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Pablo Rodriguez-Martinez Oral History Interview, 1990

Interviewee:
Rodriguez-Martinez, Pablo  Search this
Subject:
Rodriguez-Martinez, Pablo  Search this
Vitola, Francisco  Search this
Bocanegra, Fausto 1926-  Search this
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute  Search this
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Barro Colorado Island  Search this
United States Canal Zone Biological Area, Barro Colorado Island  Search this
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Canal Zone Biological Area  Search this
Interviewer:
Henson, Pamela M  Search this
Physical description:
1 audiotape (Reference copy)
Type:
Audiotapes
Collection descriptions
Transcripts
Place:
Panama
Latin America
Barro Colorado Island (Panama)
Date:
1990
Topic:
Tropical biology  Search this
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
Security guards  Search this
Guards  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
History  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Description and travel  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009581
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217749

Neal Griffith Smith Oral History Interview, 1990

Interviewee:
Smith, Neal Griffith 1937-  Search this
Subject:
Smith, Neal Griffith 1937-  Search this
Eisenmann, Eugene 1906-1981  Search this
MacArthur, Robert H  Search this
Moynihan, M  Search this
Ricklefs, Robert Eric  Search this
Mayr, Ernst 1904-2005  Search this
American Museum of Natural History  Search this
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Barro Colorado Island  Search this
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Canal Zone Biological Area  Search this
United States Canal Zone Biological Area, Barro Colorado Island  Search this
Interviewer:
Henson, Pamela M  Search this
Physical description:
3 audiotapes (Reference copies)
Type:
Audiotapes
Collection descriptions
Transcripts
Place:
Panama
Barro Colorado Island (Panama)
Date:
1990
Topic:
Ornithology  Search this
Entomology  Search this
Tropical biology  Search this
Ornithologists  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009584
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217752

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Oral History Interviews, 1990

Subject:
Rand, A. Stanley (Austin Stanley) 1932-  Search this
Bock, Brian C  Search this
Rand, Patricia  Search this
Smythe, Nicholas D  Search this
Smythe, Tanis  Search this
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Barro Colorado Island  Search this
United States Canal Zone Biological Area, Barro Colorado Island  Search this
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Canal Zone Biological Area  Search this
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute  Search this
Interviewer:
Henson, Pamela M  Search this
Physical description:
1 audiotape (Reference copy)
Type:
Audiotapes
Collection descriptions
Transcripts
Place:
Panama
Barro Colorado Island (Panama)
Date:
1990
Topic:
Tropical biology  Search this
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Women--History  Search this
Herpetologists  Search this
Paca  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Description and travel  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009580
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217748

Movement paths of 224 radio-tagged palm seeds by rodents on Barro Colorado Island, Panama.

Creator:
Office of Public Affairs  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2012-07-13T16:50:22.000Z
YouTube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
Topic:
Science  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianScience
Data Source:
Office of Public Affairs
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianScience
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_LwNhg6bkubQ

Gilberto Ocana Oral History Interview, 1989

Interviewee:
Ocana, Gilberto 1931-2004  Search this
Subject:
Ocana, Gilberto 1931-2004  Search this
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute  Search this
Universidad de Panamá  Search this
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Barro Colorado Island  Search this
Ecole nationale d'agriculture d'Alger  Search this
Servicio Interamericano de Cooperación Agrícola en Panamá  Search this
Interviewer:
Henson, Pamela M  Search this
Physical description:
2 audiotapes (Reference copies)
Type:
Audiotapes
Collection descriptions
Transcripts
Place:
Barro Colorado Island (Panama)
Barro Colorado Nature Monument (Panama)
Panama
Date:
1989
Topic:
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
Tropical biology  Search this
Agronomy  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Sustainable agriculture  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009576
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217744

