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Publications, New York Academy of Sciences

Collection Creator:
Wheatland, Richard, II, 1923-2009  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 3a
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1959-1966
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
New York Airways Collection, Acc. NASM.1992.0052, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
New York Airways Collection
New York Airways Collection / Series 2: 1973 Acquisition
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-1992-0052-ref752
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  • View Publications, New York Academy of Sciences digital asset number 1

F

Collection Creator:
Smith, C. Earle (Claude Earle), 1922-1987  Search this
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1967-1985
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes Fanshawe, Dennis. B.; Farr, George; Farris, Randall L.; Feldman, Lawrence H.; Ferguson, Robert B.; Fernández, Jorge; Fernandez-Perez, Alvaro; Ferreyra, Ramón; Field Biology Club --U of A; Field, Julia Allen; Field, Henry; Field Museum of Natural History --Publications; Fish, Suzy K.; Fish Wildlife Service (USDA); Flores, Isobel; Fogg, John M.; Folk Classification Bulletin; Fonda, Lucile; Fong, Harry H. S.; Ford, Janet; Forest Products Laboratory; Fort Burgwin Conference; Fowler, Ann; Freeman, Jane L.; de Friedemann, Nina S.; Frost, Janet O.; Furlow, Richard H.; Fuchs, E. Kay; Fryxell, Paul A.; Fulbrights Research Awards; and Furst, Peter.
Collection Restrictions:
Grant proposal reviews in Series 4: Professional Activities and materials with student grades in Series 5: University of Alabama have been restricted.

Access to the C. Earle Smith Jr. papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
C. Earle Smith Jr. papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
C. Earle Smith Jr. papers
C. Earle Smith Jr. papers / Series 1: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2006-24-ref56

Phylogeny, Adaptive Radiation, and Historical Biogeography in Bromeliaceae: Insights from an Eight-Locus Plastid Phylogeny

Author:
Jabaily, Rachel S.  Search this
Barfuss, Michael H. J.  Search this
Van Ee, Benjamin  Search this
Gonsiska, Philip A.  Search this
Sytsma, Kenneth J.  Search this
Givnish, Thomas J.  Search this
Schulte, Katharina  Search this
Luther, Harry  Search this
Crayn, Darren M.  Search this
Evans, Timothy M.  Search this
Holst, Bruce K.  Search this
Till, Walter  Search this
Smith, J. Andrew C.  Search this
Riina, Ricarda  Search this
Zizka, Georg  Search this
Brown, Gregory K.  Search this
Horres, Ralf  Search this
Berry, Paul E.  Search this
Winter, Klaus  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2011
Topic:
Tropics  Search this
Biology  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_100905

Curtis W. Sabrosky Oral History Interviews

Creator::
Sabrosky, Curtis W. (Curtis Williams), 1910- , interviewee  Search this
Extent:
5 audiotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Date:
1988
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or student on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Curtis W. Sabrosky was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his long and distinguished career as Research Entomologist, and because of his memories of work and colleagues in the National Museum of Natural History.
Descriptive Entry:
The Sabrosky interviews were conducted by Pamela M. Henson, historian, Smithsonian Institution Archives, in March of 1988. The interviews cover his education; career at the USDA; work with the National Entomological Collection maintained by the NMNH; interests in issues of taxonomic nomenclature, development of International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (the Code), especially his work with the ICZN; work with the Entomological Society of America (ESA); and reminiscences of colleagues, notably J. Chester Bradley, Roland W. Brown, J. F. Gates Clarke, and Carl F. W. Muesebeck. This collection is comprised of three interview sessions, totaling 5.0 hours and 217 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
Curtis W. Sabrosky (1910-1997), was born on April 3, 1910, in Sturgis, Michigan, and became an Entomologist specializing in Diptera. He received the A.B. in biology from Kalamazoo College in 1931, the M.S. in zoology from Kansas State College (KSC), later Kansas State University, in 1933, and the Sc.D. from Kalamazoo College in 1966. From 1936 to 1944, he taught at Michigan State College (MSC), and served in the Public Health Service during World War II. In 1946, he joined the staff of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), first with the Bureau of Entomology and later with its Systematic Entomology Laboratory (SEL) as a Research Entomologist, and serving as Research Director from 1967 to 1973. From 1980 to 1988, he was a Cooperating Scientist at SEL, as well as a Research Associate of the Department of Entomology, National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). A specialist on issues of taxonomic nomenclature, from 1963 to 1985, he served as a member of the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN).
Topic:
Museum curators -- United States -- Interviews  Search this
Entomology  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Biology -- Classification  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9583, Curtis W. Sabrosky Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9583
See more items in:
Curtis W. Sabrosky Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9583

Paul David Hurd Papers

Creator::
Hurd, Paul David, 1921-  Search this
Extent:
30.30 cu. ft. (60 document boxes) (2 oversize folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1938-1982 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
These papers document the professional career and to a lesser extent the personal life of Paul D. Hurd, Jr., between 1938 and 1982. Particularly well represented in the papers is material concerning his research on the insect order Hymenoptera; his teaching and research career at the University of California, Berkeley; his administrative duties at the National Science Foundation; his curatorial and administrative activities at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH); field work and collecting trips; and his participation in professional organizations.

A large part of the collection consists of correspondence written and received by Hurd between 1942 and 1982. The correspondence illustrates all aspects of his career and includes letters with domestic and foreign entomologists; colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley, the National Science Foundation, and the National Museum of Natural History; staff of professional organizations, journals, and publishers; and personal friends.

Papers documenting Hurd's research on the Hymenoptera include correspondence, field notes, research notes, manuscripts, specimen lists, and photographs relating to his work on the carpenter bees. Similar records illustrate his study of the squash and gourd bees, and his research project on the bee pollinators of the creosote bush. Thoroughly documented is his work as co-editor and author of the revised Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico. Also included is a research file primarily concerning the Hymenoptera.

