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Portrait of Cahuilla man. Published as Man of Palm Springs – Cahuilla

Collection Creator:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (silver gelatin)
Container:
Box 13
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Collection Restrictions:
Viewing of the photographic negatives and transparencies requires advance notice and the permission of the Photo Archivist.

Access to the Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Identifier:
NAA.2010-28, Item 1613
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs / Series 9: Photographs / 9.3: The North American Indian / Volume 15
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw348d3b378-d285-4994-841d-bee769f7cce1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2010-28-ref2523

"Man and Pleistocene Lake Cahuilla, California"

Collection Creator:
Wormington, Hannah Marie  Search this
Container:
Box 37
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
The Hannah Marie Wormington papers are open for research.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Hannah Marie Wormington Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Hannah Marie Wormington Papers
Hannah Marie Wormington Papers / Series 6: Papers Written by Others / Waters, Michael Richard
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3462305c7-1674-47c1-a40e-0869170fdfb4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1995-19-ref934

Portrait of Palm Springs Cahuilla man Marcus

Collection Creator:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Extent:
1 Photographic print (silver gelatin)
Container:
Box 13
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Collection Restrictions:
Viewing of the photographic negatives and transparencies requires advance notice and the permission of the Photo Archivist.

Access to the Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Identifier:
NAA.2010-28, Item 1612
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs / Series 9: Photographs / 9.3: The North American Indian / Volume 15
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw384966b29-5225-40c3-8fbb-7de2de421b54
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2010-28-ref2524

"The Cahuilla life saver" and "He saved my life"

Collection Creator:
Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952  Search this
Container:
Box 3, Folder 13
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
Viewing of the photographic negatives and transparencies requires advance notice and the permission of the Photo Archivist.

Access to the Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
See more items in:
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs
Edward S. Curtis papers and photographs / Series 5: Writings
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e76b48c5-fd90-4248-87e9-1b19c0eb080c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2010-28-ref1607

Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
162.64 Linear feet ((332 boxes))
Culture:
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Place:
California
Date:
1907-1961
undated
Scope and Contents note:
The arrangement of material in this section forms the basis for Volume 3 of the microfilmed papers. The reel numbers of corresponding microfilm are listed where appropriate. "N/A" indicates material that was not included in microfilm.
Scope and Contents:
This series within the John Peabody Harrington papers represents the results of Harrington's work on the native languages and cultures of southern California from the Tejon region to the Mexican border; notes collected in Baja are also included. The fieldwork was undertaken just prior to and during his employment as ethnologist (1915-1954) by the Bureau of American Ethnology and during his retirement years in California until his death in 1961. The documents focus primarily on linguistic data, although they also include significant amounts of ethnographic and historical information.
Arrangement:
Series is arranged into 15 subseries: (1) Chumash; (2) Tubatulabal; (3) Kitanemuk; (4) Serrano; (5) Gabrielino; (6) Fernandeno; (7) Cahuilla; (8) Luiseno/Juaneno; (9) Cupeno; (10) Chemehuevi; (11) Mohave; (12) Diegueno (U.S. and Baja); (13) Paipai/Kiliwa; (14) Ute/Paiute/Shoshoni; (15) General and Miscellaneous Materials
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Series 3
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37925d368-18ec-4bef-9db9-9f0c42d84684
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14008

Tubatulabal

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), b. 1885  Search this
Wheeler-Voegelin, Erminie, 1903-1988  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Boxe
Culture:
Tübatulabal (Kern River)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Place:
California
Date:
1916, 1933-1934
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's Tubatulabal research.

The vocabulary section contains vocabulary elicited from Angela Lozada in 1916, along with biographical information. Her husband, Juan Lozada confirmed an occasional term. There are a few Kitanemuk and "Tejoneno" (Yokuts) equivalences. There are also animal terms provided by Estevan Miranda in 1934. Some Kitanemuk and "Tulareno" (tu.) equivalences are included.

The grammar section consists of Harrington's reading notes on C.F. Voegelin's "Tubatulabal Grammar," although he organized them according to his own grammatical outline. Most of the notes indicate the page in Voegelin from which they were copied.

Linguistic and ethnographic notes consist of information from Miranda, Pedro Villareal (Old Pedro), Bernabe, and Isabelle Meadows. The latter three provided nonlinguistic information. The notes range over such subjects as myths, tribenames, names and relationships of persons, and reminiscences. There is a reference to a painted cave in Painted Rock Canyon. Equivalences occur in Kitanemuk and "'omo-mi-l."