Agency history, 1923-

Creator:
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute  Search this
Subject:
Zetek, James 1886-1959  Search this
Rubinoff, Ira 1938-  Search this
Koford, Carl B  Search this
Moynihan, M  Search this
Bermingham, Eldredge  Search this
Larsen, Matthew  Search this
Sanjur, Oris  Search this
Tewksbury, Joshua J  Search this
United States Canal Zone Biological Area, Barro Colorado Island  Search this
Institute for Research in Tropical America  Search this
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Earl Silas Tupper Research and Conference Center  Search this
National Research Council (U.S.)  Search this
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Place:
Mpala Ranch (Kenya)
Date:
1923
1923-
Topic:
Tropical biology  Search this
Local number:
SIA AH00017
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217834

G. B. Fairchild Oral History Interviews

Creator::
Fairchild, G. B. (Graham Bell), interviewee  Search this
Extent:
2 audiotapes (Reference copies). 3 digital .mp3 files (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Place:
Barro Colorado Island (Panama)
Panama
Brazil
Date:
1989
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conducts interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Graham Bell Fairchild was interviewed for the Oral History Collection by Hagen because of his involvement with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in its early years.
Descriptive Entry:
The Graham Bell Fairchild Interview was conducted for the Smithsonian Archives on June 7, 1989 by Joel B. Hagen, a Smithsonian postdoctoral fellow, as part of his research on the history of the Canal Zone Biological Area. This interview discusses Fairchild's reminiscences of CZBA and the scientists involved in its development, notably James Zetek, William Morton Wheeler, and Thomas Barbour; his father's interests in the tropics; the development of STRI under Smithsonian administration; the biology faculty at Harvard and the MCZ; and his career in medical entomology.
Historical Note:
Graham Bell Fairchild (1906-1994), was born in Washington, D.C. In his youth, Fairchild was introduced to tropical biology while visiting Barro Colorado Island (BCI) research station of the Canal Zone Biological Area (CZBA) with his father, David Grandison Fairchild. He received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in entomology from Harvard University where he studied under William Morton Wheeler, Joseph Charles Bequaert, and Thomas Barbour. Before and during his years at Harvard he also worked at the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ) studying the collections.

Fairchild began his career as an entomologist stationed in Brazil with the Yellow Fever Commission of the Rockefeller Foundation, from 1935 to 1937. From 1938 to 1971, he worked as an Entomologist at Gorgas Memorial Laboratory in Panama City, Panama, and from 1958 to 1971 he served as Assistant Director. At Gorgas his research focused on the taxonomy of medically important insects, especially Tabanidae and Psychodidae. During his years in Panama, he observed the development of the BCI research station from a small university consortium to Smithsonian aegis as the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI).

The Canal Zone Biological Area was established in 1923 on Barro Colorado Island (BCI) in the Panama Canal as a reserve for scientific study of the tropics. Originally designed as a consortium of universities and government agencies by Thomas Barbour, William Morton Wheeler, James Zetek, and others, CZBA was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution in 1946 and in 1966 was renamed the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.
Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Entomology  Search this
Tropical biology  Search this
Insects as carriers of disease  Search this
Psychodidae  Search this
Horseflies  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9559, G. B. Fairchild Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9559
See more items in:
G. B. Fairchild Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9559

Covers his education and career as an entomologist, focusing on his experiences in Panama and his work with other scientists affiliated with BCI, c. 1921-1989, including: Early influence of his father, David Fairchild; first trip to the tropics, 1921; ...

Collection Creator::
Fairchild, G. B. (Graham Bell), interviewee  Search this
Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9559, G. B. Fairchild Oral History Interviews
See more items in:
G. B. Fairchild Oral History Interviews
G. B. Fairchild Oral History Interviews / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9559-refidd1e278
Online Media:

Fausto Bocanegra Oral History Interviews

Creator::
Bocanegra, Fausto, 1926- , interviewee  Search this
Extent:
0.5 cu. ft. (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Place:
Panama
Buenavista (Boyacá, Colombia)
Date:
1988
Introduction:
The Oral History Project is part of the Smithsonian Institution Archives. The purpose of the project is to conduct and collect interviews with current and retired members of the Smithsonian staff who have made significant contributions, administrative and scholarly, to the Institution. The project's goal is to supplement the published record and manuscript collections in the Archives, focusing on the history of the Institution and contributions to the increase and diffusion of knowledge made by its scholars.

