Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
102 documents - page 1 of 6

Skin & Bones - Meet the Scientist: Richard Vari

Creator:
National Museum of Natural History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-01-12T18:13:33.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Natural History  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianNMNH
Data Source:
National Museum of Natural History
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianNMNH
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_oJ3xAybvt2g

Preparing a Chilean "Hulte" (marine algae) Salad

Creator:
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2011-05-04T13:29:26.000Z
YouTube Category:
Travel & Events  Search this
Topic:
Tropics;Biology  Search this
See more by:
collinlabpanama
Data Source:
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
YouTube Channel:
collinlabpanama
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_fN2DiOswmOA

Career Dives: Live Conversations in Marine Science with Dr. Valerie Paul

Creator:
Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-06-04T15:49:57.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Natural History;Marine biology  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianSMS
Data Source:
Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianSMS
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_YZy8OP8scyw

Smithsonian Cares – Dr. Briana Pobiner

Creator:
National Museum of Natural History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-05-05T17:48:18.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Natural History  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianNMNH
Data Source:
National Museum of Natural History
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianNMNH
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_XCtjdM-3sTY

Skin & Bones - Meet the Scientist: Rolf Mueller

Creator:
National Museum of Natural History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-01-12T18:12:52.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Natural History  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianNMNH
Data Source:
National Museum of Natural History
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianNMNH
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_ntIz_6uCgbg

Inside the National Museum of Natural History: Fieldwork

Creator:
National Museum of Natural History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2008-04-15T18:49:21.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
Natural History  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianNMNH
Data Source:
National Museum of Natural History
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianNMNH
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_tB3yK90Ks-I

Biology, evolution and generic review of the chemosymbiotic bivalve family Lucinidae John Taylor and Emily Glover

Title:
Bivalve family Lucinidae
Author:
Taylor, John David  Search this
Glover, Emily  Search this
Physical description:
318 pages illustrations (chiefly color) 29 cm
Type:
Books
Classification
Date:
2021
Topic:
Lucinidae--Anatomy  Search this
Lucinidae--Classification  Search this
Lucinidés--Anatomie  Search this
Lucinidés--Classification  Search this
Lucinidae  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1156367

Department of Anthropology records

Creator:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. United States National Museum. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
330.25 Linear feet (519 boxes)
Note:
Some materials are held off-site; this will be indicated at the series or sub-series level. Advanced notice must be given to view these portions of the collection.
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1840s-circa 2015
Summary:
The Department of Anthropology records contain administrative and research materials produced by the department and its members from the time of the Smithsonian Institution's foundation until today.
Scope and Contents:
The Department of Anthropology records contain correspondence, manuscripts, photographs, memoranda, invoices, meeting minutes, fiscal records, annual reports, grant applications, personnel records, receipts, and forms. The topics covered in the materials include collections, exhibits, staff, conservation, acquisitions, loans, storage and office space, administration, operations, research, budgets, security, office procedures, and funding. The materials were created by members of the Section of Ethnology of the Smithsonian Institution, the Division of Anthropology of the United States National Museum, the Office of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History, and the Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History and range in date from before the founding of the Smithsonian Institution to today. The Department of Anthropology records also contain some materials related to the Bureau of American Ethnology, such as documents from the River Basin Surveys.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 28 series: (1) Correspondence, 1902-1908, 1961-1992; (2) Alpha-Subject File, 1828-1963; (3) Alpha-Subject File, 1961-1975; (4) Smithsonian Office of Anthropology Subject Files, 1967-1968; (5) River Basin Survey Files, 1965-1969; (6) Research Statements, Proposals, and Awards, 1961-1977 (bulk 1966-1973); (7) Publication File, 1960-1975; (8) Memoranda and Lists Concerning Condemnations, 1910-1965; (9) Notebook on Special Exhibits, 1951-1952 (10) Section on Animal Industry; (11) Administrative Records, 1891-1974; (12) Administrative Records, 1965-1994 (bulk 1975-1988); (13) Fiscal Records, 1904-1986; (14) Annual Reports, 1920-1983; (15) Chairman's Office Files, 1987-1993; (16) Division of Archaeology, 1828-1965; (17) Division of Ethnology, 1840s, 1860-1972, 1997; (18) Division of Physical Anthropology; (19) Division of Cultural Anthropology, 1920-1968; (20) Records of the Anthropological Laboratory/Anthropology Conservation and Restoration Laboratory, 1939-1973; (21) Collections Management, 1965-1985; (22) Photographs of Specimens and Other Subjects (Processing Laboratory Photographs), 1880s-1950s; (23) Exhibit Labels, Specimen Labels, Catalog Cards, and Miscellaneous Documents, circa 1870-1950; (24) Antiquities Act Permits, 1904-1986; (25) Ancient Technology Program, circa 1966-1981; (26) Urgent Anthropology; (27) Records of the Handbook of North American Indians; (28) Personnel; (29) Repatriation Office, 1991-1994
Administrative History.:
The Smithsonian Institution was founded in 1846. Although there was no department of anthropology until the creation of the Section of Ethnology in 1879, anthropological materials were part of the Smithsonian's collection from its foundation. The Section of Ethnology was created to care for the rapidly growing collection. In 1881, the United States National Museum was established. Soon thereafter, in 1883, it was broken up into divisions, including the Division of Anthropology. In 1904, Physical Anthropology was added to the Division.

The Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) was created in 1879 as a research unit of the Smithsonian, separating research from collections care. However, during the 1950s, research became a higher priority for the Department of Anthropology and, in 1965, the BAE was merged with the Department of Anthropology to create the Office of Anthropology, and the BAE's archives became the National Anthropological Archives (NAA).

In 1967, the United States National Museum was broken up into three separate museums: the Musuem of History and Technology (now the National Museum of American History), the National Museum of American Art, and the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). The Office of Anthropology was included in NMNH and was renamed the Department of Anthropology in 1968.

New divisions were added to the Department, including the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA) in 1981, the Research Institute on Immigration and Ethnic Studies (RIIES) in 1982, and the Repatriation Office in 1993. In 1983, the Smithsonian opened the Museum Support Center (MSC) in Suitland, Maryland, as offsite housing for collections with specialized storage facilities and conservation labs.

The Department of Anthropology is currently the largest department within NMNH. It has three curatorial divisions (Ethnology, Archaeology, and Biological Anthropology) and its staff includes curators, research assistants, program staff, collections specialists, archivists, repatriation tribal liaisons, and administrative specialists. It has a number of outreach and research arms, including the Repatriation Office, Recovering Voices, Human Origins, and the Arctic Studies Center.

The Museum is home to one of the world's largest anthropology collections, with over three million specimens in archaeology, ethnology, and human skeletal biology. The NAA is the Smithsonian's oldest archival repository, with materials that reflect over 150 years of anthropological collecting and fieldwork. The HSFA is the only North American archive devoted exclusively to the collection and preservation of anthropological film and video.

Sources Consulted

National Museum of Natural History. "Department of Anthropology: About" Accessed April 13, 2020. https://naturalhistory.si.edu/research/anthropology/about

National Museum of Natural History. "History of Anthropology at the Smithsonian." Accessed April 13, 2020. https://naturalhistory.si.edu/sites/default/files/media/file/history-anthropology-si.pdf

National Museum of Natural History. "History of the Smithsonian Combined Catalog." Accessed April 13, 2020 https://sirismm.si.edu/siris/sihistory.htm

Chronology

1846 -- The Smithsonian Institution is founded

1879 -- George Catlin bequeaths his collection to the Smithsonian The Section of Ethnology is established to oversee ethnological and archaeological collections The Bureau of Ethnology is established by Congress as a research unit of the Smithsonian

1881 -- The U.S. National Museum (USNM) is established as a separate entity within the Smithsonian Institution

1883 -- The staff and collections of the USNM are reorganized into divisions, including a Division of Anthropology

1897 -- The United States National Museum is reorganized into three departments: Anthropology headed by W. H. Holmes; Biology with F. W. True as head; and Geology with G. P. Merrill in charge The Bureau of Ethnology is renamed the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) to emphasize the geographic limit of its interests

1903 -- The Division of Physical Anthropology established

1904 -- The Division of Physical Anthropology is incorporated into the Division of Anthropology

1910 -- The USNM moves into the new Natural History Building

1965 -- The Smithsonian Office of Anthropology is created on February 1 The BAE is eliminated and merged with the Office of Anthropology

1968 -- The Smithsonian Office of Anthropology (SOA) of the National Museum of Natural History is retitled the Department of Anthropology on October 29

1973 -- The Research Institute on Immigration and Ethnic Studies (RIIES) is established at the National Museum of Natural History's (NMNH) Center for the Study of Man (CSM) to study the waves of immigration to the United States and its overseas outposts that began in the 1960's

1975 -- The National Anthropological Film Center is established

1981 -- The National Anthropological Film Center is incorporated into the Department of Anthropology

1982 -- The RIIES, part of the CSM at the NMNH, is transferred to the Department of Anthropology

1991 -- NMNH establishes a Repatriation Office

1993 -- The Repatriation Office is incorporated into the Department of Anthropology

Head Curators and Department Chairs

1897-1902 -- William Henry Holmes

1902-1903 -- Otis T. Mason (acting)

1904-1908 -- Otis T. Mason

1908-1909 -- Walter Hough (acting)

1910-1920 -- William Henry Holmes

1920-1923 -- Walter Hough (acting)

1923-1935 -- Walter Hough

1935-1960 -- Frank M. Setzler

1960-1962 -- T. Dale Stewart

1963-1965 -- Waldo R. Wedel

1965-1967 -- Richard Woodbury

1967-1970 -- Saul H. Riesenberg

1970-1975 -- Clifford Evans

1975-1980 -- William W. Fitzhugh

1980-1985 -- Douglas H. Ubelaker

1985-1988 -- Adrienne L. Kaeppler

1988-1992 -- Donald J. Ortner

1992-1999 -- Dennis Stanford

1999-2002 -- Carolyn L. Rose

2002-2005 -- William W. Fitzhugh

2005-2010 -- J. Daniel Rogers

2010-2014 -- Mary Jo Arnoldi

2014-2018 -- Torbin Rick

2018- -- Igor Krupnik
Related Materials:
The NAA holds collections of former head curators and department chairs, including the papers of Otis Tufton Mason, Walter Hough, T. Dale Stewart, Waldo Rudolph and Mildred Mott Wedel, Saul H. Riesenberg, Clifford Evans, and Donald J. Ortner; the photographs of Frank Maryl Setzler; and the Richard B. Woodbury collection of drawings of human and animal figures.

