of the band names and the spellings in this writing appeared on a tribal flag. An older name for Minnicoujou was Howoju meaning "the people." Minnicoujou means "planters by the water," Itazipco means "Without Bows," and the French called them Sans Arc. Siha Sapa means "Black Foot," and Oohenumpa means "Two boilings/Two Kettle." The Black Foot Lakota should not be confused with the larger Blackfeet/Blackfoot nations of Montana and Canada. Many tribal members are a mixture of the four bands.
Provenance:
Gift of the family of Catherine Spain, 2022.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Education  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Bird Carson photographs of Cheyenne River Indian Reservation, image #, NMAI.AC.425; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.425
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv408920998-bab7-4ed2-8a67-3cb282200b4b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-425

Dog Soldier

Culture/People:
Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Austin Jerald Rave (Wawe Hakta [Cares for his People]), Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux, 1946-2015  Search this
Donor:
Jack S. Ellenberger (Jack Stuart Ellenberger), Non-Indian  Search this
Previous owner:
Jack S. Ellenberger (Jack Stuart Ellenberger), Non-Indian  Search this
Title:
Dog Soldier
Object Name:
Painting
Media/Materials:
Canvas, oil paint
Techniques:
Painted
Dimensions:
94 x 94.5 x 5.4 cm
Object Type:
Painting/Drawing/Print
Place:
Eagle Butte, Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation; Dewey County, Ziebach County; South Dakota; USA
Date created:
1965
Catalog Number:
26/8635
Barcode:
268635.000
See related items:
Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux
Painting/Drawing/Print
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws670315721-a855-444f-930e-11e1b1bd1e16
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_401733
Online Media:

Earth and Sky

Culture/People:
Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Chantelle Blue Arm, Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux  Search this
Seller:
Prairie Star Gallery  Search this
Title:
Earth and Sky
Object Name:
Quilt
Media/Materials:
Cotton cloth, polyester batting, thread
Techniques:
Pieced, sewn, quilted
Dimensions:
204 x 207.8 cm
Object Type:
Furnishings (Home)
Place:
Eagle Butte, Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation; Dewey County, Ziebach County; South Dakota; USA
Date created:
2014
Catalog Number:
26/9707
Barcode:
269707.000
See related items:
Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux
Furnishings (Home)
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws68ff8eb75-913f-4d22-a4d7-e46c6a2b1f8f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_411147

Mato Wakan

Culture/People:
Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Rhonda Holy Bear, Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux  Search this
Previous owner:
Randall Willis, Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Teresa Willis (Mrs. Randall Willis), Non-Indian  Search this
Seller:
Randall Willis, Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Teresa Willis (Mrs. Randall Willis), Non-Indian  Search this
Title:
Mato Wakan
Object Name:
Male doll
Media/Materials:
Wood, hide, animal hair, glass bead/beads, porcupine quills, thread, metal, ermine skin/fur, feather/feathers, goose feather/feathers, snakeskin, animal bone
Techniques:
Carved, sewn, fringed, lazy/lane stitch beadwork, painted, quilled (lane stitched), studded, tied
Dimensions:
68 x 27.5 x 13 cm
Object Type:
Games, Toys, Gambling: Dolls
Place:
Henderson; Clark County; Nevada; USA (inferred)
Date created:
2003
Catalog Number:
27/209
Barcode:
270209.000
See related items:
Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux
Games, Toys, Gambling: Dolls
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6664fc3f9-05bd-4e1d-a9e1-678458f40804
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_415685
Online Media:

Male doll

Culture/People:
Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Rhonda Holy Bear, Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux  Search this
Previous owner:
Randall Willis, Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Teresa Willis (Mrs. Randall Willis), Non-Indian  Search this
Seller:
Randall Willis, Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Teresa Willis (Mrs. Randall Willis), Non-Indian  Search this
Object Name:
Male doll
Media/Materials:
Wood, hide, animal hair, ermine skin/fur, feather/feathers, goose feather/feathers, glass bead/beads, porcupine quills, thread, paint, metal, felt, plastic, glue
Techniques:
Carved, sewn, lazy/lane stitch beadwork, edge beaded, tasseled, painted, quilled (lane stitched), quill woven/loomed quillwork, tied, glued, fringed
Dimensions:
74 x 79.5 x 20.5 cm
Object Type:
Games, Toys, Gambling: Dolls
Place:
Henderson; Clark County; Nevada; USA (inferred)
Date created:
2001-2002
Catalog Number:
27/210
Barcode:
270210.000
See related items:
Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux
Games, Toys, Gambling: Dolls
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws696625f56-1e98-4e64-8235-6d2c87e3816f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_415686
Online Media:

James E. Curry papers

Correspondent:
Paul, William L. Jr  Search this
Creator:
Curry, James E., 1907-1972  Search this
Names:
Rosebud Sioux Tribe  Search this
Three Affiliated Tribes  Search this
United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs  Search this
Bingham, Jonathan  Search this
Cohen, Felix  Search this
Cohen, Henry  Search this
Extent:
121.7 Linear feet
Culture:
Potawatomi  Search this
Muckleshoot  Search this
Nooksack  Search this
Missouria (Missouri)  Search this
Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles)  Search this
Coeur d'Alene  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Haida [Kasaan]  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Kiowa  Search this
Yuit (Siberian Yup'ik) [Gambell, St. Lawrence Island]  Search this
Hunkpapa Lakota [Standing Rock]  Search this
Sicangu Lakota (Brulé Sioux)  Search this
Wahpetonwan Dakota [Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe]  Search this
Mdewakantonwan Dakota [Flandreau]  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Yavapai [Fort McDowell]  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Wendat (Huron)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Santa Ana Pueblo  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Paiute  Search this
Wesort  Search this
Tillamook  Search this
Nisga'a (Niska)  Search this
Stockbridge Mahican  Search this
Quinault  Search this
Lummi  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
Eastern Shawnee [Quapaw Agency, Oklahoma]  Search this
Shoshone  Search this
Sandia Pueblo  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux  Search this
Coeur d'Alene  Search this
Croatan  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
Chickahominy  Search this
Lake Superior Chippewa [Lac Courte Oreilles, Wisconsin]  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Alaskan Eskimo  Search this
Unangan (Aleut)  Search this
Chiricahua Apache [Fort Sill, Oklahoma]  Search this
San Carlos Apache  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Sioux [Crow Creek]  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Ho-Chunk (Winnebago)  Search this
Yavapai  Search this
Sauk  Search this
Washoe (Washo)  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Omaha  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Niuam (Comanche)  Search this
Seri  Search this
Zia Pueblo  Search this
Yoeme (Yaqui)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Catawba  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Minitari (Hidatsa)  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Osage  Search this
Chickasaw  Search this
Umatilla  Search this
Kaw (Kansa)  Search this
Tsimshian [Metlakatla]  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Ute  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Jemez Pueblo  Search this
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Kootenai (Kutenai) [Idaho]  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Kickapoo [Oklahoma]  Search this
Oto  Search this
Spokan  Search this
Yakama (Yakima)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Notes
Letters
Clippings
Legal documents
Place:
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
Date:
1932-1958
Summary:
These are the papers of Washington, D.C. attorney James E. Curry, whose legal career included work both as a government attorney and in his own private practice. The bulk of the papers reflect his private practice in the area of Indian affairs.
Scope and Contents:
The material in the collection includes documents relating to many aspects of Curry's career but most of it relates to his work with Indian tribes and the National Congress of American Indians. For the most, the collection is made up of such materials as letters exchanged with government officials, Indians, and other attorneys; copies of legal documents; published government documents; notes; and clippings and other printed materials. Of particular significance is a subject file relating to Indian affairs. It includes material concerning affairs of Alaskan natives and the Aleut (Akutan, Pribilof Islands), Apache (including Fort Sill, Jicarilla, Mescalero, San Carlos White Mountain), Arapaho (Southern), Assiniboine (Fort Belknap, Fort Peck), Bannock (including Fort Hall), Blackfeet, Caddo, Catawba, Cherokee (Eastern), Cheyenne (Northern, Southern), Chickahominy, Chickasaw, Chippewa (including Lac Courte Oreilles), Choctaw, Cochiti, Cocopa, Coeur d'Alene, Colville, Comanche, Creek, Croatan, Crow, Dakota (Big Foot, Cheyenne River, Crow Creek, Devil's Lake, Flandreau, Fort Totten, Lower Brule, Mdewakanton, Oglala, Rosebud, Santee, Sisseton-Wahpeton, Standing Rock, Yankton), Delaware, Eskimo (including Gambell, Kiana), Flathead, Fox, Haida (including Kasaan), Havasupai, Hopi, Iroquois (Caughnawaga, Seneca, St. Regis), Isleta, Jemez, Kalilspel, Kansa (Kaw), Kickapoo, Kiowa, Klamath, Kutenai, Laguna, Lummi, Maricopa (Gila River, Salt River), Menominee, Missouria, Mohave (Fort Mohave), Mohave Apache (Fort McDowell), Muckleshoot, Navaho, Nez Perce, Niska, Nooksak, Omaha, Osage, Oto, Papago, Paiute (Fallon, Fort McDermitt), Moapa, Pyramid Lake, Shivwits, Walker River, Yerington), Pima (Gila River, Salt River), Potowatomi, Quinaielt, San Felipe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Santa Ana, Santa Clara, Sandia, Sauk, Seminole (Florida, Oklahoma), Seneca, Seri, Shawnee (Eastern), Shoshoni (including Fort Hall), Sia, Spokan, Stockbridge, Taos (Pyote clan), Tesuque, Three Affiliated Tribes (Mandan, Arikara, and Hidatsa), Tillamook, Tlingit (including Angoon, Craig, Juneau, Kake, Ketchikan, Klawak, Klukwan, Taku, Wrangell), Tsimshian (Metlakatla), Umatilla, Ute (including Uintah-Ouray), Walapai, Washo, Wesort, Winnebago, Wyandot, Yakima, Yaqui, Yavapai, Yuma, and Zuni. There are also materials relating to Curry's work with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and National Congress of American Indians, and material that reflects his interest in conditions and events in given locations (often filed by state) and in organizations with interest in Indians. The material relating to Curry's work in Puerto Rico has been deposited in the Archivo General de Puerto Rico, Instituto de Cultura Puertorriquena, in San Juan.
Arrangement note:
The James E. Curry Papershave been arranged into 6 series: (1) Daily Chronological Files, 1941-1955; (2) Subject Files Regarding Indian Affairs, bulk 1935-1955; (3) Miscellaneous Files Regarding Indian Affairs, bulk 1947-1953; (4) Non-Indian Affairs, n.d.; (5) Puerto Rico Work, 1941-1947; (6) Miscellany, undated.
Biographical/Historical note:
James E. Curry was trained in law in Chicago and practiced in that city from 1930 until 1936, serving part of that time as secretary of the local branch of the American Civil Liberties Union. From 1936 to 1938, he was an attorney with the United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs, being largely involved with matters of credit affecting Indians. From 1938 to 1942, he continued service with the Interior Department but worked in several capacities involving the Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration, the department's Consumers' Counsel Division, and the Puerto Rico Water Resources Authority.

