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Jean Baptiste Pointe du Sable

Issuing authority:
American Negro Commemorative Society  Search this
Maker:
Franklin Mint  Search this
Physical Description:
silver (overall material)
Measurements:
medal: 3.88 cm; x 1 1/2 in
Object Name:
medal
Other Terms:
Medal; Commemorative
Place made:
United States
Associated place:
United States: Illinois, Chicago
Date made:
1968
Credit Line:
American Negro Commemorative Society
ID Number:
NU.68.172.1
Catalog number:
68.172.1
3
Serial number:
3
Accession number:
280909
See more items in:
Work and Industry: National Numismatic Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a8-29bb-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_967816

Smallpox Virus Sequencing Project Videohistory Collection

Extent:
2 videotapes (Reference copies).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videotapes
Transcripts
Place:
Somalia
Date:
1991
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Videohistory Program, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 1986 until 1992, used video in historical research. Additional collections have been added since the grant project ended. Videohistory uses the video camera as a historical research tool to record moving visual information. Video works best in historical research when recording people at work in environments, explaining artifacts, demonstrating process, or in group discussion. The experimental program recorded projects that reflected the Institution's concern with the conduct of contemporary science and technology.

Smithsonian historians participated in the program to document visual aspects of their on-going historical research. Projects covered topics in the physical and biological sciences as well as in technological design and manufacture. To capture site, process, and interaction most effectively, projects were taped in offices, factories, quarries, laboratories, observatories, and museums. Resulting footage was duplicated, transcribed, and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives for scholarship, education, and exhibition. The collection is open to qualified researchers.
Descriptive Entry:
Ramunas Kondratas, Curator of the Division of Medical Sciences of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (NMAH), documented the start of the project to sequence the smallpox virus genome at the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland. As the result of NINDS's extensive facilities for DNA sequencing, it was chosen as the site for the joint CDC-NIH project to sequence the Bangladesh 1975 strain of the virus. The session was videotaped in the instrument room, laboratory, library, and computer room of NINDS, November 21, 1991.

This collection consists of one interview session, totaling approximately 3:00 hours of video recordings and 44 pages of transcript.

For additional information on DNA Sequencing, see Record Unit 9549, DNA Sequencing, Smithsonian Videohistory Collection, in Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Historical Note:
In 1967, the World Health Organization (WHO) initiated a program of world-wide eradication of smallpox through mass immunization and vigorous containment of outbreaks. The last naturally occurring case of smallpox was identified in Somalia in 1977. After two additional years of worldwide surveillance, on October 26, 1979, WHO announced the global eradication of smallpox.

The virus remained in storage at two authorized sites--the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, and the Research Institute for Viral Preparations in Moscow, Russia. In an address to the World Health Assembly in May 1990, United States Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan stated that technological advances had made it possible to map the entire smallpox genome within three years. Scientists agreed that the preferred first step toward the destruction of the virus was to determine its complete DNA sequence and in that way retain the essential scientific information of what would become an extinct virus. At a meeting of the ad hoc WHO Committee on Orthopoxvirus Infections held in Geneva, Switzerland, in December 1990, it was agreed that all remaining stocks of the Vaccinia virus would be destroyed by December 31, 1993.

Li-Ing Liu received a B.A. in nursing from the National Taiwan University in 1979, and an M.S. in nursing from the National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, in 1983. In 1990, she was awarded a Ph.D. in physiology and biophysics from the University of Illinois, Chicago. In 1990, she joined the staff of the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as a special volunteer on the sequencing project.

Brian Wilfred John Mahy received a B.S. from the Department of Physiology and Biochemistry at the University of Southampton, England, in 1959, and a Ph.D. there in 1963. In 1965, Mahy entered the Wolfson College of the University of Cambridge, where he received an M.A. in pathology in 1966 and a Doctor of Science in virology in 1982. From September 1973 to August 1974, Mahy conducted research on RNA tumor viruses at the University of California, San Francisco. From September 1980 to August 1981, he researched coronaviruses at the Universitat Wurzburg, Germany. In 1984, he was appointed Director of the Animal Virus Research Institute, Pirbright, Surrey, England, and in 1986, became head of the Pirbright Laboratory Institute for Animal Health. In 1989, he accepted the position of Director of the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases at the National Center for Infectious Diseases, CDC.