The Bocanegra interviews were added to the Oral History Collection because of their rich documentation of Barro Colorado Island and the people who lived and worked there. Additional information about the Canal Zone Biological Area can be found in the Records relating to the Canal Zone Biological Area, Office of the Secretary, 1912-1965, and the Canal Zone Biological Area, Records, 1918-1964, which are also housed in Smithsonian Archives. The Oral History Collection also contains several other sets of interviews on the history of the research station.
Descriptive Entry:
The Fausto Bocanegra Interviews were conducted in August of 1988 by Giselle Mora. The original transcript is in Spanish. An English translation was also prepared by Maureen Fern with comments by George Angehr, Jorge Ventocilla, and Georgina De Alba. The interviews discuss Bocanegra's youth, over thirty years work on BCI, and reminiscences of fellow workers and scientists such as Martin Humphrey Moynihan, Oscar Dean Kidd, Carl B. Koford, James Zetek, Adela Gomez, and Francisco Vitola, c. 1952-1988. There are 75 pages of Spanish transcript and 89 pages of English translation.

The interviewer, Giselle Mora provided the following introduction to the interviews: History is made by men and historical events have diverse protagonists. Historic events and circumstances are lived out in different ways by the different groups mentioned, and it's common that the history that is printed and recorded represents only one part of the historical process under consideration. It is also common that the voices of the most humble and their vision of history are those that are ignored or actively silenced. This manuscript attempts to contribute in part to the recognition of the role the workers of "el monte" or "the bush"--to use the words of Bocanegra--have had in the establishment, growth and consolidation of the biological station on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, which today is one of the most important centers of investigation in natural sciences in the tropics.

These transcripts record the words of Fausto Bocanegra one week before his retirement and present, in general, his version of life on the island and changes that occurred on it between 1952 and 1988. All of the interviews were carried out on the balcony of a bedroom at the station, where Bocanegra and I shared many cups of coffee. Fausto Bocanegra--"Boca" like we all call him--dedicated thirty-eight years of work to Barro Colorado Island and carried out every task imaginable: game-keeper, guide, research assistant, electrician, sailor, carpenter, and retired as a trash collector. For those of us who lived on the island, Boca was an institution unto himself. But Boca was, first and foremost, a trustworthy man, a diligent worker, and a generous friend.

The final manuscript is the result of six hours of taped interviews and the reader should always take into account that what he is reading is a transcription of the spoken word. I decided to leave intact colloquial language, incorporating sounds and casual expressions; nevertheless, the text has been edited to eliminate contractions and phonetic errors that make reading difficult. The interviews were very slightly structured, and I am conscious of the fact that they do not clearly record the richness of Boca's knowledge; nevertheless, the reader will find in these pages accounts of island life at the end of the fifties, information about life in the Canal Zone during that era, and perhaps most importantly will be able to know a little about Bocanegra and how he evaluated his thirty-eight years of service on Barro Colorado Island.

The realization of these interviews has been a privilege and a pleasure for me. I want to thank Mr. Fausto Bocanegra for having shared with me these and many other pleasant conversations. My thanks also to Dr. Joseph Wright who has supported and been a driving force behind this project since its beginning. Giselle Mora, Barro Colorado Island, October 24, 1988.
Historical Note:
Fausto Bocanegra (1926- ), mechanical assistant, carpenter, guide, patrol, general laborer, and animal caretaker, worked on Barro Colorado Island (BCI) from the early 1950s to 1988. Born on November 6, 1926 in Buenaventura, Colombia, Bocanegra arrived on BCI on October 7, 1952 at the age of twenty-six. He first came to the island as a temporary construction worker, building the new laboratory building. Due to his excellent work he was requested back by the foreman, Francisco "Chi Chi" Vitola.

