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Rural delivery carriers duties and responsibilities

Author:
United States Postal Service  Search this
Physical description:
1 volume (various pagings) forms 27 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
1980
Topic:
Letter carriers  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_990772

Miscellaneous comparisons with Morice's The Carrier Language (1932)

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 795
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 17
Series Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Series Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest / 4.2: Navajo
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e66fe8a8-eb0a-43ec-9f3b-64b113637cb8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14510

The air threat at sea : [papers / presented at the] International Symposium on the Air Threat at Sea, June 11, 12, 13, 14 1985, London

Author:
International Symposium on the Air Threat at Sea (1985 : London, England)  Search this
Royal Institution of Naval Architects  Search this
Physical description:
3 v. : ill ; 30 cm
Type:
Congresses
Date:
1985
C1985
Topic:
Naval aviation  Search this
Merchant ships--Military aspects  Search this
Armed merchant ships  Search this
Aircraft carriers  Search this
Call number:
VG90 .I57 1985Z
VG90.I57 1985Z
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_339061

Northern Athapaskan

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2.08 Linear feet ((6 boxes))
Culture:
Indians of North America -- British Columbia  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Sarsi Indians  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Tsattine Indians  Search this
Dakelh (Carrier)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Date:
circa 1936-circa 1941
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Alaska/Northwest Coast series contains Harrington's Northern Athapascan research. This section comprises a comparative vocabulary, a comparative dictionary, and other miscellaneous linguistic material, with widely scattered ethnographic information. It combines some secondary source data with original notes which were compiled for the most part during a fieldtrip Harrington made with Robert W. Young to Alberta and British Columbia from October through early December 1939. The two men had corresponded extensively regarding Navajo in 1936 to 1938 and subsequently decided to determine its provenience through the study of languages closely related in vocabulary and construction at the northernmost end of what Harrington termed' 'the chicken-wishbone of Athapascan languages." The northern Athapascan languages for which they obtained data were Sarsi (Sarcee, Sar.), Cold Lake Chipewyan (Cl., Clchip.), Beaver, Carrier (Car.), Babine (Babin), and Sekani (Sekeney, Sek., Sikny, Sik.). They also elicited a short vocabulary in Cree from bilingual speakers, obtained during Harrington's survey of neighboring Canadian languages. The amount of comparative data was increased by the addition of original notes from the earlier work on Navajo and later (1940) work on Tlingit, Eyak, and Upper Umpqua. Harrington may have made these last additions as late as August of 1941 as suggested by the reference "Wn. Aug. 41." The Tlingit notes were subsequently removed to a separate section.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Athapascan languages  Search this
Sarsi language  Search this
Chipewyan language  Search this
Tsattine language  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Babine language  Search this
Sekani language  Search this
Navajo language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 1.3
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 1: Native American History, Language, and Culture of Alaska and the Northwest Coast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a06241b5-54ee-4540-a1ea-3fe746563b15
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref12556
Online Media:

Galice/Applegate

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
0.21 Linear feet ((1 box))
Culture:
Galice  Search this
Applegate Creek  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
1940, 1942
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Alaska/Northwest Coast series contains Harrington's Galice / Applegate field notes. They represent his work with informant Hoxie Simmons (abbreviated Hox.) on at least two occasions. The bulk of the work was accomplished during a visit to Siletz, Oregon made in early 1940, undoubtedly at the suggestion of Melville Jacobs (listed as Jacobs in the notes). A lesser amount of data were collected on Harrington's return to the area in the spring or early summer of 1942 to work with speakers of other southwest Oregon Athapascan languages. An unidentified individual referred to as "Harrison" (possibly a Chetco speaker) was also present at some of the sessions.

