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W. Langdon Kihn papers, 1904-1990, bulk 1904-1957

Creator:
Kihn, W. (Wilfred) Langdon, 1898-1957  Search this
Kihn, W. (Wilfred) Langdon, 1898-1957  Search this
Subject:
Wiggins, Guy C. (Guy Carleton)  Search this
Skinner, Constance Lindsay  Search this
Oakley, Thorton  Search this
Wellcome, Henry S., Sir (Henry Solomon)  Search this
Stirling, Matthew Williams  Search this
Lecomte du Noüy, Marie  Search this
Laubin, Reginald  Search this
Lecomte du Noüy, Pierre  Search this
Kihn, Helen Butler  Search this
Kihn, Alfred  Search this
Laubin, Gladys  Search this
Dale, Maud  Search this
Dixon, Maynard  Search this
Downs, Olin  Search this
Fisher, Franklin L.  Search this
Artzybasheff, Boris  Search this
Barbeau, Marius  Search this
Dale, Chester  Search this
National Geographic Society (U.S.)  Search this
Type:
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Sketches
Photographs
Poetry
Writings
Topic:
Book illustrators -- Connecticut  Search this
Indians of North America -- Pictorial works  Search this
Theme:
Diaries  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7081
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209214
AAA_collcode_kihnwlan
Theme:
Diaries
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209214
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Norma Minkowitz, 2001 September 17 and 2001 November 16

Interviewee:
Minkowitz, Norma M., 1937-  Search this
Minkowitz, Norma M., 1937-  Search this
Interviewer:
Malarcher, Patricia  Search this
Subject:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Crocheting  Search this
Handicraft -- Study and teaching  Search this
Fiber artists -- Connecticut -- Interviews  Search this
Sculpture  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12513
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)229606
AAA_collcode_minkow01
Theme:
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_229606
Online Media:

Maurice Sendak

Artist:
Mariana R. Cook, born 9 Feb 1955  Search this
Sitter:
Maurice Sendak, 10 Jun 1928 - 8 May 2012  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
Image/Sheet: 42.7 x 38.9 cm (16 13/16 x 15 5/16")
Mount: 76 x 61 cm (29 15/16 x 24")
Type:
Photograph
Place:
United States\Connecticut\Fairfield\Ridgefield
Date:
2005 (printed 2012)
Topic:
Costume\Dress Accessory\Eyeglasses  Search this
Nature & Environment\Plant\Tree  Search this
Equipment\Walking stick\Cane  Search this
Nature & Environment\Animal\Dog  Search this
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Beard  Search this
Exterior\Forest  Search this
Costume\Robe\Bathrobe  Search this
Nature & Environment\Plant\Tree\Forest  Search this
Maurice Sendak: Visual Arts\Artist  Search this
Maurice Sendak: Male  Search this
Maurice Sendak: Literature\Writer  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.2012.82
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Mariana R. Cook
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm4c575acba-7698-40d4-878f-3dd05ee5903a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2012.82

The Presidents of the United States by Kelloggs & Comstock

Distributor:
Needham, D.  Search this
Depicted:
Washington, George  Search this
Adams, John  Search this
Jefferson, Thomas  Search this
Madison, James  Search this
Monroe, James  Search this
Adams, John Quincy  Search this
Jackson, Andrew  Search this
Van Buren, Martin  Search this
Harrison, William Henry  Search this
Tyler, John  Search this
Taylor, Zachary  Search this
Polk, James K.  Search this
Maker:
Kelloggs & Comstock  Search this
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
image: 13 1/2 in x 9 1/4 in; 34.29 cm x 23.495 cm
Object Name:
lithograph
Object Type:
Lithograph
Place made:
United States: Connecticut, Hartford
Date made:
ca 1849
Subject:
Chronology: 1840-1849  Search this
Patriotism and Patriotic Symbols  Search this
U.S. National Government, executive branch  Search this
Flags  Search this
Eagles  Search this
Related Publication:
Peters, Harry T.. America on Stone
Credit Line:
Harry T. Peters "America on Stone" Lithography Collection
ID Number:
DL.60.2531
Catalog number:
60.2531
Accession number:
228146
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Peters Prints
NMAH Reception Suite
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a1-29d2-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_324850
Online Media:

Picture Book Illustration Course Student Index Cards

Collection Creator:
Crossgrove, Roger, 1921-  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 32
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1988
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Roger Crossgrove papers, 1888-2012, bulk 1950-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Roger Crossgrove papers
Roger Crossgrove papers / Series 5: Teaching Files / University of Connecticut
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9318a8ac7-35c6-4779-a05f-f038597fe5fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-crosroge-ref164

Picture Book Illustration Course Student Autobiographies and Notes

Collection Creator:
Crossgrove, Roger, 1921-  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 31
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1985-1987
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Roger Crossgrove papers, 1888-2012, bulk 1950-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Roger Crossgrove papers
Roger Crossgrove papers / Series 5: Teaching Files / University of Connecticut
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a44fd536-96b7-4645-8b93-9c41351620ab
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-crosroge-ref163

Paul Cadmus letters to Webster Aitken, 1945-1979

Creator:
Cadmus, Paul, 1904-1999  Search this
Cadmus, Paul, 1904-1999  Search this
Subject:
Kirstein, Lincoln  Search this
Kirstein, Fidelma  Search this
Aitken, Webster  Search this
Topic:
Pianists  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)5622
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)208456
AAA_collcode_cadmpaul
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_208456
Online Media:

The Riverside Reader's Primer edited by Willhelmina Seegmiller, James Hixon Van Sickle, and Frances Jenkins

Maker:
Houghton Mifflin Company  Search this
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 3/4 in x 5 1/2 in x 1/2 in; 19.685 cm x 13.97 cm x 1.27 cm
Object Name:
book
Object Type:
Books
books
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Boston
Date made:
1911
Credit Line:
The Dr. Richard Lodish American School Collection
ID Number:
2014.3127.29
Accession number:
2014.3127
Catalog number:
2014.3127.29
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Education
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746b5-03bf-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1888809
Online Media:

The Riverside Reader's First Reader co-edited by Willhelmina Seegmiller and James Hixon Van Sickle

Maker:
Houghton Mifflin Company  Search this
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 3/4 in x 5 1/2 in x 1/2 in; 19.685 cm x 13.97 cm x 1.27 cm
Object Name:
book
Object Type:
Books
books
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Boston
Date made:
1911
Credit Line:
The Dr. Richard Lodish American School Collection
ID Number:
2014.3127.26
Accession number:
2014.3127
Catalog number:
2014.3127.26
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Education
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746b4-de0e-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1888805
Online Media:

Spencer Baird Nichols and Nichols family papers, 1870-1994

Creator:
Nichols, Spencer Baird, 1875-1950  Search this
Nichols, Spencer Baird, 1875-1950  Search this
Subject:
Nichols, Hobart  Search this
Nichols, Henry Hobart  Search this
Topic:
Painting -- Connecticut  Search this
Painting -- New York (State)  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9577
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211778
AAA_collcode_nichspen
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211778

Oral history interview with Norma Minkowitz

Interviewee:
Minkowitz, Norma M., 1937-  Search this
Interviewer:
Malarcher, Patricia  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
40 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2001 September 17 and 2001 November 16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Norma Minkowitz conducted 2001 September 17 and 2001 November 16, by Patricia Malarcher, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in Minkowitz's home in Westport, Connecticut.
Minkowitz speaks of her early childhood and what it was like growing up in a musical household in which her father was a concert pianist, her grandfather a composer, and her uncle a violinist; her relative's escape from Russia before the Russian revolution, how her parents met and what life in the Bronx was like; her relationships with different family members, specifically how close she was to her mother throughout her life; her first crocheting experience, making doilies with her mother; how she was drawn to drawing; her education in art, attendance at the Music and Art High School and then Cooper Union; her most rewarding experience at Cooper Union with her two-dimensional teacher Stefano Cusamano; her first paid job as a book illustrator for a children's dictionary; making designs to send to Woman's Day and Family Circle after the birth of her second child in 1963; the difference between a fiber artist and a craftsperson, trying to distinguish herself as an artist and how she would like to be recognized on a fine arts level; how time consuming making "wearables" or clothing was; the galleries she exhibited at including Elements in New York; her shows at the American Craft Museum, curator Paul Smith; the different museums where her work has been displayed including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Connecticut, the De Young Memorial Museum in San Francisco and the Kwang Ju Museum in Korea; her teaching experiences at the various craft schools; her different experiments within her work and how her work has changed since she began in the 1960s; her different studio spaces and how most times she can work right on her lap; how her children became artists; the meaning of several works to her and how viewers could interpret them differently, specifically, "Get Thee Up" and "Goodbye Mother;" how much home means to her; the many different pieces she has collected by other artists, including John McQueen, Richard Devore, and Ruth Duckworth; her other activities including running in three New York Marathons; how she has bronzed two pieces and what that was like; her four grandchildren, and making art and being a successful grandmother at the same time. Minkowitz also recalls Andrea Miller-Keller, Magdalena Abakanowicz, Lenore Tawney, Sheila Hicks, Alex Katz, Kathleen Whitney, Pat Hickman and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Norma Minkowitz (1937-) is a fiber artist from Westport, Connecticut. Patricia Malarcher is also a fiber artist from Englewood, N.J.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hrs., 27 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Crocheting  Search this
Handicraft -- Study and teaching  Search this
Fiber artists -- Connecticut -- Interviews  Search this
Sculpture  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.minkow01
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9526e3020-31ac-4b6f-be77-25e1f1941482
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-minkow01
Online Media:

Spencer Baird Nichols and Nichols family papers

Creator:
Nichols, Spencer Baird, 1875-1950  Search this
Names:
Nichols, Henry Hobart, b. 1836  Search this
Nichols, Hobart, 1869-1962  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1870-1994
Scope and Contents:
Letters, photographs, clippings, and business records relating to the art careers of Spencer Baird Nichols, his brother Hobart Nichols, and their father Henry Hobart Nichols, in the New York and Connecticut area.
Letters, 1923-1974, concern Spencer's exhibitions and family matters, business-related correspondence and letters between Nichols daughter, Helen Jacobs, and the Theodore Lyman Wright Art Center, Beloit College, the Smithsonian and collector James Blinder, pertaining to Nichols' work. Photographs include one of the Jay-Oakley-Nichols family (1870); two tintypes of Hobart, ca. 1880, and one of Spencer, 1899; photos of Spencer's artwork and a few of Hobart's; and Spencer's house and studio. Business records consist of inventories and receipts from Spencer's exhibits in New York.
Biographical / Historical:
Spencer Baird Nichols was a portrait painter, landscape painter, muralist, book illustrator, and educator; Connecticut. He taught illustration at the Art Students League. In 1934, he became director of art at Marot Junior College, Thompson, Connecticut. Nichols' works include a portrait of Andrew Stephenson painted for the House of Representatives and murals executed in Connecticut.
Provenance:
Donated 1989 by Hobart Nichols, son of Spencer Baird Nichols and by Helen Jacobs, daughter of Spencer Baird Nichols, 1989, 1990, and 1994.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Landscape painters -- Connecticut  Search this
Portrait painters -- Connecticut  Search this
Illustrators -- Connecticut  Search this
Topic:
Painting -- Connecticut  Search this
Painting -- New York (State)  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.nichspen
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ca272cea-d8b0-4502-91ab-1ca2fe9c8cef
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-nichspen

Lauren Ford etching

Creator:
Ford, Lauren, 1891-  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1930
Scope and Contents:
An etching on paper inscribed Merry Christmas to Meg from Lauren, undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Lauren Ford (1891-1973) was a painter, etcher, and writer/illustrator of childrens' books in Connecticut and New York.
Provenance:
Donated 1977 by Alan W. Mather.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Etchers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Book illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.fordlaur
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9598cf7d9-d50a-4864-9689-a26146f9dfe8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-fordlaur

W. Langdon Kihn papers

Creator:
Kihn, W. Langdon  Search this
Names:
National Geographic Society (U.S.)  Search this
Artzybasheff, Boris, 1899-1965  Search this
Barbeau, Marius, 1883-1969  Search this
Dale, Chester, b. 1883  Search this
Dale, Maud, 1875-1953  Search this
Dixon, Maynard, 1875-1946  Search this
Downs, Olin  Search this
Fisher, Franklin L.  Search this
Kihn, Alfred  Search this
Kihn, Helen Butler  Search this
Laubin, Gladys  Search this
Laubin, Reginald  Search this
Lecomte du Noüy, Marie  Search this
Lecomte du Noüy, Pierre, 1883-1947  Search this
Oakley, Thorton, 1881-1953  Search this
Skinner, Constance Lindsay, 1882-1939  Search this
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Wellcome, Henry S., Sir (Henry Solomon), 1853-1936  Search this
Wiggins, Guy C. (Guy Carleton), 1883-1962  Search this
Extent:
8.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Sketches
Photographs
Poetry
Writings
Date:
1904-1990
bulk 1904-1957
Summary:
The papers of painter and illustrator W. Langdon Kihn measure approximately 8.5 linear feet and date from 1904-1990, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1904-1957. Papers document Kihn's career and travels associated with his interests in documenting the native American tribal nations of the United States and Canada in portraiture and writings. Found here are biographical materials, voluminous correspondence, memoirs and writings, one travel diary, printed material, financial records, three sketchbooks, sketches, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of painter and illustrator W. Langdon Kihn measure approximately 8.5 linear feet and date from 1904-1990, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1904-1957. Papers document Kihn's career and travels associated with his interests in documenting the native American tribal nations of the United States and Canada in portraiture and writings. Found here are biographical material, voluminous correspondence, memoirs and writings, one travel diary, printed material, financial records, three sketchbooks, sketches, and photographs.

Biographical materials include address books, membership cards, exhibition and price lists, legal and travel documents, as well as biographical notes. Additional biographical sketches are found in the Writings and Notes series.

Correspondence is the largest series in the collection, almost half of the papers. In addition to letters to W. Langdon Kihn, this series include both originals and drafts of his outgoing letters; letters to his wife Helen from friends; third party business correspondence between his father, Alfred Kihn, and various parties undertaken on his son's behalf; and third party correspondence addressed to his friend and colleague, the Canadian ethnographer, Marius Barbeau. In addition to Barbeau, significant correspondents include Constance Lindsay Skinner, Chester and Maud Dale, Sir Henry Wellcome, Pierre and Marie "May" Lecompte du Noüy, and Reginald and Gladys Laubin. Although there is little correspondence with other artists, those represented with cards and letters in this collection include Boris Artzybasheff, Maynard Dixon, Olin Dows, Thornton Oakley, and Kihn's summer art school partner, Gus Wiggins. Correspondence with Franklin L. Fisher, Chief of National Geographic Magazine's Illustrated Division and Matthew W. Striling, Chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution dominate the period spanning from 1935 - 1952, the years of Kihn's close association with the National Geographic Society.

Writings and notes includes manuscripts and typescripts of articles, poems, lectures, memoirs, and other writings by Kihn and others. There is one travel diary dated circa 1924-1925, and numerous writings about Kihn's travels and documentation of native American Indians.

Printed materials include exhibition catalogs, travel brochures, and magazine and newspaper clippings. Also found here are copies of Kihn's illustrations for books by other authors, including Beaver, Kings and Cabins, by Constance Lindsay Skinner, as well as proofs from the National Geographic series on American Indians arranged by geographic location. Financial records consist of invoices and receipts related to Kihn's artwork, traveling, and exhibitions.

