Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
269 documents - page 1 of 14

The Land Speaks

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2022-02-03T20:41:06.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_NcvpBQjzwIo

Anne Arnold papers, circa 1925-2015

Creator:
Arnold, Anne, 1925-2014  Search this
Subject:
Brooklyn College  Search this
Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture  Search this
Stable Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Type:
Scrapbooks
Video recordings
Citation:
Anne Arnold papers, circa 1925-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16254
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)370915
AAA_collcode_arnoanne
Theme:
Women
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_370915

Anne Arnold papers

Creator:
Arnold, Anne, 1925-  Search this
Names:
Brooklyn College  Search this
Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture  Search this
Stable Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Extent:
8.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Video recordings
Date:
circa 1925-2015
Summary:
The papers of sculptor and educator Anne Arnold measure 8.5 linear feet and date from circa 1925 to 2015. The papers document Arnold's career in New York City and Montville, Maine, where she had a house and barn with her husband the painter Ernest Briggs. The collection includes biographical material; correspondence with family, friends, artists, schools and galleries; writings by Anne Arnold and others; financial records in the form of the sales of artwork and records relating to income and expenses; teaching files, mostly for Brooklyn College where she taught; printed materials including scrapbooks, clippings, and magazines; audiovisual material in the form of videocassettes or various artist panels and talks; and photographs of Anne Arnold and her work, friends and family, and reference photographs of animals.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of sculptor and educator Anne Arnold measure 8.5 linear feet and date from circa 1925 to 2015. The papers document Arnold's career in New York City and Monteville, Maine, where she had a house and barn with her husband the painter Ernest Briggs. The collection includes biographical material; correspondence with family, friends, artists, schools and galleries; writings by Anne Arnold and others; financial records in the form of the sales of artwork and records relating to income and expenses; teaching files, mostly for Brooklyn College where she taught; printed materials including scrapbooks, clippings, and magazines; audiovisual material in the form of videocassettes or various artist panels and talks; and photographs of Anne Arnold and her work, friends and family, and reference photographs of animals.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 7 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1925-2014 (0.5 linear feet; Boxes 1, 10)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1902, 1937-2014 (1.7 linear feet; Boxes 1-3)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1964-2010 (0.2 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 4: Financial Records, 1967-2006 (0.2 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 5: Teaching Files, circa 1970-2009 (0.4 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1958-2015 (3.9 linear feet; Boxes 3-7, 10)

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1930-circa 2014 (1.6 linear feet; Boxes 7-10)
Biographical / Historical:
Anne Arnold (1925-2014) was a sculptor and educator in New York, N.Y. and Montville, Maine. Arnold was born and raised in Massachusetts, attended the University of New Hampshire for college, received her master's degree from Ohio State University, then studied art at the Art Students League in New York City from 1949 to 1953. Arnold married the painter Ernest Briggs in 1960 and the two bought a house in Montville, Maine the following year.

Arnold taught sculpture at Brooklyn College from 1971 to roughly 1991 and was a member of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture's Board of Governors for twenty years or so starting in 1981. She also taught at Columbia University, University of Pennsylvania, and Geneseo College.

While Arnold created some paintings and drawings, the bulk of her work consists of sculptures of animals. She made sculptures of people, as well as domesticated creatures such as cats, dogs, pigs, and cows, often using her pets as models. She also included more exotic members of the animal kingdom such as elephants, rhinos, giraffes, various birds, and even a cheetah. Arnold's knack for capturing the personalities of the animals she portrayed led to expressive and eye-catching sculptures for which she became renowned and exhibited widely. She passed away in her New York City studio in 2014.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are the papers of Ernest Briggs.
Provenance:
The Anne Arnold papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in 2015 by the Anne Arnold Estate, via the executors, Robert Brooks and Janice Kasper.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Video recordings
Citation:
Anne Arnold papers, circa 1925-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.arnoanne
See more items in:
Anne Arnold papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e92df86b-351b-4808-bb47-e14ef5e48da8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-arnoanne

Brooklyn College Faculty Meeting

Collection Creator:
Arnold, Anne, 1925-  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1971-circa 1990
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Anne Arnold papers, circa 1925-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Anne Arnold papers
Anne Arnold papers / Series 7: Photographs
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw91fb2d428-c192-4b78-a0eb-07b7f25579a1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-arnoanne-ref141

Teaching and Professional Files

Collection Creator:
Arnold, Anne, 1925-  Search this
Extent:
0.4 Linear feet (Box 3)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1970-2009
Scope and Contents:
Teaching files include materials related to Arnold's teaching position at Brooklyn College and as a member of the Board of Governors for the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. There are grade books, course syllabi, teaching assignments and visual aids, as well as notes. Some of the teaching materials are not immediately recognizable as being related to one school over another. The Skowhegan material mostly consists of meeting minutes and administrative records. While most of the series consists of teaching files, there are a few scattered professional files such as guest book pages related to exhibitions and a residency in Vermont.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Anne Arnold papers, circa 1925-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.arnoanne, Series 5
See more items in:
Anne Arnold papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c0a5585d-59cc-451f-a375-b0b878884aea
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-arnoanne-ref17

Brooklyn College Class Record Book

Collection Creator:
Arnold, Anne, 1925-  Search this
Container:
Box 3, Folder 27
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1985-1989
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Anne Arnold papers, circa 1925-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Anne Arnold papers
Anne Arnold papers / Series 5: Teaching and Professional Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9b6e00d1d-231b-49bb-99f5-757232762d2b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-arnoanne-ref73

Brooklyn College Class Record Book

Collection Creator:
Arnold, Anne, 1925-  Search this
Container:
Box 3, Folder 28
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1990-circa 1991
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Anne Arnold papers, circa 1925-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Anne Arnold papers
Anne Arnold papers / Series 5: Teaching and Professional Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw953979bca-58df-418f-ad02-3e573af8f0bc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-arnoanne-ref74

Brooklyn College Teaching Files

Collection Creator:
Arnold, Anne, 1925-  Search this
Container:
Box 3, Folder 29
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1974-circa 1990
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Anne Arnold papers, circa 1925-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Anne Arnold papers
Anne Arnold papers / Series 5: Teaching and Professional Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9cfad7a85-62f8-4fe5-b26c-d2791a78a72c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-arnoanne-ref75

Conrad M. Arensberg papers

Creator:
Arensberg, Conrad M. (Conrad Maynadier), 1910-1997  Search this
Names:
Brooklyn College  Search this
Columbia University  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Search this
Correspondent:
Appell, George N.  Search this
Beatty, John  Search this
Chapple, Eliot D.  Search this
Comitas, Lambros  Search this
Coon, Carleton S. (Carleton Stevens), 1904-1981  Search this
Curry, Donald  Search this
Dillon, Wilton  Search this
Ehrich, Robert W.  Search this
Fried, Morton H. (Morton Herbert), 1923-1986  Search this
Gamburd, Geraldine DeNering  Search this
Garrison, Vivian, 1933-2013  Search this
Goodell, Grace E.  Search this
Halpern, Joel Martin  Search this
Haskell, Edward F.  Search this
Iberall, Arthur S.  Search this
Kimball, Solon T.  Search this
Landes, Ruth, 1908-1991  Search this
Lomax, Alan, 1915-2002  Search this
Mencher, Joan P., 1930-  Search this
Niehoff, Arthur H., 1921-  Search this
Richardson, Frederick L.W.  Search this
Steward, Julian Haynes, 1902-1972  Search this
Tax, Sol, 1907-1995  Search this
Tootell, Geoffrey M. B. (Geoffrey Matthew Bemis)  Search this
Warner, William Lloyd  Search this
Whyte, William Foote, 1914-2000  Search this
Winner, Irene  Search this
Zenner, Walter P.  Search this
Extent:
33.3 Linear feet (83 document boxes)
Culture:
Irish  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Periodicals
Lecture notes
Reports
Syllabi
Photographs
Field notes
Correspondence
Place:
India
Europe
Ireland
Date:
1931-1997
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of Conrad M. Arensberg, anthropologist, university professor, and anthropological consultant. Included are correspondence; published and unpublished writings; research materials, including notes, correspondence, diaries, charts, drafts, interviews, research plans, reports, project proposals, and bibliographic cards; speeches; pamphlets; articles from newspapers and periodicals; course materials, including bibliographies, lecture notes, reading lists, assignments, exams, project proposals, and syllabi; curriculum vitae; date books; scholarly papers and publications of other scholars; and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the professional papers of Conrad M. Arensberg, anthropologist, university professor, and anthropological consultant. Included are correspondence; published and unpublished writings; research materials, including notes, correspondence, diaries, charts, drafts, interviews, research plans, reports, project proposals, and bibliographic cards; speeches; pamphlets; articles from newspapers and periodicals; course materials, including bibliographies, lecture notes, reading lists, assignments, exams, project proposals, and syllabi; curriculum vitae; date books; scholarly papers and publications of other scholars; and photographs.

The materials in this collection document Arensberg's career as a university professor, his relationships with colleagues across a spectrum of disciplines, and his contributions to the field of anthropology. As a respected member of the anthropological community, Arensberg received a voluminous amount of correspondence from his peers, who often included copies of their most recent papers. He kept many of these works, which, along with his annotations, can be found throughout the collection. It appears he used these papers in a variety of ways, including as resources for his classes or as reference materials. Arensberg's own work is reflected in his writings and research files. Arensberg's Ireland research, despite its importance to his career and to the field of anthropology as a whole, has a minimal presence in the collection. Located in Series 3. Research Files, the subseries containing Arensberg's Ireland material primarily consists of photocopies of his correspondence, field notes, and diaries during this time. His role as a professor, rather than as a researcher or writer, is the most well-represented in the collection. Arensberg formed lasting relationships with many of his students, as evidenced by his continued correspondence with many of them long after their years at Columbia.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 8 series:

Series 1) Correspondence, 1933-1994

Series 2) Writings, 1936-1983

Series 3) Research files, 1931-1984

Series 4) Professional activities, 1933-1990

Series 5) Teaching files, 1938-1983

Series 6) Biographical files, 1946-1997

Series 7) Subject files, 1934-1979

Series 8) Photographs, undated
Biographical Note:
Conrad M. Arensberg was born on September 12, 1910 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Academically inclined from a young age, he graduated first in his class at Shadyside Academy in Pittsburgh. His early success earned him admittance to Harvard College. Arensberg studied anthropology and graduated summa cum laude in 1931.

As a graduate student at Harvard University, Arensberg was asked to join a project being conducted in Ireland by Harvard's Anthropology Department. Alongside W. Lloyd Warner and Solon T. Kimball, Arensberg spent three years studying rural Irish life in County Clare. This research resulted in his doctoral dissertation, "A Study in Rural Life in Ireland as Determined by the Functions and Morphology of the Family," which was later published as The Irish Countryman in 1937. His work was groundbreaking in the field of anthropology, and his study of County Clare "became a model for other community studies... requiring that researchers study a target culture from the inside, making meticulous notes on everything they saw, heard or experienced." Arensberg reshaped the way that anthropologists approached fieldwork and opened doors for the study of modern industrial societies.

Arensberg had a long teaching career. He first became a university professor in 1938 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and remained a professor for the rest of his life, teaching at MIT, Brooklyn College, Barnard College, Columbia University, the University of Florida, and the University of Virginia. At Columbia, Arensberg worked alongside such notable anthropologists as Margaret Mead, Charles Wagley, and Marvin Harris.

Arensberg officially retired in 1979, but he continued to collaborate with his colleagues, counsel past students, and participate in professional associations until his death. He passed away on February 10, 1997 in Hazlet, New Jersey.

Sources Consulted

Comitas, Lambros. 2000. "Conrad Maynadier Arensberg (1910-1997)." American Anthropologist 101(4): 810-813.

Curriculum Vitae—Amended Posthumously. Series 6. Biographical Files. Conrad M. Arensberg papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Thomas, Robert McG. Jr. 1997. "Conrad Arensberg, 86, Dies; Hands-On Anthropologist." New York Times, February 16: 51.