Other related collections at the NAA include the papers of Gordon D. Gibson, Eugene I. Knez, and Betty J. Meggers and Clifford Evans; and the records of the Bureau of American Ethnology, the Center for the Study of Man, and the River Basin Surveys.
Provenance:
This collection was transferred to the National Anthropological Archives (NAA) by the National Museum of Natural History's Department of Anthropology in multiple accessions.
Restrictions:
Some materials are restricted.

Access to the Department of Anthropology records requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Anthropology  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Citation:
Department of Anthropology Records, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.XXXX.0311
See more items in:
Department of Anthropology records
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3da0f5297-c324-47c1-96dd-171f6edd11b6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-xxxx-0311

Near Eastern Skeletal Biology Program

Collection Creator:
Ortner, Donald J.  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1977-2010, undated
Scope and Contents:
This series consists of fieldwork materials, data analysis, and publications related to Ortner's work with specimens from Jordan, Egypt, Yemen, and Bahrain, dated 1977 to 2010 and undated. The bulk of this series relates to Ortner's participation in fieldwork at a cemetery complex in Bab edh-Dhra, Jordan, a part of the Expedition to the Dead Sea Plain with Walter Rast and R. Thomas Schaub.

Subseries 3.1, Publications, dated 1977 to 2008 and undated, includes drafts, data, data analysis, research materials, notes, correspondence, photographs, a blueprint, and a map related to Ortner's publications on his work in Bab edh-Dhra. The computer disks in this series are digital copies of the paper manuscripts they are included with. Several folders in this subseries contain planning material related to the series of books: Reports of the Expedition to the Dead Sea Plain. Bruno Frohlich and Ortner's 2008 book The Early Bronze Age I Tombs and Burials of Bab edh-Dhra, Jordan, also represented in this series, was volume 3 of the Reports.

Subseries 3.2, Bab edh-Dhra field seasons 1977 and 1979, dated 1977 to 2005, includes travel and finance documents, data analyses, correspondence, photographs, negatives, and maps. Of note are the sound recordings and transcripts of Ortner's audio journals in 1977 and 1979; as well as an interview, interpreted by Muhammed Darwish, conducted by between Ortner and Mahmoud Mustafa about burial practices of people living in El Mazra. Recordings are on 9 sound cassettes.

Subseries 3.3, Bab edh-Dhra field season 1981, dated 1980 to 1990, includes mostly financial and planning materials because Ortner did not travel to the site for this field season.

Subseries 3.4 Other projects and events, 1980 to 1983 and undated, includes files from other projects Ortner was involved with in Jordan, Egypt, Yemen, and Bahrain unrelated to the Expedition to the Dead Sea Plain. This includes a proposal for a Near Eastern Skeletal Biology Program with Smithsonian archaeologist Bruno Frohlich in collaboration with Yarmouk University in Bahrain. There is not much information on the Early Islamic Project in Egypt, the Yemen mummy project, or the Abydos study.

The series maintains Ortner's original arrangement with some changes for clarity.

This series is arranged in 4 subseries: 3.1 Publications, 1977-2008; 3.2 Bab edh-Dhra field seasons 1977 and 1979, 1977-2005; 3.3 Bab edh-Dhra field season 1981, 1980-1990; 3.4 Other projects and events, 1980-1983, undated
Restrictions:
The CD-Roms and floppy disks are unavailable for research due to preservation concerns.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Donald J. Ortner Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2014-07, Series 3
See more items in:
Donald J. Ortner Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw303edce06-0a8c-4fb3-a704-1485cc53e6ca
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2014-07-ref400

Michigan Fieldwork: Lake Superior Commercial Fishing

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Michigan Program 1987 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Cochrane, Timothy (field worker)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
analog.
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Michigan
Local Numbers:
FP-1987-CT-0001-2
General:
INTVW W/ PAUL VANLANDSCHOOT, SR: LAKE SUPERIOR COMMERCIAL FISHING: FISHER FOLK BIOLOGY; CATCHING METHODS; DIVISION OF LABOR; NAVIGATION; NETS; RELATIONS W/ FISH AND GAME AUTHORITIES; NARRATIVES; HISTORY; TRADITION OF SMOKING FISH MORE DETAILS IN FIELDWORK FILE
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Michigan, United States, September 29, 1986.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1987, Item FP-1987-CT-0001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Michigan / Fieldwork
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5dc2d5a73-b17e-4050-9931-099f193178df
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1987-ref1122

Michigan Fieldwork: Interview with Francis Thill (Fishing)