His placename notes are from trips taken in 1933. Harrington was accompanied by Miranda, Petra Canada and Petra Nicolas on the trips. He kept a mileage log and recorded a running account of placenames with linguistic and ethnographic elaborations, names of persons, and sketch maps of some locations. He interviewed Luciana Benkowa who spoke Tubatulabal and "Tulareno" (Yokuts). Nonlinguistic informants included Pedro Villareal and Bernabe and there are references to the deceased Costanoan woman Omesia. Their itinerary took them through Cameron, Tehachapi, Caliente, Bakersfield, Maricopa, Poso, California Hot Springs, Isabella, Kernville, Fairview, and Weldon.

The subseries also contains notes from separate conversations with T. T. Waterman; C.F. Voegelin; and an unidentified couple, most likely Voegelin and his wife, Erminie. The three conversations loosely touch on the subject of comparative phonetics.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's first Tubatulabal vocabulary was elicited from Angela Lozada in December 1916. Lozada and her husband, Juan, were Kitanemuk Indians working with Harrington in the Kitanemuk language as well as Tubatulabal. She came from a Kitanemuk, Serrano, and Tubatulabal background, but claimed to be least fluent in Tubatulabal.

In 1933 and again in the latter half of 1934, Harrington was based mainly in Santa Ana, but also worked out of Los Angeles and the Bakersfield area. At that time and along with fieldwork among many other southern California tribes, Harrington accumulated linguistic and ethnographic information from his principal Tubatulabal informant, Estevan Miranda (Est., Est. M., Esteban). Another informant, Luciana Benkowa, described Miranda's dialect as "Tulareno" rather than Tubatulabal. He was a "regular Poso Creek Indian." Harrington also noted that 'omo-mi-I (Om.) was the language of Miranda's antecedents who, he wrote, lived around Rio Chiquito and Rio Grande. Miranda was in his eighties in 1933.

Two elderly women, Petra Canada (Kennedy) and Petra Nicolas (Nikolds, Petra Mi., Petra Mir.), accompanied Harrington and Miranda on several placename trips covering an area generally between Mojave and the Sequoia National Forest. Isabelle Meadows, a Costanoan associate of Harrington's, was frequently present.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Tubatulabal language  Search this
Kitanemuk language  Search this
Yokuts language  Search this
Cahuilla language  Search this
Chumash language  Search this
Gabrielino language  Search this
Luiseño language  Search this
Serrano language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.2
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f85adef2-7534-42d8-8cb7-743b8647b61c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14231

Serrano

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
4 Boxes
Culture:
Serrano  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Place:
California
Date:
1918
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Serrano.

His linguistic and ethnographic field notes deal mostly with names of places visited or viewed during the car and walking trips which Harrington took with Manuel Santos and Tomas Manuel. Liberally interspersed is ethnographic material on such subjects as tribenames, plants, animals, games, myths, and folklore. Sketch maps often accompany the descriptions of an area. Some of the material is difficult to read and the pagination is erratic. There are Gabrielino and occasional Cahuilla terms taken from Harrington's own notes. Following the field notes are typed or handwritten lists of place and tribe names distilled from both the Serrano and Gabrielino notes and from Edward Winslow Gifford's "Clans and Moieties in Southern California." There are also brief notes of an interview with sixty-five-year-old Ernest Juan, who described Manuel Santos as the oldest man of the tribe.

The semantic slipfile basically represents a 1934 reorganization by Harrington of his 1918 field notes, many of which his assistant Marta J. Herrera typed and mounted on large sheets of paper, evidently preparatory to rehearings or corrections. Since no new data were obtained, the large sheets were cut to slipfile size to make the material less bulky. The first group of slips generally follows the order of the field notes, although not all notes were copied and some new information was interspersed. The language was sometimes edited for clarification. Another group was organized by region. It includes some Gabrielino equivalences and a few tribenames. The last two groups of placename slips mark a further reorganization rather than an addition of new information. Manuel Santos and Tomas Manuel were the principal sources. Inserted for comparison purposes were some of the Serrano terms that Eugenia Mendez contributed to Harrington's Kitanemuk notes.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington accumulated Serrano material between August 28 and November 25, 1918 on a series of placename trips in the San Bernardino Mountains between Victorville and the Marongo Reservation with Serrano speakers Manuel Santos (Ms, MS) and Tomas Manuel (Tom). Other informants include Ernest Juan, Albert Juan, Tomas Manuel's son, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Marango, Jose Zalvidea's son (Zalvidea Sr. was a Gabrielino), and "Mac.," possibly Macario Marcos, who had given Serrano equivalences to Harrington for his Cahuilla notes.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Serrano language  Search this
Gabrielino language  Search this
Cahuilla language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Maps
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.4
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c01f8ace-5493-4670-9092-36eab1040bc2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14257

Gabrielino

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Southwest Museum (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
7 Boxes
Culture:
Tongva (Gabrielino Mission)  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Maps
Narratives
Place:
California -- History
Date:
1914-1922, 1933
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Gabrielino.