Over the years, Bocanegra's versatility served him well. He became the principal caretaker for director Martin Humphrey Moynihan's large collection of monkeys and other animals. He also served as a very knowledgeable guide to the island, not only for visitors but for scientists who wished to study the flora and fauna of the area. As a member of an unarmed anti-poacher patrol, Bocanegra captured poachers in a number of instances. In addition, he operated the launches carrying messages and transporting materials and visitors between Frijoles Station and the Island, cleared trails for general use, and attended to general maintenance of the Island. Bocanegra retired in 1988 after thirty-seven years on Barro Colorado Island.

The Canal Zone Biological Area (CZBA) was established in 1923 on Barro Colorado Island (BCI) in the Panama Canal as a reserve for scientific study of the tropics. Originally designed as a consortium of universities and government agencies by Thomas Barbour, William Morton Wheeler, James Zetek, and others, CZBA was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution in 1946 and in 1966 was renamed the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI).
Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Topic:
Tropical biology  Search this
Zoology  Search this
African Americans -- History  Search this
Hispanic Americans -- History  Search this
Monkeys  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9561, Fausto Bocanegra Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9561
See more items in:
Fausto Bocanegra Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9561

Vochysia ferruginea Mart.

Biogeographical Region:
80 - Central America  Search this
Collector:
W. N. Bangham  Search this
Place:
Barro Colorado Island. Panama Canal Zone. Shores- south of Lab., Canal Zone, Panamá Oeste, Panama, Central America - Neotropics
Collection Date:
28 Aug 1929
Common name:
Chilate negro
Taxonomy:
Plantae Dicotyledonae Myrtales Vochysiaceae
Published Name:
Vochysia ferruginea Mart.
Barcode:
03329466
USNM Number:
1477351
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/34dfc4d8f-694e-4acb-929c-1e0b8b23dfce
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_14833484

Persicaria punctata (Elliott) Small

Biogeographical Region:
80 - Central America  Search this
Collector:
W. N. Bangham  Search this
Place:
Barro Colorado Island, Panama Canal Zone. P.N. 11. End of Island., Canal Zone, Panamá Oeste, Panama, Central America - Neotropics
Collection Date:
6 Sep 1929
Taxonomy:
Plantae Dicotyledonae Polygonales Polygonaceae
Published Name:
Persicaria punctata (Elliott) Small
Barcode:
03226684
USNM Number:
1490732
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/333640751-9d51-4ab2-a80e-352823595f4f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_14736026

Conservation of Endangered Species Videohistory Collection

Extent:
13 videotapes (Reference copies). 39 digital .wmv files and .rm files (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Transcripts
Place:
Barro Colorado Island (Panama)
Panama
Date:
1990
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Videohistory Program, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 1986 until 1992, used video in historical research. Additional collections have been added since the grant project ended. Videohistory uses the video camera as a historical research tool to record moving visual information. Video works best in historical research when recording people at work in environments, explaining artifacts, demonstrating process, or in group discussion. The experimental program recorded projects that reflected the Institution's concern with the conduct of contemporary science and technology.

Smithsonian historians participated in the program to document visual aspects of their on-going historical research. Projects covered topics in the physical and biological sciences as well as in technological design and manufacture. To capture site, process, and interaction most effectively, projects were taped in offices, factories, quarries, laboratories, observatories, and museums. Resulting footage was duplicated, transcribed, and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives for scholarship, education, and exhibition. The collection is open to qualified researchers.
Descriptive Entry:
Pamela M. Henson, Historian for the Smithsonian Institution Archives, conducted videotaped interviews with scientists and researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama and the National Zoological Park (NZP) at its Washington, D.C. park, and Conservation and Research Center (CRC) in Front Royal, Virginia, to document two of the Institution's endangered species programs.

