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Emma A. Koch photograph collection of India, South Asia, and Australia

Collector:
Koch, Emma Augusta, 1847-1932  Search this
Names:
Bourne & Shepherd  Search this
Scowen & Co.  Search this
Shepherd & Robertson  Search this
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Shepherd, Charles  Search this
Extent:
165 mounted prints (circa 165 mounted prints, albumen)
Culture:
Pushtuns  Search this
East Indians  Search this
Burmese  Search this
Andamanese (Indic people)  Search this
Assamese  Search this
Fakirs  Search this
Pakistanis  Search this
Sinhalese (Sri Lankan people)  Search this
Kashmiri (South Asian people)  Search this
Bengali (South Asian people)  Search this
Tibetans  Search this
Nepalese  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Mounted prints
Photographs
Place:
Australia
India
Afghanistan
Assam (India)
Bengal (India)
Rajasthan (India)
Tibet (China)
Nepal
Pakistan
Sri Lanka
Burma
Andaman Islands (India)
Jammu and Kashmir (India)
Date:
circa 1862-1885
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs collected by Emma A. Koch documenting the people and natural and built environments of India, South Asia, and Australia. The collection largely consists of images of East Indian peoples, structures, scenery, and activities, including tea making and entertainment; areas of India most commonly depicted are Assam, Bengal, and the Andaman Islands. Additional photographs portray people, architecture, and scenery in Burma, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Nepal, Tibet, and Australia. Most of the photographs were likely taken by Samuel Bourne and Charles Shepherd (Bourne & Shepherd), with some made by Scowen & Co., Shepherd & Robertson, Benjamin F. Simpson, Reynolds, and Ganey.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 161, USNM ACC 40922
Location of Other Archival Materials:
This collection has been relocated from Photo Lot 79-38.
Photographs in the Koch Collection (accession 40922), previously filed in Photo Lot 97 and Photo Lot 8, have been relocated and merged with Photo Lot 161. These photographs were also collected and donated by Koch in 1903 and form part of this collection.
Additional photograhs by Bourne & Shepherd can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 82-44, Photo Lot 91-27, and Photo Lot 97.
Additional photographs by Shepherd & Robertson can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 8.
The Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives hold additional photographs by Benjamin Simpson, Samuel Bourne, Bourne & Shepherd, Scowen & Co., and Shepherd & Robertson.
Material found in Gus Van Beek's office can also be found in the National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 79-34.
Koch also donated an album of dried flowers to the Department of Anthropology as part of accession 40922.
See others in:
Emma A. Koch photograph collection of India, South Asia, and Australia, circa 1862-1885
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Architecture -- India  Search this
Tea trade  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 161, Emma A. Koch photograph collection of India, South Asia, and Australia, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.161
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-161

Charles Isaacs Collection

Collector:
Isaacs, Charles  Search this
Creator:
Saché, John Edward, 1824-1882  Search this
Beato, Felice, b. ca. 1825  Search this
Kusakabe, Kimbei, 1841-1934  Search this
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Skeen & Co.  Search this
Scowen & Co.  Search this
Extent:
73 albumen prints (various sizes.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photographs
Place:
India
Jammu and Kashmir (India)
Udagamandalam (India)
Kanpur (India)
Lucknow (India)
Japan
Guangzhou (China)
China
Pakistan
Sri Lanka
Date:
circa 1850-1900
Scope and Contents:
73 albumen photo prints, some mounted, many signed and numbered in the negative and some with hadwritten penciled identifications, various sizes. A small number are hand-tinted. Images depict Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Japan and China. Subjects include portraits, people in daily activities, street scenes, city views, architecture, fauna and gardens, and landscapes. Photographers include Scowen & Co., Skeen & Co. and Samuel Bourne. Images depict architectural monuments, city and village views, and picturesque landscapes such as the Great Imambara and Mosque in Lucknow, the quadrangle of the Moti Masjid (Pearl Mosque) in Agra, the Memorial Well in Kanpur (Cawnpore), numerous views of villages, bridges and landscapes in Kashmir, and the botanical gardens at Ootacamund (Udagamandalam). There is also one photograph, an unmounted albumen print, signed and numbered in the negative, by John Edward Saché (active 1860-1880), also depicting a landscape in India. Additionally, an ethnographic portrait (unmounted albumen print) of two Sri Lankan aboriginal men titled "Veddahs" by Charles T. Scowen is included in the collection.
Arrangement:
Four flat boxes.
Biographical / Historical:
British photographer Charles T. Scowen arrived in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) in the early 1870s, where he was first employed as a clerk. By 1876, Scowen had established a studio, Scowen & Co., in Kandy, with a second location appearing in Columbo by the 1890s. There appear to have been several Scowens working in the studios, as Charles T. Scowen returned to England in 1885. C. Scowen was listed as the proprietor until 1891 and M. Scowen was the proprietor when the firm was finally sold in 1893. Images from Scowen & Co. were used to illustrate a number of books about Ceylon and the tea trade.
Skeen & Co. was a commercial photography studio active in Ceylon (Sri Lanka) from 1860-1903. In 1860, William Skeen, who was the official Government Printer, purchased J. Parting's photography studio in Colombo for his son, William Louis Henry Skeen, who had studied at the London School of Photography. In 1891 another Skeen & Co. studio was opened in Kandy. The firm was known for its images of agriculture (particularly tea and spices), industry (the construction of the Ceylon railroads and the Colombo Breakwater), landscapes and ethnic groups.
John Edward Saché (1824-1882) was an American commercial photographer, born in Prussia as Johann Edvart Zachert. He arrived in Calcutta in 1864 and for the next twenty years traveled widely in northern India, photographing major towns and sites. Saché's first professional association was with W. F. Westfield in Calcutta but he would go on to establish other studios, either alone or in partnerships, in Nainital, Bombay, Lucknow and Benares, among other locations.
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2002.01
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Mosques  Search this
Imambaras  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints
Identifier:
FSA.A2002.01
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a2002-01
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: Cawnpore, Memorial Well