Chronology

1910 September 12 -- Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

1931 -- B.A. from Harvard College

1932-1934 -- Traveled to Ireland to study rural life in County Clare as part of the Harvard Irish Mission

1933-1936 -- Junior Fellow, The Society of Fellows, Harvard University

1933-1994 -- Member and Fellow, American Anthropological Association

1934 -- Ph.D. in Anthropology from Harvard University

1937 -- Published The Irish Countryman, the result of his work in Ireland

1938-1940 -- Occasional consultant, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of American Ethnology

1938-1941 -- Assistant Professor, Department of Social Sciences and Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1940 -- Founded (with others) the Society for Applied Anthropology

1941-1946 -- Associate Professor and Chairman, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Brooklyn College

1943-1946 -- Captain, Major, AUS, Military Intelligence Service

1946-1952 -- Associate Professor of Sociology, Chairman (until 1949) Department of Sociology, Barnard College, Columbia University

1951-1952 -- Research Director, UNESCO, Institute for the Social Sciences, Cologne, Germany

1951-1952 -- Editor, Point Four Manual, American Anthropological Association

1952-1953 -- Associate Professor of Anthropology, The Graduate Faculty of Political Science, Columbia University

1953-1970 -- Professor of Anthropology, Chairman (1956-1959), Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1962-1978 -- Co-Director (with Alan Lomax) of Columbia University's Cross-Cultural Surveys of Social Structure and Expressive Behavior

1970-1979 -- Buttenwieser Professor of Human Relations, Columbia University

1979-1997 -- Buttenwieser Professor Emeritus of Human Relations, Columbia University

1980 -- President, American Anthropological Association

1991 -- First recipient, "Conrad M. Arensberg Award" of the Society for the Anthropology of Work

1997 February 10 -- Died in Hazlet, New Jersey
Related Materials:
Arensberg is listed as a correspondent in the following collections at the Smithsonian Institution's National Anthropological Archives: John Lawrence Angel papers; Papers of Carleton Stevens Coon; Ethel Cutler Freeman papers; Frederica de Laguna papers; Ruth Landes papers; William Duncan Strong papers.

For oral history interviews with Arensberg, see the following collections:

-The Smithsonian Institution's Human Studies Film Archives "Video Dialogues in Anthropology: Conrad Arensberg and Lambros Comitas, 1989." In this video oral history conducted by anthropologist Lambros Comitas, Arensberg comments on his training in anthropology, the individuals who were influential in his career, and the geographical areas where he conducted his fieldwork.

-The National Anthropological Archives Manuscript (MS) 2009-15. May Mayko Ebihara conducted this oral history interview with Arensberg on March 7, 1984 as part of a larger oral history project with anthropologists.

For more concerning Arensberg's work with interaction theory, see the Frederick L.W. Richardson papers at the National Anthropological Archives. Richardson worked closely with Eliot Chapple and Conrad Arensberg on theories concerning human interaction.

For correspondence and other information related to Arensberg's Ireland research, see: Solon Toothaker Kimball Papers, Special Collections, Teachers College, Columbia University; and Solon Toothaker Kimball Papers, The Newberry Library, Chicago.

Additional materials concerning Arensberg's research and personal life can be found among the papers of his wife, anthropologist Vivian "Kelly" Garrison. See the Vivian E. Garrison papers at the National Anthropological Archives.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Vivian E. Garrison Arensberg in 2011.
Restrictions:
The Conrad M. Arensberg papers are open for research.

Files containing Arensberg's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. For preservation reasons, the computer disk containing digital correspondence files from Joel Halpern is restricted.

Access to the Conrad M. Arensberg papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Peasants  Search this
Management  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnic groups  Search this
Family  Search this
Urban policy  Search this
Social interaction  Search this
Industrial relations  Search this
Political anthropology  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Applied anthropology  Search this
Economic anthropology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Periodicals
Lecture notes
Reports
Syllabi
Photographs
Field notes
Correspondence
Citation:
Conrad M. Arensberg papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2011-17
See more items in:
Conrad M. Arensberg papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37ac2b245-98ed-4b7c-a620-cb61f8d237ec
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2011-17

Philip Pearlstein papers

Creator:
Pearlstein, Philip, 1924-  Search this
Names:
WBAI Radio (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
WRFM (Radio station : New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Barnet, Will, 1911-2012  Search this
Blaine, Michael  Search this
Cantor, Dorothy  Search this
Close, Chuck, 1940-  Search this
Downes, Rackstraw  Search this
Dückers, Alexander, 1939-  Search this
Field, Richard  Search this
Haas, Richard, 1936-  Search this
Hampleman, Jean  Search this
Kelly, W. J.  Search this
Levine, Jack, 1915-2010  Search this
McCarthy, David, 1960-  Search this
Shaman, Sanford Sivitz  Search this
Storr, Robert  Search this
Tamburini, Fernando  Search this
Tsao, Vivian, 1950-  Search this
Updike, John  Search this
Viola, Jerome  Search this
Wallin, Leland  Search this
Ward, John  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928- -- Photographs  Search this
Witkin, Jerome  Search this
Yezzi, David  Search this
Extent:
31.8 Linear feet
16.68 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Motion pictures (visual works)
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Video recordings
Date:
circa 1940-2008
Summary:
The papers of New York artist Philip Pearlstein measure 31.8 linear feet and 16.68 GB and date from circa 1940 to 2008. The collection is comprised of biographical material, correspondence, interviews and transcripts, writing projects and lectures, personal business records, printed material, three scrapbooks, photographs and moving images, documentary production material, digital records, sound and video recordings, and motion picture film that documents Pearlstein's career as a painter and educator.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York artist Philip Pearlstein measure 31.8 linear feet and 16.68 GB and date from circa 1940 to 2008. The collection is comprised of biographical material, correspondence, interviews and transcripts, writing projects and lectures, personal business records, printed material, three scrapbooks, photographs and moving images, documentary production material, digital records, sound and video recordings, and motion picture film that documents Pearlstein's career as a painter and educator.

Biographical material includes appointment books, several awards, annotated calendars, a catalogue raisonné working list, identification card, membership files, resumes, and one sound recording. Correspondence is with Will Barnet, Chuck Close, Rackstraw Downes, Richard Haas, Jack Levine, Robert Storr, John Updike, Leland Wallin, Jerome Witkin, family, galleries and museums, students, colleagues, artists, arts organizations, and includes a digital recording.

Also found are sound recordings and transcripts of interviews with Pearlstein by Vivian Tsao, Michael Blaine, Sanford Sivitz Shaman, David McCarthy, and broadcast stations WRFM and WBAI. Writing projects and lectures by Pearlstein consist of student work, numerous articles and essays, sound and video recordings of lectures and speeches, letters, memorials, miscellaneous manuscripts and notes, and a U.S. and U.S.S.R. Workshop Exchange project proposal. Writings by others about Pearlstein are by W.J. Kelly, Alexander Dückers, Richard Field, John Ward, Jerome Viola, Robert Storr, and David Yezzi.

Personal business records contain agreements, consignment and loan documents, donations, financial material, exhibition files, insurance and inventories, recommendations written by Pearlstein, reproduction permissions, digital recordings, and teaching files for various institutions. Art reproductions, clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs for exhibitions of artwork by Pearlstein and others, magazines and journals, newsletters, postcards, and publicity files that include one digital recording are in printed materials.

Two scrapbooks are of Egyptian and Roman architecture and objects accompanied by notes and a small amount of sketches, and one scrapbook is printed material regarding Pearlstein's work and exhibitions. Artwork is by Jean Hampleman, Fernando Tamburini, and unidentified artists. Photographs and moving images that include video recordings and motion picture film of Pearlstein in the studio, portraits, and candids; personal photographs of family, travel, and classmates including Andy Warhol and Dorothy Cantor; artist's models; events and exhibitions; and works of art.

Completed and unedited video and sound recordings, computer graphics footage, soundtrack material, and administrative records for the 1985 documentary video production Philip Pearlstein Draws the Artist's Model are also in this collection.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 10 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1964-2008 (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 1, 36, OV42)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1955-2008 (8.5 linear Feet; Boxes 1-10, OVs 42-43, 0.168 GB; ER01)

Series 3: Interviews and Transcripts, 1957-2003 (0.5 linear Feet; Box 10)

Series 4: Writing Projects and Lectures, circa 1945-2008 (2.5 linear Feet; Boxes 10-13, 37-38, 8.26 GB: ER02-ER13)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1955-2007 (1 linear Feet; Boxes 13-14, 3.77 GB: ER14-ER15)

Series 6: Printed Materials, 1946-2008 (3.0 linear Feet; Boxes 14-21, 36, OVs 42-43)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, circa 1953-1970s (0.4 linear Feet; Box 22)

Series 8: Artwork, undated, 1967-2004 (0.2 linear Feet; Box 22, OV 42)

Series 9: Photographs and Moving Images, 1940s-2008 (3.3 linear Feet; Boxes 22, 37, 39-41, 4.18 GB; ER16-ER18)

Series 10: Philip Pearlstein Draws the Artist's Model, Documentary Production Material, 1983-1991 (8.5 linear Feet; Boxes 23-30, SAV 31-35)
Biographical / Historical:
Philip Pearlstein (1924- ) is a painter and educator based in New York, N.Y.

Pearlstein was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and he attended classes at the Carnegie Museum of Art as a child. While still in high school, his paintings were reproduced in Life magazine after winning Scholastic magazine's high school art competition. After graduating from high school Pearlstein enrolled in the Carnegie Institute of Technology's (CIT) art school, but left after a year to serve in the Army during World War II. He gained knowledge of printing, drafting, and sign painting while stationed in Florida and Italy. After the war he returned to CIT as a student and became art editor of the engineering school's Carnegie Technical magazine. During this time Pearlstein met his wife, Dorothy Cantor, and became close friends with Andy Warhol, both classmates at CIT. Pearlstein moved to New York City with Warhol after receiving his Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1949. In 1955, he completed his thesis on Francis Picabia and received a Master of Arts in art history from New York University's Institute of Fine Arts.

As Pearlstein's career evolved, he became known for his realistic nudes and landscapes. Many of Pearlstein's paintings were inspired by his travels to the western United States, Peru, Egypt, and to Italy as a 1958 Fulbright Grant recipient. His work has been exhibited throughout the United States and internationally, and he has worked closely with the Tanager and Alan Frumkin Galleries in New York. In addition to his painting career, Pearlstein was an instructor at Pratt Institute from 1959 to 1963 and at Brooklyn College from 1963 to 1988. He is also a member of the National Academy of Design and the American Academy of Arts and Letters, serving as president from 2003 to 2006.