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Michigan Program 1987 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Field worker:
Cochrane, Timothy  Search this
Artist:
Thill, Frances  Search this
Performer:
Thill, Frances  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
analog.
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States
Michigan
Date:
1986 September 30
1986
Local Numbers:
FP-1987-CT-0002-2
Publication, Distribution, Etc. (Imprint):
United States 1986
General:
INTVW W/ FRANCIS THILL: LAKE SUPERIOR COMMERCIAL FISHING: HIS FAMILY; COMPARE W/ LAKE MICHIGAN; NETS, BIOLOGY, BOATS, BOAT ENGINES, RELATION W/ DNR; WISC INDIAN FISHING; NARRATIVES MORE DETAIL IN FW FILE
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Michigan, United States, September 30, 1986.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Fishers  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1987, Item FP-1987-CT-0002
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1987 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Michigan / Fieldwork
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5787d176c-3120-4b84-803a-89e46e7ce758
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1987-ref1123

Eric H. Davidson audio recordings

Collector:
Davidson, Eric H., 1937-  Search this
Musician:
Galyean, Cullen  Search this
Harrison, Bobby  Search this
Jarrell, Tommy, 1901-1985  Search this
Joines, Polly  Search this
Neaves, Glen  Search this
Smith, Glen (Banjo player)  Search this
Spencer, Ed  Search this
Ward, Wade  Search this
Extent:
73 Sound tape reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Audiotapes
Date:
1958-1984
Summary:
This collection contains 73 open reel tapes, made by Eric H. Davidson between 1958-1984, featuring the traditional music of Southern Appalachia.
Scope and Contents:
The Eric H. Davidson audio recordings consists of 73 open reel tapes dating from 1958-1984, featuring field recordings made by Davidson and his colleagues (including Caleb Ellicott Finch, Paul Newman, Lyn Davidson, and Jane Rigg) featuring the traditional music of Southern Appalachia. The recordings were collected primarily in Grayson and Carroll counties in Southwestern Virginia, and adjacent counties in North Carolina.
Arrangement:
The Eric H. Davidson audio recordings are arranged in chronological order. Each open reel tape was assigned a unique number by Eric Davidson.
Biographical / Historical:
Eric H. Davidson was born in 1937, in New York City. He was primarily known as a pioneering developmental biologist, who revolutionized the research of and theoretical framework behind "the gene regulatory networks that perform complex biological processes, such as the transformation of a single-celled egg into a complex organism. His work helped to reveal how the DNA sequences inherited in the genome are used to initiate and drive forward the sequence of steps that result in development." (1)

Davidson's work in biology began at the age of 16, when he began conducting research with cell physiologist L. V. Heilbrunn, a family friend, at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. He began as a dish washer at the MBL, but was informed by Heilbrunn that he was also expected to have a research project. This project resulted in a published abstract in the Biological Bulletin on clotting in sand dollars.

Davidson earned his bachelor of arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1958 and his doctorate from Rockefeller University in 1963. After working as a postdoctoral researcher and faculty member at Rockefeller, he moved to Caltech, where he would spend the rest of his career, beginning as a visiting assistant professor. He was named Norman Chandler Professor of Cell Biology in 1982 and remained there until his death.

His interest in old time music arose at nearly the same time as his interest in biology. His father, a well-known abstract painter, and mother were connected to several people who were hired to do research for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) of the late 1930's and 40's. At 14, he began to play the 5-string banjo after being introduced to the instrument through his exposure to recordings of Southern Appalachian music recorded as a part of the WPA, held at the Library of Congress.

In college, he played music in cafes. He also got a hold of the log of WPA recordings that were so influential to him. He began to stick pins in maps wherever the recordings were made, and began to notice that most of the pins were clustered in two counties in Southwestern Virginia--Grayson and Carroll counties--and adjacent counties in North Carolina.

In 1956, he began to take trips down to these areas during breaks from school to record musicians that had learned songs and skills through oral tradition, as opposed to the radio or records. He continued to go every year for many years, until the last person he knew had learned by oral tradition passed away. He formed close relationships with many notable musicians during these trips, including Wade Ward (from whom he learned the clawhammer banjo playing technique), Tommy Jarrell, Paul Joines, Glen Neaves, Vester Jones, Ed Spencer, Glen Smith, Cullen Galyean, and Bobby Harrison. He often recorded with his longtime collaborators Caleb Ellicott Finch, Paul Newman, Lyn Davidson, and Jane Rigg. Many of these recordings were released by Moses Asch as Folkways Records albums, produced by Davidson and his collaborators between 1962-1986.

Davidson was interested in the personal, musical, structural, traditional, and historical aspects of Southern Appalachian music. His fieldwork style was to continue to record a musician until they got tired or he'd run out of tape. Then he'd come back the next day, and the next year, and the year after that, until he had recorded everything that musician knew. This gave his work the characteristic of what he described as, borrowing from his scientific background, a longitudinal study. He was able to observe changes in the musical tradition of the region: the transition of traditional ballad singing from a cappella to string band accompaniment, the incorporation of the guitar into the string band ensemble, and the shift from clawhammer to three-finger banjo picking. In an oral history interview with Davidson conducted by the Ralph Rinzler Folklife and Collections in 2015, Davidson said that in his research, he could see how "ballads combine and recombine like genetic organisms in biology."