The material is highly miscellaneous, consisting of a short vocabulary with scattered notes on the linguistic relationship of neighboring languages and the location of tribal boundaries. Limited biographical information is provided for Simmons and for other native speakers of Oregon languages. The vocabulary, covering mostly tribenames and natural history terms, is principally in Galice (Gal.) with some Applegate (ApI.) and a few Chasta Costa (Chast., Chasta., Costa.) equivalences. Some words were elicited from Simmons for comparison with the Upper Umpqua (U.U.) terms Harrington had just recently obtained from John Warren at Grand Ronde. At a later date Harrington annotated certain pages with comparisons from Navajo and Carrier data which he got from a Navajo speaker named Adolph Dodge Bitanny (Bit.) and from his co-worker on northern Athapascan, Robert W. Young (Y.).
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Galice language  Search this
Applegate language  Search this
Chastacosta language  Search this
Navajo language  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Taltushtuntude  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 1.13
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 1: Native American History, Language, and Culture of Alaska and the Northwest Coast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw30e17188e-32f9-4532-a93e-f08eb8f94302
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref13097

John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 1)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Clark, Ann Nolan, 1898-1995  Search this
La Farge, Oliver  Search this
Hoijer, Harry, 1904-1976  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
59 Boxes
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1935-1949
Scope and Contents:
This set of files contains Harrington's Navajo research. The materials consist of vocabulary, dictionary notes, grammar, rehearings of linguistic data, ethnobotany notes, ethnographic notes, texts, drafts and notes relating to primers, published and unpublished primers, unpublished and published papers, extracts from secondary sources, and miscellaneous notes.

The vocabulary section contains terms extracted from Young and Morgan's The Navaho Language, which were reheard principally to obtain Kiowa and Hano (Arizona Tewa) equivalences. Information is occasionally included from Harrington's Apache and Tewa notes. A brief typed vocabulary contains scattered grammatical material. There is also a slipfile of terms based mainly on An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language. It contains annotations and relevant excerpts from Harrington-Young correspondence. Plant names wIth Young's annotations are based on W. L. Jepson's A Manual of Flowering Plants of California (1925) and Washington Matthews' The Navajo Names for Plants (1886). Of the twenty semantic categories, the sections on animals, animal parts, plants, and placenames are particularly substantial.

The dictionary section consists of lexical terms from the Bureau of Indian Affairs' "Navajo Phrase Book," obtained from Willard Beatty and sent by Harrington to Young for rehearings. Navajo entries with Kiowa equivalences were apparently taken from a manuscript for a dictionary by Young. Two miscellaneous groups of entries are in Navajo/English.

The material on Navajo grammar is extensive and includes notes, drafts of a manuscript, excerpts from secondary sources, correspondence between Young and Harrington, and slips. The file was for proposed publications ranging from introductory manuals to the structuring of a comprehensive Navajo grammar.

A further substantial body of grammatical material is found on large slips. These include information from Young's voluminous correspondence, not otherwise interfiled. Part of this section is a further rehearing by Young of Morice's The Carrier Language. Another group of notes records comparisons with several southern Athapascan languages, evidently based on Young's notes, vocabulary items, correspondence, and other undocumented material. Harrington also used the slipfile format to index questions which he had earlier sent to Young.

Most of the rehearings of lingustic data are of Edward Sapir's linguistic terms by Young in 1940 and 1941. Though the copied materials may be similar in content, they do not appear to be exact duplicates of the Sapir linguistic holdings at the American Philosophical Society. Young also reheard terms from Hoijer's Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts late in 1940. George E. Hood commented on Hoijer's "The Southern Athapascan Languages," possibly at about the same time. There are typed excerpts from Young's May 1938 letters regarding Morice's The Carrier Language and miscellaneous linguistic information given by Hood and reheard by Richard Long. Other miscellaneous rehearings are with Alfred Sanchez (abbreviated"Alf." or "Alfredo"), Willietto Antonio, George Hood, and Robert Young (September 1939); and with Howard Gorman, Albert Sandoval, and John Charles (1939). There is also a rehearing with Henry Tsosie of terms from Gladys A. Reichard and Adolph Dodge Bittany's Agentive and Causative Elements in Navaho (1940), including some excerpts from the book. Finally, in February 1941, he reheard the vocabulary of Pedro Bautista Pino with Howard Gorman; Young did not consider these terms to be Navajo.

The files also contains Harrington's notes on Navajo names for plants, gathered from secondary sources and possibly original data from colleagues or friends. Young also annotated some of the notes.