The collection also includes field notes, correspondence, and related materials documenting field work and collecting trips in the western and southwestern United States, Alaska, and Mexico; desk diaries maintained by Hurd during his tenure as Chairman, Department of Entomology, NMNH; and correspondence, class notes, lecture notes, copies of examinations, and related materials documenting his student days and teaching career at the University of California, Berkeley.
Historical Note:
Paul D. Hurd, Jr. (1921-1982), entomologist, educator, and museum curator, was an authority on the taxonomy and biology of bees. He developed an interest in natural history, especially birds, after his family moved to the Mojave Desert region of California. His first published paper, a report on a bird census in Newport Upper Bay, California, appeared in Audubon Magazine in 1941. In 1940, Hurd enrolled at the University of California, Berkeley, to study entomology. His undergraduate work was interrupted between 1942 and 1945 while he served in the United States Navy as a Chief Pharmacist's Mate. He resumed his studies at Berkeley in 1946 and received the B.S. degree in 1947; the M.S. degree in 1948; and his Ph.D. degree in 1950.

Hurd remained at Berkeley to begin his professional career, receiving appointment as Senior Museum Entomologist in 1950. As his career advanced Hurd was given teaching, as well as research responsibilities. By 1965, he had attained the rank of Professor of Entomology and Entomologist in the California Agricultural Experiment Station. Hurd's duties at Berkeley included responsibility for the California Insect Survey where he directed numerous field trips and contributed to the development of the University's collection of native insects. During 1967 and 1968 Hurd took leave of absence from the University to join the National Science Foundation as Associate Program Director in the Division of Biological and Medical Sciences. In 1970, Hurd accepted appointment as Curator in the Department of Entomology, National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). His service at NMNH included a term as Chairman of the Department of Entomology from 1971 to 1976. He was appointed Senior Scientist in 1980.

Hurd's research interests were broad, and he published on several of the families of the order Hymenoptera, including Mutillidae, Pompilidae, Anthophoridae, Megachilidae, and Halictidae. He also published papers on certain families of the orders Coleoptera and Diptera. However, most of his research was devoted to the bees of the superfamily Apoidea. Hurd published over twenty papers and books on the carpenter bees (Xylocopinae) including A Classification of the Large Carpenter Bees, co-authored with Jesus S. Moure. Another major research interest was the pollination of plants by insects. He conducted extensive studies on the bee pollinators of the squashes, gourds, and other plants of the genus Cucurbita. He also studied the pollination of the creosote bush (Larrea tridentata). Hurd's research at the National Museum of Natural History was highlighted by his duties as co-editor of the revised Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico published in 1979. While most of Hurd's field work was concentrated in California and the southwestern United States, he also conducted studies in Alaska, Mexico, South America, and Central America.

Hurd was active within the entomological profession, and he served several organizations in an appointed or elected capacity. For several years he was editor of the Pan-Pacific Entomologist, journal of the Pacific Coast Entomological Society. As a member of the Entomological Society of America, Hurd worked on the Governing Board and served as Chairman of the Advisory Committee for Systematics Resources in Entomology. He was also President of the Association for Tropical Biology, 1969-1970; Section Editor (Hymenoptera) for Biological Abstracts; and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the California Academy of Sciences.

For additional biographical information on Hurd see Karl V. Krombein and E. Gorton Linsley, "Paul David Hurd, Jr., 1921-1982," Pan-Pacific Entomologist, October 1982, vol. 58, no. 4, pp. 262-277.
Chronology:
1921 -- Born in Chicago, Illinois, April 2

1941 -- Published first paper on California bird census in Audubon Magazine

1942-1945 -- Service in the United States Navy in the South Pacific

1947 -- Bachelor of Science, University of California, Berkeley

1948 -- Master of Science, University of California, Berkeley

1950 -- Ph. D., University of California, Berkeley

1950-1952 -- Senior Museum Entomologist, University of California, Berkeley

1950-1963 -- Editor, Pan-Pacific Entomologist

1952-1953 -- Field work analyzing soil invertebrates at Point Barrow, Alaska

1952-1954 -- Junior Entomologist, University of California, Berkeley

1954-1959 -- Lecturer in Entomology and Assistant Entomologist, University of California, Berkeley

1956 -- Field work investigating fossiliferous amber in Chiapas, Mexico

1959-1960 -- Fulbright Commission/Guggenheim Foundation Research Scholar and Fellow, Universidade da Parana, Curitiba, Brazil

1959-1960 -- Field Work in Central and South America

1959-1965 -- Lecturer in Entomology and Associate Entomologist, University of California, Berkeley

1963 -- Field work in Costa Rica and Panama

1963 -- A Classification of the Large Carpenter Bees (with J. S. Moure). University of California Publication Entomol. : 29

1964 -- Trip to study carpenter bee type specimens in European museums

1965 -- Field work in Venezuela and Colombia

1965-1970 -- Professor of Entomology and Entomologist, University of California, Berkeley

1967 -- Field work in Argentina and Brazil

1967-1968 -- Associate Program Director, Division of Biological and Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation

1969-1970 -- President, Association for Tropical Biology

1970 -- A Classification of the Squash and Gourd Bees Peponapis and Xenoglossa (with E. G. Linsley). University of California Publication Entomol. : 62

1970-1971 -- Curator, Division of Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, Department of Entomology, National Museum of Natural History (NMNH)

1971-1973 -- International Biological Program/National Science Foundation Larrea Bee Project

1971-1976 -- Chairman, Department of Entomology, NMNH

1972-1975 -- Member of Governing Board, Entomological Society of America (ESA)

1973-1975 -- Chairman, Advisory Committee for Systematics Resources in Entomology (ESA)

1975 -- The Principal Larrea Bees of the Southwestern United States (with E. G. Linsley) Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology : 193

1976-1980 -- Curator, Department of Entomology, NMNH

1979 -- Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico (co-editor and author of Apoidea section) Smithsonian Institution Press

1980 -- Principal Sunflower Bees of North America with emphasis on the Southwestern United States (with W. E. LaBerge and E. G. Linsley) Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology : 310

1980-1982 -- Senior Scientist, Department of Entomology, NMNH

1982 -- Death, March 12
Oversize:
This collection contains oversize material.
Topic:
Entomology  Search this
Entomologists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7311, Paul David Hurd Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7311
See more items in:
Paul David Hurd Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7311

Folder 4 Hurd, Paul D., Jr., Linsley, Earle Gorton, Moore, Arthur D., and Ruckes, H., Jr. "The morphology, classification, biology, and control of coleopterous insects injurious to forests and forest products." California Agricultural Experiment Statio...