Davidson was also an accomplished banjo musician in his own right. He formed the Iron Mountain String Band together with Caleb Finch (fiddle), and Peggy Haine (guitar), releasing an album (FA 2473) on Folkways Records in 1973 consisting of songs and tunes learned from his many recording trips into Grayson and Carroll counties.

Eric Davidson died on September 1, 2015 at the age of 78.

1. "Developmental Biologist Eric H. Davidson Passes Away," Caltech News, September 4, 2015, accessed January 5, 2016, http://www.caltech.edu/news/developmental-biologist-eric-h-davidson-passes-away-47772.
Disclaimer:
Please note that some language in this collection is culturally insensitive or offensive to viewers. It is presented as it exists in the original material for the benefit of research and the historical record. The material reflects the culture and context in which it was created and not the views of the Smithsonian Institution.
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Related Materials:
An oral history with Eric H. Davidson was conducted by the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections on April 26, 2015. Both the video and transcript is available for researchers. Contact archives staff for information.
Provenance:
Donated by Eric H. Davidson.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Fiddle tunes -- Appalachian Region, Southern  Search this
Folk music -- Appalachian Region, Southern  Search this
Banjo music -- Appalachian Region, Southern  Search this
Music -- Appalachian Region, Southern  Search this
Old-time music -- Appalachian Region, Southern  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Citation:
Eric H. Davidson audio recordings, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Eric H. Davidson audio recordings, 1958-1985. Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.DAVID
See more items in:
Eric H. Davidson audio recordings
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk52c2d3cd3-b94b-423c-9ac8-a24b224bf680
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-david

Patterns of parental care in Neotropical glassfrogs: fieldwork alters hypotheses of sex-role evolution

Author:
Delia, J.  Search this
Bravo-Valencia, L.  Search this
Warkentin, K. M.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
2017
Citation:
Delia, J., Bravo-Valencia, L., and Warkentin, K. M. 2017. "Patterns of parental care in Neotropical glassfrogs: fieldwork alters hypotheses of sex-role evolution." Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 30, (5) 898–914. https://doi.org/10.1111/jeb.13059.
Identifier:
142411
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.1111/jeb.13059
ISSN:
1010-061X
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_142411

Francis P. Conant Papers

Creator:
Conant, Francis  Search this
Names:
Hunter College. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Goldschmidt, Walter, 1913-2010  Search this
Naguib, Mohammed, 1901-  Search this
Extent:
20 Linear feet ((43 boxes) plus 25 digital storage media and 5 map folders )
Culture:
Southern Bauchi languages  Search this
Suk (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field recordings
Maps
Field notes
Manuscripts
Electronic records
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Photographs
Place:
Africa, French-speaking West
Sahara
Egypt
Ethiopia
Uganda
West Pokot District (Kenya)
Bauchi Province (Nigeria)
Belgian Congo
Finland
Morocco
Sudan
Date:
1946-2011
bulk 1953-2008
Summary:
The papers of Francis P. Conant document his anthropological work and, to a lesser extent, his previous career as a journalist and photographer. Francis Paine Conant was a cultural anthropologist who pioneered the use of satellite data in anthropology. He conducted fieldwork in Nigeria and Kenya, and his research interests spanned cultural ecology, AIDS, malaria, and sex and gender studies. He was also Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Hunter College, where he taught from 1962 to 1995.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Francis P. Conant document his anthropological work and, to a lesser extent, his previous career as a journalist and photographer. The bulk of the collection consists of his field work in Africa, specifically his doctoral research among the Barawa in Nigeria during the 1950s; his work among the Pokot in Kenya for Walter Goldschimdt's Culture and Ecology in East Africa Project during the 1960s; and his later research among the Pokot during the 1970s incorporating remote sensing tools. These materials include his dissertation, field notes, kinship charts, maps, correspondence, photographs, and sound recordings. The collection also contains photographs, correspondence, and writings relating to the Bernheim-Conant expedition through Africa. Among the photos are Polaroids of Mohammad Naguib, first president of Egypt. Also present in the collection are his published and unpublished academic writings, his writings and correspondence as a news correspondent in Finland, and files from courses that he taught. In addition, the collection contains some of Conant's digital files, which have not yet been examined. Overall there is little correspondence in the collection, aside from some letters scattered throughout the collection relating to his research and writings (both as an academic and a journalist).
Arrangement:
Collection is organized into 9 series: 1) Nigeria, 1956-1960, undated; 2) Kenya, 1961-1974, undated; 3) Remote Sensing, 1967, 1971, 1976-1984, 1991-1992, 2002; 4) Bernheim-Conant Expedition, 1953-1956; 5) Writings, 1960-1966, 1974-1995, 2000-2006, undated; 6) University Files, 1956-1957, 1961, 1970, 1972, 1982-1995, undated; 7) Biographical Files and Letters, circa 1940, CIRCA 1946-1947, 1951, 1955, 1979, 1989-1991, 1996-2000, 2007-2011, undated; 8) Sound Recordings, 1956-1965, 1971, 1977-1978, undated; 9) Digital Files
Biographical / Historical:
Francis Paine Conant was a cultural anthropologist who pioneered the use of satellite data in anthropology. He conducted fieldwork in Nigeria and Kenya, and his research interests spanned cultural ecology, AIDS, malaria, and sex and gender studies. He was also Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Hunter College, where he taught from 1962 to 1995.