Harrington's ethnographic files includes notes, vocabulary, and illustrations on the structure of dwelling places as well as some information on the mythic origins of the Navajo. Many of the illustrations are by Charles Keetsie Shirley. On the same subject is a set of cards in Young's hand which was sent to Harrington at Fort Wingate in August 1939. At Harrington's request, Young also translated what appears to be a lesson on hogans, possibly a section of a proposed text for instructional purposes. A group of Chaco Canyon placenames were given by Ed Henry in June 1939; several others were extracted from various secondary sources. Other ethnographic subjects briefly covered are the Hoop and Pole game, a social and economic survey questionnaire, White Hat's funeral (1939), the Lord's Prayer as recorded by Berard Haile, and notes on Sandoval's sound recordings. Malcolm Farmer supplied nonlinguistic information and there is a small set of highly miscellaneous ethnographic and historical notes.

The text section contains billingual texts that Young collected and sent to Harrington in 1936. They were written with interlinear translations and followed by a precis in English. Titles include: "Deer and Coyote," "Where the People Came Out," "A Wedding Ceremonial," and "The Woman Who Changed into a Bear." A recording session on October 31, 1949, with Dick Left, Richard Long, and Harry (not further identified) provided Navajo songs, ceremonies, and legends. Harrington's notes supply the identity of the discs and peripheral information such as the gestures accompanying the songs. Some linguistic annotations are interspersed. The discs described in the notes have not been located.

Notes, drafts, and mockups from Harrington and Young's work creating Navajo primers are also present. During the course of their work together from 1937 to 1939, Harrington and Young prepared drafts for two primers, "Little Bear Primer" and "Spotted Dog Primer," a pre-primer (probably the so called "Doda Primer"), and a playbook or cut-out book. Despite an assurance that at least both of the major works were to be printed, neither of the primers were ever published. He and Young also served as translators for a set of four primers in the "Little Herder" series, and Harrington was also credited with developing the "Harrington-La Farge phonetic system" utilized in the three-volume set entitled Little Man's Family. Harrington and Young also helped translate Ann Nolan Clark's "Who Wants To Be a Prairie Dog?"

Other materials related to Harrington's writing include notes for his "Southern Peripheral Athapaskawan Origins, Divisions, and Migrations" and preliminary drafts and notes for the Navajo portion of "Earliest Navaho and Quechua" (1944) coauthored by Robert W. Young. There are also notes and drafts for his unpublished writings, among which include "Navaho Mouthmap," "The Indian Dog Comes into His Own,"and "What Light Can Navajo Throw on Indogermanic Reconstruction?"

Among his miscellaneous notes is a comparison of Navajo with other Indian languages. There are brief notes on trips made in 1940, a list of the names of non-Indians, miscellaneous correspondence, and notes which are neither linguistic nor ethnographic.

Because of their long-term collaboration, Young's notes are inextricably intermixed with those of Harrington. Although some are labeled "Y," Young's unlabeled contributions can be identified through his handwriting and printing, and even with his style. Other hand-copied material is the work of B.A.E. assistant, Arvilla Johnson. Harrington's daughter Awona produced many of the copies in eighteen-point type.
Biographical / Historical:
Although John P. Harrington published brief articles on Navajo in 1911 and 1929, his most sustained work in this language spanned the years 1935 to 1946. Correspondence and reports indicate that during this period he was in the field from July to November 1939, and from August to mid-November 1940 at such places as Fort Wingate and Gallup, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Tuba CIty, and Window Rock, Arizona. His success in the field is due in no small part to his brilliant young collaborator, Robert W. Young, whom he first contacted in August 1936 and with whom he carried on an extensive correspondence into the mid-1940s. In fact their joint efforts in Navajo were accomplished mainly by mail.

Harrington collaborated or corresponded with others, among whom were Ann Nolan Clark, Oliver La Farge, Francis Elmore, Harry Hoijer, William Hill, and Richard Van Valkenburgh. He also contacted various university professors and graduate students, some of whom taught at such programs as those directed by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (Camp Wycliffe) and the University of New Mexico School of American Research.