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Bourne and Shepherd  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
India
Kanpur (India)
Date:
circa 1860s-1880s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print, circa 1860s-1880s, depicting Sacred carved stone angel in Cawnpore, Memorial Well, India. Signed "Bourne 1206 in the lower left corner of image.
Arrangement:
Organized in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, and within a few years, the firm had become the most successful studio in the subcontinent, with their work widely distributed throughout India and in Britain. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography. He was replaced as principal photographer by Colin Murray. Shepherd returned to England in 1879. The firm changed ownership numerous times in the early 20th century and currently operates under the same name in Calcutta -- perhaps the oldest photographic studio still in operation.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.08
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.08
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-08
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: Futtepore Sikri, Interior of Great Quadrangle

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm., mounted 31 x 40 cm.)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
Agra (India)
India -- Uttar Pradesh -- Agra
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of Futtepore Sikri, Interior of Great Quadrangle, circa 1860s. Signed "Bourne 1261" in the lower left corner of the image.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts the Futtepore Sikri, Interior of Great Quadrangle.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.09
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.09
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-09
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: Mausoleum of Akbar, Secundra

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm., mounted 31 x 40 cm.)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
India -- Uttar Pradesh -- Agra
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of the Mausoleum of Akbar, Secundra. View from an angle with two Indian men in the center of the photograph. Signed "Bourne 1250" in the lower right corner of the image.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts the Mausoleum of Akbar, Secundra.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.11
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Mausoleums -- India  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.11
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-11
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: Futtepore Sikri, Tomb of Selim Chisti

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm., mounted 31 x 40 cm.)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
India -- Uttar Pradesh -- Agra
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of the Futtepore Sikri, Tomb of Selim Chisti, circa 1860s. View from an angle with two Indian men in the center of the photograph. Signed "Bourne 1265" in the lower right corner of the image.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts the Futtepore Sikri, Tomb of Selim Chisti.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.12
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Mausoleums -- India  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.12
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-12
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: View From the Terrace, Tomb of Zenab Aliya, Lucknow

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm., mounted 31 x 40 cm.)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
Lucknow (India)
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of the View From the Terrace, Tomb of Zenab Aliya, Lucknow, India, circa 1860s. View from an angle with two Indian men in the center of the photograph. Signed "Bourne 1051" in the lower right corner of the image.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts a View From the Terrace, Tomb of Zenab Aliya, Lucknow, India
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.13
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.13
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-13
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: Mausoleum of Prince Etmad-Dowlach, Agra

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Names:
Ghiyas Beg, Mirza, d. 1627  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm., mounted 31 x 40 cm.)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
Agra (India)
India -- Uttar Pradesh -- Agra
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of the mausoleum of Prince Etmad-Dowlach (Agra, India), circa 1860s. View from top from with a few gentlemen to the side. Signed "Bourne 1232" in the center of the image.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts the tomb of Mirza Ghiyas Beg, located in Agra, India. An important official of the Mughal empire. Ghiyas Beg served as the chief treasurer during the rule of Emperor Jahangir, and was given the title I'timād-ud-Daulah (i.e. Etmad-Dowlach), or Pillar of the State. The tomb, which is considered an architectural predecessor of the Taj Mahal, was commissioned by Nur Jahan, Ghiyas Beg's daughter and the wife of Jahangir.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.10
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Mausoleums -- India  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.10
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-10
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: Chandra Valley