Three sketchbooks and loose sketches include illustrated field notes and other drawings that document Kihn's travels and of native Americans. Photographs are of Kihn, and of Kihn at work. There are also photographs of Kihn's artwork.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1916-1957 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1904-1959 (Boxes 1-5; 4.0 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1920-1990 (Box 5-6; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed Material, circa 1920-1957 (Boxes 6-8, OV 10; 2.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Financial Records, 1920-1955 (Box 8; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 6: Sketchbooks and Sketches, circa 1922-1955 (Boxes 8-9, OV 10; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1920-1955 (Box 9; 5 folders)
Biographical Note:
Born in Brooklyn, New York, W. (Wilfred) Langdon Kihn (1898-1959) is best known for his portraits of American Indians and illustrations of their history, culture and rapidly disappearing way of life. In 1919, Kihn joined his art teacher Winold Reiss on a trip to the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana where he completed his first series of portraits. This marked the beginning of his lifelong career of documenting the tribal nations of the United States and Canada. Through commissions from Canadian and American Railroad companies, Kihn spent much of the 1920s traversing both the United States and Northwest Canada where he had the opportunity to record the members and lives of various tribes. During this period, his paintings also traveled the country in a one man exhibition of his American Indian portraits, which was arranged by the Brooklyn Museum, and traveled to about 40 institutions in the United States. However his largest and best known commission was a project to research and paint North American Indians for serial publication in National Geographic. Kihn received the commission in 1935 and his association with the organization spanned two decades, culminating in the 1955 exhibition of his work at the National Geographic Museum, Washington, D.C, and the publication Indians of the Americas, with copius illustrations derived from Kihn's paintings and drawings.

In addition to his travels and work in North America, Kihn enjoyed a brief stint between 1929-1932 painting in France and Spain. Upon his return he focused upon obtaining commercial work and enjoyed success as an illustrator, whose work was featured in Beaver, Kings and Cabins (1933) and Flat Tail (1935), among other books. Kihn also wrote articles about his travels; amateur painters, whom he specialized in teaching; and American Indian legends and tribal cultures. Between 1948-1951 he was a partner in the Guy Wiggins-W. Langdon Kihn Art School in Essex, Connecticut. He married Helen Butler in 1920 and in between their travels the couple eventually settled in East Haddam, Connecticut. W. Langdon Kihn died in 1957.
Provenance:
Helen Kihn, W. Langdon Kihn's widow, donated the bulk of the collection in 1959. In 1994 Phyllis Kihn, the artist's daughter, donated pages 1-8 of Kihn's original manuscript of his memoirs and a transcript of the complete memoirs.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Connecticut  Search this
Topic:
Book illustrators -- Connecticut  Search this
Indians of North America -- Pictorial works  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Sketches
Photographs
Poetry
Writings
Citation:
W. Langdon Kihn papers, 1904-1990, bulk 1904-1957. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kihnwlan
See more items in:
W. Langdon Kihn papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw93f008482-8b83-4adf-8682-b122de614058
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kihnwlan
Online Media:

Guy Pène Du Bois papers

Creator:
Pène Du Bois, Guy, 1884-1958  Search this
Names:
C.W. Kraushaar Art Galleries  Search this
Cortissoz, Royal, 1869-1948  Search this
Hopper, Edward, 1882-1967  Search this
McCoy, Samuel Duff, 1882-  Search this
Pène du Bois, William, 1916-1993  Search this
Soyer, Raphael, 1899-1987  Search this
Tarkington, Booth, 1869-1946  Search this
Extent:
2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Prints
Sketches
Date:
circa 1900-1963
bulk 1920-1963
Summary:
The papers of painter and art critic Guy Pène Du Bois measure 2.0 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to 1963 with the bulk of the materials dating from 1920 to 1963. Found within the papers are biographical material; personal and professional correspondence, including letters from Royal Cortissoz and Edward Hopper; writings, including essays, journals, short stories, and drafts of the autobiography Artists Say the Silliest Things; personal business records; printed material; and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and art critic Guy Pène Du Bois measure 2.0 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to 1963 with the bulk of the materials dating from 1920 to 1963. Found within the papers are biographical material; personal and professional correspondence, including letters from Royal Cortissoz and Edward Hopper; writings, including essays, journals, short stories, and drafts of the autobiography Artists Say the Silliest Things; personal business records; printed material; and artwork.

Biographical materials consist of certificates, a curriculum vitae, passport, and a photograph of two unidentified women.

Correspondence is primarily with Pène Du Bois' family, friends, and business associates. The series includes significant correspondence from fellow art critic Royal Cortissoz; artists Raphael Soyer and Edward Hopper; and writers Samuel Duff McCoy, Lincoln Isham, and Newton Booth Tarkington. Other correspondents of note include C.W. Kraushaar Art Galleries and Pène Du Bois' son, the children's book illustrator William Pène Du Bois.

Writings include book drafts of Pène Du Bois' autobiography, Artists Say the Silliest Things, journal entries, 35 essays, 8 short stories, and various writing fragments and notes.

Personal business records consist of account and sales records from C.W. Kraushaar Art Galleries, book and publishing contracts, and receipts for art supply purchases.

Printed material includes a brochure for the Guy Pène Du Bois School of Art, clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, and miscellaneous printed material.

Artwork consists of pen and ink sketches by Pène Du Bois and a print by an unknown artist.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series.

