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Robert E. Kuntz photographs of Asia, Africa, Oceania, and the Middle East

Creator:
Kuntz, Robert E.  Search this
Extent:
2,168 Negatives (circa, acetate)
548 Modern prints (circa)
78 Color slides
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Modern prints
Color slides
Photographs
Place:
Taiwan
Egypt
Turkey
Hong Kong (China)
Borneo
Nigeria
Kenya
Libya
Pakistan
Sudan
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
India
Thailand
Philippines
Yemen
Vietnam
Korea
Damascus (Syria)
Japan
Date:
circa 1949-1966
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made by Robert E. Kuntz documenting people and the natural and built environments that he encountered during his world travels. Locations depicted include Asia (Taiwan, India, Korea, Thailand, Hong Kong, Vietnam, and Japan), the Middle East (Pakistan, Turkey, Lebanon, Syria, Egypt, and Yemen), Africa (Sudan, Libya, Kenya, and Nigeria), and Oceania (Borneo and the Philippines). Images of Taiwan include street scenes of Taipei, festivals and ceremonies (including celebrations of 10-10 Day, Buddha's birthday, and Lantern Festival), temples, villages and agriculture, boats and harbors, artwork and shrines, carving, construction, markets, bridges, and a cemetery. The collection also includes images of the Acropolis of Athens, the Taj Mahal and other structures in India, historical structures and the harbor in Istanbul, markets and vendors in west Pakistan, and Wat Benchamabophit and Wat Arun in Thailand, ancient structures in Baʻlabakk (Lebanon), St. Catherine's Monastery (Sinai) and a parade and ceremonies in Egypt.
Biographical/Historical note:
Dr. Robert E. Kuntz (1916-2003) was a parasitologist for the U.S. Navy and the Southwest Research Foundation. After earning his MS in zoology from Oklahoma University and Ph.D. in parasitology from the University of Michigan, he joined the United States Navy in 1943. He was a parasitologist and medical entomologist with the Naval Medical Research Institute and then Chairman of the department of parasitology at the Southwest Foundation for Research and Education, a position that brought him into contact with groups in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. In 1964, Kuntz retired from the Navy as a captain. He wrote hundreds of publications and his photographs have been reproduced in textbooks, National Geographic Magazine, and other publications.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 2003-25
Reproduction Note:
Modern prints made from original negatives by Smithsonian Institution, 1987.
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Kuntz's field notes are held in the Smithsonian Institutuion Archives in the Field Book Project, SIA Acc. 12-254.
Taiwanese fish skins collected by Kuntz held in the anthropology collections of the NAtional Museum of Natural History, accession 231999.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Festivals  Search this
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Markets  Search this
Art  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 2003-25, Robert E. Kuntz photographs of Asia, Africa, Oceania, and the Middle East, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.2003-25
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-2003-25

D-1398: Baalbeck (Lebanon): Qubbat as-Saadin: Annotated Sketch of the Facade

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Drawing (11.8 cm. x 18.9 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Drawings
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbek
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Drawings are arranged roughly in sequential number sequences, housed in document boxes or in flat file folders by size, and stored in the map case drawers.
Local Numbers:
D-1398

FSA A.06 05.1398
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were exchanged between the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architectural drawing  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.06 05.1398
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 5: Drawings and Maps
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref24878

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of Arabic Inscription No. XVII, in Naskhi Mameluke Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
- Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalbek."
- Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 137 (Negative Number: 3783). Baalbek, Inscription. XVII, detail of No.119."
- Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 5,066, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3783
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were exchanged between the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3783
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref29870

Drawings and Maps

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Krefter, Friedrich, 1898-1995  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1562 Drawings (visual works) (various dimensions)
70 Maps (various dimensions)
Type:
Archival materials
Drawings (visual works)
Maps
Drawings
Place:
Asia
Iran
Iraq
Lebanon
Syria
Turkey
Mesopotamia
Aleppo (Syria)
Bakun, Tall-e (Iran)
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Bīshāpūr (Extinct city)
Bisutun Site (Iran)
Damascus (Syria)
Fīrūzābād (Iran)
Ḥimṣ (Syria)
Iṣfahān (Iran)
Luristān (Iran)
Nahāvand (Iran)
Naqsh-i Rustam (Iran)
Paikuli (Iraq)
Palmyra (Syria)
Pasargadae (Extinct city)
Persepolis (Iran)
Sāmarrāʼ (Iraq)
Sīstān va Balūchistān (Iran)
Taq-e Bostan Site (Iran)
Tripoli (Lebanon)
Date:
1903-1947
1899-1962
Scope and Contents:
The abbreviations used in captions of published drawings are:

IAE -- Iran in the Ancient East, Herzfeld

AMI -- Archaeologische Mitteilungen aus Iran, Herzfeld

Corpus -- Materiaux pour un Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. Part II, Tome II (Aleppo), Herzfeld

ID -- Iranische Denkmä, Lieferung 3/4 Niphauanda, Herzfeld

SA-I -- Ars Islamica, IX, "Damascus:Studies in Architecture, I. The Mukarnas Dome. The Madrasa," Herzfeld