One section consists of slips with notes on placenames, ethnic names, vocabulary, grammar, and ethnographic information. Some of the slips stem from a visit which Harrington and Kewen made to the Southwest Museum in Los Angeles, where Kewen supplied a linguistic and ethnographic treatment to artifacts encountered among the exhibits and to people and places mentioned therein. Some Juaneno terms are included. There is also a field notebook apparently written between March 22 and April 7, 1915. Kewen and Zalvidea supplied the information. Kewen's entries were typed over onto slips but Zalvidea's were not re-recorded. The material touches briefly upon placenames, local history, biographical data, and reminiscences. There are several sketch maps.

Harrington's linguistic and ethnographic field notes range 1914 to 1933. They are divided into three main sections based on the informant from whom Harrington elicited the original data between 1914 and 1922. With each section is a 1933 rehearing of the earlier material. Amongst the Gabrielino vocabulary, there are equivalences in Luiseno, Serrano, Juaneno, and Cahuilla. The field notes also contain placenames, personal names, local history, and ethnographic statements.

The subseries also contains texts of songs. Over fifty songs were contributed by Jesus Jauro in 1933, including two Serrano songs with Gabrielino translation. Apparently this group was recorded on numbered aluminum discs, but the discs have not been located.

There is also a section of miscellaneous notes, containing stories, folklore, anecdotes, and mentions of local events from Kewen. There are also biographical data, lists and questionnaires, a typescript of the Montano 1915 semantic vocabulary, a text for a Gabrielino museum exhibit, notes on morphology, and scattered linguistic and nonlinguistic rough notes.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington's work on Gabrielino falls generally into two time frames, one between 1914 and 1922 and a second in 1933. The first specifically documented date is March 1914 when he copied entries from the records at Mission San Gabriel. At the same time he was in touch with Jose Maria Zalvidea from whom he elicited data on March 29,1914, and again between April 14 and 19 of the same year. Zalvidea became one of Harrington's principal informants, working with him in 1915, 1916, and 1917. Another prolific informant was Jose de los Santos Juncos. Because he was reputed to be exceptionally bright, de los Santos Juncos had been dubbed "Kewen," the name of a local attorney. The nickname was apparently universally used; it was taken up by Harrington and it is the one adopted for this description. Harrington worked with Kewen between 1914 and 1916 and again in December 1918. The third principal informant of the earlier phase was Felicita[s] Serrano Montano. She provided a vocabulary dated February 24, 1915, and continued to supply information in 1916 and 1918. In 1922, Montano reheard some of her original 1915 data. Thomas Cooper was a nonlinguistic informant during the early phase. By July 1932, Harrington had located Jesus Jauro (Jes.), one of the few remaining Gabrielino speakers. In January 1933 he worked assiduously with the ninety-year-old Jauro, rehearing the material obtained from Zalvidea, Kewen, and particularly Montano.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Gabrielino language  Search this
Luiseño language  Search this
Serrano language  Search this
Cahuilla language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Maps
Narratives
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.5
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33d34fbfd-70be-4d16-b46f-4e5d97bd30d0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14270
Online Media:

Adan Castillo, 1944 & 1945. Some Cahuilla and Luiseno congnates

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 561
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 105
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin / 3.5: Gabrielino
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38ab95827-d7be-48cd-808b-0e9e3ee5dbf5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14279

Cahuilla

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Anza, Juan Bautista de, 1735-1788  Search this
Font, Pedro, -1781  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
16 Boxes
Culture:
Cahuilla  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Diaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Songs
Place:
California -- History
California -- Discovery and exploration
Date:
1922-1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Cahuilla. Materials include comparative vocabulary, grammar, texts, writings, and miscellaneous linguistic notes.