Pearlstein continues to work and live in New York, N.Y.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Philip Pearlstein conducted by Paul Cumming, June 8 to August 10, 1972.
Provenance:
The papers were donated in multiple installments by Philip Pearlstein from 1975 to 2009.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and born-digital records with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Rights:
Audio visual material "Philip Pearlstein Draws the Artists' Model": Authorization to quote or reproduce for purposese of publication requires written permission from Pearlstein or his heirs. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Architecture -- Egypt  Search this
Architecture, Roman  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Motion pictures (visual works)
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Video recordings
Citation:
Philip Pearlstein papers, circa 1940-2008. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.pearphil
See more items in:
Philip Pearlstein papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ae8de1cb-660c-49be-b009-d765ed771ebe
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-pearphil
Online Media:

Comparative Social Structure Part II: Stratification and the Formation of Elite Groups - Hugh Smythe, Brooklyn College; Course A-501; Side 1 and 2; Reel 55; December 5, 1962

Container:
Box 74 of 87
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-001, Warren M. Robbins Papers
See more items in:
Warren M. Robbins Papers
Warren M. Robbins Papers / Series 12: Audio recordings, 1959-1973 / Box 74
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa11-001-refidd1e32454

Comparative Social Structure Part II: Stratification and the Formation of Elite Groups - Hugh Smythe, Brooklyn College; Course A-501; Side 1 and 2; Reel 56; December 5, 1962

Container:
Box 74 of 87
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-001, Warren M. Robbins Papers
See more items in:
Warren M. Robbins Papers
Warren M. Robbins Papers / Series 12: Audio recordings, 1959-1973 / Box 74
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa11-001-refidd1e32465

Mark Baum papers

Creator:
Baum, Mark, 1903-1997  Search this
Extent:
1.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides
Sketches
Sound recordings
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Date:
1926-1997
Summary:
The papers of painter Mark Baum date from 1926 through 1997 and measure 1.5 linear feet. Found within the collection are biographical and personal files; family and professional correspondence; exhibition announcements and catalogs; lecture notes and cassette tape recordings of lectures; writings, newspaper clippings, photographs and slides, loose sketches, sketchpads, sketchbooks, and stencils.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Mark Baum date from 1926 through 1997 and measure 1.5 linear feet. Found within the collection are biographical and personal files; family and professional correspondence; exhibition announcements and catalogs; lecture notes and cassette tape recordings of lectures; writings, newspaper clippings, photographs and slides, loose sketches, sketchpads, sketchbooks, and stencils.
Arrangement:
The collection has been organized on the folder level in a preliminary fashion and arranged into 7 loose series of similar materials. The collection has not been arranged at the item level.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical and Personal Files, 1926-circa 1997 (Box 1; 5 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1932-1996 (Box 1; 13 folders)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1963-1986 (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 4: Exhibitions, 1929-1996 (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 5: Newspaper Clippings, 1929-1963 (Box 1, OV 3; 2 folders)

Series 6: Sketchbooks and Sketchpads, circa 1940s-circa 1990s (Boxes 1-2, OV 3; 12 folders)

Series 7: Photographs and Slides, circa 1920s-circa 1990s (Box 2; 4 folders)
Biographical Note:
Mark Baum was born in 1903 in Sanok, Poland. He emigrated to the United States with his family in 1919 and settled in New York City. Baum studied at the National Academy of Design in 1924-1925 and at the Cape Cod School of Art in Provincetown, Massachusetts with C. W. Hawthorne in the summer of 1926. He was also trained as a furrier and supported himself and his family as an expert cutter of fur coats.

Early success with his figurative painting gave Mark Baum a reason to hope for a lifelong career as an artist. He had a show of watercolors at the Whitney Studio Galleries in 1929 and work was purchased by Juliana force. Baum followed his success with an exhibit of oil paintings at the Marie Harriman Gallery in 1930. Baum paid a visit to Alfred Stieglitz at his American Place gallery and recorded in his notes that Stieglitz bought a painting for his own collection.

During the Depression, Baum worked for the Works Program Administration in the easel division. He married in 1933 and his sons William and Paul were born in 1936 and 1939. Baum's wife Celia was an elementary school teacher who went on to receive a Ph.D. in education and become a professor of education at Brooklyn College.

In 1941, Mark Baum exhibited his paintings at the Perls Gallery. Other exhibitions at the St. Etienne Gallery in 1947 and the Laurel Gallery in 1948 established mark Baum as painter of sturdy figures, and city architectural views and landscapes. Some time in the late 1940s, Baum stopped painting for a while and, when he resumed, broke completely with his previous style. He adopted a staircase motif for a series of abstract and geometric patterns and elements appearing in endless combinations of vast surfaces of painted space.

In the early 1960s, Mark Baum took up residence in costal Maine, where he converted a spacious barn in Cape Neddick into a studio. He lived there until his death in 1997. The work of Mark Baum is in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art.
Provenance:
William Baum, son of Mark Baum, donated the papers to the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, in 2001.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Maine -- Cape Neddick  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides
Sketches
Sound recordings
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Mark Baum papers, 1926-1997. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.baummark
See more items in:
Mark Baum papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9d8c3b1dd-97b1-4e52-be42-f1c7243d5826
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-baummark
Online Media:

Lawrence Oschinsky papers

Creator:
Oschinsky, Lawrence, 1921-1965  Search this
Extent:
18 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Photographs
Date:
circa 1900-1965
Summary:
The papers of Lawrence Oschinsky primarily document his research and professional activities from 1940s-1965 as an American physical anthropologist, but include some personal materials as well. The collection contains his published works, dissertations, field notes, correspondence, teaching materials, and many photographs depicting both his personal travels and his research subjects in the Canadian Arctic, Africa, Asia, and other regions.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Lawrence Oschinsky primarily document his professional life and research on the racial affinities and evolutionary characteristics of various peoples. The collection contains his published works, dissertations, field notes, correspondence, teaching materials, and many photographs depicting both his personal travels and his research subjects in the Canadian Arctic, Africa, Asia, and other regions.
Arrangement:
The Lawrence Oschinsky papers are organized into 9 series:

Series 1: Personal Information and Effects

Series 2: Correspondence

Series 3: Education

Series 4: Research and Notes

Series 5: Published Works

Series 6: Writings

Series 7: Teaching Materials

Series 8: Photographs

Series 9: Motion picture film
Biographical / Historical:
Lawrence Oschinsky was born on April 19, 1921, to Lea Pollak Oschinsky and John Oschinsky in New York City. He received his B.A. degree from Brooklyn College in 1943, where he was first drawn to anthropology. In 1947 he received his master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Chicago, with the thesis entitled "Islam in Chicago: Being a Study of the Acculturation of a Muslim Palestinian Community in That City." He attended the University of Zurich from 1947-1950 pursuing graduate coursework in anthropology.

From 1950-1951 he was instructor of anatomy at Makerere College Medical School, in Kampala Uganda, studying the racial affinities of various African tribes. From 1951-1952 he was a Research Student at the University of Cambridge, England. He returned to the University of Zurich in 1952 and received his PhD in Anthropology. His doctoral dissertation, published in 1953, was entitled "The Racial Affinities of the Baganda and Other Bantu Tribes of British East Africa." In October 1953, Oschinsky returned to the United States and began his teaching and research career as an Instructor in Physical Anthropology at the Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. He also acted as research assistant to Dr. Wilton M. Krogman, Professor of Physical Anthropology, and took anthropometric measurements of school children for Krogman's child growth research program.

Concurrently, Oschinsky cooperated with police and other agencies in the forensic identification of unknown human remains and cases of disputed paternity. Toward the end of 1953, he obtained a position as a Research Scholar in Physical Anthropology at the United States Educational Foundation in Burma. He spent a year studying the peoples of Burma in relation to those of Thailand, Indonesia, Malaya, and the Philippines. From 1956-1957, he was an Instructor in Anatomy at Howard University Medical School in Washington, DC. During 1957-1958, he was Visiting Lecturer in Physical Anthropology at the University of Arizona, Tucson. In 1958, Oschinsky was offered the position of Curator of Physical Anthropology at the National Museum of Canada, in Ottawa, where he devoted himself to an intensive study of the museum's osteological collections. In 1962 he became a part-time instructor in Physical Anthropology at St. Patrick's College, University of Ottawa. In July 1963, Oschinsky became Assistant Professor, and later Associate Professor of Physical Anthropology, University of Toronto, where he taught for the rest of his career. He died on December 19, 1965.

Oschinsky wrote several scientific papers during these years, culminating in 1964 with the monograph The Most Ancient Eskimos: The Eskimo Affinities of Dorset Culture Skeletal Remains.. In this book, Oschinsky explored Eskimo prehistory via skeletal specimens.

Chronology

1921 April 19 -- Born in New York City, NY

1939-1943 -- Bachelor of Arts, Brooklyn College

1943-1947 -- Masters in Anthropology, University of Chicago

1947-1950 -- Graduate Coursework in Anthropology, University of Zurich

1950-1951 -- Anatomy instructor; studied racial affinities of African tribes, Makerere College Medical School, Uganda

1951-1952 -- Research student, University of Cambridge, England

1952-53 -- PhD in Physical Anthropology, University of Zurich

1953 -- Worked with police and other agencies in the forensic identification of unknown human remains and cases of disputed paternity

1953-1954 -- Instructor, Physical Anthropology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Research assistant to Dr. Wilton M. Krogman; took anthropometric measurements of schoolchildren for Krogman's child growth research program.

1954-1955 -- Research scholar in Physical Anthropology, United States Educational Foundation, Burma (currently Myanmar)

1956-1957 -- Instructor in Anatomy, Howard University Medical School, Washington, D.C.

1957-1958 -- Visiting Lecturer in Physical Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson

1958-1963 -- Curator of Physical Anthropology, National Museum of Canada, Ottawa

1962 -- Part-time instructor in Physical Anthropology, St. Patrick's College, University of Ottawa

1963-1965 -- Assistant Professor of Physical Anthropology, University of Toronto

1964 -- Published monograph, The Most Ancient Eskimos: The Eskimo Affinities of Dorset Culture Skeletal Remains

1965 December 19 -- Died in Toronto, Ontario
Related Materials:
The National Anthropological archives holds the records of the Wilton M. Krogman Center for Research in Child Growth and Development.
Separated Materials:
Oschinsky's measuring instruments and a number of dental casts were transferred to the biological anthropology collections of the National Museum of Natural History.
Provenance:
The papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Lawrence Oschinsky's nephew, Scott Fuller, in 2016.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Access to the Lawrence Oschinsky papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Physical anthropology  Search this
anthropometry  Search this
Physical anthropology -- skeletal remains  Search this
Physical anthropology -- Eskimo  Search this
Physical anthropology -- Early man  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Photographs
Citation:
Lawrence Oschinsky papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2016-26
See more items in:
Lawrence Oschinsky papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33565392a-9526-4fe9-871d-aa2f22fd5bcc
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2016-26