Conant was born on February 27, 1926 in New York City. After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy, he deferred college to enlist in the U.S. Army in 1944. He served as a field artillery observer for the 294th Field Artillery Battalion and helped liberate two concentration camps during World War II. After he was honorably discharged in 1946, he attended Cornell University, where he obtained his B.A. in 1950. While at Cornell, a Finnish student invited Conant to Finland to help relocate families, farms, and livestock further from the Russian border, a protective measure against another Russian invasion. Conant accepted his invitation and took time off from his academic studies to spend several months in Finland in 1947, as well as a summer in 1949.

After graduating from Cornell, Conant attended University of Iowa's graduate writing program for a short time. Dissatisfied with the program, he worked briefly for the Carnegie Endowment, during which time he occasionally served as a personal driver for Alger Hiss. In 1951, he returned to Finland to pursue a career in journalism. He worked for United Press International until 1953.

From December 5, 1953 to May 26, 1954, Conant traveled throughout Africa as part of the Bernheim-Conant Expedition for the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). The expedition was led by Claude Bernheim, the father of his first wife, Miriam. They traveled 16,000 miles through Northern Central and Eastern Africa, collecting film footage and material culture for the museum. Conant served as the writer and photographer for the expedition, publishing illustrated articles in the New York Times and Natural History Magazine.

He later returned to Africa as a doctoral student at Columbia University, where he earned his PhD in Anthropology in 1960. After studying the Hausa language at the International African Institute in London, he traveled to Nigeria as a Fellow of the Ford Foundation to carry out his fieldwork in Dass Independent District, Bauchi Province. Working among the Barawa that live in the mountains of Dass, he focused on their religion and its impact on the technology, social and political organization, and structure of their society. His dissertation was titled "Dodo of Dass: A Study of a Pagan Religion of Northern Nigeria." During his fieldwork, he also collected data on rock gongs, which were first identified and written about by Bernard Fagg in 1955.

In 1961 to 1962, Conant was a research associate for Walter Goldschmidt's Culture and Ecology in East Africa Project. The purpose of the project was to conduct a controlled comparison of four different East African societies and the farmers and pastoralists within each tribe. Conant was assigned to conduct ethnographic research among the Pokot in West Pokot District in Kenya. This research would form the basis of his remote sensing work in the same area more than a decade later. Conant was first introduced to remote sensing data in 1974 when his colleague Priscilla Reining showed him Landsat imagery of one his former fieldwork sites. He was inspired by the potential applications of satellite data to study cultural and ecological relationships. In 1975, he and Reining organized a workshop on "Satellite Potentials for Anthropological Studies of Subsistence Activities and Population Change." He incorporated remote sensing tools in his 1977 to 1980 study of the changing cultivation patterns and management of livestock in West Pokot District. His research combined traditional fieldwork (which included data he had collected in the 1960s), LANDSAT data, and geospatial data collected from the ground.

Later in his career, Conant's research interests expanded to include the spread of diseases, specifically AIDS and malaria. He, along with Priscilla Reining, John Bongaarts, and Peter Way found that uncircumcised men were 86% more likely to contract HIV than circumcised men. Their findings were published in their paper "The Relationship Between Male Circumcision and HIV Infection in African Populations" (1989). His research on malaria focused on the spread of the disease during African prehistory.

Conant taught briefly at Columbia University and was an Assistant Professor at University of Massachusetts, at Amherst in 1960-1961. Most of his academic career was spent at Hunter College, where he served as Chair of the Anthropology Department several times. He also founded and headed the college's Research Institute in Aruba.

Conant was a Fulbright Senior Research Fellow at Oxford University's Pitts Rivers Museum in 1968-1969. He was also a fellow of the American Anthropological Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the International African Institute, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the Royal Anthropological Institute. In addition, he was actively involved with the Human Ecology: An Interdisciplinary Journal.

Conant died at the age of 84 on January 29, 2011.

Sources Consulted

Bates, Daniel G. 2011. Francis P. Conant: A Tribute to a Friend of Human Ecology. Human Ecology 39(2): 115.

Bates, Daniel and Oliver Conant. Francis P. Conant. Anthropology News. 52(5): 25.

Conant, Veronika. Email message to Lorain Wang, October 22, 2013.

[Curriculum Vitae], Series 7. Biographical Files and Letters, Francis Conant Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

Francis P. Conant. http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/anthropology/faculty-staff/in-remembrance/francis-p.-conant [accessed August 23, 2013].