This collection consists of thirteen interview sessions, separated into two collection divisions, totaling approximately 13:10 hours of recordings and 225 pages of transcript. There is also a supplementary set of interview sessions, comprised of 4:00 hours of recordings. There is no transcription for these supplemental sessions.

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Participants from STRI included researchers who employed a variety of approaches to the study and preservation of tropical biosystems. John H. Christy received his B.S. in biology from Lewis and Clark College in 1970, and his Ph.D. in population ecology and animal behavior from Cornell University in 1980. From 1978 to 1983 he served both as a research assistant and assistant professor at the University of South Carolina. He came to STRI in 1983 as a visiting research scholar and remained as a researcher until 1987, when he assumed the position of biologist. In 1988, he was appointed assistant director for marine research. At STRI, he focused his research on the reproductive behavior of crabs.

After receiving his B.S. in biochemistry and zoology in 1972 from the James Cook University of North Queensland (JCUNQ), Australia, Norman C. Duke worked as a technical officer for the Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Fisheries Branch. From 1974 to 1989 he worked with the Australian Institute of Marine Science, first as a technical officer and later as an experimental scientist, overseeing the design and implementation of studies about mangrove plants. During this time he completed his M.S. and Ph.D. in botany at JCUNQ, in 1984 and 1988 respectively. In 1989, he accepted the position of mangrove ecologist for STRI's Oil Spill Project to study the effects of recent oil spills on Panamanian mangrove forests.

Robin Foster became a biologist with STRI in 1978, and also held concurrent positions as senior ecologist at Conservation International and research associate in the Department of Botany at the Field Museum of Natural History. He was awarded his B.A. in biology from Dartmouth College in 1966, and his Ph.D. in botany from Duke University in 1974. From 1972-1980 he served as an Assistant Professor of biology at University of Chicago. In 1980, with Stephen Hubbell, Foster embarked on a long term study of forest dynamics on a fifty-hectare plot on BCI.

After receiving a B.S. in biochemistry from Michigan State University in 1970 and a Ph.D. in ecology from The Johns Hopkins University in 1976, Brian D. Keller served as a Research Oceanographer for the Scripps Institute of Oceanography from 1976 to 1979. From 1980 to 1984 he was a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Biology at Yale University. In 1984 he accepted the position of acting head of the Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica, and served as Assistant Head from 1985 to 1986. In 1987, Keller joined STRI as project manager for the Oil Spill Project.

Gilberto Ocana joined STRI in 1980 as Superintendent of the Barro Colorado Nature Monument. He was awarded his B.S. from the Ecole Nationale d'Agriculture in Alger, Algeria, in 1955, and a Ph.D. in plant pathology from the University of California, Riverside, in 1967. Prior to his STRI appointment, he was a Professor of plant pathology in the Department of Agronomy at the University of Panama. At STRI, he began an experimental farm to develop alternatives to cattle ranching and slash and burn agriculture.

A. Stanley Rand received his B.A. from De Pauw University in 1955 and his Ph.D. in biology from Harvard University in 1961. He served as Assistant Herpetologist at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard from 1961 to 1962, and as zoologist for the Secretary of Agriculture, Sao Paulo, Brazil, from 1962 to 1964. Rand came to STRI in 1964 as a herpetologist. From 1974 to 1979 he served as STRI assistant director, and was appointed senior biologist in 1979. His interest in the behavior and ecology of reptiles and amphibians led to pioneering studies of frog communications.

After receiving a B.S. from Queens College in 1959, and a M.A. and Ph.D. in biology from Harvard in 1961 and 1963, respectively, in 1965 Ira Rubinoff served as Assistant to the Curator of ichthyology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard. Rubinoff arrived at STRI in 1965 to assume the positions of Biologist and Assistant Director for marine biology. He was appointed Director of STRI in 1973. His research interests include sea snakes, the biological implications of interoceanic canal construction, zoogeography of the Eastern Tropical Pacific, and preservation of tropical forests.