John Joseph Honigmann Papers

Correspondent:
Mead, Margaret, 1901-1978  Search this
Roberts, Frank H. H. (Frank Harold Hanna), 1897-1966  Search this
Spier, Leslie, 1893-1961  Search this
Spier, Robert Forest Gayton  Search this
Simpkins, Norman  Search this
Sinder, Leon  Search this
Slobodin, Richard  Search this
Spicer, Edward Holland  Search this
Tax, Sol, 1907-1995  Search this
Helm, June, 1924-  Search this
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Osgood, Harold Cornelius  Search this
Pollitzer, William S., 1923-  Search this
Peck, John Gregory  Search this
Niehall, Arthur  Search this
Nelleman, George  Search this
Opler, Morris Edward  Search this
Oakes, Marrilee  Search this
Rouse, Irving, 1913-2006  Search this
Rogers, Edward S.  Search this
Siddiqi, A. H. A.  Search this
Salz, Beate R.  Search this
Riesman, David  Search this
Reina, Ruben E.  Search this
Rioux, Marcel  Search this
Fenton, William N. (William Nelson), 1908-2005  Search this
Aberle, David F. (David Friend), 1918-2004  Search this
Alizai, Saeed K.  Search this
Chance, Norman A.  Search this
Casagrande, Joseph B. (Joseph Bartholomew), 1915-1982  Search this
Count, Earl W.  Search this
Cohen, Yehudi A.  Search this
Davis, William  Search this
Damas, David  Search this
Blackwell, Gordon  Search this
Boek, Walter  Search this
Berndt, Ronald  Search this
Bittle, William Elmer  Search this
Barnouw, Victor  Search this
Basehart, Harry  Search this
Anderson, Nels  Search this
Balikci, Asen, 1929-  Search this
Fejos, Paul, 1897-1963  Search this
Fejos, Lita Binns  Search this
Evans, Arthur  Search this
Ervin, Sam J. Jr  Search this
Erickson, Vincent O.  Search this
Carneiro, Robert  Search this
Braidwood, Robert J. (Robert John), 1907-2003  Search this
Bohannan, Paul James  Search this
Gibson, Mickey  Search this
Geertz, Clifford  Search this
Freilich, Morris  Search this
Ford, Clellan  Search this
Foote, Don Charles  Search this
Flannery, Regina  Search this
Fischer, F. L.  Search this
McFeat, Tom F. S.  Search this
Mayo, Selz C.  Search this
Matthiasson, John S.  Search this
Maslow, Abraham H.  Search this
Naroll, Raoul  Search this
Murdock, George Peter, 1897-1985  Search this
Meggers, Betty Jane  Search this
Langness, L. L.  Search this
Laing, Gordon B.  Search this
Kupferer, Harriet J.  Search this
Kimball, Solon T.  Search this
Marshall, Donald Stanley  Search this
Lurie, Nancy Oestreich  Search this
Lewis, Oscar  Search this
Lantis, Margaret, 1906-2006  Search this
Hopkins, Tom R.  Search this
Herzmaier, Maria  Search this
Hindley, George K.  Search this
Kaplan, Berton H.  Search this
Kenny, Michael  Search this
Hsu, Francis Lang-Kwang  Search this
Jocher, Katherine  Search this
Duncan, Richard  Search this
Eggan, Fred, 1906-1991  Search this
Desy, Pierrette  Search this
Du Bois, Cora Alice, 1903-1991  Search this
Heath, Dwight Braley  Search this
Eiseley, Loren C., 1907-1977  Search this
Emmons, Gary L.  Search this
Gillin, John, 1907-1973  Search this
Gladwin, Thomas Favill  Search this
Goldschmidt, Walter, 1913-2010  Search this
Goodenough, Ward Hunt  Search this
Graves, Theodore Dumaine  Search this
Gulick, John  Search this
Gussow, Zachary  Search this
Hamori-Torok, Charles  Search this
Hansen, Asael Tanner  Search this
Harper, Edward B.  Search this
Hayakawa, S. I.  Search this
Spindler, George D.  Search this
Teicher, Morton I.  Search this
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Titiev, Mischa  Search this
Trudeau, John  Search this
Toit, Brian du  Search this
Valentine, Victor F.  Search this
Tuden, Arthur  Search this
Vincent, Clark  Search this
Vallee, Frank G.  Search this
Vogt, Evon Zartman  Search this
Voget, Fred W.  Search this
Walker, Willard  Search this
Von Furer-Haimendorf, C.  Search this
Weltfish, Gene, 1902-1980  Search this
Wallace, Anthony F. C., 1923-  Search this
Wolf, Eric R.  Search this
Creator:
Honigmann, John Joseph, 1914-1977  Search this
Extent:
83 Linear feet
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
American Indian -- Arctic  Search this
American Indian -- Sub-Arctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Cree  Search this
Kaska Dena  Search this
Eskimo/Inuit  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Psychological tests
Place:
Great Whale River (Québec)
Attawapisdat, Ontario
Schefferville, Quebec
Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Canada
Churchill, Manitoba
Canada
Pakistan
Date:
1944-1967
Scope and Contents:
The papers of John Joseph Honigmann (1914-1977) consist largely of research material of a specialist in personality, socialization, and social problems of Subarctic and Arctic people. Trained at Yale University (M.A., 1943; Ph.D., 1947), Honigmann spent most of his professional career at the University of North Carolina (1951-77) and was chairman of its Department of Anthropology from 1970-1975. Some material reflects his classroom teaching and administrative work. There are also general reference materials and materials relating to the history of anthropology.

Correspondents include David F. Aberle, Saeed K. Alizai, Nels Anderson, Asen Balikci, Victor Barnouw, Harry Basehart, Ronald Berndt, William E. Bittle, Gordon Blackwell, Walter Boek, Paul J. Bohannan, Robert J. Braidwood, Robert Carneiro, Joseph B. Casagrande, Norman A. Chance, Yehudi A. Cohen, Earl W. Count, David Damas, William Davis, Pierrette Desy, Cora du Bois, Richard Duncan, Fred R. Eggan, Loren C. Eiseley, Gary L. Emmons, Vincent Erickson, Sam J. Ervin, Arthur Evans, Lita B. Fejos, Paul Fejos, William N. Fenton, F.L. Fischer, Regina Flannery, Don Charles Foote, Clellan Ford, Morris Freilich, Clifford Geertz, Mickey Gibson, John P. Gillin, Thomas F. Gladwin, Walter R. Goldschmidt, Ward H. Goodenough, Theodore D. Graves, John Gulick, Zachary Gussow, Charles Hamori-Torok, Asael T. Hansen, Edward B. Harper, S.I. Hayakawa, Dwight B. Heath, June Helm, Maria Herzmaier, George K. Hindley, Tom R. Hopkins, Francis L.K. Hsu, Katherine Jocher, Berton H. Kaplan, Michael Kenny, Solon T. Kimball, Harriet J. Kupferer, Gordon B. Laing, L.L. Langness, Margaret L. Lantis, Oscar Lewis, Nancy O. Lurie, Donald S. Marshall, Abraham H. Maslow, John S. Matthiasson, Selz C. Mayo, Tom F.S. McFeat, Margaret Mead, Betty J. Meggers, George P. Murdock, Raoul Naroll, George Nelleman, Arthur Niehall, Marrilee Oakes, Morris E. Opler, Harold Orlans, Cornelius Osgood, Simon Ottenberg, John G. Peck, William Pollitzer, Ruben E. Reina, David Reisman, Marcel Rioux, Frank H.H. Roberts, Jr., Edward S. Rogers, Irving Rouse, Beate R. Salz, A.H.A. Siddiqi, Norman Simpkins, Leon Sinder, Richard Slobodin, Edward H. Spicer, Leslie Spier, Robert F.G. Spier, George D. Spindler, Sol Tax, Morton I. Teicher, Laura Thompson, Mischa Titiev, Brian du Toit, John Trudeau, Arthur Tuden, Victor F. Valentine, Frank G. Vallee, Clark Vincent, Fred W. Voget, Evon Z. Vogt, C. Von Furer-Haimendorf, Willard Walker, Anthony F.C. Wallace, Gene Weltfish, and Eric R.Wolf.
Arrangement note:
The Honigmann papers are not fully processed and are only broadly desccribed in this finding aid. The collection is arranged into (1) Churchill, five northern towns, and Schefferville, undated; (2) the Cree of Attawapisdat, Ontario, 1947-1956; (3) Frobisher Bay, 1963; (4) Great Whale River; (5) Inuvik, 1967; (6) Material concerning the Kaska of Lower Post, British Columbia, and Southern Yukon Territory, 1944-1945; (7) General anthropological subjects and teaching;(8) General and miscellaneous material on peoples of the world; (9) West Pakistan; (10) Canadian Wildlife Service Arctic Ecology Map; (11) Understanding Culture; (12) Miscellany; (13) Correspondence, ca. 1950s-1970s
Biographical / Historical:
Honigmann was regularly in the field. In 1943, this began with an ethnographic study of the Fort Nelson Slave in Canada. In 1944-1945, he was with the Kaska in British Columbia. In 1947-1948, he worked at Attawapiskat on James Bay and, in 1949-1950, at Great Whale River on Hudson Bay. He investigated town life in Pakistan in 1952 and 1957-1958. During the summers of 1960-1962, 1964-1966, 1972, and 1975, his studies carried him to a village in Austria. In 1963, he worked at Frobisher Bay and in 1967 at Inuvik.

1914 -- Born June 7, New York City, New York

1937 -- Married Irma Grabel

1942 -- Student at Columbia University Received BA from Brooklyn College

1943 -- Received MA from Yale University Field trip with the Fort Nelson Slave in Fort Nelson (3-6 months)

1944-1945 -- Field trip with the Kaska in British Columbia, Canada (3-6 months)

1946-1947 -- Assistant professor of Sociology and anthropology at State College, Washington

1947 -- Received PhD in anthropology from Yale University

1947-1948 -- Field trip at Attawapiskat, James Bay, Ontario, Canada Research anthropologist for the National Committee for Community Health Studies in Toronto, Canada

1948-1951 -- Assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at New York University

1949 -- Published Anthropology, Culture and Ethos of the Kaska Society

1949-1950 -- Field trip at Great Whale River, Hudson's Bay, Ontario, Canada

1951-1955 -- Associate professor of anthropology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

1952 -- Field trip at Pakistan

1955 -- Field trip at Attawapiskat, James Bay, Ontario, Canada

1955-1957 -- Professor of anthropology, UNC, Chapel Hill

1957-1958 -- Field trip at Pakistan

1959 -- Published The World of Man

1960 -- Field trip at Austria

1962 -- Published Foodways in a Muskeg Community Field trip at Austria

1963 -- Published Understanding Culture Field trip at Frobishers Bay, Baffin Island, Canada

1964 -- Field trip at Austria

1965 -- With wife Irma, co-authored Eskimo Townsmen

1966 -- Field trip in Austria

1967 -- Published Personality in Culture Field trip at Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Canada

1967-1970 -- Postdoctoral fellowship and grants: NSF grant

1970 -- Co-authored Arctic Townsmen Chairman of the department of anthropology, UNC, Chapel Hill

1972 -- Field trip at Austria

1975 -- Field trip at Austria

1977 -- Died at Chapel Hill, NC, August 4
Provenance:
Most of Honigmann's papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Irma Honigman, his wife, between October 1977 and January 1979. Honigmann's daughter, Karen Honigmann Schaefer, donated her father's field journals in July 1993.
Restrictions:
Some materials concerning the operations of the University of North Carolina Department of Anthropology are restricted.
Rights:
Honigmann used pseudonyms when referring to his informants in publications. Irma Honigmann has requested that researchers refrain from publishing their names.
Topic:
Socialization -- Eskimos  Search this
Personality -- Eskimos  Search this
Anthropology -- History  Search this
Social problems -- Eskimos  Search this
Enslaved persons  Search this
Genre/Form:
Psychological tests
Citation:
John Joseph Honigmann Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1993-15
See more items in:
John Joseph Honigmann Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cce2ded2-5cf0-43db-8c58-30bbc9a9a154
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1993-15