The comparative vocabulary section contains terms excerpted from "Hopi Journal of Alexander M. Stephen," edited by Elsie Clews Parsons. Benjamin L. Whorf had reviewed the glossary compiled by Parsons while it was still in manuscript form and had appended to it Hopi terms from his own fieldwork. Harrington elicited equivalent terms in Cahuilla and Luiseno from Adan Castillo and made notes relative to a November 1926 interview with Whorf. There are minimal notes on phonetics and morphology. A later semantic vocabulary, variously dated between February 1944 and 1947, also contains Cahuilla and Luiseno equivalences. There are occasional Cupeno and Gabrielino terms and, rarely, a word or expression in Paiute, Yuma, Hopi, Pima, and Papago. Some grammatical elaborations are interspersed, with Castillo again the principal source.

The grammatical section is the most substantial part of the Cahuilla material. A 1948 draft of a proposed grammar was sent to C. F. Voegelin for his comments. On hand are preliminary draft pages with notes interspersed, some in English and some in Spanish. The introductory material touches on history, ethnology, other dialects, and foreign influences on the Cahuilla language. Luiseno notes form a large part of a group of notes marked "Rejects" or "Rejects and Pending." There is also a great of data from rehearings with Castillo. Random terms are expressed in Luiseno, Cupeno, and Tubatulabal. There are also terms in Pima, Papago, and Tewa, probably excerpted from Harrington's own field notes.

The texts portion of the subseries contains Adan Castillo's biography, the Lord's Prayer, and native myths and stories, some of which were used in Harrington's version of Chinigchinich. One small section contains several song texts. These contain Luiseno equivalences and an occasional Gabrielino term. Cahuilla, English, and Spanish are intermixed in a general interlinear format.

The writings section contains Harrington's efforts to publish a translation in Cahuilla of the diaries of the Juan Bautista de Anza expeditions of 1774-1776. The diaries of de Anza, Juan Diaz, and Pedro Font are arranged in chronological order from March 10, 1774, to May 7,1776. There are sketch maps of the de Anza routes, miscellaneous reading notes, and some linguistic and ethnographic comments from Castillo. Also filed in the category of writings are the notes for Harrington's article "Chuckwalla, a Cahuilla Indian Word," published in 1947 in El Palacio. Undated material for another proposed paper titled "The Non-denotive Framework of the Cahuilla Language" consists mainly of headings with sparsely scattered linguistic notes. Late in the 1950s during his retirement years in California, Harrington began to extract information from his earlier notes for possible use in a paper tentatively titled "Solutions of the Origin of the Tribal Name Cahuilla." These notes comprise the final group in the series on writings.

The subseries also contains miscellaneous linguistic notes. There are five pages of vocabulary provided by Luisa Barelas on March 21, 1922. Carbon copies of the June 1922 census of the Mission Indians include some information on farm production, stock counts, and car ownership, but lack linguistic annotations. There are also placenames extracted from eighteen unratified treaties of 1851. Placenames include northern, central, and southern California. Linguistic and ethnographic notes of the above are from Castillo, Clem Segundo, and Lee Arenas. There is also a 1952 document on Indian rights signed by Castillo and Purl Willis.

Since large portions of Harrington's Cahuilla field notes underwent frequent rehearings and reorganizations in Washington, new data often alternate with material collected several years earlier. Scattered gaps in pagination can probably be attributed to this method of collection.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Cahuilla language  Search this
Cupeño language  Search this
Gabrielino language  Search this
Luiseño language  Search this
Hopi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Diaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Songs
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.7
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ab51847c-d36b-42f7-a459-b18e15ab873d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14294
Online Media:

Comparative Vocabulary to Hopi

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 564
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 107
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin / 3.7: Cahuilla
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3fbdcd891-9c07-4d98-a5bb-ec793be405cd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14295

Vocabulary

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 565
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 107
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin / 3.7: Cahuilla
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3654d892a-1137-4fac-90a9-ca2879918ea0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14297

Grammar

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 566-573
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 108-111
(formerly BAE MSS#6040, 6051pt., 6052pt., 6061, 6064)
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin / 3.7: Cahuilla
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3de2caba3-1ed7-49fd-b8e4-48d903b89f22
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14299

Texts

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 574-575
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 112
(formerly BAE MSS#6050, 6051pt.)
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin / 3.7: Cahuilla
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3dfbff805-da8f-4048-98c9-1285b3734b7b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14302

Writings

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 576-578
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 113-114
(formerly BAE MSS#6052pt., 6065)
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin / 3.7: Cahuilla
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3fbdc913e-9c8b-4e27-8f9f-a2aad12d2081
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14305

Miscellaneous Linguistic and Ethnographic notes

Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Container:
Box 579
Type:
Archival materials
Scope and Contents note:
Microfilm Reel: 114
Subseries Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Subseries Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin / 3.7: Cahuilla
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3da97931f-57e3-4742-a105-e3d7913fe325
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14308

Luiseño/Juaneño

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Harrington, Arthur  Search this
Names:
Mission San Juan Capistrano  Search this
Boscana, Gerónimo, 1776-1831  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
37 Boxes
Culture:
Luiseño Indians  Search this
Juaneño Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Maps
Place:
California -- Languages
California -- History
Date:
1919-1947
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Luiseno and Juaneno.