Alan P. Smith was awarded his B.A. from Earlham College in 1967, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Duke University in 1970 and 1974, respectively. He joined STRI in 1974 as a staff scientist. Concurrently, from 1974 to 1981, he served as an Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Pennsylvania, and from 1981 to 1988 he served in the same position at the University of Miami. In 1988, while continuing to serve as an adjunct professor of biology at the University of Miami, he assumed the position of Assistant Director for terrestrial research at STRI. Interested in the dynamics of tropical forests, Smith introduced the use of crane towers to study the forest canopy.

Nicholas D. Smythe joined STRI in 1970 as a biologist to study tropical mammals. He received his B.A. from University of British Columbia in 1963 and his Ph.D. from University of Maryland in 1970. His research at STRI focused on the paca and peccary, animals that are widely distributed in Latin America. In 1983, with a grant from the W. Alton Jones Foundation, Smythe began investigating the behavior and physiology of pacas in captivity with a view toward domesticating them to provide an alternative to cattle grazing.

In 1975, after receiving his Ph.D. in neurobiology and animal behavior from Cornell University in 1972, Donald M. Windsor joined STRI as a computer programmer and data analyst for the Environmental Monitoring Program. In 1990, he was appointed research biologist and coordinator of the Environmental Sciences Program. He has conducted extensive research on the ecological and genetic factors influencing the reproductive success of the wasp.

Rolando Perez, Dilia Santamaria, and Eduardo Sierra, students from the University of Panama, Hamilton W. Beltran Santiago and Ernesto Yallico, students from Peru, Zenith O. Batista, coordinator of the Tropical Forest Dynamics Project, Kaoru Kitajima Okada, STRI predoctoral fellow, Kevin P. Hogan, STRI visiting scientist, and Mirna Samaniego, a graduate in forestry from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, demonstrated scientific techniques used to study tropical plants. Todd Underwood, a student, demonstrated procedures for crab behavioral studies. Elias Gonzales, a Panamanian farmer participating in the experimental farm program, Arturo Cerezo, a faculty member from the School of Agriculture at the University of Panama, and Juvencio Trujillo, an agricultural assistant, showed how the Las Pavas experimental program actually operated.

National Zoological Park and Conservation and Research Center

Interviews conducted at both the NZP and CRC included staff members who participated in various programs to ensure species survival. Larry R. Collins received his B.A. in biology from Columbia Union College in 1965 and his M.S. in zoology from University of Maryland in 1973. He began his tenure with the NZP in 1967 as an animal keeper in the Scientific Research Division, and was appointed Supervisory Zoologist in that division in 1969. In 1972 he became Assistant Curator of the Department of Living Vertebrates at NZP, and from 1973 to 1975 he served as the Associate Curator for the Office of Animal Management. In 1975, Collins was appointed Mammal Curator at CRC.

Scott R. Derrickson completed his B.A. in biology in 1970 from Gettysburg College and his M.S. and Ph.D. in ecology and behavioral biology from University of Minnesota in 1975 and 1977, respectively. In 1977, he began work as a Research Behaviorist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and continued there until he was appointed Assistant Curator of ornithology at CRC in 1984. Later that same year, he was appointed Curator of ornithology. Since 1987, he has held that position concurrently with the position of Deputy Associate Director for Conservation and Captive Breeding.

Theodore H. Reed received his doctorate in veterinary medicine from Kansas State College in 1945. He taught veterinary pathology there before working as Assistant State Veterinarian for Oregon from 1946 to 1948. Between 1948 and 1955 Reed maintained a private veterinary practice in Idaho and Oregon. While practicing with the Rose City Veterinary Hospital in Portland, Reed was called upon to work with the Portland Zoo's animal collection which led to his career in exotic animal studies and zoo administration. Reed was appointed as a veterinarian for NZP in 1955. He became acting director of the NZP in 1956 and director in 1958. Reed retired from the directorship position in 1983.