Collection Creator::
Hurd, Paul David, 1921-  Search this
Container:
Box 54 of 60
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7311, Paul David Hurd Papers
See more items in:
Paul David Hurd Papers
Paul David Hurd Papers / Series 9: Research File, 1946-1980, and undated / Box 54
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7311-refidd1e9049

Ecology Program Records

Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Environmental Sciences  Search this
Extent:
11.5 cu. ft. (23 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Serials (publications)
Maps
Date:
1965-1973
Descriptive Entry:
This record unit consists of files documenting the operation of the Smithsonian Office of Ecology (SOE), 1965-1970, and its successor, the Ecology Program of the Office of Environmental Sciences (OES), 1970-1973. The records were created primarily by administrators Buechner, 1965-1968; Wallen, 1969; and Jenkins, 1970-1973. They include organizational files, 1965-1973; administrative records, 1965-1973, including material concerning the development of the Chesapeake Bay Center for Field Biology (after 1970, the Chesapeake Bay Center for Environmental Studies) and the Smithsonian-Peace Corps Environmental Program; project files, 1965-1973, including records documenting projects conducted as part of the International Program in Ecology; and files of Lee Merriam Talbot, 1965-1971.
Historical Note:
The history of the Ecology Program of the Office of Environmental Sciences can be traced to July 1, 1965, when the Smithsonian Office of Ecology (SOE) was created to assist in expanding the research opportunities of Smithsonian scientists and to aid in the coordination of ecological activities with other government agencies. From its creation until 1966, the SOE was an administrative unit of the National Museum of Natural History. In 1966, administrative responsibility for the SOE was transferred to the Assistant Secretary for Science. The Smithsonian's environmental sciences programs were reorganized under the Office of Environmental Sciences (OES) in 1970. At that time, the SOE became the Ecology Program of the newly created OES. In 1973, OES was merged with the Office of International Activities to form the Office of International and Environmental Programs (OIEP). The Ecology Program came under the administrative control of OIEP. The Ecology Program was abolished in 1974.

Administrators of the Ecology Program of OES and its predecessor the SOE included Helmut K. Buechner, assistant director for ecology, 1965-1966, head, 1966-1968 (he also served as senior scientist, 1968-1971); Irvin Eugene Wallen, acting head, 1969; and Dale W. Jenkins, director, 1970-1973. Other staff included Lee Merriam Talbot, research biologist, 1965-1966, field representative, Ecology and Conservation, 1966-1967, deputy head and international field representative, 1968, resident ecologist, 1969-1971, and deputy director, 1972-1973; and Francis Raymond Fosberg, special assistant for tropical biology, 1965-1966.

Programs and bureaus under the administration of the Ecology Program of OES and its predecessor the SOE included the Chesapeake Bay Center for Field Biology (after 1970 the Chesapeake Bay Center for Environmental Studies), 1965-1969; the Center for Natural Areas, 1972-1974; and the Peace Corps Environmental Program, 1972-1974.
Topic:
Coastal ecology  Search this
Research  Search this
Environmental sciences  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Serials (publications)
Maps
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 271, Smithsonian Institution, Office of Environmental Sciences, Ecology Program Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 271
See more items in:
Ecology Program Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0271
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  • View Ecology Program Records digital asset number 1
Online Media:

Richard E. Blackwelder Oral History Interview

Creator::
Blackwelder, Richard E., interviewee  Search this
Extent:
2 audiotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Date:
1978
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or student on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Blackwelder was interviewed for the Oral History Collection to document his career in entomology and his role in the founding of the Society of Systematic Zoology.
Descriptive Entry:
Blackwelder was interviewed by Pamela M. Henson on January 17, 1978. The interview covers Blackwelder's education; field work in the West Indies; his career with the USDA, American Museum of Natural History, USNM, St. John Fisher College, and Southern Illinois University; his research interests; the SSZ; and his colleagues. The interview focuses on his years in the Division of Insects, USNM, his curatorial duties, research on Staphylinidae, his colleagues, relations with the USDA staff, and USNM administration. Blackwelder discusses the founding of the SSZ, his role in its development, and relations between the SSZ and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and other zoological societies. Blackwelder reminisces extensively about his friend and colleague, Waldo LaSalle Schmitt, Head Curator of Biology in the USNM and a founder of the SSZ.
Historical Note:
Richard Eliot Blackwelder (1909-2001), received the B.A. (1931) and Ph.D. (1934) in zoology from Stanford University. From 1935 to 1938, he conducted entomological field work in the West Indies with the Smithsonian's Walter Rathbone Bacon Traveling Scholarship. He then worked briefly for the White-Fringed Beetle Identification Unit, Bureau of Entomology, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) before accepting an Assistant Curatorship in Entomology at the American Museum of Natural History in 1938.

In 1940 Blackwelder joined the staff of the United States National Museum (USNM) as an Assistant Curator in the Division of Insects and in 1942 advanced to Associate Curator. His research specialty was the morphology, classification, and nomenclature of the family Staphylinidae. During World War II, Blackwelder worked in electronics research and development while on leave from the museum. After the war he returned to the Division of Insects and was active in the development of the Society of Systematic Zoology (SSZ), as Secretary-Treasurer from 1949 to 1960, President in 1961, and Editor of its journal, Systematic Zoology.