Missing Title

Biographical material, 1929-1954 (4 folders; Box 1)

Correspondence, 1908-1958 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1)

Writings, circa 1900-1954 (1.1 linear feet; Box 1-4)

Personal business records, circa 1920-1949 (3 folders; Box 3)

Printed material, circa 1920-1963 (0.3 linear feet; Box 3)

Artwork, circa 1920-1954 (2 folders; Box 3)
Biographical / Historical:
Painter and art critic Guy Pène Du Bois (1884-1958) lived and worked in New York City, New York and was known for his realist paintings, essays, and art reviews.

Pène Du Bois was born in Brooklyn, New York to the art critic Henri Pène Du Bois and his wife Laura. After he showed an early interest in art, his' family supported his decision to enroll in William Merritt Chase's New York School of Art at the age of 15. There, Pène Du Bois trained with the realist painters Robert Henri and Kenneth Hayes Miller along with fellow students George Bellows, Edward Hopper, and Rockwell Kent. In 1905, he traveled to Paris and studied briefly with the artist Thèophile Steinlen, but returned to New York the following year after the death of his father. To help support his family, he found work as an illustrator and cartoonist for the New York American, and was promoted to the position of art critic for the newspaper in 1909.

In 1911, Pène Du Bois married his wife, Florence Duncan, and became an assistant writer for the New York Tribune under Royal Cortissoz (1913). Pène Du Bois also wrote art reviews for the New York Post (1916-1918), and was a writer and later editor of Arts and Decoration (1913-1915, 1917-1921). During these years, Pène Du Bois also began to establish a career as a realist painter of note. His work was included in the 1913 Armory Show, after which he signed on as a member of the Kraushaar Gallery stable. Throughout the 1910s, Pène Du Bois exhibited in numerous galleries and museums, and held his first one-man show in 1918 at the Whitney Studio Club.

From 1920 to 1924, Pène Du Bois taught at the Art Students League, and spent the latter part of the 1920s in France with his family. After seven years, he moved his family back to Connecticut and opened the Guy Pène Du Bois School of Art in Stonington, Connecticut. Throughout the 1930s, Pène Du Bois continued painting and received commissions to design federal murals in upstate New York (1937) and Boston (1942). In 1940, Pène Du Bois published his autobiography, Artists Say the Silliest Things. After the death of his wife in 1950, Pène Du Bois lived and traveled with his daughter's family and died in her home in Boston in 1958.
Related Materials:
The Archives also holds the Guy Pène Du Bois and Mary Lightfoot Tarleton correspondence.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel 28) including sketches and etching proofs. Lent material was returned to the lender and is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Sketches and etching proofs were lent to the Archives of American Art in 1970 for microfilming by Pène du Bois' children, Yvonne McKenney and William Pène du Bois. Yvonne McKenney donated papers in 1971. In 1980, two journals dating from 1913 to 1955, were loaned for microfilming by Pène du Bois' daughter-in-law, Willa Kim. These journals were subsequently donated by Martha Fleishman in 2017.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Painting, American -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Prints
Sketches
Citation:
Guy Pène Du Bois papers, circa 1900-1963, bulk 1920-1963. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.duboguyp
See more items in:
Guy Pène Du Bois papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97572fde2-20b1-4c2d-888b-9056094d425e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-duboguyp
Online Media:

John Steuart Curry and Curry family papers

Creator:
Curry, John Steuart, 1897-1946  Search this
Names:
Curry, Kathleen, 1899-  Search this
Extent:
10.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Video recordings
Photographs
Sketches
Interviews
Date:
1848-1999
Summary:
The papers of painter, muralist, and illustrator John Steuart Curry, and Curry family papers, measure 10.1 linear feet and date from 1848 to 1999. Papers document his career and family history through certificates, correspondence, photographs, clippings, contracts, receipts, inventories, writings, notes, and other materials. The papers contain particularly rich documentation of Curry's period as artist-in-residence at the University of Wisconsin, from 1936 to 1946. Mural projects in Kansas, Washington, DC, and Wisconsin are also documented.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of painter, muralist, and illustrator John Steuart Curry, and Curry family papers, measure 10.1 linear feet and date from 1848 to 1999. Papers document his career and family history through certificates, correspondence, photographs, clippings, contracts, receipts, inventories, writings, notes, and other materials. The papers contain particularly rich documentation of Curry's period as artist-in-residence at the University of Wisconsin, from 1936 to 1946. Mural projects in Kansas, Washington, DC, and Wisconsin are also documented.

Biographical Materials include chronologies, biographical narratives, genealogical notes, certificates and awards, and other ephemera related to Curry and his family. Family Correspondence includes the earliest records created by Curry himself, including letters home from art school and from the East Coast during his early career.

Correspondence and Project files document mural projects, appearances, gallery relationships, and other activities from the early 1930s until his death in 1946 with correspondence, photographs, clippings, contracts, writings, and other miscellany. Subject files include pictorial reference and research files created by Curry for subjects depicted in his murals and paintings. Curry's writings include essays, lectures, interviews, and notes related to his technical and philosophical approach to art, as well as notes from his various travels, and essays by others about Curry. Personal Business Records contain records of artwork, business transactions, and personal finances.

Print Materials include print copies of published artwork by Curry, including magazine illustrations from Curry's early career. Extensive clippings, exhibition catalogs, and a scrapbook created by Curry as a youth are also found. Photographs depict Curry throughout his life in formal portraits, candid snapshots, and publicity photographs, with a significant number of photographs depicting Curry creating and posing with his artwork. The Artwork series contains a few sketches by Curry and seven canvases used for testing art materials. Additional sketches are found in Subject Files and scrapbooks.