In 1945, Curry returned to Washington and set up private practice, also maintaining for a time an office in Puerto Rico. In Washington, he became the attorney for the National Congress of American Indians and from that time until the 1950s his practice increasingly involved representation of American Indian tribes, mostly in claims against the federal government. In this work, for a time, he was involved in business relations with a New York Law firm that included Henry Cohen, Felix Cohen, and Jonathan Bingham.

He also often worked closely with lawyers who lived near the tribes he represented, William L. Paul, Jr., of Alaska, for example. This aspect of his practice--representing Indian tribes--was largely broken up during the early 1950s when the Commissioner of Indian Affairs began to use his powers to disapprove contracts between Curry and the tribes. In 1952 and 1953, his official relationship with the National Congress of American Indians was also ended. After this, while Curry continued until his death to act as a consultant in Indian claims with which he had earlier been involved, his career and life developed in a different direction.
Related Materials:
Additional material relating to James E. Curry can be found in the records of the National Congress of American Indians, also located at the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center.
Provenance:
The Curry papers were originally donated to the National Anthropological Archives by James E. Curry's daughter Mrs. Aileen Curry-Cloonan in December 1973. In 2007 The Curry papers were transferred from the National Anthropological Archives to the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center along with several other records concerning American Indian law and political rights.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Genre/Form:
Notes
Letters
Clippings
Legal documents
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); James E. Curry papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.015
See more items in:
James E. Curry papers
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv47452304f-6226-44f3-9c83-407a91782872
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-015

Films of Black Hills rodeo and Dog Feast

Names:
Black Elk, Ben  Search this
Roan Bear, Chief  Search this
Extent:
Film reels (16 minutes, color silent; 366 feet, 16mm)
Culture:
Cheyenne River Lakota Sioux  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Film reels
Silent films
Place:
North America
Black Hills (S.D. and Wyo.)
Date:
1938
1942
Scope and Contents:
Footage taken at a July 4th rodeo in Belle Fourche, South Dakota. Parade shots at the rodeo include Ben Black Elk in buckskins and war bonnet and truncated versions of the war and kettle dance as well as a fancy dancer. Footage also includes a Sioux Indian Dog feast held by Chief Roan Bear at the Cheyenne River Agency, South Dakota, showing preparation of a shunka (dog) accompanied by cooking of buffalo meat, tipsina (Indian turnip), radishes, and other vegetables.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or Anthropology Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Local Numbers:
HSFA 1988.10.1
Provenance:
Received from the Red Cloud Indian School Heritage Center in 1988.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Rodeo performers  Search this
Rodeos  Search this
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Genre/Form:
silent films
Citation:
Films of Black Hills rodeo and Dog Feast, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
HSFA.1988.10
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc99ed342ef-2b02-485b-a3c3-98a62270ae19
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-hsfa-1988-10
Online Media:

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