The Luiseno linguistic and ethnographic notes consist mainly of notes elicited from Maria Jesusa Omish and Maria Jesusa Soto in 1933 and from Bernardo Cuevas in 1934. The material is a random rehearing of the information which Harrington assembled for Chinigchinich ... with continued refinements of terms from DuBois and Kroeber. Substantial amounts of ethnographic information were recorded. A Gabrielino Indian, Jose Juan Jauro, was credited with an occasional Juaneno and Ventureno term. A group of Sparkman terms was reheard in 1934 with Micaela Calec and with Juan S. Calac, Willie [Calac], and Victor Meza. Jesus Jauro provided a few Gabrielino and Serrano terms.

A large section of the Luiseno vocabulary is arranged semantically; the notes were accumulated between 1932 and 1934 with elicitations from more than fifteen informants. Juaneno, Diegueno, Cahuilla, and Gabrielino terms were also recorded. Animals, ceremonies, placenames, and plant names contain the largest amounts of material. Included among the notes are first-hand recollections of events which the informants witnessed or participated in, bits of local biography, and ethnographic miscellany. There is also an earlier vocabulary, possibly from Cecilia Tortes, dated May 17, 1919.

Records of his placename trips cover information recorded in 1925, 1932, 1933, and 1934 from his trips to Corona, Elsinore, Hemet, Mesa Grande, Murietta rancheria, San Jacinto, San Juan Capistrano, Santa Ana, Soboba, Warner Springs, and many smaller sites between these points. He traveled with many Luiseno speakers and interviewed local residents along the way, noting the mileage between sites, and often sketching rough maps of the area. The result is a journal of linguistic, ethnographic, and geographic material, which is unfortunately somewhat difficult to read. Some Cupeno and Diego terms were recorded.

The Luiseno texts contains Chinigchinich songs composed by Jose Luis Albanez in the 1870s and 1880s. A small group of songs sung by Encarnaciona and Juan Calac were recorded for Harrington by Josephine Porter Cook in 1934 and 1935. No corresponding discs have been located in N.A.A. The related notes comprise linguistic annotations and often an English precis of the song text. A typescript titled "Notes for the Use of Miss Roberts" refers to the ethnomusicologist Helen H. Roberts. The document covers topics of an instructive nature such as the linguistics of song, the ethnography of song, musical accompaniment, dances, etc. Three Luiseno texts from Adan Castillo contain interlinear English or Spanish translations. Also present is the beginning of a possible paper titled "Southern California Indian Legends for Children" and dated 1947. Some of the stories are in English only.

The Juaneno vocabulary is limited to plant names elicited from Anastacia de Majel, with a few Luiseno equivalences from Jose Albanez. There are some incidental ethnographic observations.

The Juaneno linguistic and ethnographic notes section contains notes copied from the notebooks of Father St. John O'Sullivan of the Mission San Juan Capistrano. Most of the information is of an ethnographic nature from a number of informants, although some original linguistic data was supplied to O'Sullivan by Jose de la Gracia Cruz, known as Acu. Acu's reliability, unfortunately, was questionable. There is a mixture of anecdotes, reminiscences, stories, folklore, hymns, ethnohistory, and related miscellany. Some stories may be Luiseno rather than Juaneno.The linguistic content was reheard with Anastacia de Majel. Eustaquio Lugo added some Juaneno and Luiseno terms. There are also notes copied from San Juan Capistrano Mission records. A file of fieldwork with de Majel, which probably took place in 1933, resulted in substantial amounts of both linguistic and ethnographic information, with some Luiseno input from Albanez.

The rehearings of Sparkman data section contains Juaneno and Luiseno data. Some of the rehearings were conducted by Harrington's nephew, Arthur E. Harrington, who worked with de Majel.

Among the drafts and notes for Chingchinich are Luiseno annotations of Robinson's 1846 translation of Boscana's account. There are also incomplete, initial drafts of translations of Boscana's account into Catalonian and literary Spanish by E. Vigo Mestres and into Luiseno by Albanez.