Estate Papers contain materials dated after Curry's death in 1946 and mainly document the activities of Kathleen Curry in managing her husband's estate from 1946 until her death in 2001. Estate papers contain writings about Curry, correspondence, inventories of artwork, and alphabetical files documenting sales, exhibitions, and other projects.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into ten series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1911-1993 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Family Correspondence, 1916-1946 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Correspondence and Project Files, 1928-1946 (Boxes 1-3, OV 11; 2.3 linear feet)

Series 4: Subject Files, 1848-1946 (Boxes 3-4, OV 11-12; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 5: Notes and Writings, circa 1911-1946 (Box 4; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 6: Personal Business Records, 1916-1952 (Box 4, OV 13; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Print Materials, 1918-1985 (Boxes 4-5, 10; OV 12-13; 1.6 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1900-1998 (Boxes 5-6, OV 14; 1.1 linear feet)

Series 9: Artwork, 1941, undated (Box 7, OV 12, 14, 15; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 10: Estate Papers, circa 1946-1999 (Boxes 7-9 and rolled document; 2.3 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Painter, muralist, and illustrator John Steuart Curry is considered one of the three important painters of the American Regionalist movement, along with Thomas Hart Benton of Missouri and Grant Wood of Iowa. Curry was born in north-eastern Kansas in 1897, and grew up on his family's farm. Curry left high school to attend the Kansas City Art Institute briefly, and then studied at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1916 with Edward J. Timmons and John Norton. Curry later spent a year in Paris studying with Basil Schoukhaieff in 1926 and 1927.

Curry began his career as a freelance illustrator in Leonia, New Jersey, under the influence of Harvey Dunn. Curry's illustrations were widely published in illustrated magazines such as Boy's Life, Country Gentleman, and Saturday Evening Post in the early 1920s. He married Clara Derrick in 1923 and lived in Greenwich Village, and then Westport, Connecticut, from 1924 to 1936. Derrick died in 1932, and in 1934 Curry married Kathleen Gould.

Curry's career shifted from illustration to painting during the 1920s and 1930s, bolstered by success in exhibitions and sales. Exhibits included the National Academy of Design (1924), the Corcoran Gallery (1927-1928), a solo exhibition at the Whitney Studio Club (1930), and the Carnegie International Exhibition (1933). Early sales include Baptism in Kansas, purchased by the Whitney in 1930, and Spring Shower, purchased by the Metropolitan Museum in 1932. Curry taught at Cooper Union (1932-1934) and the Art Student's League (1932-1934), and painted his first murals in Westport under the Federal Art Project in 1934.

In 1936, he was appointed artist-in-residence at the University of Wisconsin College of Agriculture as part of a rural art program developed by rural sociologist John Burton. The purpose of his residency was to serve as an educational resource for rural people of the state. Curry stayed in this position until his death in 1946, carrying out the program's mission through lectures and visits with dozens of art and civic groups around the state, and by making himself available to rural artists through correspondence and guidance in his studio. He also helped to organize annual rural art exhibitions for UW's Farm and Home Week beginning in 1940. In return for his work, he was given a salary and a studio on campus and the freedom to execute his own work as he chose.

Under the Federal Art Program's Section of Painting and Sculpture, Curry completed two murals in the Justice Department building in Washington in 1936, Westward Migration and Justice Defeating Mob Violence, and two murals in the Department of the Interior building in 1938, The Homestead and The Oklahoma Land Rush. A design that was rejected by the government for the Justice building, a mural entitled Freeing of the Slaves, was later executed at the University of Wisconsin in their law library. From 1938 to 1940, Curry worked on murals for the state house rotunda in Topeka, Kansas admist a stormy, public controversy over his dramatic depiction of Kansas history. The legislature effectively blocked Curry's completion of the project through a formal resolution not to remove marble that was blocking areas that were part of Curry's design. Infuriated, Curry left the unfinished murals unsigned, and later derided the state frequently for the treatment he received. The Kansas State legislature issued a formal apology and appreciation of the completed murals in the 1990s.

Despite the lack of appreciation of his home state, Curry did receive recognition elsewhere during his lifetime as an artist of national importance. He continued to paint and exhibit in the art centers of the East Coast. In 1941, he won the Gold Medal Award at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts exhibition, and in the 1942 Artists For Victory exhibition, he won the top prize for Wisconsin Landscape. Curry's book illustrations were in high demand, and he contributed to books such as My Friend Flicka, editions of Lincoln's and Emerson's writings, and Wisconsin writer August Derleth's The Wisconsin. A biography of Curry written by Laurence Schmeckebier was published in 1942.