Harrington consulted a wide array of secondary sources and reheard or compared data from them which he later combined with original notes. These include several hundred terms from then-unpublished manuscripts of Edward Sapir, and two of Harry Hoijer's publications--Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts (1938) and "The Southern Athapascan Languages" (1938). He made extensive use of two works published by the Franciscan Fathers, An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language (1910) and A Vocabulary of the Navaho Language (1912). He turned to W. L. Jepson and Washington Matthews for botanical terms, and to Adrien G. Morice for Carrier comparisons. In a search for precise grammatical terminology, he consulted a score or more of grammars, dictionaries, and publications on language and linguistics in Latin, Greek, Indo-Germanic, and several Arabic languages. Most prominent are Walter A. Ripman's Latin Handbook (1930) and Alan H. Gairdner's publication on Arabic phonetics (1935).

He worked with many Navajo speakers, some of whom were well-educated. Mentioned frequently are Willietto Antonio, Chee Dodge, Howard Gorman, George E. Hood, Hoskie Naswood, Albert Sandoval (also called "Chic"), Charles Keetsie Shirley, and Sam Tilden.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into two catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 2) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Navajo files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Navajo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest / 4.2: Navajo
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a20de076-50c6-4ba1-a37d-c9dbdce60655
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17243

John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 2)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Young, Robert W., 1912-2007  Search this
Clark, Ann Nolan, 1898-1995  Search this
La Farge, Oliver, 1901-1963  Search this
Hoijer, Harry, 1904-1976  Search this
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
59 Boxes
Culture:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1935-1949
Scope and Contents:
This set of files contains Harrington's Navajo research. The materials consist of vocabulary, dictionary notes, grammar, rehearings of linguistic data, ethnobotany notes, ethnographic notes, texts, drafts and notes relating to primers, published and unpublished primers, unpublished and published papers, extracts from secondary sources, and miscellaneous notes.

The vocabulary section contains terms extracted from Young and Morgan's The Navaho Language, which were reheard principally to obtain Kiowa and Hano (Arizona Tewa) equivalences. Information is occasionally included from Harrington's Apache and Tewa notes. A brief typed vocabulary contains scattered grammatical material. There is also a slipfile of terms based mainly on An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language. It contains annotations and relevant excerpts from Harrington-Young correspondence. Plant names wIth Young's annotations are based on W. L. Jepson's A Manual of Flowering Plants of California (1925) and Washington Matthews' The Navajo Names for Plants (1886). Of the twenty semantic categories, the sections on animals, animal parts, plants, and placenames are particularly substantial.

The dictionary section consists of lexical terms from the Bureau of Indian Affairs' "Navajo Phrase Book," obtained from Willard Beatty and sent by Harrington to Young for rehearings. Navajo entries with Kiowa equivalences were apparently taken from a manuscript for a dictionary by Young. Two miscellaneous groups of entries are in Navajo/English.

The material on Navajo grammar is extensive and includes notes, drafts of a manuscript, excerpts from secondary sources, correspondence between Young and Harrington, and slips. The file was for proposed publications ranging from introductory manuals to the structuring of a comprehensive Navajo grammar.

A further substantial body of grammatical material is found on large slips. These include information from Young's voluminous correspondence, not otherwise interfiled. Part of this section is a further rehearing by Young of Morice's The Carrier Language. Another group of notes records comparisons with several southern Athapascan languages, evidently based on Young's notes, vocabulary items, correspondence, and other undocumented material. Harrington also used the slipfile format to index questions which he had earlier sent to Young.

Most of the rehearings of lingustic data are of Edward Sapir's linguistic terms by Young in 1940 and 1941. Though the copied materials may be similar in content, they do not appear to be exact duplicates of the Sapir linguistic holdings at the American Philosophical Society. Young also reheard terms from Hoijer's Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts late in 1940. George E. Hood commented on Hoijer's "The Southern Athapascan Languages," possibly at about the same time. There are typed excerpts from Young's May 1938 letters regarding Morice's The Carrier Language and miscellaneous linguistic information given by Hood and reheard by Richard Long. Other miscellaneous rehearings are with Alfred Sanchez (abbreviated"Alf." or "Alfredo"), Willietto Antonio, George Hood, and Robert Young (September 1939); and with Howard Gorman, Albert Sandoval, and John Charles (1939). There is also a rehearing with Henry Tsosie of terms from Gladys A. Reichard and Adolph Dodge Bittany's Agentive and Causative Elements in Navaho (1940), including some excerpts from the book. Finally, in February 1941, he reheard the vocabulary of Pedro Bautista Pino with Howard Gorman; Young did not consider these terms to be Navajo.