1926 -- Born February 27 in New York City, New York

1944-1946 -- Enlists in Army and serves in World War II as a flash ranger in 294th Field Artillery Battalion

1950 -- Earns B.A. from Cornell University in English and Russian, minor in Engineering

1953-1954 -- AMNH Bernheim-Conant Expedition to northern Africa

1957 -- Conducts language studies at the International African Institute

1957-1959 -- Conducts fieldwork in northern Nigeria

1960 -- Earns PhD in Cultural Anthropology from Columbia University

1960-1961 -- Assistant Professor, Anthropology, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

1961-1962 -- Research Associate for Culture and Ecology in East Africa Project directed by Walter Goldschimdt

1962 -- Joins faculty at Hunter College

1968-1969 -- Fulbright Senior Research Fellow, Oxford University, Pitt-Rivers Museum

1977-1980 -- Sets up remote sensing monitoring area in West Pokot district in Kenya. Studies changing cultivation patterns and management of livestock

1995 -- Retires from Hunter College; Emeritus Professor

2011 -- Dies on January 29 at the age of 84
Related Materials:
For additional materials at the National Anthropological Archives relating to Francis Conant, see the papers of Priscilla Reining and John Lawrence Angel. His film collection is at the Human Studies Film Archives.

Artifacts and film collected during the Bernheim-Conant Expedition, his doctoral research in Nigeria, and his fieldwork in Kenya during the 1960s and 70s are at the American Museum of Natural History. He also deposited collections at the Pitts River Museum at the University of Oxford.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Francis Conant's widow Veronika Conant in 2012.
Restrictions:
The Francis P. Conant Papers are open for research. Access to the Francis P. Conant Papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Remote sensing  Search this
Journalism  Search this
Musical instruments -- Nigeria  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Subsistence farming -- Kenya  Search this
Subsistence herding -- Kenya  Search this
Human ecology  Search this
Landsat satellites  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field recordings
Maps
Field notes
Manuscripts
Electronic records
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Francis P. Conant Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2012-13
See more items in:
Francis P. Conant Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw353adee01-90b3-4434-ace0-16b4f5ce003f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2012-13
Online Media:

Harold K. Schneider papers

Correspondent:
Fallers, Lloyd  Search this
Evans-Pritchard, Edward Evans  Search this
Forde, Cyril Daryll, 1902-  Search this
Godelier, Maurice  Search this
Fortes, Meyer  Search this
Hansen, Judith  Search this
Goody, Jack  Search this
Humphrey, Hubert H. (Hubert Horatio), 1911-1978  Search this
Herskovits, Melville J. (Melville Jean), 1895-1963  Search this
Merriam, Alan P. (Alan Parkhurst), 1923-1980  Search this
Fenton, William N. (William Nelson), 1908-2005  Search this
Winter, Edward H.  Search this
Tax, Sol, 1907-1995  Search this
Southall, Aidan, 1920-2009  Search this
Richards, Audrey  Search this
Peristiany, John  Search this
Narroll, Raoul  Search this
Murdock, George Peter, 1897-1985  Search this
Moore, Joseph G.  Search this
Bascom, William Russell, 1912-1981  Search this
Creator:
Schneider, Harold Kenneth, 1925-1987  Search this
Names:
Society for Economic Anthropology (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
21 Sound tape reels
10.3 Linear feet
Culture:
Suk (African people)  Search this
Pokot  Search this
Turu  Search this
Nyaturu (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Place:
Africa
Date:
1919-1960
bulk 1949-1960
Summary:
Harold K. Schneider was an economic anthropologist specialized in Africa. He was trained at Northwestern University (Ph.D., 1953) and taught at Lawrence University (1953-1970) and Indiana University (1970-1987). The Schneider papers comprise mainly sets of documents relating to fieldwork in East Africa. The collection includes a few original fieldnotes, complete copies of expanded typscript versions of the notes, collations of data on subject categories, lexicons and other linguistic material, indexes, maps, and a few photographs. Also among the material are translations of German sources and copies of notes based on archival material, particularly material produced in colonial district offices. A small quantity of material concerning Africa generally reflects Schneider's broad interest in Africa and African pastoral economies.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Harold K. Schneider are primarily comprised of documents relating to his fieldwork in East Africa. One part concerns the Pokot (Suk), a pastoral people of Kenya, among whom Schnieder conducted fieldwork in 1951-1952 and about whom he wrote his dissertation. Another part concerns the Turu, a pastoral people of Tanzania, whom Schneider visited in 1959-1960.

The collection includes original fieldnotes, complete copies of expanded typescript versions of the notes, collations of data by subject categories, lexicons and other linguistic material, indexes, maps and a few photographs. Also among the materials are translations of German documents, copies of archival items, and notes from archival research, especially in records of colonial district offices. A small quantity of material concerning Africa in general reflects Schneider's broad interests in Africa and African pastoral economies. There are also a number of sound recordings, mainly recordings of Schneider's own lectures but also including a lecture by historian George Stocking.