In 1954 Blackwelder left the USNM and pursued his broader research interests in the principles of zoology. From 1956 to 1958 he was an Associate Professor at St. John Fisher College, and from 1965 until his retirement in 1977 was Professor of Zoology at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.
Topic:
Entomology  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Biology -- Classification  Search this
Records of meetings, organizations, and professional societies  Search this
Museum curators -- Interviews  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9517, Richard E. Blackwelder Oral History Interview
Identifier:
Record Unit 9517
See more items in:
Richard E. Blackwelder Oral History Interview
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9517

Records

Topic:
Journal of Systematic Zoology (Serial)
Creator::
Society of Systematic Zoology  Search this
Extent:
26 cu. ft. (11 record storage boxes) (30 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1947-1975
Descriptive Entry:
These records include membership files, administrative files, reports, fiscal records, records related to the Journal of Systematic Zoology and copies of other SSZ publications, records related to the annual meetings, the Pacific Section of SSZ records, files on scientific societies, and the records of the Summer Institute in Systematics.
Historical Note:
The Society of Systematic Zoology (SSZ) was organized at the Chicago meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in 1947. Prior to the meeting, Waldo LaSalle Schmitt and George W. Wharton, Jr., had polled taxonomists about the founding of a systematics society; and the result was an organizational meeting on December 29, 1949. The first annual meeting of the SSZ was held in Washington in September 1948. Schmitt became its first president and Wharton its first secretary-treasurer. The government of the Society was vested in a council, with officers elected from nominees named by the Council. Original Council members were Orlando Park and Richard Eliot Blackwelder. A president ad president-elect were elected to one-year terms.

A News Letter for the SSZ was first published in 1949 under the direction of Hobart Muir Smith, chairman of the Publications Committee. In 1952 the Journal of Systematic Zoology was founded under the auspices of Richard Eliot Blackwelder. It gradually supplanted the News Letter which was discontinued in 1964. The quarterly Journal was considered the most important project of the SSZ; it was devoted to theoretical and philosophical considerations in systematics rather than the naming of new taxa.

Other projects of the Society have included the continuing publication of "List of Books on Zoology," and a Directory of Zoological Taxonomists.
Topic:
Biology -- Classification  Search this
Animals -- Classification  Search this
Professional associations  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7226, Society of Systematic Zoology, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 7226
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7226

Records

Topic:
Adventures in science (Radio program)
Creator::
Science Service  Search this
Extent:
268.55 cu. ft. (79 record storage boxes) (372 document boxes) (2 12x17 boxes) (3 3x5 boxes) (3 5x8 boxes) (2 tall document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Nitrate materials
Clippings
Sound recordings
Manuscripts
Brochures
Audiotapes
Phonograph records
Date:
1902-1965
Introduction:
The bulk of this collection was processed by Jane Livermore, a devoted and tireless volunteer in the Smithsonian Institution Archives between 1995 and 2004. Livermore is a former Science Service employee. She worked in the organization's library, oversaw the educational project "THINGS of Science," and served as Assistant to the Director. The Archives wishes to thank Ms. Livermore for her excellent work on this collection.

Many others have assisted on this project. SIA also thanks Helen Shade, Program Assistant in the Archives Division, who helped create folder listings for many of the later series in this record unit. SIA is especially indebted to historian Marcel C. LaFollette, who has conducted extensive research in this collection, written a historical summary for this guide, and whose findings in these records have generated excitement both within the Archives and among professional colleagues. SIA could not have created this finding aid without Dr. LaFollette's contributions, annotations, and insights.
Descriptive Entry:
Record Unit 7091 contains: correspondence and telegrams; drafts and final versions of articles, books, and radio scripts; staff notes and interoffice correspondence; published material such as pamphlets and news clippings; photographs and drawings; advertisements and trade literature; and other ephemera related to science news coverage and publishing.

This record unit is one of the largest single collections in the Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA). There are several related collections in SIA (see Accessions 01-122, 01-243, 04-042, 90-068, 90-105, 93-019, and 97-020 (see also the National Air and Space Museum; the National Museum of American History, including the Archives Center and collections in agriculture and mining, chemistry, costume, engineering, electricity, medical sciences, military history, modern physics, and photographic history; the National Museum of Natural History; and the National Portrait Gallery).

The arrangement of RU 7091 reflects the eclectic nature of an active news organization that was reactive to current events and discoveries, in touch with a worldwide network of researchers, and concerned about accuracy. In 1960, the organization's educational director described their records in this way: "... Science Service has been distributing science news for 40 years. During that time we have been in touch with practically all the major scientists and the developments which were taking place. Since all of our material has to have full authentification, we have built up a mass of files" (Letter from Frederick A. Indorf to Joseph C. Shipman, October 24, 1960, Box 350, Folder 13). This "mass of files" also included two extensive "morgues" that contained back-up material, information, and photographs that could be used in future stories. The informational "morgue" files were organized according to the Library of Congress classification scheme. A few of these files are in RU 7091 (see Series 7); more extensive collections are located in SIA Accessions 01-122, 01-243, 90-068, 90-105, and 93-019 and in curatorial collections in Smithsonian Institution museums. A major portion of the biographical "morgue," containing photographs and information about scientists, engineers, and other public figures, is in SIA Accession 90-105.

Editorial correspondence with news sources was usually filed in the general correspondence files of Series 1 - 5. Some was also filed with the resulting story for the Daily Mail Report (see Series 8) or with other back-up in a morgue file. Correspondence with scientists and engineers who appeared on the Science Service radio programs may also be found in the radio program files (see Series 10). Audiotapes of some broadcasts are in Series 20, SIA Accession 04-042, and in the NMAH Archives Center collection (Call # ACNNMAH0223).

Most folders in RU 7091 retain the original folder's title. This finding aid uses edited descriptions and additional notes to assist researchers in navigating through the record unit. Most correspondence was filed by the date and the last name of correspondent, but documents were sometimes filed alphabetically according to a topic or by the name of an individual's affiliation.

The topics covered in RU 7091 include all fields of science and engineering, theoretical physics to bridge construction techniques, wildlife conservation to plastics and paints. There is considerable attention to social and economic issues and to military research and censorship during World War II. The staff visited museums, observatories, industrial test facilities, and military installations; they reported on most of the major scientific events of the time, including the Scopes trial. During the 1930s and 1940s, Science Service purchased news and photographs from official U.S.S.R. news offices and also supported efforts to interact with Soviet scientists. There were attempts to establish branch operations in England and France and to encourage science popularization and education in Mexico.