The files also contains Harrington's notes on Navajo names for plants, gathered from secondary sources and possibly original data from colleagues or friends. Young also annotated some of the notes.

Harrington's ethnographic files includes notes, vocabulary, and illustrations on the structure of dwelling places as well as some information on the mythic origins of the Navajo. Many of the illustrations are by Charles Keetsie Shirley. On the same subject is a set of cards in Young's hand which was sent to Harrington at Fort Wingate in August 1939. At Harrington's request, Young also translated what appears to be a lesson on hogans, possibly a section of a proposed text for instructional purposes. A group of Chaco Canyon placenames were given by Ed Henry in June 1939; several others were extracted from various secondary sources. Other ethnographic subjects briefly covered are the Hoop and Pole game, a social and economic survey questionnaire, White Hat's funeral (1939), the Lord's Prayer as recorded by Berard Haile, and notes on Sandoval's sound recordings. Malcolm Farmer supplied nonlinguistic information and there is a small set of highly miscellaneous ethnographic and historical notes.

The text section contains billingual texts that Young collected and sent to Harrington in 1936. They were written with interlinear translations and followed by a precis in English. Titles include: "Deer and Coyote," "Where the People Came Out," "A Wedding Ceremonial," and "The Woman Who Changed into a Bear." A recording session on October 31, 1949, with Dick Left, Richard Long, and Harry (not further identified) provided Navajo songs, ceremonies, and legends. Harrington's notes supply the identity of the discs and peripheral information such as the gestures accompanying the songs. Some linguistic annotations are interspersed. The discs described in the notes have not been located.

Notes, drafts, and mockups from Harrington and Young's work creating Navajo primers are also present. During the course of their work together from 1937 to 1939, Harrington and Young prepared drafts for two primers, "Little Bear Primer" and "Spotted Dog Primer," a pre-primer (probably the so called "Doda Primer"), and a playbook or cut-out book. Despite an assurance that at least both of the major works were to be printed, neither of the primers were ever published. He and Young also served as translators for a set of four primers in the "Little Herder" series, and Harrington was also credited with developing the "Harrington-La Farge phonetic system" utilized in the three-volume set entitled Little Man's Family. Harrington and Young also helped translate Ann Nolan Clark's "Who Wants To Be a Prairie Dog?"

Other materials related to Harrington's writing include notes for his "Southern Peripheral Athapaskawan Origins, Divisions, and Migrations" and preliminary drafts and notes for the Navajo portion of "Earliest Navaho and Quechua" (1944) coauthored by Robert W. Young. There are also notes and drafts for his unpublished writings, among which include "Navaho Mouthmap," "The Indian Dog Comes into His Own,"and "What Light Can Navajo Throw on Indogermanic Reconstruction?"

Among his miscellaneous notes is a comparison of Navajo with other Indian languages. There are brief notes on trips made in 1940, a list of the names of non-Indians, miscellaneous correspondence, and notes which are neither linguistic nor ethnographic.

Because of their long-term collaboration, Young's notes are inextricably intermixed with those of Harrington. Although some are labeled "Y," Young's unlabeled contributions can be identified through his handwriting and printing, and even with his style. Other hand-copied material is the work of B.A.E. assistant, Arvilla Johnson. Harrington's daughter Awona produced many of the copies in eighteen-point type.
Biographical / Historical:
Although John P. Harrington published brief articles on Navajo in 1911 and 1929, his most sustained work in this language spanned the years 1935 to 1946. Correspondence and reports indicate that during this period he was in the field from July to November 1939, and from August to mid-November 1940 at such places as Fort Wingate and Gallup, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Tuba CIty, and Window Rock, Arizona. His success in the field is due in no small part to his brilliant young collaborator, Robert W. Young, whom he first contacted in August 1936 and with whom he carried on an extensive correspondence into the mid-1940s. In fact their joint efforts in Navajo were accomplished mainly by mail.