Rehearings of notes used for Chinigchinch include information on material culture, names of persons, placenames, and more stories and anecdotes. Vocabulary and especially orthography were accorded detailed attention. Rehearings of terms from DuBois are included and some Luiseno equivalences.

Notes and drafts for Boscana's original manuscript contains the results of his fieldwork among Luiseno and Juaneno speakers in 1934 as part of his plan to publish annotations of the manuscript. Harrington worked with many of the same people, particularly Anastacia de Majel and Jose Olivas Albanez. Adan Castillo gave a number of Luiseno and Cahuilla terms for the phonetic section. Harrington worked from a numbered typescript of the original Spanish manuscript. This triple-spaced material is interfiled with related ethnographic and linguistic handwritten notes. A second complete typed copy of the Spanish manuscript is filed separately.
Biographical / Historical:
Aside from a continuing effort to record the languages of the "Mission Indians of California," John P. Harrington's study of Luiseno and Juaneno sprang from two main roots. The first was his interest in providing a linguistic treatment of Alfred Robinson's 1846 translation of Father Geronimo Boscana's account of the Indians of San Juan Capistrano Mission. The second involved plans for extensive rehearings of Philip Stedman Sparkman's Luiseno vocabulary collected between 1899 and 1906. The Bancroft Library in Berkeley, California, holds this manuscript, the title page of which reads as follows: "The Luiseno Language, Being the language spoken by the San Luis Rey, San Luis, or Luiseno Indians of Southern California. A Shoshonean dialect. Written by P. S. Sparkman, at the Rincon, San Diego County, California, 1899 to 1906." It consists of 713 leaves of typescript, with annotations and revisions by Alfred L. Kroeber.

Harrington began serious and thorough work on the annotations for Boscana's historical account in March of 1932. His interest continued until at least, and probably past, April 1936 and resulted in two publications and extensive notes on a proposed third publication. Harrington was convinced that Boscana's account, probably written between 1820 and 1822, stood alone as an early ethnological document on the Spanish Missionary period in California and was therefore an ideal subject for major ethnographic and linguistic amplifications. The work proceeded in three general phases.

The first phase culminated in the publication early in 1933 of Harrington's book titled Chinigchinich: A Revised and Annotated Version of Alfred Robinson's Translation of Father Geronimo Boscana's Historical Account of the Belief, Usages, Customs and Extravagencies [sic] of the Indians of This Mission of San Juan Capistrano called the Acagchemem Tribe. The linguistic material is chiefly Luiseno.

In 1933 while Chinigchinich ... was still in the printing process, Harrington began a second round of rehearings, this time focusing mainly on the Juaneno language. This period forms the second cohesive phase.

Meanwhile a search initiated in 1932 for Boscana's original manuscript was completed. Abel Doysie wrote from Paris that he had discovered the original document in the Bibliotheque Nationale. M. Doysie photographed the sixty-page manuscript and sent it to Harrington on January 3, 1933. Harrington's translation, A New Original Version of Boscana's Historical Account of the San Juan Capistrano Indians of Southern California, appeared in June 1934. In the introduction, Harrington stated that "it is an 1822 variant of the Historical Account that Robinson translated, each version containing certain important data that the other omits. " The new manuscript contained fifteen chapters; the Robinson translation had sixteen.

On page 3, Harrington mentioned "exhaustive notes" for a later volume of annotations to the translation and although in 1936 he received a {dollar}500 grant from the Social Research Council to carry through this plan, the annotations were not published. Phase three, however, centers around this endeavor. In 1935 and 1936, Harrington copied and reorganized hundreds of pages of notes and added new data preparatory to the proposed third publication.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Luiseño language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
manuscripts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Narratives
Maps
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.8
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34d37f113-9a8f-464c-8e6a-ee8aca796295
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14310

Cupeño

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Cupeño Indians  Search this
Diegueño Indians  Search this
Luiseño Indians  Search this
Cahuilla  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Place:
California
Date:
1915, 1925-1926
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Cupeno. One group of his field notes consists of information elicited from Martin J. Blacktooth in Los Angeles, March 1915. The vocabulary is arranged on slips in semantic order in Cupeno and English. One section lists names of objects of material culture in English only. A small number of slips contain information on phonetics and morphology. The other set of notes are from placename trips. Between August 1925 and February 1926, Harrington conducted a number of field trips accompanied by speakers of various "Mission Indian" languages. The Cupeno information was apparently obtained between October 5 and 15, 1925, contributed mainly by Francisco Laws, Manuel Chuparosa, and Marcelino Cahuish. Other Cupeno sources were Chuparosa's wife, Juan Chutnikat, Bernardo Segundo, Victoria, Joe Cales, Manuel Tortes, and Jack Mack. Vocabulary from the placename trips in the Aguanga, Hemet, and Pala areas are found in notebooks and on loose pages. Other placenames identified were Coyote Canyon, Palm Canyon, and Torres. There are four notebooks, three of which contain both Cupeno and Diegueno. The loose pages consist of sketches and small amounts of local biography and ethnography conversation. The subseries also contains a two-age typescript of the Migration Legend in English.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Cupeño language  Search this
Diegueño language  Search this
Luiseño language  Search this
Cahuilla language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Tipai-Ipai  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.9
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cc1c8afa-ebc6-441d-a33e-c18a777d0740
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14359