Correspondents include trustees, news sources, publishers, writers, and business clients. Most inquiries from readers or listeners were answered and filed with regular editorial correspondence. "Taffy" is the term Science Service used for complimentary correspondence; it is often filed separately. Series 5 also contains manuscripts and letters from scientists and non-scientists who were convinced they had discovered, proved, or understood a new scientific principle or insight - or else could save humanity from foreseeable destruction.

Frequent correspondents among the trustees included: C. G. Abbot, Edward U. Condon, Rene J. Dubos, Frank R. Ford, George Ellery Hale, Ross G. Harrison, Harrison E. Howe, W. H. Howell, Vernon Kellogg, Karl Lark-Horovitz, D. T. MacDougal, Kirtley F. Mather, John C. Merriam, Robert A. Millikan, Raymond Pearl, Marlen E. Pew, Michael I. Pupin, I. I. Rabi, Charles Edward Scripps, Robert P. Scripps, Paul B. Sears, Thomas L. Sidlo, Harry L. Smithton, Mark Sullivan, Warren S. Thompson, Henry B. Ward, Alexander Wetmore, David White, William Allen White, and Robert M. Yerkes.

Other notable writers, scientists, and public figures include: William Beebe, Hans A. Bethe, Charles Bittinger, Howard W. Blakeslee, Edwin G. Boring, Bart J. Bok, Gregory and Marjorie Breit, P. W. Bridgman, Wilfred Swancourt Bronson, Rachel Carson, George Washington Carver, Morris L. Cooke, Clarence Darrow, Frances Densmore, Thomas A. Edison, Enrico Fermi, Henry Field, George Gamow, Eugene Garfield, Robert H. Goddard, Peter C. Goldmark, Hamilton Holt, J. Edgar Hoover, Julian S. Huxley, Louis M. Lyons, Margaret Mead, Merrill Moore, Edward R. Murrow, H. H. Nininger, Henry Fairfield Osborn, Gifford Pinchot, James A. Reyniers, J. B. Rhine, Walter Orr Roberts, M. Lincoln Schuster, John T. Scopes, Glenn T. Seaborg, Gilbert Seldes, Elizabeth Sidney Semmens, Upton Sinclair, Otto Struve, Elihu Thomson, Harold C. Urey, Mark Van Doren, Selman A. Waksman, Henry A. Wallace, Warren Weaver, H. G. Wells, and Gaylord Wilshire.

RU 7091 contains extensive records of the transactions with temporary correspondents and photographers, notes on the article titles and amounts paid, as well as correspondence discussing particular scientific events and, during the 1930s and 1940s, the situation in Europe. Among the active European correspondents were Maxim Bing in Switzerland, Victor Cofman in England, and Theodor G. Ahrens, Hans F. Kutschbach, and Gabrielle Rabel in Germany.

Researchers interested in the history of American publishing, journalism, advertising, and public relations will find extensive correspondence with professionals in those fields. Newspaper Enterprise Association, or "NEA Service," was a news syndicate established by the Scripps organization in 1909, to which Science Service sold articles and feature series. They also marketed articles and photographs to publications like Life and Reader's Digest. There is considerable correspondence with the editors about topic selection and why particular stories were rejected.

Science Service staff used special abbreviations in their interoffice correspondence. Starting in the 1930s, small name and date stamps were also used to record or acknowledge all correspondence and notes. Abbreviations were written in all capital letters as well as in initial cap form (e.g., Watson Davis was "WD" as well as Wd"). Here is a partial list of abbreviations that appear frequently in RU 7091:

ACM = A. C. Monahan

An = Anne Shiveley, secretary to Watson Davis

Ba = Howard Bandy, treasurer

Be = Miriam Bender, office staff

DGL = Donald G. Loomis, assistant treasurer

Do = Dorothy Reynolds, secretary to Watson Davis

Ed = Emily C. Davis (sometimes written as "ECD")

En = Leonard Engel

Ew = Ann Ewing

Fa = Bob Farr

FD = Fremont Davis

Fl = Margaret Fleming

Fr = Violet Frye

Gi = Minna Gill, librarian

Hd = Helen Miles Davis

Hj = Hallie Jenkins, sales manager

Ho = Janet Howard

HW = Howard Wheeler, business manager

JWY = J. W. Young

Js = James Stokley

Kl = Fred Kline, list room

Kr = Joseph Kraus, science youth programs

Md = Marjorie MacDill (Breit); in 1928, Jane Stafford became the medical editor and used these initials from 1928-1936

Mg = Mary McGrath, secretary to Watson Davis

Ml = Bernice Maldondo

Mm = Martha G. Morrow

Mn = Minna Hewes

Mo = Morton Mott-Smith

Ot = Frances Ottemiller

Pd = Phillippa Duckworth, secretary to E. E. Slosson

Ps = Page Secrest

Pt = Robert Potter

Ri = William E. Ritter

RLI = Ronald L. Ives, photograph editor

RNF = Robert N. Farr

Ro = Ron Ross

Sl = E. E. Slosson

St = Jane Stafford, after 1936

Th = Frank Thone

Vn = Marjorie Van de Water

Wd = Watson Davis

We = Margaret Weil

Wi = Austin Winant

Interoffice correspondence in the 1920s also used these abbreviations: Bk = bookkeeper; Cr = circulation; Fl = File; Lb = library or library files; Mr = mailroom; Rt = retail files; Sa = sales department; Tp = typing department; Wb = wastebasket.
Historical Note:
Science Service, a not-for-profit institution founded to increase and improve the public dissemination of scientific and technical information, began its work in 1921. Although initially intended as a news service, Science Service produced an extensive array of news features, radio programs, motion pictures, phonograph records, and demonstration kits and it also engaged in various educational, translation, and research activities. It later became Science Service, Inc., an organization that publishes Science News and promotes science education. On January 10, 2008 Science Service was renamed Society for Science & the Public (SSP).