Curry died in 1946 of heart failure. A retrospective that had been planned for the living artist opened less than a month after his death at the Milwaukee Art Institute. His wife, Kathleen Curry, maintained his estate until her death, in 2001, at the age of 102. Additional retrospective exhibitions were held at Syracuse University in 1956 and in the Kansas State Capitol in 1970. In 1998, the exhibition "John Steuart Curry: Inventing the Middle West" was organized at the University of Wisconsin and traveled to the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum and the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art.
Related Material:
The Archives of American Art holds an oral history interview with Kathleen Curry regarding John Steuart Curry conducted in 1990 and 1992.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reels 164-168 and 4574-4576) including 98 sketchbooks, 1919-1942; a ledger, 1938-1946, of expenses with four loose letters to John Steuart Curry in Italian and Spanish; a notebook, 1932-1938, titled "Account and records of works, etc."; a journal, undated, of drafts of poems, and approximately 50 sketches. Loaned materials were returned to the lender some of which were subsequently donated to the Worcester Museum of Art in Worcester, Massachusetts. This material is not described in the collection container inventory.

John Steuart Curry memorabilia received with the Kathleen Curry's donation in 1979 (baby cup, baby dress, overalls, medals, paint box, watercolor box, 2 photographs) were transferred to the Spencer Museum of Art in 1985.
Provenance:
John Steuart Curry's widow, Kathleen Curry, lent materials on reels 164-168 for microfilming in 1971. In 1979, she subsequently donated portions of the material lent, along with additional items, some of which were transferred to Spencer Museum of Art. In 1972, Mildred Curry Fike, John Steuart Curry's sister, gave material and R. Eugene Curry, a brother, donated more material in 1975 and 1993. Ellen Schuster, John Steuart Curry's daughter, donated the home movies in 1973 and Daniel Schuster, John Steuart Curry's son-in-law, gave additional papers in 1991 in 1992, 1995, and 1999. In 1992, 1999 and 2000, additions were received from Kathleen Curry that may contain material previously filmed as a loan on reels 164-168.
Restrictions:
The bulk of the collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website. Access to undigitized portions requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Wisconsin  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Regionalism  Search this
Muralists -- Wisconsin  Search this
Illustrators -- Wisconsin  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Video recordings
Photographs
Sketches
Interviews
Citation:
John Steuart Curry and Curry family papers, 1900-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.currjohn
See more items in:
John Steuart Curry and Curry family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9943b22b6-7e9f-4538-b0aa-808dbe459e9d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-currjohn
Online Media:

Arthur Sinclair Covey papers

Creator:
Covey, Arthur Sinclair, 1877-1960  Search this
Names:
Bransom, Paul, 1885-  Search this
Dunn, Harvey, 1884-1952  Search this
Lenski, Lois, 1893-  Search this
Penfield, Edward, 1866-1925  Search this
Extent:
5.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Sketches
Date:
1882-1960
Summary:
The papers of mural painter and illustrator Arthur Sinclair Covey measure 5.7 linear feet and date from 1882 to 1960. Found within the papers are biographical material; correspondence with art institutions, patrons, and colleagues; scattered business and financial records; notes and writings by Covey and others, including a transcript of an interview with Covey by a radio station; art work and sketchbooks by Covey and his colleagues including Paul Bransom, Harvey Dunn, and Edward Penfield; project files concering Covey's mural projects; a scrapbook of clippings; additional printed material; and photographs of Covey, family members, colleagues, and art work.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of mural painter and illustrator Arthur Sinclair Covey measure 5.7 linear feet and date from 1882 to 1960. Found within the papers are biographical material; correspondence with art institutions, patrons, and colleagues; scattered business and financial records; notes and writings by Covey and others, including a transcript of an interview with Covey by a radio station; art work and sketchbooks by Covey and his colleagues including Paul Bransom, Harvey Dunn, and Edward Penfield; project files concering Covey's mural projects; a scrapbook of clippings; additional printed material; and photographs of Covey, family members, colleagues, and art work.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into nine series according to type of material and further arranged in chronological order. Oversized material from various series has been housed in Boxes 6-8 and Oversized Folders 9-12, and is noted in the Series Descriptions/Container Listing section at the appropriate folder title with see also/see references.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1925-1960, undated (Box 1, 6; 4 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1915-1960, undated (Box 1, OV 9; 28 folders)

Series 3: Business Records, 1915-1958, undated (Box 1; 14 folders)

Series 4: Notes and Writings, 1923-1958, undated (Box 1; 10 folders)

Series 5: Art Work, 1921-1957, undated (Box 1, 6, OV 9-10; 23 folders)

Series 6: Project Files, 1916-1959 (Box, 1-2, 6, OV 9-12; 68 folders)

Series 7: Scrapbook, 1914-1960 (Box 8; 1 folder)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1882-1959, undated (Box 2-4, 7; 2.4 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographs, 1891-1959, undated (Box 5, 7-8; 21 folders)
Biographical Note:
Arthur Sinclair Covey was born June 13, 1877 in Leroy, Illinois, son of Byron and Emeline Edwards Covey. His boyhood was spent in various small towns in Missouri and Kansas. As a teenager in 1893, Covey "made the run" to claim land at the opening of the Cherokee Strip in Oklahoma.

From 1895 to 1896, Covey attended Southwestern College in Winfield, Kansas, followed by three years of study under Frank Duveneck, among others, at the Chicago Art Institute, from which he graduated in 1899. From 1900 to 1901, he worked as a staff artist and art editor for the Indianapolis Press and the Cleveland Plain Dealer. For the next two years, he taught at the Chicago Art Institute and established his own studio.

In 1904, Covey traveled to the Royal Academy in Munich where he was a student of Karl Marr, and, from 1905 to 1908, served as assistant to British mural painter Frank Brangwyn and taught at the London School of Art. In 1908, Covey returned to New York and married Mary Dorothea Sale, with whom he had two children, Margaret Sale Covey and Laird Fortune Covey.