General and Miscellaneous Materials

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Santa Barbara Mission  Search this
Anza, Juan Bautista de, 1735-1788  Search this
Cabrillo, Juan Rodríguez, -1543  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
19 Boxes
Culture:
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Chumash  Search this
Mojave (Mohave)  Search this
Chemehuevi  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Place:
Santa Barbara (Calif.)
California -- History
California -- Languages
California -- Gold discoveries
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries is part of the Southern California/Basin series within the John P. Harrington papers.

The largest body of material stems from his 1928 publication, "Exploration of the Burton Mound at Santa Barbara, California." This section (former B.A.E. MS 4554a) contains the manuscript, photographs and catalogs of Burton Mound artifacts, and related notes. Between 1923 and 1926, Harrington interviewed almost one hundred people on Burton Mound and other Santa Barbara sites. Records of these interviews are arranged alphabetically by the name of the person with whom he spoke (former B.A.E. MS 3209pt.) Notes on those interviewed in groups have been placed at the end of the alphabetic portion. There are also field notes and notebooks of co-workers David Banks Rogers and George W. Bayley (former B.A.E. MS 4633pts). Data concerning other Santa Barbara sites are included.

Another section of the subseries pertains to early California history, particularly relating to the ancient occupancy of the Chumash Indians. There are notes and several papers that he prepared on the Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo expedition of 1542-1543. There are also notes on other explorers and diarists such as Garces, Drake, Vizcaino, Portola, Costanzo, Crespi, Vancouver, Menzies, de Anza, Font, Fages, Zalvidea, and Duflot de Mofras. Incidental notes concern the discovery of gold in California, the 1921 reminiscences of de Anza descendents, notes from the archives of the Santa Barbara Mission, and some Spanish geographic terms in the Garces diary. A last section deals with comments on verification of the English translations in Herbert E. Bolton's (1930) five-volume work, Anza's California Expeditions. A few Chumash terms found in the Font diary were reheard in 1935 with Isabelle Meadows (abbreviated "Iz."), a Costanoan informant. There are also a number of secondary sources on California history.

The linguistic and ethnographic notes include a fairly substantial accumulation of notes on tribenames organized in 1946 and 1947 (former B.A.E. MS 3900 pt.) It represents an attempt to identify ethnic names applied to California tribes principally by Mohave and Chemehuevi informants. Some tribenames were given in Cahuilla, Paiute, Cupeno, Diegueno, Juaneno, Luiseno (abbreviated "R."), and Washo. Other materials include Koso (Panamint), Rio Chiquito (Tubatulabal), and Tataviam vocabulary; biographical notes; notes from Harrington's attempt to etymologize the four known words of the San Nicolas Island language using comparative terms in Cahuilla, Luiseno, Cupeno, and Gabrielino; reading notes; and rehearings of English texts with speakers of Luiseno, Cahuilla, Serrano, Gabrielino, and Diegueno.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Archaeology  Search this
Luiseño language  Search this
Cahuilla language  Search this
Serrano language  Search this
Gabrielino language  Search this
Diegueño language  Search this
Cupeño language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 3.15
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 3: Papers relating to the Native American history, language and culture of southern California and Basin
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3117ea62b-1853-4ded-99d8-16c1a2894f23
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14430

Zuni

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
8 Boxes
Culture:
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1913-1953
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's Zuni research, which mainly focused on the linguistic relationship between Zuni and Tano-Kiowan-Keresan-Shoshonean stock.

The earliest field data which Harrington obtained on Zuni was recorded in the form of three brief vocabularies. One, dated February 20, 1913, was elicited from George Piro. Harrington indicated that another list of Zuni terms was copied for his B.A.E. colleague Neil Judd in 1919. A third gives the Indian names of several Zuni native speakers and ethnologists. Brief intermixed vocabulary and grammar notes were taken in the field from Nachapani in June and July 1929. A few Navajo comparisons were added.