J. Craig Venter received a B.A. in biochemistry from the University of California, San Diego in 1972, and a Ph.D. in physiology and pharmacology in 1975. From 1976 to 1982, he served as a Professor of pharmacology and biochemistry at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo. From 1982 to 1985 he served as Associate Chief Cancer Research Scientist in the Department of Molecular Immunology at the Roswell Park Memorial Institute. In 1983 he was appointed Adjunct Professor of biochemical pharmacology at SUNY-Buffalo, and joined NIH in 1984 as Chief of the Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section, NINDS. In 1987 he also became Co-director of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology at NINDS, and was appointed Director of the NINDS DNA facility.

Teresa Utterback, a medical technologist working as a sequencing technician on the smallpox project, demonstrated DNA sequencing processes; Nicolay Selivanov, an Associate Professor at the Soviet Institute of Virology working on advanced cloning and subcloning of viral genes, demonstrated his template making of the pox virus, and Anthony Kerlavage demonstrated the data processing associated with the project.
Topic:
Technology -- History  Search this
Molecular biology  Search this
Medicine  Search this
Smallpox  Search this
Virology  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Genomics  Search this
Medicine -- History  Search this
Science -- History  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Immunization  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9564, Smallpox Virus Sequencing Project Videohistory Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 9564
See more items in:
Smallpox Virus Sequencing Project Videohistory Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9564

Paul David Hurd Papers

Creator::
Hurd, Paul David, 1921-  Search this
Extent:
30.30 cu. ft. (60 document boxes) (2 oversize folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1938-1982 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
These papers document the professional career and to a lesser extent the personal life of Paul D. Hurd, Jr., between 1938 and 1982. Particularly well represented in the papers is material concerning his research on the insect order Hymenoptera; his teaching and research career at the University of California, Berkeley; his administrative duties at the National Science Foundation; his curatorial and administrative activities at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH); field work and collecting trips; and his participation in professional organizations.

A large part of the collection consists of correspondence written and received by Hurd between 1942 and 1982. The correspondence illustrates all aspects of his career and includes letters with domestic and foreign entomologists; colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley, the National Science Foundation, and the National Museum of Natural History; staff of professional organizations, journals, and publishers; and personal friends.

Papers documenting Hurd's research on the Hymenoptera include correspondence, field notes, research notes, manuscripts, specimen lists, and photographs relating to his work on the carpenter bees. Similar records illustrate his study of the squash and gourd bees, and his research project on the bee pollinators of the creosote bush. Thoroughly documented is his work as co-editor and author of the revised Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico. Also included is a research file primarily concerning the Hymenoptera.

The collection also includes field notes, correspondence, and related materials documenting field work and collecting trips in the western and southwestern United States, Alaska, and Mexico; desk diaries maintained by Hurd during his tenure as Chairman, Department of Entomology, NMNH; and correspondence, class notes, lecture notes, copies of examinations, and related materials documenting his student days and teaching career at the University of California, Berkeley.
Historical Note:
Paul D. Hurd, Jr. (1921-1982), entomologist, educator, and museum curator, was an authority on the taxonomy and biology of bees. He developed an interest in natural history, especially birds, after his family moved to the Mojave Desert region of California. His first published paper, a report on a bird census in Newport Upper Bay, California, appeared in Audubon Magazine in 1941. In 1940, Hurd enrolled at the University of California, Berkeley, to study entomology. His undergraduate work was interrupted between 1942 and 1945 while he served in the United States Navy as a Chief Pharmacist's Mate. He resumed his studies at Berkeley in 1946 and received the B.S. degree in 1947; the M.S. degree in 1948; and his Ph.D. degree in 1950.

Hurd remained at Berkeley to begin his professional career, receiving appointment as Senior Museum Entomologist in 1950. As his career advanced Hurd was given teaching, as well as research responsibilities. By 1965, he had attained the rank of Professor of Entomology and Entomologist in the California Agricultural Experiment Station. Hurd's duties at Berkeley included responsibility for the California Insect Survey where he directed numerous field trips and contributed to the development of the University's collection of native insects. During 1967 and 1968 Hurd took leave of absence from the University to join the National Science Foundation as Associate Program Director in the Division of Biological and Medical Sciences. In 1970, Hurd accepted appointment as Curator in the Department of Entomology, National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). His service at NMNH included a term as Chairman of the Department of Entomology from 1971 to 1976. He was appointed Senior Scientist in 1980.

Hurd's research interests were broad, and he published on several of the families of the order Hymenoptera, including Mutillidae, Pompilidae, Anthophoridae, Megachilidae, and Halictidae. He also published papers on certain families of the orders Coleoptera and Diptera. However, most of his research was devoted to the bees of the superfamily Apoidea. Hurd published over twenty papers and books on the carpenter bees (Xylocopinae) including A Classification of the Large Carpenter Bees, co-authored with Jesus S. Moure. Another major research interest was the pollination of plants by insects. He conducted extensive studies on the bee pollinators of the squashes, gourds, and other plants of the genus Cucurbita. He also studied the pollination of the creosote bush (Larrea tridentata). Hurd's research at the National Museum of Natural History was highlighted by his duties as co-editor of the revised Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico published in 1979. While most of Hurd's field work was concentrated in California and the southwestern United States, he also conducted studies in Alaska, Mexico, South America, and Central America.