Record Unit 7091 contains correspondence and other material related to Science Service, from just before its establishment through 1963, including the editorial correspondence of the first two directors and senior staff.

The inspiration for such an organization developed during conversations between newspaper publisher E.W. Scripps (1854-1926) and zoologist William E. Ritter (1856-1944), who headed the Scripps-funded oceanographic institute in California. "Document A - The American Society for the Dissemination of Science," dictated by E. W. Scripps on March 5, 1919 (see Box 1, Folder 1), declared that the "first aim of this [proposed] institution should be just the reverse of what is called propaganda." Scripps believed that it should not support partisan causes, including those of any particular scientific group or discipline, but should instead develop ways to "present facts in readable and interesting form..." (p. 3). Scripps and Ritter held meetings throughout the United States to solicit ideas and support from scientists. By 1920, they had concluded that the best way to improve the popularization of science would be to create an independent, non-commercial news service with close ties to, but not operated by, the scientific community. The scientists would lend credibility to the organization's work, help to ensure accuracy, and project an image of authority.

Scripps supplied an initial donation of $30,000 per year from 1921 until his death in 1926. His will placed $500,000 in trust for Science Service and provided a continuing endowment until the trust was dissolved in 1956.

Science Service did not provide all its services for free. Scripps believed that the news service would be more valued by its clients - and would better reflect their needs and professional standards - if it charged a fair price for its products. As a result, the history of the organization is one of continual innovation, as the staff developed and marketed new syndicated features, wrote articles and books for other publishers on commission, and re-wrote each basic news story for multiple markets.

From the beginning, Science Service was guided by a 15-member board of trustees composed of two groups: prominent scientists nominated by the National Academy of Sciences, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Smithsonian Institution, and newspaper editors or executives nominated by the Scripps-Howard organization or the Scripps family trust. William E. Ritter served as the first president of the board of trustees. Such scientists as J. McKeen Cattell, Edwin G. Conklin, Harlow Shapley, and Leonard Carmichael (the seventh Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution) succeeded him over the next four decades.

During the summer of 1920, Ritter began negotiations with Edwin E. Slosson (1865-1929), a well-known chemist and popularizer. Slosson had taught at the University of Wyoming for thirteen years until moving to New York to become the literary editor of The Independent. He began work as the head of Science Service in January 1921.

The first public announcement of the creation of Science Service appeared in Science, April 8, 1921, pp. 321-323. The first meeting of the trustees was held on May 20, 1921; the Science Service trust was set up July 22, 1921; and the not-for-profit organization was incorporated in the state of Delaware on November 1, 1921.

In 1921, Howard Wheeler, former editor of the San Francisco Daily News, was hired as the business manager. Watson Davis (1896-1967), a civil engineer who had been working at the National Bureau of Standards and writing science features for a Washington, D.C., newspaper, was hired as principal writer. In 1923, Wheeler was fired; Slosson (whose title had been "Editor") was named Director; and Davis was promoted to managing editor.

Throughout the 1920s, Davis built the news service through the "Daily Science News Bulletin," which later became the syndicated "Daily Mail Report" sold to newspapers around the country. He developed a local radio program and script service ("Science News of the Week"), coordinated a project to produce phonograph records, and assembled a skilled staff to handle reporting, circulation, production, sales, advertising, and accounting. Davis also edited the organization's most successful product, Science News Letter (titled Science News Bulletin, April 2, 1921-March 1922, and Science News-Letter, March 1922-October 1930).

After Slosson's death on October 15, 1929, the trustees favored replacing him with another scientist. Davis lobbied for the position but remained as managing editor until he was finally appointed director in 1933. He guided the organization until his retirement in 1966.

From 1921-1924, the editorial offices were located in offices rented by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington. When the NAS moved to its own building at 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., in April 1924, Science Service acquired space there. As World War II began, space became precious at the NAS headquarters. In spring 1941, Science Service purchased its own building at 1719 N Street, N.W., to house its expanding operations and staff.

Between 1921-1963, Davis and senior writers such as Frank Thone, James Stokley, Jane Stafford, and Marjorie Van de Water interviewed hundreds of scientists and engineers, and wrote thousands of articles, often maintaining a lively correspondence with their sources. Thone, a botanist with a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, worked for the organization from 1924 until his death in 1949, covering both the Scopes trial and the atomic tests at Bikini Atoll; astronomer Stokley joined the group in 1925 and continued to write the "Star Map" feature even after he went to work for the Franklin Institute and for General Electric. Stafford, one of the founding members of the National Association of Science Writers, covered medicine and biology for Science Service from 1928 to 1956. Van de Water covered psychology and related topics from 1929 through the 1960s. Other members of the Davis family also assisted in the operations, including Watson's wife, the chemist Helen Miles Davis (1896-1957), who edited Chemistry from 1944, when it was acquired by Science Service, until shortly before her death. Watson's brother Fremont Davis served as the organization's photographer.

Science Service also depended on an extensive network of part-time correspondents, or "stringers," in the United States, Europe, and Asia, to provide information and photographs. Most of these contributors were graduate students, young professors, or schoolteachers. By the mid-1930s, Science Service was dispensing small fees (under $10.00) for over 500 short news items and illustrations annually. The staff was also answering hundreds of letters each year from readers of all age who were curious about science in general or had specific questions about a subject mentioned in the news. The correspondence with these people afford a rich resource for social and cultural historians.

In addition to sending its writers to participate in expeditions, Science Service established projects to collect scientific data, such as seismological information and ursigrams, and to compile weekly astronomical and meteorological charts. They also initiated a "Scientific Minute Men" project in which a network of archeologists and other scientists were authorized to wire Science Service at no charge.