SA-II -- Ars Islamica, X. Same study, II."The Cruciform Plan. Syrian Architecture, Period of Nur al-din," Herzfeld

SA-III -- Ars Islamica, XI--II. Same study, III. "The Ayyubid Madrasa. The Turba," Herzfeld

SA-IV -- Ars Islamica, XIII--IV. Same study, IV. "The Mosque," Herzfeld

TA -- Am Tor von Asien, Herzfeld
Drawings D-405 through D-485 (water-colors) are mounted on mats numbered PI.XXXIII through PI.LXI. They were apparently prepared for some publication not yet located. Other water-colors have similar notations. The large numbers, such as No.3445, apparently refer to a catalogue or inventory, not located.
- Approximately 1,562 drawings and plans that reflect Herzfeld's fine draftmanship and architectural training , with observations on topography, landscape, archaeological remains, architecture, and artifacts. Renderings are in pencil, ink, and watercolor. The published and unpublished drawings reveal Herzfeld's working methodology, in which he often employed tracings to rework his original field sketches. In addition, there are drawings by Friedrich Krefter, the architect who worked in association with Herzfeld for many years, and by drafting assistant Karl Bergner and Donald E. McCown.
- Approximately 70 maps dating from 1899 to the 1930s, including original maps prepared by Herzfeld, Karl Bergner or Friedrich Krefter, as well as various maps from German archaeologists such as Moritz Sobernheim and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim.
Arrangement:
Drawings are arranged roughly by size and then in number sequences, housed in document boxes or in flat file folders and stored in map case drawers.
Biographical / Historical:
"Ernst Emil Herzfeld (1879-1948) was an orientalist whose many talents led him to explore all phases of Near Eastern culture, from the prehistoric period to Islamic times and from linguistics and religion to art and architecture." [Margaret Cool Root, 1976: "The Herzfeld Archive of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Metropolitan Museum Journal, Vol. 11, pp. 119-124."]
Local Numbers:
FSA A.06 05
General:
- Title is provided by Xavier Courouble, FSg Archives cataloger, based on Joseph Upton's Catalogue of the Herzfeld Archive."
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
The Papers primarly relate to Herzfeld's survey of the monuments, artifacts, and inscriptions of Western Asia between 1903 and 1947 and particularly to his excavations at Istakhr (Iran), Paikuli (Iraq), Pasargadae (Iran), Persepolis (Iran), Samarra (Iraq) and Kuh-e Khwaja (Iran), as well as various archaeological expeditions throughout Cilicia, Mesopotamia, Northern Syria, and Persia. Additional research material, probably collected by Moritz Sobernheim and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim but preserved by Ernst Herzfeld, was part of a broader project, that of Max van Berchem's "Matériaux pour un Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Abbasids  Search this
Ancient Near Eastern Art  Search this
Antiquities  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architectural drawing  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Cartography  Search this
Decoration and ornament  Search this
Description and Travel  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Numismatics  Search this
Pottery  Search this
Relief (Sculpture)  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Royalty (Nobility)  Search this
Sassanids  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Textile design  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Maps
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Series 5
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref8672

D-156: Baalbek. Inscription of Nur al-din. Kufic. Corpus, pl.LXXVIId

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Drawing (16 cm x 61 cm.)
1 Drawing (14 cm x 51.6 cm.)
Container:
Item D-156
Type:
Archival materials
Drawings
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbek
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Baalbek (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: Transcription of Arabic Inscription No. I, in Kufic Script [drawing]
Arrangement:
Drawings are arranged roughly in sequential number sequences, housed in document boxes or in flat file folders by size, and stored in the map case drawers.
Local Numbers:
D-156

D-156a

FSA A.6 05.0156
General:
- Title is provided by Xavier Courouble, FSg Archives cataloger, based on Ernst Herzfeld original drawings'caption and Joseph Upton's Catalogue of the Herzfeld Archive.
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were circulating among the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architectural drawing  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 05.0156
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 5: Drawings and Maps
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref8845
Online Media:

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of Arabic Inscription No. XV (right) and No. XVII (left), in Naskhi Mameluke Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalbek."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 119 (Negative Number: 3786). Baalbek. Section of wall with Arabic inscriptions."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3786
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were exchanged between the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3786
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28985

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of Arabic Inscription No. XV (right) and No. XVII (left), in Naskhi Mameluke Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 18 cm. x 13 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalbek."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 120 (Negative Number: 3787). Baalbek. Section of wall with Arabic inscriptions."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3787
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were exchanged between the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3787
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28986

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of a Paper Squeeze with Arabic Inscription No. I (part 1/3), in Kufic Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "46."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 121 (Negative Number: 3852). Baalbek. Squeeze of Kufic inscriptions."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3852
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were circulating among the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3852
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28987

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of a Paper Squeeze with Arabic Inscription No. I (part 2/3), in Kufic Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalb. Inscript. I."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 122 (Negative Number: 3855). Baalbek. Squeeze of Inscription I."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3855
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were circulating among the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3855
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28988