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm.)
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
India
Chandra Valley
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of the Chandra Valley, circa 1860s. Signed "Bourne 1450" in the lower left corner of the image.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts a View of the Chandra Valley.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.26
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.26
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-26
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: Sanawar Church and girl's school, from the road

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm., mounted 31 x 40 cm.)
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
India
Sanawar
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of the Sanawar Church and girl's school, from the road, circa 1860s. View from angle with a few Indian women to the right. Signed "Bourne 1135" in the lower left corner of the image.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts a Sanawar Church and girl's school, from the road.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.22
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.22
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-22
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: Darjeeling Tea Factory and Darjeeling Frost

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
2 Prints (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm., mounted 31 x 40 cm.)
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
India
Darjeeling (Bengal, India)
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of the Darjeeling Tea Factory, women cleaning tea in factory ; Darjeeling Frost, Darjeeling, Tree Study at fantakphu, circa 1860s.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts a Darjeeling Tea Factory and Darjeeling Frost.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.23
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.23
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-23
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: Kashmir, View on the Canal (Prize Winning Photograph)

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm., mounted 31 x 40 cm.)
Container:
Box 2
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
India
Jammu and Kashmir (India)
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of Kashmir, View on the Canal (Prize Winning Photograph), circa 1860s. View from an angle with Indian man in the left of the photograph. Signed "Bourne 825" in the lower center of the image.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts a Kashmir, View on the Canal (Prize Winning Photograph).
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.21
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.21
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-21
Online Media:

Samuel Bourne Photograph: Mausoleum of Prince Etmad-Dowlach, Agra

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Names:
Ghiyas Beg, Mirza, d. 1627  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm., mounted 31 x 40 cm.)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microform
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
Agra (India)
India -- Uttar Pradesh -- Agra
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of the mausoleum of Prince Etmad-Dowlach (Agra, India), circa 1860s. View from an angle with two Indian men in the center of the photograph. Signed "Bourne 1233" in the lower left corner of the image.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts the tomb of Mirza Ghiyas Beg, located in Agra, India. An important official of the Mughal empire. Ghiyas Beg served as the chief treasurer during the rule of Emperor Jahangir, and was given the title I'timād-ud-Daulah (i.e. Etmad-Dowlach), or Pillar of the State. The tomb, which is considered an architectural predecessor of the Taj Mahal, was commissioned by Nur Jahan, Ghiyas Beg's daughter and the wife of Jahangir.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1998.08
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Mausoleums -- India  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1998.08
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1998-08
Online Media:

Samuel Bourne Photograph: Nautch Bungalow Shalimar

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image, 24 x 29 cm., mounted 31 x 40.)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Prints
Albumen prints
Photographs
Place:
Srinagar (Jammu and Kashmir, India)
India -- Kashmir -- Dal Lake
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of a nautch bungalow at the Shalimar Garden, Srinagar, India, circa 1860s. With two men next to a pool of water. Signed "Bourne 806" in black ink on bottom right of image. "Nautch Bungalow Shalimar" is inscribed on the board beneath the photograph.
Arrangement:
Organized in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
The Shalimar Gardens were built by the Mughal emperor Jahangir (r.1605-27) for his wife Mehrunissa, called Nur Jahan, in 1616. The gardens were the inspiration for other gardens of the same name, notably the Shalimar Gardens in Lahore, Pakistan. A simple translation of nautch is "dance" or "dancing". The nautch bungalow was likely a residence for the young girls known as "Nautch girls", who performed one of several styles of popular dance known as Nautch. The performance of Nautch rose to prominence during the later period of Mughal Empire, gradually expanding outside the confines of the Imperial Courts.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1998.07
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Shalimar Garden (Srinagar, India)  Search this
Gardens -- India  Search this
Gardens, Mogul  Search this
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photographs
Identifier:
FSA.A1998.07
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1998-07
Online Media:

Catherine Glynn Benkaim Collection

Collector:
Benkaim, Catherine Glynn  Search this
Photographer:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Murray, Colin Roderick, 1840-1884  Search this
Johnson, William  Search this
Henderson, William  Search this
Creator:
Bourne and Shepherd  Search this
Extent:
7 albumen prints (black and white)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Albumen prints
Photographs
Place:
India
Date:
circa 1850-1880
Scope and Contents:
Seven 19th-century albumen photographs taken by Samuel Bourne, Colin Murray and unknown photographers (possibly William Johnson and William Henderson). The photographs depict various scenes and people of India, including a portrait of a hunting party in Nepal, images of the Queen Victoria Monument in Bombay and views of Dal Lake, Calcutta and Kutb Minar.
Arrangement:
Organized in one box.
Biographical / Historical:
Catherine Glynn Benkaim is a trustee of the Freer and Sackler Galleries of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. She graduated from the University of California, Santa Barbara and has a master's degree in Asian art history from U.C.L.A,. as well as a doctorate in Indian art history from the University of Southern California.
Samuel Bourne's photographic career in India, which spanned only seven years before his departure in 1870, began with his arrival in Calcutta in 1863. In Simla, he formed a partnership with two established photographers, Howard (likely William Howard) and Charles Shepherd. Howard soon left, and within a few years, Bourne & Shepherd had become the most successful firm in the subcontinent, opening additional studios in Calcutta (1867) and Bombay (1870). Colin Murray (d. 1884) became the main photographer of Bourne & Shepherd in 1870.
William Johnson had a daguerrotype studio in Bombay circa 1852-1854 and a photographic studio circa 1854-1860. In partnership with William Henderson, Johnson produced the "Indian Amateur's Photographic Album" (1856-1858).
Local Numbers:
FSA A2006.02
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Albumen prints
Photographs
Identifier:
FSA.A2006.02
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a2006-02

Still Prints of Asia: Great Gate, Futtepore Sikhri

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
India
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of the Great Gate, Futtepore Sikhri, India, circa 1860s. Signed "Bourne 1264" in the center of the image.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts the Great Gate, Futtepore Sikhri, India.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.14
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.14
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-14
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: Kootub Minar

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
India
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of the Kootub Minar. Signed "Bourne 1369" in the lower right corner of the image.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts a view of Kootub Minar.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.15
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.15
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-15
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: The Fort, Agra with Taj in Distance

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
India
Agra (India)
Date:
circa 1860s-1880s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print, circa 1860s-1880s, depicting The Fort, Agra with Taj in Distance, India. Signed "Bourne 1221 in the lower left corner of image.
Arrangement:
Organized in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, and within a few years, the firm had become the most successful studio in the subcontinent, with their work widely distributed throughout India and in Britain. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography. He was replaced as principal photographer by Colin Murray. Shepherd returned to England in 1879. The firm changed ownership numerous times in the early 20th century and currently operates under the same name in Calcutta -- perhaps the oldest photographic studio still in operation.
This photograph depicts The Fort, Agra with Taj in Distance.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.16
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.16
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-16
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: Cawnpore, the Memorial Well

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
India
Kanpur (India)
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of Cawnpore, the Memorial Well. View from an angle with a few Indian men in the center of the photograph. Signed "Bourne 1205" in the center of the image.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts Cawnpore, the Memorial Well.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.17
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.17
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-17
Online Media:

Still Prints of Asia: Nyne Tal, the Lake

Creator:
Bourne, Samuel, 1834-1912  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (albumen, image 23 x 29 cm., mounted 31 x 40 cm.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
India
Nyne Tal
Date:
circa 1860s
Scope and Contents:
One albumen print of the Nyne Tal, the Lake, India, circa 1860s. View from an angle with Indian men in the center of the photograph.
Arrangement:
One folder in one flat box.
Biographical / Historical:
Samuel Bourne (1834-1912) had already begun to earn recognition for his work in England, having exhibited at the London International Exhibition of 1862, when he decided to give up his position in a bank and depart for India to work as a professional photographer. He arrived in Calcutta early in 1863, initially setting up a partnership with William Howard. They moved up to Simla, where they established a new studio Howard & Bourne, to be joined in 1864 by Charles Shepherd, to form Howard, Bourne & Shepherd. By 1866, after the departure of Howard, it became Bourne & Shepherd, the name under which the firm continues to operate to this day. Although Bourne only spent 6 years in India, his time there was extremely productive. He undertook three major expeditions in the Himalayas, creating an impressive body of work which combined the highest technical quality and a keen artistic eye, while working under difficult physical conditions. Bourne left India for good in 1870, selling his interest in Bourne & Shepherd shortly thereafter and abandoning commercial photography.
This photograph depicts view of Nyne Tal, the Lake.
Local Numbers:
FSA A1999.18
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Albumen prints -- 1860-1880
Identifier:
FSA.A1999.18
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1999-18
Online Media:

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