The vocabulary sections contains Zuni terms arranged semantically, most numerous in the animal and animal parts categories. Other categories include age/sex, material culture, phenomena, placenames, plants, rank, relationship terms, religion, time, and tribenames. Most of the original material was obtained in 1929 in New Mexico where he consulted primarily with Charles or Dick Nachapani.

For his comparative vocabulary, Harrington followed the same semantic arrangement he used for the vocabulary notes, interfiling and comparing Tewa, Kiowa, Hano, Taos, Acoma, and Cahuilla terms. The material stems from his original notes in these languages and contains references to his publications in Tewa ethnozoology and ethnogeography. Perry A. Keahtigh was cited as the Kiowa souce and Adan Castillo for Cahuilla terms. Juan is the only Tewa speaker mentioned by name in the notes, although other Tewa speakers undoubtedly contributed to the original notes used in the many comparisons. Also interfiled are excerpts from papers by Ruth L. Bunzel on Zuni ethnology and grammar and compilations of Nahuatl from the works of Horatio Carochi and Alonso de Molina. Other terms labeled "Gatschet revd by Hodge" may refer to B.A.E. ms. 2870 in which many of Gatschet's approximately 200 Zuni/English vocabulary slips contain annotations by Frederick W. Hodge. Harrington also tapped Matilda Coxe Stevenson's "The Zuni Indians" (1904) for further comparisons. Kymograph tracings are mainly a comparison of Zuni and Navajo lexical terms.

Harrington's Zuni grammatical material was probably assembled in Washington for correlation with his own notes on other languages and with notes from secondary sources to be compiled into a comparative grammar. Most of Harrington's original Zuni material was derived from his fieldwork with Nachapani in June and July of 1929.

Correspondence indicates that Harrington's first draft of a comparative grammar was written in 1944 and was to be titled "Zuni Discovered To Be Hokan." Many of the notes which precede it, however, were interfiled later (probably in the early 1950s) and stem from his original field notes in Zuni, Tewa, and Kiowa. Also included are a lesser number of Taos and Aztec expressions. Harrington utilized the same sources as those found in the grammatical notes, relying most heavily on Bunzel's "Zuni." Another version of the manuscript has the modified title "Zuni, Tanoan, Kiowa Comparisons: Zuni Discovered To Be Hokan."

His ethnobotany notes contains extracts from Wooton and Standley's Flora of New Mexico (1913) and Stevenson's "Ethnobotany of the Zuni Indians." The ethnographic notes are based on Stevenson's The Zuni Indians. This work is frequently referred to in the notes as "Zuni Book."

Harrington's writings consists of notes used in "Name of Zuni Salt Lake in Alarcon's 1540 Account" (1949) and in "Trail Holder" (1949) as well as drafts and notes for proposed publications. Harrington's article "The Name Zuni Comes from the Laguna Dialect of West Keresan" was apparently not accepted for publication. Most of the notes are based on the Zuni section of Hodge's "Handbook." Another unpublished article is on Zuni phrases and numbers. It is similar in approach to a draft on Aztec phrases and numbers, suggesting that he may have contemplated a series of such short articles.
Biographical / Historical:
As early as 1919, John P. Harrington claimed a linguistic relationship between Zuni and a putative Tano-Kiowan-Keresan-Shoshonean stock. In 1929, at the suggestion of Edgar L. Hewett, he was authorized by the Bureau of American Ethnology to work with University of New Mexico students at a summer session in Chaco Canyon. Correspondence and reports indicate that he accumulated the bulk of his original Zuni notes at that time, later reorganizing them at various intervals in Washington, D.C., with an eye toward producing a vocabulary and grammar that would clearly demonstrate affinity among these languages. Harrington also recorded several hundred kymograph tracings. Charles and Dick Nachapani (Natcapanih) and Charlie Cly served as the primary sources of information. Harrington called one of the Nachapani brothers "the prince of all Zuni informants;" which one is uncertain.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
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Topic:
Zuni language  Search this
Cahuilla language  Search this
Kiowa language  Search this
Acoma dialect  Search this
Tiwa language  Search this
Tewa language  Search this
Navajo language  Search this
Nahuatl language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Grammar, Comparative and general  Search this
Ethnobotany  Search this
Zoology -- nomenclature  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
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Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 4.4
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 4: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Southwest
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw385cf212b-afea-4900-97c1-e610682ed7cc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14612
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