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of a Paper Squeeze with Arabic Inscription No. I (part 3/3), in Kufic Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalb. Inscript. I."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 123 (Negative Number: 3788). Baalbek. Squeeze of Inscription I."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3788
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were circulating among the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3788
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28989

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Qubbat al-Amjad: View of Arabic Inscription No. III, in Naskhi Ayyubid Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalb. Inscr. III."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 124 (Negative Number: 3528). Baalbek. Inscription. III."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3528
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were circulating among the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3528
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28990

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of Arabic Inscription No. IV, in Naskhi Ayyubid Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalb. Inscr. IV."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 125 (Negative Number: 3794). Baalbek. Inscription. IV."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3794
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were circulating among the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3794
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28991

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of Arabic Inscription No. V, in Naskhi Ayyubid Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalb. Inscr. V."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 126 (Negative Number: 3789). Baalbek. Inscription. V."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3789
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were circulating among the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3789
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28992

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Umayyad Mosque within the Citadel: View of Arabic Inscription No. VI, in Naskhi Ayyubid Script, on Base of Minaret

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalb. Inscr. VI."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 127 (Negative Number: 3524). Baalbek. Inscription. VI, door lintel."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3524
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were circulating among the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3524
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28993

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of Arabic Inscription No. XI, in Naskhi Mameluke Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalb. Inscr. XI."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 128 (Negative Number: 3790). Baalbek, Inscription. VII, tabula ansata."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3790
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were circulating among the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3790
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28994

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of Arabic Inscription No. XIV, in Naskhi Mameluke Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalb. Inscr. 14."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 129 (Negative Number: 3782). Baalbek, Inscription. XIV."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3782
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were circulating among the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3782
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28995

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of Arabic Inscription No. XIV, in Naskhi Mameluke Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalb. Inscr. 14."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 130 (Negative Number: 3784). Baalbek, Inscription. XIV."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3784
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were circulating among the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3784
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28996

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of Arabic Inscription No. XIV, in Naskhi Mameluke Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalb. Inscr. 14."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 131 (Negative Number: 3585). Baalbek, Inscription. XIV."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3585
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, and Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were circulating among the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3585
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28997

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of Arabic Inscription No. XV, in Naskhi Mameluke Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 18 cm. x 13 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalbek. Inscr. XV."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 132 (Negative Number: 3785). Baalbek. Inscription. XV, detail of No.119."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3785
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were exchanged between the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3785
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28998

Baalbeck (Lebanon): Fortified Walls of the Citadel: View of Arabic Inscription No. XV, in Naskhi Mamluk Script

Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Names:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Sobernheim, Moritz  Search this
Collection Creator:
Herzfeld, Ernst, 1879-1948  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (b&w, 13 cm. x 18 cm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Asia
Lebanon
Baʻlabakk (Lebanon)
Lebanon -- Beqaa -- Baalbeck
Date:
1899-1914
Scope and Contents:
Handwritten notes accompanying related print in photo file 14, vol. 2 reads, "Baalb. Inscr. XV."
Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.14: Photo File 14 (2 vols.), "Syria: Architecture & Inscriptions," Subseries 4.14.1: vol. 1; Image No. 133 (Negative Number: 3599). Baalbek, Inscription. XV, another view of No.132, tabula ansata."
Additional information from staff reads, "Under the Ayyubids (1175-1250) and the Mamluks (1279-1516), Baalbek witnessed a revival of its political and economic role. To defend the city from crusader attacks, the Ayyubids built a citadel on the site of the temples of Jupiter and Bacchus, which continued to be used during the Mamluk period. Of this citadel and the town that existed within, the fortification wall, a gate, the towers and a mosque remain. Outside the fortified citadel, the old Shiite Mosque, the great and the small Ras al-Ain Mosques, Qubbat al-Amjad, Qubbat Douris and Qubbat as-Saadin were constructed."
Arrangement:
Glass Negatives, numbered from 1 to 3850, are housed in document boxes, and stored on shelves."
Local Numbers:
FSA A.6 04.GN.3599
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
As early as 1893, Ernst Herzfeld, Moritz Sobernheim, Max Freiherr von Oppenheim participated in Max Van Berchem's project to create a Corpus Inscriptionum Arabicarum. During the following 25 years, research materials such as glass negatives, photographic prints, drawings, maps, and notebooks were exchanged between the four archaeologists. In the case of this glass negative, it may have been taken by Moritz Sobernheim on a visit to Baalbeck between 1899 and 1905, as mentioned in his 1922 publication, "Baalbek in Islamischer Zeit, in Voradruck aus dem Werke: Baalbek, Ergebnisse der Aus rabungen und Unterschungen in den Jahren 1898 bis 1905, Vol. 3."
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art of the Islamic World  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Inscriptions  Search this
Inscriptions, Arabic  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Ernst Herzfeld, 1946
Identifier:
FSA.A.06, Item FSA A.6 04.GN.3599
See more items in:
Ernst Herzfeld Papers
Ernst Herzfeld Papers / Series 4: Photographic Files
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a-06-ref28999

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