Linwood R. Williamson received his B.S. in wildlife management from Virginia Polytechnic and State University in 1972. He came to CRC in 1978 and began working with birds, small mammals and hoofstock, as the Biotechnician in charge of the Ungulate Research Facilities.

For additional information on Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, National Zoological Park and Conservation Research Center, see the records of each bureau and oral history interviews of STRI researchers, administrators, game wardens, and neighbors, and of NZP administrators, located at the Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Historical Note:
Scientific efforts to preserve endangered species have focused on either maintenance of a controlled population that ensures genetic diversity or protection of habitat that ensures viability of a population in the wild. The Smithsonian Institution has sponsored programs using both methods in the study and exhibition of the plant and animal kingdoms.

In 1923, the Institute for Research in Tropical America established a research laboratory on Barro Colorado Island (BCI) in the Panama Canal Zone to investigate the flora and fauna of tropical America. In 1946, the laboratory was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution and was renamed the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in 1966. Under Smithsonian aegis, STRI developed an extensive program of terrestrial and marine research on the tropical environment and special projects to find alternatives to tropical rainforest destruction and to study the effects of oil spills on the environment. In 1979, STRI assumed responsibility for the Barro Colorado Nature Monument, an extensive nature preserve which includes BCI and several surrounding peninsulas. STRI also built research facilities in Panama City and on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts.

The National Zoological Park was founded in 1889 in Washington, D.C., "for the advancement of science and the instruction and recreation of the people." Under the administration of Director Theodore H. Reed, a major renovation of the park was begun in 1963. Also during the 1960s, in response to rising concerns over endangered species, the NZP established a research department to study exotic animal physiology and behavior. In 1975, a separate facility for research, and animal breeding and rearing was established at Front Royal, Virginia, allowing the NZP to become an important part of the international Species Survival Program.
Topic:
Tropical biology  Search this
Botany  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Ecology  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Mammalogy  Search this
Ornithology  Search this
Invertebrate zoology  Search this
Herpetology  Search this
Conservation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9553, Conservation of Endangered Species Videohistory Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 9553
See more items in:
Conservation of Endangered Species Videohistory Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9553

Pollen use by Megalopta sweat bees in relation to resource availability in a tropical forest

Author:
López Quintero, Isis J.  Search this
Wcislo, William T.  Search this
Roubik, David Ward  Search this
Moreno Patiño, Jorge Enrique  Search this
Smith, Adam R.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2012
Topic:
Tropics  Search this
Biology  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_112080

Alexander Wetmore Oral History Interviews

Creator::
Wetmore, Alexander, 1886-1978, interviewee  Search this
Extent:
2 audiotapes (Reference copies). 4 digital .mp3 files (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Compact discs
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Electronic records
Place:
Barro Colorado Island (Panama)
Date:
1974
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Wetmore was interviewed for the Oral History Project because he has made significant scholarly and administrative contributions to the Smithsonian during 50 years of service.
Descriptive Entry:
Wetmore was interviewed by Miriam Freilicher on April 18 and May 8, 1974. The interviews consist of reminiscences of his field work, expeditions for the Biological Survey, administration, changes, growth and finances of the U.S. National Museum, reminiscences of colleagues, notably John L. Keddy, Louise M. Pearson, and James Zetek, and the acquisition of the Canal Zone Biological Area.
Historical Note:
Alexander Wetmore (1866-1978), B.A., University of Kansas, 1912 and Ph.D., George Washington University, 1920, pursued a career of ornithological field work beginning with the U.S.D.A. Bureau of Biological Survey from 1910-1924. After working informally with Smithsonian collections for many years, he was appointed Superintendent of the National Zoological Park in 1924 and as Assistant Secretary in charge of the U.S. National Museum in 1925. In 1945 he became Secretary of the Institution and during his tenure oversaw the acquisition of the Canal Zone Biological Area. After his retirement in 1952, he continued as a Research Associate of the Institution. Dr. Wetmore was well-known for his research and publications of North and South American birds.
Topic:
Ornithology  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Compact discs
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9504, Alexander Wetmore Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9504
See more items in:
Alexander Wetmore Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9504