Covey received official recognition for his artwork when he assisted Robert Reid and Jules Guerin on murals for the 1914-1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition and received the Bronze Medal. The following year, Covey completed his first commission to paint murals for the Wichita, Kansas, Library, and continued to work steadily on mural projects for the rest of his career.

Following the death of his wife in 1917, Covey married children's book illustrator Lois Lenski in 1921. They had a son, Stephen John Covey.

In 1925, Covey received the Architectural League's Gold Medal of Honor in Painting for his murals at the Kohler Company. From 1926 to 1929, he served as President of the national Mural Painters Society, and from 1929 to 1942, he taught pictorial composition at the National Academy Schools in New York. From 1938 to 1939, Covey created pierced brass on redwood murals for the exterior of the Contemporary Arts Building at the New York World's Fair. In 1939, he decorated the dome and globe of the Land Plane Building at La Guardia Airport in New York.

In the 1950s, Lois Lenski Covey's failing health required that the couple move permanently to Florida's warmer climate.

Arthur Sinclair Covey died on February 5, 1960, in Tarpon Springs, Florida.
Provenance:
The Arthur Sinclair Covey papers were donated from 1961 to 1965 by the artist's widow, Lois Lenski Covey.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Mural painting and decoration -- Buildings  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Illustrators -- Connecticut  Search this
Muralists -- Connecticut  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Sketches
Citation:
Arthur Sinclair Covey papers, 1882-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.covearth
See more items in:
Arthur Sinclair Covey papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw94b265373-484f-42ea-9f9b-4ffd2f233604
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-covearth

Paul Cadmus letters to Webster Aitken

Creator:
Cadmus, Paul, 1904-1999  Search this
Names:
Aitken, Webster, 1904-  Search this
Kirstein, Fidelma  Search this
Kirstein, Lincoln, 1907-  Search this
Extent:
0.02 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1945-1979
Summary:
The letters of Paul Cadmus to Webster Aitken measure 0.02 linear feet and date from 1945-1979. Found within the collection are letters, notes, and postcards from Cadmus to Aitken regarding music, composers, musicians, mutual friends, Cadmus's sister and brother-in-law Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln Kirstein, travels, and Cadmus's work, art processes, and personal reflections on life events.
Scope and Contents:
The letters of Paul Cadmus to Webster Aitken measure 0.02 linear feet and date from 1945-1979. Found within the collection are 49 letters, notes, and postcards from Cadmus to Aitken regarding classical music, composers, musicians, mutual friends, Cadmus's sister and brother-in-law Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln Kirstein, travels, and Cadmus's work, art processes, and personal reflections on life events.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 1 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Paul Cadmus Letters to Webster Aitken, 1945-1979 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)
Biographical / Historical:
Painter Paul Cadmus (1904-1999) lived and worked in New York, N.Y. and Weston, Connecticut and was known for realist works of New York public life and the social lives of men. Cadmus was born in New York City to lithographer and watercolorist Egbert Cadmus and his wife, Maria Latasa, a fellow artist and book illustrator. With the support of his family, Cadmus entered the National Academy of Design at the age of 15 where he excelled in life drawing and printmaking classes. After graduating from the Academy in 1926, he continued his studies at the Art Students League where he met fellow artists Jared French and George Tooker. Throughout the 1920s, Cadmus found work as a commercial illustrator and layout artist for various agencies, including the New York Herald-Tribune.

In 1933, after two years of travel through France and Spain with Jared French, Cadmus returned to New York and was one of the first artists to be accepted into the federal Public Works of Art Project. Throughout the 1930s, his depictions of sailors and New Yorkers in public life were seen as controversial, beginning with the 1934 ejection of his painting The Fleet's In! from the Corcoran Gallery and continuing into 1940 with objections to the showing of Sailors and Floozies at the San Francisco Golden Gate International Exposition. Cadmus met his partner Jon Anderson in 1964 and featured him as a model for many of his subsequent works. Cadmus was a member of the National Academy of Design and the American Academy of Arts and Letters and died in his home in 1999.

Pianist and educator Webster Aitken (1908-1981) lived and worked in Santa Fe, New Mexico. A student of Emil Sauer and Artur Schnabel, Aitken studied at the Curtis Institute and had his recital debut in Vienna in 1929 and his American debut in New York's Town Hall in 1935. He is known for his 1938 London and New York performances of Schubert's sonatas, and a series of programs on the late works of Beethoven performed at American universities. Aitken taught at the Carnegie Institute, the University of Illinois, and the University of Texas. He died in his home in 1981.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are the Paul Cadmus letters to Edgar Munhall and an oral history interview with Paul Cadmus conducted by Judd Tully, March 22, 1988. The University of Texas at Austin holds the Webster Aitken Collection, 1899-1985.
Provenance:
The letters were donated in 1981 by Cadmus' long-time friend and Aitken's wife, Lilian Gilbert Aitken.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State)  Search this
Topic:
Pianists  Search this
Art -- Technique  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Citation:
Paul Cadmus letters to Webster Aitken, 1945-1979. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.cadmpaul
See more items in:
Paul Cadmus letters to Webster Aitken
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9af132496-8037-45e3-9d78-22ed2a347625
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cadmpaul
Online Media:

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