There is also an alphabetical file based on personal names that includes correspondence, obituaries and publications. Notable contacts include William R. Bascom, G. Boulogne, John Bucklew, Stephan Borhegyi, E.E. Evans-Pritchard, Father Delbert Ewing, Lloyd A. Fallers, George Fathauer, William N. Fenton, Daryll Forde, Meyer Fortes, H.A. Fosbrooke, Padraic Frucht, Alexander Galloway, James Gibbs, Maurice Godelier, J.R. Good, Melville J. Herskovits, Hubert H. Humphrey, Father Raymond F. Kelly, Edward E. LeClair, Jr., Alan P. Merriam, James Moody, Joseph G. Moore, Leonard Moss, Raoul Narroll, Maxine Nimitz, J. Peristiany, Nathan M. Pusey, Audry I. Richards, Chandler W. Rowe, Aidan W. Southall, Kathleen Stahl, Roy Swanson, Curtis W. Tarr, Sol Tax, and E.H. Winter.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 6 series: 1. Personal name file (includes correspondence); 2. Pokot Material; 3. Turu Material; 4. Other Materials (comprising draft manuscripts, conference papers, lecture notes and typescripts of Turu fieldnotes; 5. General Africa Materials; 6. Sound recordings.
Biographical Note:
Harold K. Schneider was an economic anthropologist who specialized in Africa. He began his undergraduate studies at Macalester College, attended Seabury-Western Theological Seminary (1946-48), then returned to Macalester to complete his degree, majoring in sociology with a minor in biology (B.A., 1949). He received his Ph.D. in anthropology from Northwestern University (where he studied with Melville Herskovits) in 1953. Following his fieldwork among the Pokot of Kenya, Scheider accepted a position as instructor of anthropology at Lawrence University (1953-1970). He conducted fieldwork among the Turu of Tanzania in 1959-60, from which he further developed his theories in economic anthropology. He served as the president of the Central States Anthropological Society (1965); as founding president of the Society for Economic Anthropology (1982-84); and as associate editor for American Ethnologist (1980-84). In 1970, he joined the faculty of Indiana University, where he remained until his death on May 2, 1987.

1925 -- Born in Aberdeen, South Dakota, on August 24, 1925

1946-48 -- Attends Seabury-Western Theological Seminary

1949 -- Receives his B.A. in sociology from Macalester College

1948 -- Marries Carol Snyder on September 11, 1948

1951-52 -- Receives a Fulbright grant to conduct fieldwork among the Pokot (Suk) of Kenya

1953 -- Receives his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Northwestern University

1953-70 -- Begins as an Instructor at Lawrence University

1959-60 -- Receives the National Science Foundation research grant to conduct fieldwork among the Turu of Tanzania

1961 -- Chairman of the anthropology department at Lawrence University

1965 -- President of the Central States Anthropological Society

1970 -- Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University at Bloomington

1980-84 -- Associate editor for American Ethnologist

1980-82 -- First president of the Society for Economic Anthropology

1987 -- Remains employed at Indiana University until his death on May 2.
Separated Materials:
Films from this collection were transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives (Harold K. Schneider films, HSFS.1995.06).
Provenance:
Received from Carol S. Schneider in 1987 and 1994.
Restrictions:
The Harold K. Schneider papers are open for research.

Access to the Harold K. Schneider papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Uriha -- Turu  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Citation:
Harold K. Schneider Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1994-19
See more items in:
Harold K. Schneider papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a1cf8d11-6455-451c-aec1-c3c0aca1c17c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1994-19

Short video featuring the fieldwork of Smithsonian scientists created in 2000, posted by the Smithsonian Archives

Creator:
Smithsonian Insider  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 15 Jan 2013 13:00:24 +0000
Topic:
Science  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Insider
Data Source:
Smithsonian Insider
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_58b83ea2fdd55b44cb2f3724acb17848

Florida Oyster Reef Communities

Creator:
Smithsonian Insider  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Mon, 19 Oct 2015 12:08:03 +0000
Topic:
Science  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Insider
Data Source:
Smithsonian Insider
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_df16dbd8f2be840e66bc1ae6bad98fa7

David Murray Gates (1921-2016)

Subject:
Gates, David M (David Murray) 1921-2016  Search this
Boulder Laboratories (U.S.)  Search this
United States National Bureau of Standards  Search this
Physical description:
Gelatin silver prints
Type:
Black-and-white photographs
Topic:
Botany  Search this
Ecology  Search this
Atmospheric physics  Search this
Biology--Fieldwork  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 90-105 [SIA2008-1842]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
Copyright Not Evaluated
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_383224

Joseph Grinnell (1877-1939)

Subject:
Grinnell, Joseph 1877-1939  Search this
University of California, Berkeley Museum of Vertebrate Zoology  Search this
Physical description:
Gelatin silver prints
Type:
Black-and-white photographs
Topic:
Zoology  Search this
Biology--Fieldwork  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 90-105 [SIA2008-2109]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
Copyright Not Evaluated
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_384488

Joseph Grinnell (1877-1939)

Subject:
Grinnell, Joseph 1877-1939  Search this
University of California, Berkeley Museum of Vertebrate Zoology  Search this
Physical description:
Gelatin silver prints
Type:
Black-and-white photographs
Topic:
Zoology  Search this
Biology--Fieldwork  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 90-105 [SIA2008-2110]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
Copyright Not Evaluated
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_384489

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By