Ruth Landes papers

Correspondent:
Mead, Margaret, 1901-1978  Search this
Boas, Franz, 1858-1942  Search this
Wallis, Ruth Sawtell, 1895-1978  Search this
Wagley, Charles, 1913-1991  Search this
Lopez, Salvador  Search this
Little, Kenneth  Search this
Wilson, Maggie  Search this
Whitecloud, Thomas St. Germain  Search this
Henry, Jules, 1904-1969  Search this
Hellman, Ellen  Search this
Haugen, Einar  Search this
Gough, Kathleen  Search this
Lewis, Oscar  Search this
Kaberry, Phyllis Mary, 1910-  Search this
Imes, Elmer Samuel, 1883-1941  Search this
Strong, William Duncan, 1899-1962  Search this
Steyn, Anna F.  Search this
Spier, Leslie, 1893-1961  Search this
Stefansson, Vilhjalmur, 1879-1962  Search this
Solecki, Ralph S.  Search this
Sparta, Francisco  Search this
Rubin, Joan  Search this
Rubin, Vera  Search this
Rodnick, David  Search this
Rogers, Edward S.  Search this
Ritzenthaler, Robert E. (Robert Eugene), 1911-1980  Search this
Roberts, Robert W.  Search this
Ramo, Arthur  Search this
Richards, Audrey  Search this
Preston, Richard J.  Search this
Verger, Pierre  Search this
Vennum, Thomas  Search this
Topash, Mary  Search this
Topash, Joe  Search this
Teskey, Lynn  Search this
Taylor, Beryl  Search this
Tanner, Helen Hornbeck  Search this
Densmore, Frances, 1867-1957  Search this
Quain, Buell H. (Buell Halvor), 1912-1939  Search this
Dunning, William  Search this
Douglas, William A.  Search this
Eggan, Fred, 1906-1991  Search this
Edmondson, Munro S.  Search this
Black, Mary B.  Search this
Benedict, Ruth, 1887-1948  Search this
Domengeaux, James  Search this
Feldman, Albert G.  Search this
Feder, Norman  Search this
Gacs, Ute  Search this
Franklin, John Hope  Search this
Ewers, John C. (John Canfield), 1909-1997  Search this
Erickson, Vincent O.  Search this
Falk, Minna R.  Search this
Faitlovitch, V.  Search this
Alberto Torres, Heloisa  Search this
Buck, Pearl  Search this
Bruce, Harold E.  Search this
Borri, Rina  Search this
Boggs, Stephen Taylor  Search this
Arensberg, Conrad M. (Conrad Maynadier), 1910-1997  Search this
Baldus, Herbert  Search this
Barnouw, Victor  Search this
Bateson, Mary Catherine  Search this
Lurie, Nancy Oestreich  Search this
Malherbe, E. G. (Ernst Gideon), 1895-  Search this
Marks, Eli S.  Search this
Masha, Louise  Search this
Maslow, Will  Search this
Masquat, Joseph M.  Search this
Mayer, Kurt B.  Search this
McWilliams, Carey  Search this
Bunche, Ralph J.  Search this
Carneiro, Edison  Search this
Chilver, E. M.  Search this
Chilver, Richard  Search this
Clifton, James A.  Search this
Colson, Elizabeth F.  Search this
Daveron, Alexander  Search this
Lowenfeld, Margaret, 1890-1973  Search this
Officer, James E.  Search this
Odum, Howard W.  Search this
Park, Alice  Search this
Paredes, Anthony  Search this
Paton, Alan, 1903-1988  Search this
Park, George  Search this
Prado, Idabel do  Search this
Peschel, Keewaydinoquay M.  Search this
Merwe, Hendrik W. van der  Search this
Murphy, Robert Francis  Search this
Messing, Simon D.  Search this
Neumann, Anita  Search this
Nef, Evelyn Stefansson  Search this
Nocktonick, Louise  Search this
Neumann, Walter  Search this
Creator:
Landes, Ruth, 1908-1991  Search this
Names:
Committee on Fair Employment Practices  Search this
Fisk University  Search this
Research in Contemporary Cultures  Search this
Johnson, Charles S.  Search this
Landes, Ruth, 1908-1991  Search this
Park, Robert E.  Search this
Extent:
26.5 Linear feet ((63 document boxes and 1 oversized box))
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Dakota (Eastern Sioux)  Search this
African  Search this
Acadians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Jews -- American  Search this
Latinos -- California  Search this
Brazilians  Search this
Basques  Search this
American Indians  Search this
Afro-Brazilians  Search this
Africans  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Quebec -- Bilingualism
United Kingdom -- colored immigration
South Africa
Date:
1928-1992
Summary:
Most of Ruth Landes's papers relate directly or indirectly to Landes's American Indian research, her work in Brazil, and her study of bilingualism. There is also a considerable amount of material that relates to her experiences (sometimes fictionalized) at Fisk University. There is only small amount of material related to her other interests. Her collection also has material of and relating to the Brazilian folklorist and journalist Edison Carneiro. There is also noteworthy material concerning Herbert Baldus, Ruth Benedict, Elmer C. Imes, Charles S. Johnson, and Robert E. Park. There is a large amount of printed and processed materials in the collection, mainly in the form of newspaper clippings and a collection of scholarly papers.
Scope and Contents:
This collection is mainly comprised of the professional papers of Ruth Schlossberg Landes. Included are correspondence, journals, published and unpublished manuscripts of writings, research materials including field notes and reading notes, photographs, drawings, scholarly papers and publications by other scholars, and clippings from newspapers and periodicals.

Landes's field research on Candomblé in Brazil is well-represented in this collection, consisting of her field journals, writings, and photographs. Also present are Maggie Wilson's stories that were the basis for Landes's The Ojibwa Woman. Unfortunately, Landes was unable to locate her journals for her early research with the Ojibwa/Chippewa, Potawatomi, and Dakota. There are, however, field photographs of the Ojibwa/Chippewa and Potawatomi in the collection. There is also a great deal of her research on groups, especially minorities, in multilingual states with particular focus on the French of Quebec, Basques of Spain and the United States, Boers and Blacks of South Africa, the several socio-linguistic groups of Switzerland, and Acadians (Cajuns) of Louisiana. In the collection are several drafts of her unpublished manuscript on bilingualism, "Tongues that Defy the State." There is also a small amount of material about Black Jews of New York and considerable material about Landes's experience among African Americans when she taught briefly at Fisk University, including her unpublished manuscript "Now, at Athens," containing fictional and autobiographical accounts of her time at Fisk.

Reflections of other facets of Landes's professional activities are also included. Some materials concern her teaching activities, and there is also documentation of her work with the Fair Employment Practices Commission (a federal government agency during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt) and a similar private organization which immediately succeeded the FEPA; Gunnar Myrdal's research into the plight of African Americans ("The Negro in America"); the Research in Contemporary Cultures project at Columbia University; and the American Jewish Congress.

Among Landes's correspondents are Ruth Benedict, Franz Boas, Margaret Mead, Ralph Bunche, Herbert Baldus, Edison Carneiro, Sally Chilver, Frances Densmore, Sol Tax, Elmer S. Imes, Charles S. Johnson, Robert E. Park, and Hendrik W. van der Merwe.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 6 series: (1) Correspondence, 1931-1991; (2) Research Materials, circa 1930s-1990; (3) Writings, circa 1930s-1990; (4) Teaching Materials, 1935-1975, undated; (5) Biographical and Personal Files, 1928-1988; (6) Graphic Materials, 1933-1978, undated
Biographical Note:
Ruth Schlossberg Landes was born on October 8, 1908 in New York City. Her father was Joseph Schlossberg, an activist in the Yiddish labor socialist community and one of the founders of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. She studied sociology at New York University (B.A. 1928) and social work at the New York School of Social Work, Columbia University (M.S.W. 1929). While in graduate school, Landes studied Black Jews in Harlem for her master's thesis, a topic that developed her interests in anthropology.

After graduating in 1929, she worked as a social worker in Harlem and married Victor Landes, a medical student and son of family friends. Their marriage ended after two years when she enrolled in the doctoral program in anthropology at Columbia against her husband's wishes. She kept his surname due to the stigma of being a divorced woman.

At Columbia, Landes studied under Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict, her main advisor. Under the guidance of Benedict, Landes moved away from further study of African Americans to focus on Native American communities. Upon Benedict's suggestion, Landes studied the social organization of the Ojibwa in Manitou Rapids in Ontario from 1932 to 1936 for her Ph.D. fieldwork. Her dissertation, Ojibwa Sociology, was published in 1937. Landes also contributed "The Ojibwa of Canada" in Cooperation and Competition among Primitive Peoples (1937), a volume edited by Margaret Mead. In 1938, Landes published Ojibwa Women (1938), a book written in collaboration with Maggie Wilson, an Ojibwa interpreter and informant.

In addition to studying the Ojibwa in Ontario, Landes also conducted fieldwork with the Chippewa of Red Lake, Minnesota in 1933, working closely with shaman or midé Will Rogers. Her book, Ojibwa Religion and the Midéwiwin (1968) was based largely on her research with Rogers and Maggie Wilson. In 1935 and 1936, she undertook fieldwork with the Santee Dakota in Minnesota and the Potawatomi in Kansas. Like Ojibwa Religion and the Midéwiwin, her books on the Santee Dakota and Potawatomi were not published until several years later—The Mystic Lake Sioux: Sociology of the Mdewakantonwan Sioux was published in 1968 while The Prairie Potawatomi was published in 1970. In between her field research in the 1930s and the publication of The Prairie Potawatomi, Landes returned to Kansas to study the Potawatomi in the 1950s and 1960s.

Landes's plan to continue her studies with the Potawatomi in 1937 changed when Benedict invited her to join a team of researchers from Columbia University in Brazil. Landes was to conduct research on Afro-Brazilians in Bahia, Brazil, while Walter Lipkind, Buell Quain, and Charles Wagley studied indigenous people in the Amazons. To prepare for her research, Landes was at Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee in 1937 and 1938 to consult with Robert Park and Donald Pierson and to use the university's library collections of African and African American materials. During that time, Landes also held a teaching position at Fisk and lived in the non-segregated women's residence on campus. Landes later wrote "Now, at Athens," an unpublished memoir containing fictional and true accounts of her experiences at Fisk.

From 1938 to 1939, Landes conducted fieldwork on the role of Afro-Brazilian women and homosexuals in the Candomblé religion in Bahia, Brazil. Unable to move freely by herself in Brazil as a single woman, Landes was accompanied by Edison Carneiro, a Bahian journalist and folklorist. With Carneiro as her companion, Landes was allowed access to rituals and people that would have been closed off to her otherwise. Due to her association with Carneiro, a member of the Brazilian Communist Party, Landes was suspected of being a communist and was forced to leave Bahia early. Publications from her research in Brazil include "A Cult Matriarchate and Male Homosexuality" (1940) and City of Women (1947). She returned to Brazil in 1966 to study the effects of urban development in Rio de Janeiro. In 1967, a Portuguese translation of City of Women was published, a project that Carneiro had commissioned as the first director of the Ministry of Education and Culture's Special National Agency for the Protection of Folklore.

Landes returned to New York in 1939, working briefly as a researcher for Gunnar Myrdal's study of African Americans. Unable to obtain a permanent position at a university, she worked in several other short term positions throughout most of her career. During World War II, Landes was a research director for the Office of the Coordinator for Inter-American Affairs (1941) and consultant for President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Fair Employment Practices Committee on African American and Mexican American cases (1941-44). In 1945, Landes directed a program created by Pearl S. Buck and a group of interdenominational clergy to analyze pending New York anti-discrimination legislation. She moved to California the following year to work for the Los Angeles Metropolitan Welfare Council on a study of race and youth gangs. After her contract ended, she moved back to New York and was hired as a contract researcher for the American Jewish Congress (1948-50). She also participated in Columbia University's Research in Contemporary Cultures (1949-51), studying Jewish families. She coauthored with Mark Zborowski, "Hypothesis concerning the Eastern European Jewish Family." From 1951 to 1952, Landes spent a year in London, funded by a Fulbright fellowship to study colored colonial immigrants and race relations in Great Britain.

After her fellowship ended, Landes returned to the United States and held short term appointments at several universities. She taught at the William Alanson White Psychiatric Institution in New York (1953-54), the New School for Social Research in New York (1953-55), University of Kansas (1957, 1964), University of Southern California (1957-62), Columbia University (1963), Los Angeles State College (1963), and Tulane University (1964). At Claremont Graduate School, Landes helped to develop and direct the Claremont Anthropology and Education Program (1959-62).

It was not until 1965 that Landes obtained a permanent faculty position at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario; she was recruited for the position by Richard Slobodin. Due to Ontario's age retirement law, Landes was forced to retire in 1973 at the age of 65. She continued to teach part-time until 1977, when she became professor emerita.

Landes passed away at the age of 82 on February 11, 1991.

Sources Consulted

Cole, Sally. 2003. Ruth Landes: A Life in Anthropology. Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press.

Chronology

1908 October 8 -- Born Ruth Schlossberg in New York City

1928 -- B.A. in sociology, New York University

1929 -- M.S.W., New York School of Social Work, Columbia University

1929-1931 -- Social worker in Harlem Married to Victor Landes

1929-1934 -- Studied Black Jews in Harlem

1931 -- Began graduate work in anthropology at Columbia University

1932-1936 -- Studied the Ojibwa in Ontario and Minnesota (in field periodically)

1933-1940 -- Research Fellow, Columbia University

1935 Summer-Fall -- Studied the Santee Sioux (Dakota) in Minnesota

1935-1936 -- Studied the Potawatomi in Kansas

1935 -- Ph.D., Columbia University

1937 -- Instructor, Brooklyn College

1937-1938 -- Instructor, Fisk University

1938-1939 -- Studied Afro-Brazilians and Candomblé in Brazil, especially at Bahia

1939 -- Researcher on Gunnar Myrdal's study, "The Negro in America"

1941 -- Research Director, Office of Inter American Affairs, Washington, D.C.