Harrington collaborated or corresponded with others, among whom were Ann Nolan Clark, Oliver La Farge, Francis Elmore, Harry Hoijer, William Hill, and Richard Van Valkenburgh. He also contacted various university professors and graduate students, some of whom taught at such programs as those directed by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (Camp Wycliffe) and the University of New Mexico School of American Research.

Harrington consulted a wide array of secondary sources and reheard or compared data from them which he later combined with original notes. These include several hundred terms from then-unpublished manuscripts of Edward Sapir, and two of Harry Hoijer's publications--Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts (1938) and "The Southern Athapascan Languages" (1938). He made extensive use of two works published by the Franciscan Fathers, An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language (1910) and A Vocabulary of the Navaho Language (1912). He turned to W. L. Jepson and Washington Matthews for botanical terms, and to Adrien G. Morice for Carrier comparisons. In a search for precise grammatical terminology, he consulted a score or more of grammars, dictionaries, and publications on language and linguistics in Latin, Greek, Indo-Germanic, and several Arabic languages. Most prominent are Walter A. Ripman's Latin Handbook (1930) and Alan H. Gairdner's publication on Arabic phonetics (1935).

He worked with many Navajo speakers, some of whom were well-educated. Mentioned frequently are Willietto Antonio, Chee Dodge, Howard Gorman, George E. Hood, Hoskie Naswood, Albert Sandoval (also called "Chic"), Charles Keetsie Shirley, and Sam Tilden.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Local Note:
This subseries was broken up into two catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the catalog record for John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 1) to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Navajo files.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Navajo language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers
John Peabody Harrington papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest / 4.2: Navajo
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw319a390f3-cfe7-4322-97c0-fe170d37113c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref17244

MS 123 Concordance of the Athapascan languages, with an appendix

Creator:
Anderson, Alexander Caulfield, 1814-1884  Search this
Extent:
20 Pages
Culture:
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Athapaskan  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Denésoliné (Chipewyan)  Search this
Montagnais Innu  Search this
Kwalhioqua  Search this
Clatskanie  Search this
Applegate Creek  Search this
Tututni (Tutuni)  Search this
Umpqua Indians  Search this
Hupa  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Dakelh (Carrier)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
undated
Summary:
This manuscript is a set of comparative data containing materials in several Athabascan/Athapascan languages. The language names as they appear in the ms. with alternative spellings in parenthesis. Chipwyan (Chipewyan, Montagnais, Dene Suline, Sluacus-tinneh, Dene Soun'line), Tacully (Tâh-killy, Tâ-cully ), Klatskani [Kwalhioqua ?] (Kwalhioqua-Tlatskanai Kwalhioqua- Clatskanie, Kwalhioqua-Tlatskanie), Willopah (Willapa, Willoopah) Upper Umpqua, Tootooten, Applegate Creek, Hopah, Haynarger with notes in English.
Scope and Contents:
Consists of Comparative vocabulary, 4 double leaves; Appendix, 8 pages.
Place and date of record not on manuscript; recorded at Cathlamet, Washington Territory, February 24, 1858, according to Pilling, Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 14.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 123
Topic:
Chipewyan language  Search this
Hupa language  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Athabaskan  Search this
Dene Suline  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 123, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS123
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3be535e6d-a4b1-41dd-b990-13dd382eacab
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms123
Online Media:

When we were almost like men / Martin Hayes

Author:
Hayes, Martin 1966-  Search this
Subject:
Great Britain Post Office  Search this
Physical description:
130 pages ; 20 cm
Type:
Poetry
Place:
Great Britain
Date:
2015
Topic:
Postal service  Search this
Letter carriers  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1050882

A journal of voyages and travels in the interiour of North America : between the 47th and 58th degrees of north latitude, extending from Montreal nearly to the Pacific Ocean, a distance of about 5,000 miles, including an account of the principal occurrences, during a residence of nineteen years, in different parts of the country : to which are added, a concise description of the face of the countr...