The activities of the staff and organization were wide-ranging and reflect the breadth of science and scientific concerns during the twentieth century. Slosson and Davis were involved extensively with groups like the American Association for the Advancement of Science, British Association for the Advancement of Science, Sigma Xi, and American Eugenics Society, and the staff writers covered dozens of scientific meetings every year, sometimes serving as officers of those associations. Davis was a major participant in the National Inventors Council and served on dozens of advisory committees for scientific laboratories and universities, and national and international government agencies. With Alexander Gode, Davis worked to promote acceptance of Interlingua, an international scientific language. One of the organization's most lasting contributions was to science education, through its sponsorship of Science Clubs of America, National Science Fairs, the Science Talent Search, and informal teaching units called "THINGS of Science." Science Service also sponsored early innovation in microphotography, established a Documentation Division and a Bibliofilm Service, and helped to found the American Documentation Institute.

For the first four decades of its existence, however, the central mission remained science journalism. As Davis wrote in 1960, Science Service strived from the beginning to convince both publishers and scientists that "science is news, good news, news that can compete, from a circulation standpoint, with crime, politics, human comedy and pathos, and the conventional array of news and features" and that science "could be written popularly so as to be accurate in fact and implication and yet be good reading in newspaper columns" (Watson Davis, "The Rise of Science Understanding," 1960, Box 368, Folder 2). These records will help historians to understand better the processes of negotiation, adjustment, and innovation which created that news. - Marcel C. LaFollette
Topic:
Science -- History  Search this
Interlingua (International Auxiliary Language Association)  Search this
Journalism, Scientific  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Nitrate materials
Clippings
Sound recordings
Manuscripts
Brochures
Audiotapes
Phonograph records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7091, Science Service, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 7091
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7091

Records

Creator::
Biological Society of Washington  Search this
Extent:
7.5 cu. ft. (15 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
circa 1880-1972
Introduction:
This finding aid was digitized with funds generously provided by the Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee.
Descriptive Entry:
The records of the Society include mailing and membership lists, officers' reports, financial material, minutes of meetings, and official correspondence. There is a sizeable amount of correspondence and related material concerning the publication of manuscripts in the Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington.
Historical Note:
The Biological Society of Washington was founded on December 3, 1880. Its original purpose was the furtherance of biological scholarship by providing a forum for the presentation of scientific papers. Later modifications limited the purpose to the furtherance of taxonomic study and the diffusion of taxonomic knowledge, mainly through the publication of the Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington. It was also one of the eight founding organizations of the Washington Academy of Sciences.

The governing council of the Society includes the elected officers and selected local members. The first president was George Brown Goode and the first recording secretary was Richard Rathbun. A number of other Smithsonian Institution and United States National Museum staff have been active members of the Society, as have staff from other federal government scientific agencies, particularly the Departments of Agriculture and Interior.
Topic:
Professional associaitons  Search this
Biology -- Classification  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7185, Biological Society of Washington, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 7185
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7185

Records

Topic:
ASC Newsletter (Serial)
Creator::
Association of Systematics Collections  Search this
Extent:
34 cu. ft. (34 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Manuscripts
Date:
circa 1972-1988
Introduction:
This finding aid was digitized with funds generously provided by the Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee.
Descriptive Entry:
These records document the establishment and programs of the ASC. They include records and audiotapes of annual meetings and Board of Directors meetings, circa 1972-1987; outgoing correspondence of the ASC Secretary and Executive Director, 1972-1983, which contains extensive documentation on the founding of the organization; correspondence with member institutions; files concerning ASC committees and councils; records concerning an ASC-sponsored survey of systematics collections, circa 1976-1977; files regarding the ASC project "Development of a Center for Biosystematics Resources," which was supported by a contract with the United States Department of Energy, circa 1978-1981; records documenting ASC participation in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora; records of ASC conferences and symposia; records of the ASC project Checklist of Vertebrates of the United States and the United States Territories, circa 1980; files regarding an ASC survey of endangered and protected species in the United States, circa 1978-1980; records documenting ASC projects under contracts with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, National Science Foundation, Environmental Protection Agency, and other organizations; and copies of the ASC Newsletter.
Historical Note:
The Association of Systematics Collections (ASC) is an international, non-profit organization of institutions that maintain biological collections. It was established on July 7, 1972 ... "To foster the care, management, preservation, and improvement of systematics collections and to facilitate their utilization in science and society." The ASC is responsible for coordinating development and implementation of plans to improve the condition and availability of biological collections. It fulfills its mission by providing representation for institutions housing systematics collections, encouraging interaction among those concerned with systematics collections and their use, and providing a forum for consideration of mutual problems. The ASC publishes a bimonthly ASC Newsletter and booklets on a variety of topical issues. It is governed by a Board of Directors and a permanent Secretariat.
Topic:
Biology -- Classification  Search this
Professional associations  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7459, Association of Systematics Collections, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 7459
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7459

Website Records

Topic:
Fourth International Barcode of Life Conference (Blog)
Creator::
Consortium for the Barcode of Life  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Electronic records
Date:
2011-2015
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of one website and one blog maintained by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL), an international initiative devoted to developing DNA barcoding as a global standard for the identification of biological species since 2004. The CBOL Secretariat operates from the National Museum of Natural History. The Barcode of Wildlife Project website, crawled February 11, 2015, provides information about the Project which enables its six member countries to use DNA barcodes to identify species from minute samples in the investigation and prosecution of wildlife crimes. The Project is administered by CBOL. The "Fourth International Barcode of Life Conference" blog, crawled February 19, 2015, provides information for attendees at the 2011 event. Materials are in electronic format.
Topic:
Biology -- Classification  Search this
DNA  Search this
Web sites  Search this
Blogs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 15-165, Website Records
Identifier:
Accession 15-165
See more items in:
Website Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa15-165