1941-1945 -- Representative for Negro and Mexican American Affairs, Fair Employment Practices Committee (FEPC), President Franklin D. Roosevelt Administration

1944 -- Interim Director, Committee Against Racial Discrimination, New York

1946-1947 -- Researcher, study of Mexican American youth, gangs, and families, Los Angeles Metropolitan Council

1948-1951 -- Researcher, American Jewish Congress, New York

1949-1951 -- Research consultant, study on Jewish families in New York for Research in Contemporary Cultures Project, Columbia University

1951-1952 -- Fulbright Scholar, to study colored colonial immigration into Great Britain

1953-1954 -- Lecturer, William Alanson White Psychiatric Institution, New York

1953-1955 -- Lecturer, New School for Social Research, New York

1956-1957 -- Married to Ignacio Lutero Lopez

1957 Summer -- Visiting Professor, University of Kansas

1957-1958 -- Visiting Professor, University of Southern California

1957-1965 -- Consultant, California agencies (Department of Social Work, Bureau of Mental Hygiene, Department of Education, Public Health Department) and San Francisco Police Department

1958-1959 -- Director, Geriatrics Program, Los Angeles City Health Department

1959-1962 -- Visiting Professor and Director of Anthropology and Education Program, Claremont Graduate School

1962 -- Extension Lecturer, University of California, Los Angeles and University of California, Berkeley

1963 -- Extension Lecturer, Columbia University Extension Lecturer, Los Angeles State College

1963-1965 -- Consultant, International Business Machines (IBM)

1964 January-June -- Visiting Professor, Tulane University

1964 Summer -- Field work with Potawatomi in Kansas Professor, University of Kansas

1965-1975 -- Professor at McMaster University

1966 -- Studied urban development in Rio de Janeiro

1968-1975 -- Studied bilingualism and biculturalism in Spain, Switzerland, South Africa, United States, and Canada (in Spain and the United States concentrated on Basques)

1975 -- Became part-time faculty member at McMaster University

1977 -- Professor Emerita, McMaster University

1978 -- Award of Merit from the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay

1991 February 11 -- Died in Hamilton, Ontario

1991 -- Establishment of the Ruth Landes Memorial Research Fund at Research Institute for the Study of Man (RISM)
Related Materials:
Correspondence from Ruth Landes can be found in the William Duncan Strong Papers, the Leonard Bloomfield Papers, and MS 7369. The Ruth Bunzel Papers contains a copy of a grant application by Landes.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Ruth Landes in 1991.
Restrictions:
The Ruth Landes papers are open for research. The nitrate negatives in this collection have been separated from the collection and stored offsite. Access to nitrate negatives is restricted due to preservation concerns.

Access to the Ruth Landes papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Midéwiwin  Search this
Bilingualism  Search this
Aging  Search this
Candomblé (Religion)  Search this
Citation:
Ruth Landes papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1991-04
See more items in:
Ruth Landes papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw37e032ce2-12b4-4c64-83be-ec51796c4bd6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1991-04
Online Media:

Carol Laderman Papers

Creator:
Laderman, Carol  Search this
Extent:
6 Linear feet ((15 boxes and 1 manuscript envelope) and 154 cassette tapes)
Culture:
Malays (Asian people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Sound recordings
Photographs
Place:
Kampong Merchang (Terengganu)
Malaysia
Date:
1970-2009
Summary:
Carol Laderman was a medical anthropologist best known for her research on Malay traditional medicine. Her work focused on beliefs and practices regarding childbirth and nutrition as well as shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia. This collection consists of the professional papers of Carol Laderman, medical anthropologist and university professor. The bulk of the collection pertains to her research on childbirth, nutrition, and shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia. These materials include field notes, surveys, transcripts of Main Peteri ceremonies, grant applications, photographs, and sound recordings. Of special interest are her photographs of midwives and shamans treating patients, including Main Peteri ceremonies, as well as traditional Malay weddings and festivals. Also noteworthy are her recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies and her interviews with midwives and shamans. The collection also contains her unpublished and published writings; her dissertation; a report on her undergraduate fieldwork with pregnant Puerto Rican teenagers; her lecture notes and files as a university professor; files documenting her involvement in professional associations; and correspondence with colleagues.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the professional papers of Carol Laderman, medical anthropologist and university professor. The bulk of the collection pertains to her research on childbirth, nutrition, and shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia. These materials include field notes, surveys, transcripts of Main Peteri ceremonies, grant applications, photographs, and sound recordings. Of special interest are her photographs of midwives and shamans treating patients, including Main Peteri ceremonies, as well as traditional Malay weddings and festivals. Also noteworthy are her recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies and her interviews with midwives and shamans. The collection also contains her unpublished and published writings; her dissertation; a report on her undergraduate fieldwork with pregnant Puerto Rican teenagers; her lecture notes and files as a university professor; files documenting her involvement in professional associations; and correspondence with colleagues.
Arrangement:
This collection is organized in 8 series: Series 1. Research, 1972, 1975-1977, 1981, 1985, 1987, 2000-2003, undated; Series 2. Writings, 1970, 1975, 1978-2001, 2004, undated; Series 3. Student Files, 1972, 1975, 1979, undated; Series 4. Teacher Files, 1977, 1979-1982, 2001-2002, 2007, undated; Series 5. Correspondence, 1974-1981, 1985-2005, 2009, undated; Series 6. Professional Activities, circa 1981, 1989-1990, 1994, 2004, undated; Series 7. Photographs, circa 1975-1977, circa 1982, undated; Series 8. Sound Recordings, 1976-1977, 1982, 2003, undated.
Biographical/Historical note:
Carol Laderman was a medical anthropologist best known for her research on Malay traditional medicine. Her work focused on beliefs and practices regarding childbirth and nutrition as well as shamanic healing practices in rural Malaysia.

Laderman (née Cohen) was born on October 25, 1932 in Brooklyn, New York. When she was 6, her father changed their family's surname to Ciavati due to his difficulty as a Jew finding an engineering job. Laderman grew up with musical aspirations, intending to become a concert pianist. She attended the High School of Music and Art in Manhattan and majored in music at Brooklyn College. In 1953, she married Gabriel Laderman, a painter and later an art professor. She took a leave from college to follow her husband after he was drafted into the U.S. Army five months following their wedding. Her hiatus from college spanned fifteen years, during which time she had two sons (1958, 1965). She also worked as a legal secretary in Ithaca, New York, and as a social secretary and translator for an opera singer when she and her family lived in Italy.

After returning to New York City, she enrolled in evening classes at Hunter College. Although she planned to resume her studies in music, her academic focus changed after taking an anthropology course taught by medical anthropologist Rena Gropper. In 1972, she earned her B.A. in Anthropology, and with the assistance of a Danforth Foundation Fellowship, she attended graduate school at Columbia University, where she earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology in 1979.

As an undergraduate student, Laderman conducted fieldwork at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City (1972-1973), assisting in a project on pregnant teenagers and nutritional health. She was assigned to collect data on Puerto Rican adolescent mothers, which exposed her to humoral beliefs in food, medicine, and people. This experience would later inspire her to conduct her graduate fieldwork on nutrition and childbirth in Malaysia, where humoral beliefs were also held but not well-explored by researchers.

From 1975 to 1977, Laderman and her family lived in Merchang, in Trengganu (now Terengganu), Malaysia. Working under the auspices of the Malaysian Ministry of Health of the Institute for Medical Research, Laderman studied both traditional and hospital-based medicine. As part of her fieldwork, she received training from a hospital to collect blood samples to study the effects of birthing and dietary practices on women's health. She also apprenticed herself to a traditional midwife (bidan kampung), whom she assisted in a number of births. By comparing food ideologies and actual food intake of pregnant and postpartum women, Laderman was able to refute the prevailing view of scholars that malnutrition among rural Malays was largely due to dietary restrictions based on the humoral system. In her dissertation, "Conceptions and Preconceptions: Childbirth and Nutrition in Rural Malaysia," Laderman describes how Malay women adapt their diets to their needs and that their customs allow for interpretation and manipulation. In 1983, a revised version of her dissertation was published as Wives and Midwives: Childbirth and Nutrition in Rural Malaysia.

While seeking to gain an understanding of traditional Malay medicine in its entirety, Laderman also became exposed to theatrical spirit séances known as Main Peteri (also Puteri or Teri). At that time Main Peteri was no longer performed in most Malaysian states but was still thriving in Trengganu and nearby Kelantan. Performed primarily as healing ceremonies by shamans (bomoh), Main Peteri was a last resort for the afflicted. These performances were characterized by entranced patients, spirit possessions, singing, music, dancing, and an audience. Laderman attended and participated in a number of these ceremonies and became a student and adopted daughter to a shaman. She recorded and transcribed several Main Peteri performances and received an NEH grant (1981-1985) to translate the texts. She also returned to Merchang in 1982 to conduct further research on traditional healing ceremonies. In her monograph Taming the Wind of Desire (1991), she discusses Main Peteri and its relationship to the Malay concept of Inner Winds (angin), which determine a person's personality, talents, and drives. In 1987 to 1990, she returned to her musical roots to collaborate with ethnomusicologist Marina Roseman to transcribe, analyze, and interpret the music of Main Peteri. Together, she and Roseman also edited The Performance of Healing (1996). In addition, Laderman became interested in the effects of urbanization and globalization on traditional Malay healing practices, a topic which she addressed in a collection of her writings, The Life and Death of Traditional Malay Medicine (in press).

Laderman was a professor at the Department of Anthropology at City University of New York City College (1990-2010). She was also an associate professor at Fordham University (1982-1990) and taught briefly at Hunter College (1978-1980), Brooklyn College (1979-1980), and Yale University (1980-1982).

She died on July 6, 2010 at the age of 77.

Sources Consulted

[Autobiographical statement], Series 2. Writings, Carol Laderman Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

1972. Carol Laderman, SGS Student, Wins Danforth Fellowship. SGS Newsletter 2(7): 1.

Laderman, Carol. 1983. Wives and Midwives: Childbirth and Nutrition in Rural Malaysia. Berkeley, California: University of California Press.

Laderman, Carol. 1991. Taming the Wind of Desire: Psychology, Medicine, and Aesthetics in Malay Shamanistic Performance. Berkeley, California: University of California Press.

Maizura, Intan. 2003, September 28. A bidan, a bomoh & a New Yorker. Nuance: 16-18.

Roseman, Marina, Laurel Kendall and Robert Knox Dentan. 2011. Obituaries: Carol Laderman (1932-2010). American Anthropologist 113(2): 375-377.

1932 -- Born October 25 in Brooklyn, New York

1953 -- Marries Gabriel Laderman and takes a leave from Brooklyn College

1972 -- Earns B.A. in Anthropology from Hunter College

1972-1973 -- Conducts research at Mt. Sinai Hospital on ethnic eating patterns, food beliefs, and anemia in adolescent Puerto Rican mothers

1975-1977 -- Conducts fieldwork in Merchang in Trengganu, Malaysia

1979 -- Earns Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University

1982 -- Returns to Malaysia to conduct fieldwork on shamanism and trance healing

1982-1988 -- Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Fordham University

1988-1990 -- Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Fordham University

1990-2010 -- Professor, Department of Anthropology, City University of New York City College

2010 -- Dies on July 6
Related Materials:
Two videotapes were received with the Carol Laderman papers and transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives.