Title:
Harmon's journal
Author:
Harmon, Daniel Williams 1778-1843  Search this
Haskel, Daniel 1784-1848  Search this
Former owner:
Tucker, Marcia Brady DSI  Search this
Davis, Asa DSI  Search this
Physical description:
xxiii, [25]-432 p., [2] leaves of plates (1 folded) : map, port. ; 22 cm
Type:
Glossaries, vocabularies, etc
Place:
Canada
Northwest, Canadian
Date:
1820
Topic:
Cree language  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Description and travel  Search this
Call number:
F1060.7 .H28X 1820
F1060.7.H28X 1820
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_392178

Thirty-nine cent stories / by Larry Roberts

Title:
39 cent stories
Author:
Roberts, Larry (Letter carrier)  Search this
Subject:
Roberts, Larry (Letter carrier)  Search this
United States Postal Service Officials and employees  Search this
Physical description:
84 unnumbered pages ; 22 cm
Type:
Biography
Anecdotes
Place:
Nebraska
Date:
2015
Topic:
Letter carriers  Search this
Postal service  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1046129

Options for funding aircraft carriers / John Birkler ... [et al.]

Author:
Birkler, J. L. 1944-  Search this
National Defense Research Institute (U.S.)  Search this
Rand Corporation  Search this
Subject:
United States Navy Appropriations and expenditures  Search this
Physical description:
xx, 58 p. : col. ill., charts ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
2002
C2002
Topic:
Aircraft carriers  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_717663

Aircraft carriers / by Michael and Gladys Green

Author:
Green, Michael 1952-  Search this
Green, Gladys 1954-  Search this
Physical description:
144 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 29 x 37 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1999
C1999
Topic:
Aircraft carriers  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_713928

Aircraft carriers / David Brown

Author:
Brown, David 1938-  Search this
Physical description:
64 p. : ill. ; 27 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1977
C1977
Topic:
Aircraft carriers  Search this
Call number:
V874.B76 1977X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_91259

[Minutes of the National Rural Letter Carriers' Association convention, Peoria, Ill., 1928]

Author:
National Rural Letter Carriers' Association Convention (25th : 1928 : Peoria, Ill.)  Search this
Subject:
National Rural Letter Carriers' Association  Search this
Physical description:
1 v. ; 29 cm
Type:
Congresses
Place:
Congresses
United States
Date:
1928
[1928?]
Topic:
Letter carriers  Search this
Call number:
HE6499 .N279 1928
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_715712

The island : guide / Tom Sachs

Title:
Island guide
Author:
Sachs, Tom  Search this
Subject:
Sachs, Tom Island  Search this
Physical description:
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 22 x 28
Type:
Books
Date:
2006
C2006
21st century
Topic:
Aircraft carriers in art  Search this
Sculpture, Modern  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_896881

Punk's war / Ward Carroll

Author:
Carroll, Ward 1959-  Search this
Subject:
United States Navy  Search this
Physical description:
vii, 224 p. : map ; 24 cm
Type:
Fiction
Place:
United States
Date:
2001
C2001
20th century
Topic:
Aircraft carriers  Search this
History, Naval  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_726451

Flat-tops and fledglings; a history of American aircraft carriers [by] Gareth L. Pawlowski

Author:
Pawlowski, Gareth L  Search this
Physical description:
530 p. illus. 29 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1971
[1971]
Topic:
Aircraft carriers  Search this
Call number:
V874.3 .P33
V874.3.P33
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_8897

Rural delivery salary tables : in effect July 1, 1914 / Post Office Department, United States of America

Author:
United States Post Office Department  Search this
Physical description:
72 p. ; 18 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
1914
Topic:
Postal service--Employees--Salaries, etc  Search this
Postal service--Letter carriers--Salaries, etc  Search this
Rural free delivery  Search this
Call number:
HE6161 .R94 1914
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_475447

Twenty-second annual convention of the National Rural Letter Carriers Association : Cleveland, Ohio August 25, 26, 27, 28, 1925

Author:
National Rural Letter Carriers Association Convention (22nd : 1925 : Cleveland, Ohio)  Search this
Subject:
National Rural Letter Carriers Association Congresses  Search this
Physical description:
552 leaves ; 28 cm
Type:
Manuscripts
Place:
United States
Date:
1925
Topic:
Postal service--Letter carriers--Congresses  Search this
Call number:
HE6499 .N279 1925
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_497264

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