Liana Abundance, Diversity, and Distribution on Barro Colorado Island, Panama

Author:
Lao, Suzanne  Search this
Yorke, Suzanne Rutishauser  Search this
Mohan, Jacqueline  Search this
Tobin, Michael F.  Search this
Dalling, James W.  Search this
Hubbell, Stephen P.  Search this
Mangan, Scott A.  Search this
Valdes, Oldemar  Search this
Aguilar, Salomón  Search this
Brassfield, David  Search this
Schnitzer, Stefan A.  Search this
Muller-Landau, Helene C.  Search this
Pérez, Rolando A.  Search this
Baldeck, Claire A.  Search this
Ledo, Alicia  Search this
Hernandez, Andres  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2012
Topic:
Tropics  Search this
Biology  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_114227
Online Media:

A population explosion in a tropical tree frog: Hyla rufitela on Barro Colorado Island, Panama

Author:
Ryan, Michael J.  Search this
Rand, A. Stanley  Search this
Troyer, Katherine  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
1983
Topic:
Tropics  Search this
Biology  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_106489

Pleocyemata

Collector:
D. Blake  Search this
Doris Cochran  Search this
Preparation:
Alcohol (Ethanol)
Place:
Barro Colorado Island, Panama Canal Zone and Columbia, Panama
Collection Date:
20 Feb 1963 and 6 May 1963
Common name:
True Crabs
USNM Number:
1494654
See more items in:
Invertebrate Zoology
Arthropoda
Data Source:
NMNH - Invertebrate Zoology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/38f44da90-275f-49c0-a9a3-2666e5702142
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhinvertebratezoology_14140390

Rottboellia cochinchinensis (Lour.) Clayton

Biogeographical Region:
80 - Central America  Search this
Collector:
John Edwin Ebinger  Search this
Place:
Barro Colorado Island., Panamá, Panama, Central America - Neotropics
Collection Date:
23 Jun 1960
Taxonomy:
Plantae Monocotyledonae Poales Poaceae Panicoideae
Published Name:
Rottboellia cochinchinensis (Lour.) Clayton
Barcode:
04242235
USNM Number:
2381766
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/350f2f3ef-709e-4cda-8dfd-73c4952e1984
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_16170334

Philodendron hederaceum (Jacq.) Schott

Biogeographical Region:
80 - Central America  Search this
Collector:
Paul Clifford Hutchison  Search this
J. Kenneth Wright  Search this
Place:
The Andes. Gatun Lake, Barro Colorado Island., Panamá, Panama, Central America - Neotropics
Collection Date:
Nov 1963
Common name:
Tric-trac
enrredadera
Taxonomy:
Plantae Monocotyledonae Arales Araceae Aroideae
Published Name:
Philodendron hederaceum (Jacq.) Schott
Barcode:
03823375
USNM Number:
2469736
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3b311c98b-5e7f-4601-9fdd-7f22b97886bb
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_15473367

Philodendron pterotum K. Koch & Augustin

Biogeographical Region:
80 - Central America  Search this
Collector:
Paul Clifford Hutchison  Search this
J. Kenneth Wright  Search this
Place:
The Andes. Gatun Lake, Barro Colorado Island., Panamá, Panama, Central America - Neotropics
Collection Date:
Nov 1963
Taxonomy:
Plantae Monocotyledonae Arales Araceae Aroideae
Published Name:
Philodendron pterotum K. Koch & Augustin
Barcode:
03823481
USNM Number:
2469721
See more items in:
Botany
Flowering plants and ferns
Data Source:
NMNH - Botany Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/322e35b3f-7dc3-4ea7-abe8-0bcfcca17378
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhbotany_15475770

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