Some of Laderman's original field recordings are at Columbia University's Center for Ethnomusicology. Copies of those recording are in this collection and are so noted.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Carol Laderman's sons, Raphael and Michael Laderman in 2012.
Restrictions:
The Carol Laderman Papers are open for research. Access to the Carol Laderman Papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use. Permission to use sound recordings of Main Peteri ceremonies transcribed and published in Taming the Wind of Desire must be obtained from Columbia University's Center for Ethnomusicology.
Topic:
Traditional medicine  Search this
Shamanism  Search this
Malay language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Medical anthropology  Search this
Malays (Asian people) -- Medicine  Search this
Seances  Search this
Pregnancy -- Nutritional aspects  Search this
Midwifery  Search this
Ethnology -- Malaysia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Carol Laderman Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2012-09
See more items in:
Carol Laderman Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33834bd8d-479d-4d3c-ab0d-97f73a5a3609
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2012-09
Online Media:

Laura Thompson papers

Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Names:
Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project  Search this
Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.). Institute of Human Values  Search this
United States. Office of Indian Affairs  Search this
Extent:
27 Linear feet (50 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Germany
Guam
Fiji
Iceland
Date:
1905-1997
Summary:
The papers of Laura Thompson reflect the professional and personal life of an active and pioneering anthropologist. In the 1930s, Thompson began her work in applied anthropology, producing studies of Fiji, Guam and Hawaii intended to aid administrators of economic, educational and political development and pioneering approaches now known as "administrative" and "educational" anthropology. In the 1940s, Thompson applied her skills to the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, a study of eleven communities of five Native American tribes. From the 1950s until the end of her career, Thompson sought to formulate and demonstrate a theoretical anthropological synthesis of man and culture, while pursuing fieldwork in Iceland and Germany, teaching, and consulting for numerous institutions.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Laura Thompson reflect the professional and personal life of an active and pioneering anthropologist. In the 1930s, Thompson began her work in applied anthropology, producing studies of Fiji, Guam and Hawaii intended to aid administrators of economic, educational and political development and pioneering approaches now known as "administrative" and "educational" anthropology. In the 1940s, Thompson applied her skills to the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, a study of eleven communities of five Native American tribes. From the 1950s until the end of her career, Thompson sought to formulate and demonstrate a theoretical anthropological synthesis of man and culture, while pursuing fieldwork in Iceland and Germany, teaching, and consulting for numerous institutions.

Included in this collection are field diaries, numerous manuscripts and lectures, research materials, correspondence, sound recordings and ethnographic photographs. Also included are various subject and index files maintained by Thompson for her many research projects. The collection is particularly rich in unpublished manuscripts that Thompson created from 1950 to the mid 1990s. Manuscript topics include particular field sites, such as Fiji and West Germany, as well as Thompson's critical and theoretical exposition regarding the future of applied anthropology, variously titled "Clinical" and "Holistic Anthropology."

Numerous materials pertaining to Thompson's personal life are also located in the collection, including personal diaries and professional awards, correspondence with friends and family, and personal photographs of Thompson from infancy to old age. Located in Thompson's personal papers are her writings from late in life, in which she addressed aging through her anthropological sensibilities, recorded formative memories from her youth, and projected the future of a world rife with injustice and environmental destruction. A large portion of the Laura Thompson papers include documents from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration (IPEA) Project, initiated by the Office of Indian Affairs and the University of Chicago Committee on Human Development. This investigation of five Native American tribes includes the results of over 1000 psychological studies of native children. Materials included encompass the protocols for and implementation of the project, as well as field reports, psychological tests, correspondence, worker supervision reports and final analyses of findings. Included is a copy of the project's published final report, Personality and Government (1951). The bulk of the records date between 1941and 47; related material spans as late as 1992. Correspondents primarily include project members and consultants, particularly: John Collier, A. I. Hallowell, Maud Hallowell, Royal Hassrick, Robert Havinghurst, Alice Joseph, Bruno Klopfer, Clyde Kluckhohn, Dorothea Leighton, D'Arcy McNickle, Trude Schmidl-Waehner, Heinrich Schultz, Ruth Underhill, and W. Lloyd Warner. The papers of the IPEA Project are restricted in use.

Additional material in the NAA relating to the IPEA Research Project can be found in the following collections: Indian Personality and Administration Research Project Papers, donated by Robert J. Havighurst, and the Dorothea Cross Leighton papers. A list of publications resulting from findings of the project can be found in the Thompson collection accession folder.

Nearly absent from the collection are materials reflecting Thompson's fieldwork in Hawaii, her marriages to Bernhard Tüting and John Collier, and manuscripts of her early publications.

Correspondents in Thompson's papers include: Ruth BENEDICT, Charles W. COLLIER, John COLLIER, Malcolm COLLIER, Cora DUBOIS, Fred EGGAN, Alfred EMERSON, Kenneth EMORY, Frederick V. FIELD, Roland W. FORCE, Derek FREEMAN, Ann Pinson GILL, Peggy GOLDE, A. I. HALLOWELL, Maude HALLOWELL, Royal HASSRICK, Robert HAVINGHURST, Alice JOSEPH, Felix KEESING, Lawrence KELLY, Bruno KLOPFER, Clyde KLUCKHOHN, A. L. KROEBER, Harry S. LADD, Bruno LASKER, Dorothy LEE, Dorothea LEIGHTON, Charles F. LOOMIS, Katherine LOUMALA, Robert H. LOWIE, John R. MACCORMACK, Bronislaw MALINOWSKI, D'Arcy MCNICKLE, Margaret MEAD, Robert REDFIELD, Trude SCHMIDL-WAEHNER, Heinrich SCHULTZ, Leslie SPIER, George D. SPINDLER, Rebecca STEVENSON, Ratu J. L. V. SUKUNA (District Commissioner of Lau), Alfred TOZZER, W. Lloyd WARNER and Alvin WOLFE.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
Arranged in 11 series: (1) Fiji, 1933-1995; (2) Germany, 1934-1991; (3) Guam, 1938-1996; (4) Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, 1941-1992; (5) Iceland, 1952-1981; (6) Institute of Human Values, 1973-1982; (8) Manuscripts and research, 1935-1994; (9) Professional correspondence, 1943-1992; (10) Publications, 1932-1991; (11) Personal Papers, 1905-1997.
Biographical Note:
Laura Thompson (1905-2000) conducted fieldwork in Oceania, the Southwestern United States and Europe; she taught at numerous institutions and served as a consultant for many organizations, including the Naval Government of Guam and the Office of Indian Affairs, throughout her career. Thompson's papers reflect her involvement in each of these activities as well as her desire to formulate a unifying theory of applied anthropology that would address issues including environmentalism and overpopulation.

1905 -- Born in Honolulu, Hawaii on January 23.

1923 -- Graduated from Punahou Academy, Hawaii.

1927 -- Bachelor of Arts, Mills College, California.

1928 -- Graduate studies in anthropology, Radcliffe College and Harvard University, Massachusetts.

1929-33 -- Graduate studies in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley.

1929-34 -- Assistant Ethnologist, Bishop Museum, Hawaii.

1931-32 -- Fellow, Bishop Museum, Hawaii.

1933 -- Ph.D. in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley.

1933-34 -- Lau Islands, Fiji, fieldwork.

1934-37 -- Germany, travel and research.

1938-39 -- Guam, fieldwork under U.S. Naval Government and University of Hawaii.

1938-40 -- Consultant, U. S. Naval Government of Guam.

1940-41 -- Social Scientist, Community Survey of Education, Hawaii.

1941 -- Co-founder, Society for Applied Anthropology. Graduate work in Human Development, University of Chicago, Illinois.

1941-47 -- Coordinator, Indian Personality, Education, and Administration Research Project.

1941-43 -- Papago Indians, fieldwork. Pine Ridge Sioux Indians, fieldwork. Hopi Indians, fieldwork. Navaho Indians, fieldwork. Poston War Relocation Camp, fieldwork. Zuni Indians, fieldwork.

1942-44 -- Consultant, U. S. Office of Indian Affairs.

1946 -- Papago Indians, fieldwork.

1946-54 -- Research consultant, Institute of Ethnic Affairs (Washington DC and New York).

1952 -- Iceland, fieldwork.

1954-56 -- Professor of Anthropology, City College of New York.

1957-58 -- Visiting Professor of Anthropology, University of North Carolina.

1958-59 -- Research fellow, Laboratories of Anthropology, University of North Carolina.

1959-60 -- Visiting Professor, North Carolina State College.

1960 -- Iceland, fieldwork.

1961 -- Visiting professor, Utah State University (summer). Distinguished Visiting Professor, Pennsylvania State University.

1961-62 -- Professor of Anthropology, University of Southern Illinois.

1962 -- Visiting Professor, University of Hawaii (summer).

1962-63 -- Professor of Anthropology, San Francisco State College.

1964 -- Lecturer, Brooklyn College, CUNY.

1974 -- Honorary Ll.D., Mills College, CA.

1976 -- Board of Governors, Institute of Human Values, St. Mary's University, Halifax.

1977 -- Ancient Order of the Chammori (Honor for public service in Guam).

1979 -- Malinowski Award, Society for Applied Anthropology.

1985 -- Returned to Hawaii.

2000 -- Died January 29.
Related Materials:
Additional material in the NAA relating to the IPEA Research Project can be found in the following collections: Indian Personality and Administration Research Project Papers, donated by Robert J. Havighurst, and the Dorothea Cross Leighton papers. A list of publications resulting from findings of the project can be found in the Thompson collection accession folder.
Provenance:
Thompson's papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by the creator periodically over 25 years.
Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1983-51
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw368b0c5ca-b0b1-4f61-b59e-b87cf0b0ff5b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1983-51

Jerome R. Mintz papers

Creator:
Mintz, Jerome R.  Search this
Extent:
23 Cubic feet (20 linear feet (49 document boxes) plus 70 sound recordings and 10 floppy disks. Of the total extent, 2.5 inches (1 box) is restricted)
Culture:
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Spaniards  Search this
Jews, Hasidic  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Place:
Andalusia (Spain)
Date:
1960-1992
Summary:
The Jerome R. Mintz Papers document his career as an educator and ethnographic filmmaker. Mintz's papers relate to his research in Andalusia, Spain, among the Hopi, and on Hasidism. The collection includes audio tapes, correspondence, notes, photographs, publications, and transcriptions. Mitnz's papers also feature course materials from the Jewish studies and anthropology classes he taught at Indiana University.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the professional papers of Jerome Mintz, documenting his work as an anthropologist, filmmaker, and professor. The collection contains his correspondence, research files, writings, photographs, sound recordings, grant applications, teaching files, and floppy disks.

A significant portion of the collection pertains to his work in Spain, particularly his research on the anarchist uprising in Casas Viejas. There are also materials related to his ethnographic films and his collection of song lyrics from carnivals held in Cadiz Province. His research on Hasidic tales and social change is also represented in this collection as well as interviews from his Hopi fieldwork.

His course files as a professor at Indiana University also form a sizable portion of the collection. He taught a wide range of courses within the folklore, Jewish studies, and anthropology department.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Biographical Note:
Jerome R. Mintz was born on March 29, 1930 in Brooklyn, New York. He received an A.B. (1952) in Comparative Literature and an M.A. (1955) in English literature from Brooklyn College. In 1961, he earned his Ph.D. in Folklore at Indiana University.

As a doctoral student in 1959, he began studying New York's Hasidic community. He interviewed members of different Hasidic courts and collected and analyzed Hasidic tales. This research formed the basis of his dissertation, which was expanded and published as The Legends of the Hasidim: an Introduction to Hasidic Culture and Oral Tradition in the New World (1968). He also published Hasidic People: A Place in the New World (1992), which is based on his study of social change within the Hasidic community. He received critical acclaim for the book and was honored with the National Jewish Book Award.

Mintz also received international recognition for his work in Andalusia, Spain. In 1965 he began studying Spanish anarchism, focusing on the events surrounding the 1933 uprising in the small rural town of Casas Viejas that resulted in the massacre of innocent villagers. Despite working in Casas Viejas, now Benalup-Casas Viejas, during the reign of Francisco Franco, Mintz was able to gain the trust and friendship of his informants, which included survivors of the failed anarchist uprising. Although much had been written about the event, his book The Anarchists of Casas Viejas (1982) is considered the most comprehensive account and the first to incorporate the perspectives of the campesinos involved. He also published Carnival Song and Society: Gossip, Sexuality, and Creativity in Andalusia (1997) and produced six ethnographic films on tradition and change in rural Andalusia. His films The Shoemaker and Pepe's Family (1980) received first place awards in the Modern Language Association Film Festival, and Romería: Day of the Virgin (1986) was honored by the Society for Visual Anthropology. In 2013, the city council of Benalup-Casas Viejas chose to posthumously honor Mintz for his contributions by renaming the city's cultural center after him.