Curatorial Records

Creator::
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center  Search this
Extent:
9.5 cu. ft. (9 record storage boxes) (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Clippings
Picture postcards
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color negatives
Color transparencies
Place:
Latin America
Date:
1955-2012
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the professional correspondence of research zoologist Roy W. McDiarmid and his work at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, United States Geological Survey (USGS). McDiarmid's research focuses on the systematics, behavior, ecology, and biogeography of amphibians and reptiles in the Neotropics. Some materials predate his time with the USGS. Materials include correspondence, manuscripts, postcards, newspaper clippings, photographs, negatives, and transparencies.
Topic:
Herpetology  Search this
Amphibians -- Behavior  Search this
Reptiles -- Behavior  Search this
Ecology  Search this
Amphibians -- Geographical distribution  Search this
Reptiles -- Geographical distribution  Search this
Zoology -- Research  Search this
Biology -- Classification  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Picture postcards
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color negatives
Color transparencies
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 15-202, Curatorial Records
Identifier:
Accession 15-202
See more items in:
Curatorial Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa15-202

Website Records

Topic:
Barcode of Life: Identifying Species with DNA Barcoding (Website)
Barcode of Life: Connect (Website)
e-Biosphere ’09 Post-Conference Website
Third International Barcode of Life Conference (Website)
Fourth International Barcode of Life Conference (Website)
Creator::
Consortium for the Barcode of Life  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Electronic records
Date:
2009-2014
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of 6 websites maintained by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life, an international initiative devoted to developing DNA barcoding as a global standard for the identification of biological species since 2004.

The Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL) website, crawled September 30, 2014, had been previously discontinued. At the time of the crawl, it consisted of a single page with links to portions of the "Barcode of Life: Identifying Species with DNA Barcoding" website where the content from the CBOL website was relocated. The Consortium for the Barcode of Life Secretariat operates from the National Museum of Natural History.

The "Barcode of Life: Identifying Species with DNA Barcoding" website, crawled September 30, 2014, provides information for and about the DNA barcoding community, including events, publications, and other resources. It also includes information about CBOL and the International Barcode of Life project (iBOL), the largest biodiversity genomics initiative ever undertaken.

"Barcode of Life: Connect," crawled September 30, 2014, is a community space that includes discussion forums and blog posts. This accession may not include all public content and does not include password-protected content.

The "e-Biosphere '09 Post-Conference Website" includes information about the International Conference on Biodiversity Informatics, held June 1-3, 2009, and its components as well as the results of various discussions and challenges that occurred. It also includes conference documents such as abstracts, programs, brochures, and announcements. The website was crawled September 24, 2014.

The "Third International Barcode of Life Conference" website, crawled September 24, 2014, provides information about the conference held November 7-13, 2009. It includes information about the conference, including the schedule, abstracts, and program. Due to technical issues, this accession does not include the posters presented at the conference.

The "Fourth International Barcode of Life Conference" website, crawled September 29, 2014, provides information about the conference held November 28-December 3, 2011. It includes information about the conference, including the agenda, program, and promotional poster.

Materials are in electronic format.
Topic:
Biology -- Classification  Search this
DNA  Search this
Genre/Form:
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 15-068, Website Records
Identifier:
Accession 15-068
See more items in:
Website Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa15-068

Website Records

Creator::
Consortium for the Barcode of Life  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Electronic records
Date:
2015
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the Twitter account of the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL) as it existed on March 14, 2015. CBOL is an international initiative devoted to developing DNA barcoding as a global standard for the identification of biological species since 2004. The CBOL Secretariat operates from the National Museum of Natural History. Twitter is a microblog that CBOL used to post links to professional opportunities as well as to publicize events and research. Materials are in electronic format.
Topic:
Biology -- Classification  Search this
DNA  Search this
Web sites  Search this
Blogs  Search this
Social media  Search this
Online social networks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 17-180, Website Records
Identifier:
Accession 17-180
See more items in:
Website Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa17-180

Minutes

Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents  Search this
Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
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Online Media:

Administrative Records

Creator::
National Museum of Natural History. Department of Systematic Biology  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Manuscripts
Floppy disks
Electronic records
Date:
1993-2005
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records documenting the administration of the Department of Systematic Biology. The primary purpose of the department was outreach and the improvement of the image of research. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, surveys, strategic goals, organizational charts, budgets, funding information, brochures, and related materials. Some materials pre-date the establishment of the department and some materials are in electronic format.
Rights:
Restricted for 15 years, until Jan-01-2021; Transferring office; 9/21/2007 memorandum, Wright to Sitnik; Contact reference staff for details.
Topic:
Natural history museums  Search this
Research  Search this
Biology -- Classification  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Manuscripts
Floppy disks
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 07-211, National Museum of Natural History. Department of Systematic Biology, Administrative Records
Identifier:
Accession 07-211
See more items in:
Administrative Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa07-211

Website Records

Creator::
Consortium for the Barcode of Life  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Electronic records
Web sites
Date:
2017
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the Barcode of Wildlife Project website as it existed on November 15, 2017. The website is maintained by the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL), an international initiative devoted to developing DNA barcoding as a global standard for the identification of biological species since 2004. The CBOL Secretariat operates from the National Museum of Natural History. The website provides information about the Project which enables its partner countries to use DNA barcodes to identify species from minute samples in the investigation and prosecution of wildlife crimes. Scientific data is not included in this accession. Materials are in electronic format.
Topic:
Biology -- Classification  Search this
DNA  Search this
Web sites  Search this
Genre/Form:
Electronic records
Web sites
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 19-055, Website Records
Identifier:
Accession 19-055
See more items in:
Website Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa19-055

Program Records

Creator::
National Museum of Natural History. Department of Systematic Biology  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Manuscripts
Clippings
Compact discs
Floor plans
Electronic records
Date:
1993-2005
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records documenting programs and events organized, hosted, and sponsored by the Department of Systematic Biology. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, agendas, schedules, floor plans, invitation lists, registration information, brochures, reports, clippings, and related materials. Some materials pre-date the establishment of the department and some materials are in electronic format.
Rights:
Restricted for 15 years, until Jan-01-2021; Transferring office; 9/21/2007 memorandum, Wright to Sitnik; Contact reference staff for details.
Topic:
Natural history museums  Search this
Biology -- Classification  Search this
Special events  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Manuscripts
Clippings
Compact discs
Floor plans
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 07-212, National Museum of Natural History. Department of Systematic Biology, Program Records
Identifier:
Accession 07-212
See more items in:
Program Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa07-212

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