In addition to his research on the New York Hasidim and Andalusian campesinos, Mintz studied the oral traditions and history of the Hopi in Arizona. In 1962, in between his field work among the Hasidim, Mintz spent the summer on the Hopi reservation recording interviews with Hopi informants. He planned to analyze the ethnographic data, tales, and histories that he collected but ultimately did not publish on the subject.

Mintz spent most of his academic career at Indiana University. He began teaching at the university in 1962 and joined the anthropology faculty in 1966. He retired in 1995.

After a long battle with leukemia, Mintz passed away on November 22, 1997.

Sources Consulted

Bahloul, Joëlle. 1998. Jerome R. Mintz. Anthropology Newsletter, February.

Carnival NEH Grant, Series 4. Grants, Jerome R. Mintz Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

La casa de cultura de Benalup llevará el nombre de Jerome Mintz. Diario de Cadiz, February 2, 2013. http://www.diariodecadiz.es/article/ocio/1450991/la/casa/cultura/ benalup/llevara/nombre/jerome/mintz.html (accessed February 7, 2013).

Grants (APS and IU), Series 4. Grants, Jerome R. Mintz Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

1930 -- Born March 29 in Brooklyn, New York

1952 -- Earns A.B. from Brooklyn College

1955 -- Earns M.A. from Brooklyn College

1959-61 -- Conducts fieldwork in Hasidic community in New York

1961 -- Earns Ph.D. from Indiana University

1961-62 -- Instructor, Ohio State University

1995 -- Retired from Indiana University

1997 -- Died on November 22

1963 -- Conducts fieldwork in Hasidic community in New York

1964 -- Conducts fieldwork in Hasidic community in New York

1965-1966 -- Conducts fieldwork in Andalusia, Spain

1969-1971 -- Conducts fieldwork in Andalusia, Spain

1972-1978 -- Professor of Folklore and Anthropology, Indiana University

1973 -- Conducts summer fieldwork in Andalusia, Spain

1978 -- Professor of Anthropology, Indiana University

1980 -- His films The Shoemaker and Pepe's Family are awarded first place prizes at MLA Film Festival

1993 -- Received the National Jewish Book Award for Hasidic People: A Place in the New World

1962 -- Began teaching at Indiana University as an assistant professor Conducts fieldwork among Hopi on reservation in Northern Arizona
Related Materials:
Copies of Mintz's Spanish films and associated photos and sound recordings are at the Human Studies Film Archives. His original Spanish and Hopi sound recordings are at the Archives of Traditional Music at Indiana University, Bloomington.
Provenance:
This collection was donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Betty Mintz, wife of Jerome Mintz, in 2002.
Restrictions:
The Jerome R. Mintz papers are open for research. As part of his research on the Hasidim in New York, Jerome Mintz presented TAT drawings to children and adults. Their responses are restricted. Also restricted are materials containing social security numbers of living individuals and his students' grades. His floppy disks are restricted due to preservation reasons.

Access to the Jerome R. Mintz papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use. Permission to use his Spanish and Hopi sound recordings must be obtained from Indiana University, Bloomington.
Topic:
Anarchism  Search this
Anthropology -- teaching  Search this
Hasidim -- Legends  Search this
Carnival -- Spain  Search this
Filmmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Citation:
Jerome R. Mintz papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1998-72
See more items in:
Jerome R. Mintz papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38909befe-e5d8-4175-9f96-5d964b5a7868
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1998-72

Irving Goldman papers

Creator:
Goldman, Irving, 1911-2002  Search this
Names:
Jenner Committee  Search this
Extent:
27 Sound recordings
9.3 Linear feet (26 boxes)
Culture:
Shuswap  Search this
Modoc  Search this
Cubeo (Kobeua)  Search this
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Nuxalk (Bellacoola)  Search this
Dakelh (Carrier)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Field notes
Photographs
Color slides
Place:
Vaupés (Colombia)
Chiapas (Mexico)
British Columbia
Date:
1928-1999
bulk 1934-1994
Summary:
Irving Goldman (1911-2002) was an anthropologist who conducted research among the Modoc Indians in California, the Ulkatcho Carrier of British Columbia, and the Cubeo Indians in the Vaupes region of the Northwest Amazon. The focus of the collection is Goldman's field research on the Cubeo. The collection also includes some materials relating to his work on the Modoc, the Ulkatcho Carrier, Polynesians, and Tzotzil of Chamula Indians of Chiapas, Mexico. Other materials in the collection include his professional and personal correspondence and his writings. Another important part of this collection is from his personal materials. Goldman was a Communist from 1936-1942, and in 1953 was brought before the Jenner Committee. The file Goldman kept of this investigation includes a transcript of his appearance in front of the Committee, as well as many newspaper clippings.
Scope and Contents:
The focus of the collection is Irving Goldman's field research on the Cubeo Indians of Vaupes, Colombia. In addition to documentation from multiple trips to Cubeo, the collection also includes some materials relating to his work on the Modoc, the Ulkatcho Carrier, Polynesians, and Tzotzil of Chamula Indians of Chiapas, Mexico. The Cubeo materials include field notes, research notes, questionnaires and photographs that Goldman used in his publications, which include The Cubeo: Indians of the Northwest Amazon and Hehenewa of the Cuduiari: An Introduction to Cubean Religious Thought, which was published posthumously as Cubeo Hehenewa Religious Thought: Metaphysics of a Northwestern Amazonian People. Additional materials from his Cubeo research are 26 field recordings of music, interviews, and dances. Also in the collection is a sound recording relating to the Kwakiutl Indians. The work on Polynesia for his publication "Ancient Polynesian Society" consist of his reading notes. His Ulkatcho Carrier notes contain language material from his field research among the Ulkatcho, Nazko, and Quesnel, three Carrier bands in the Blackwater dialect group. His notes from his research in Chiapas contain ethnographic and linguistic notes on what appears to be Tzotzil. The Modoc materials also contain ethnographic and linguistic notes.

The correspondence in the collection is a mix of professional and personal. This includes correspondence from former students and recommendations he wrote for them. In the writing series are notes and edits of chapters and manuscripts for his books, as well as articles that Goldman wrote and a couple of speeches he gave. The collection includes many photographs, most of which do not have descriptions of locations. The identified photographs include images from Vaupes and Chiapas, Mexico. There is one folder that includes some photographs of the Modoc and another that contains pictures from the British Columbia Ulkatcho.

Another important part of this collection is a file on the Jenner Committee's investigation of Goldman and a transcript of his testimony in front of the committee, as well as many newspaper clippings.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 7 series: (1) Professional Correspondence, 1951-1999; (2) Field Research, 1935-40, 1955-90, undated [Bulk 1970-1985, undated]; (3) Writings, 1941-45, 1958-94 [Bulk 1968-85]; (4) Conferences, 1975-1976; (5) Personal Material, 1928-1977 [Bulk 1943-1958]; (6) Photographs, Undated, 1934, 1948-40, 1948, 1955, 1962-79 [Bulk 1978-1979]; (7) Microfilm, undated; (8) Sound recordings, 1968-70, 1986, undated.
Biographical Note:
Irving Goldman was born September 2, 1911 in Brooklyn, New York to Louis and Golda Goldman, immigrants from Russia. Goldman graduated from Brooklyn College in 1933, and continued from there to Columbia University for graduate work, where he studied under Franz Boas. In 1936, he joined the American Communist Party, but left the party in 1942.

As a graduate student, Goldman conducted research among the Modoc Indians in California (1934) and the Cubeo in the Vaupes region of the Northwest Amazon (1939). For his graduate work at Columbia, he focused on the Ulkatcho Carrier of British Columbia, which he researched from 1935-36. His thesis, "The Alkatcho Carrier of British Columbia" was published in Acculturation in Seven American Indian Tribes (1940). Goldman received his Ph.D. in 1941.

Goldman began World War II as a Research Analyst for the Coordinator of InterAmerican Affairs (1942-43). He was reassigned to the Office of Strategic Services, where he was a 2nd Lieutenant (1943-1945). In 1945 he was transferred to the U.S. Department of State, where he was the Chief of Branch for the Office of Research and Analysis, until he was released in 1947 as a security risk due to his earlier involvement with communism.

Goldman taught at Sarah Lawrence from 1947 until 1981, where he also served on many faculty committees, as well as their Board of Trustees. During this time, Goldman also continued his anthropological research. He spent 1955 in Chiapas, Mexico, studying Tzotzil of Chamula Indians. He also did library research on Polynesia, which led to his book Ancient Polynesian Society (1970), a key work in anthropological thought. During his time at Sarah Lawrence College, Goldman also published two other significant books: The Cubeo: Indians of the Northwest Amazon (1963) and The Mouth of Heaven: An Introduction to Kwakiutl Religious Thought (1975). In 1968, he returned to the Cubeo, continuing his research there into the early 1980s. His wife, Hannah, who died in 1986, traveled occasionally with him. From 1980 to 1987, Goldman taught at the New School for Social Research in New York City.

During the McCarthy era, in 1953, Goldman was forced to testify before the Jenner Senate Committee, which investigated connections between academics and communism. While Goldman admitted to having been a part of the party, he took his First Amendment right to avoid naming others who he knew had been members. This was a risky and rare tactic; however it had a positive outcome for him, as Sarah Lawrence College, where Goldman was teaching at the time, decided not to fire him since he had spoken his conscious and no more.

Goldman died April 7, 2002. Goldman's peers considered him to have "insightful analyses that were often ahead of his time" (Rubel 2003) and to have had "the courage to tackle big problems in the realm of comparative research." (Rubel 2003) His final manuscript was published posthumously as Cubeo Henewa Religious Thought: Metaphysics of a Northwestern Amazonian People (2004).

Sources Consulted

Rubel, Paul and Abraham Rosman. 2003. Irving Goldman (1911-2002). American Anthropologist 105:4.

Shenn, Jody. 2002. Remembering Irving Goldman. News and Events at Sarah Lawrence.

Schildkrout, Enid, and Irving Goldman. 1989. A Conversation with Irving Goldman. American Ethnologist 16:3.

1911 -- Born April 18 in New York, New York.

1933 -- Earns B.S. from Brooklyn College.

1934 -- Fieldwork on Modoc Indians, California.

1935-1936 -- Fieldwork on Ulkatcho Carrier Indians, British Columbia.

1939-1940 -- First fieldwork on Cubeo Indians, Vaupes, Colombia.

1941 -- Earns Ph.D. from Columbia University.

1942 -- Research Analyst on Latin America for the Coordinator of InterAmerican Affairs.

1943-1945 -- 2nd Lieutenant for the Office of Strategic Services.

1945-1947 -- Chief of Branch for the Office of Research and Analysis for the United States State Department.

1947 -- Left State Department; began to teach at Sarah Lawrence College.

1953 -- Investigated by the Jenner Committee for his communist connections.

1955 -- Fieldwork on Tzotzil of Chamula Indians, Chiapas, Mexico.

1968-1980 -- Goldman continuously returned to Vaupes, Colombia to study the Cubeo.

1980 -- Began to teach at the New School for Social Research.

1981 -- Retired from Sarah Lawrence College.

1987 -- Retired from the New School for Social Research.

2002 -- Died April 7, 2002 in Brooklyn, New York.
Related Materials:
Materials at the NAA relating to Irving Goldman's involvement with the Handbook of South American Indians can be found in Manuscript 4846 and the Handbook of South American Indians records, 1934-47.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Sonya Shenn of the Department of Anthropology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 2002. An unidentified 8mm film in the collection was transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives in 2007 (HSFA 2008.04)
Restrictions:
Access to the Irving Goldman papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Cubeo language  Search this
Carrier language  Search this
Bella Coola language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Tzotzil language  Search this
Modoc language  Search this
Shuswap language  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Color slides -- 1960-1990
Citation:
Irving Goldman papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2003-11
See more items in:
Irving Goldman papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw342644939-5f47-4aa5-8da9-53912e4adca1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2003-11

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By