Hurd was active within the entomological profession, and he served several organizations in an appointed or elected capacity. For several years he was editor of the Pan-Pacific Entomologist, journal of the Pacific Coast Entomological Society. As a member of the Entomological Society of America, Hurd worked on the Governing Board and served as Chairman of the Advisory Committee for Systematics Resources in Entomology. He was also President of the Association for Tropical Biology, 1969-1970; Section Editor (Hymenoptera) for Biological Abstracts; and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the California Academy of Sciences.

For additional biographical information on Hurd see Karl V. Krombein and E. Gorton Linsley, "Paul David Hurd, Jr., 1921-1982," Pan-Pacific Entomologist, October 1982, vol. 58, no. 4, pp. 262-277.
Chronology:
1921 -- Born in Chicago, Illinois, April 2

1941 -- Published first paper on California bird census in Audubon Magazine

1942-1945 -- Service in the United States Navy in the South Pacific

1947 -- Bachelor of Science, University of California, Berkeley

1948 -- Master of Science, University of California, Berkeley

1950 -- Ph. D., University of California, Berkeley

1950-1952 -- Senior Museum Entomologist, University of California, Berkeley

1950-1963 -- Editor, Pan-Pacific Entomologist

1952-1953 -- Field work analyzing soil invertebrates at Point Barrow, Alaska

1952-1954 -- Junior Entomologist, University of California, Berkeley

1954-1959 -- Lecturer in Entomology and Assistant Entomologist, University of California, Berkeley

1956 -- Field work investigating fossiliferous amber in Chiapas, Mexico

1959-1960 -- Fulbright Commission/Guggenheim Foundation Research Scholar and Fellow, Universidade da Parana, Curitiba, Brazil

1959-1960 -- Field Work in Central and South America

1959-1965 -- Lecturer in Entomology and Associate Entomologist, University of California, Berkeley

1963 -- Field work in Costa Rica and Panama

1963 -- A Classification of the Large Carpenter Bees (with J. S. Moure). University of California Publication Entomol. : 29

1964 -- Trip to study carpenter bee type specimens in European museums

1965 -- Field work in Venezuela and Colombia

1965-1970 -- Professor of Entomology and Entomologist, University of California, Berkeley

1967 -- Field work in Argentina and Brazil

1967-1968 -- Associate Program Director, Division of Biological and Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation

1969-1970 -- President, Association for Tropical Biology

1970 -- A Classification of the Squash and Gourd Bees Peponapis and Xenoglossa (with E. G. Linsley). University of California Publication Entomol. : 62

1970-1971 -- Curator, Division of Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, Department of Entomology, National Museum of Natural History (NMNH)

1971-1973 -- International Biological Program/National Science Foundation Larrea Bee Project

1971-1976 -- Chairman, Department of Entomology, NMNH

1972-1975 -- Member of Governing Board, Entomological Society of America (ESA)

1973-1975 -- Chairman, Advisory Committee for Systematics Resources in Entomology (ESA)

1975 -- The Principal Larrea Bees of the Southwestern United States (with E. G. Linsley) Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology : 193

1976-1980 -- Curator, Department of Entomology, NMNH

1979 -- Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico (co-editor and author of Apoidea section) Smithsonian Institution Press

1980 -- Principal Sunflower Bees of North America with emphasis on the Southwestern United States (with W. E. LaBerge and E. G. Linsley) Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology : 310

1980-1982 -- Senior Scientist, Department of Entomology, NMNH

1982 -- Death, March 12
Oversize:
This collection contains oversize material.
Topic:
Entomology  Search this
Entomologists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7311, Paul David Hurd Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7311
See more items in:
Paul David Hurd Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7311

World's Columbian Exposition (Chicago, 1893), 1886, 1890-1895.

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Note:
On April 25, 1890, Congress approved ". . . An Act to provide for celebrating the 400th Anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus, by holding an international exhibition of arts, industries, manufactures and the products of soil, mine and sea . . ." The exposition opened in Chicago, Illinois, on May 1, 1893, and closed October 31, 1893. Known as the 'White City,' its special effects included electric lighting of the buildings and the famed Midway Plaisance.

Preparations by the Smithsonian Institution began soon after the authorization of government exhibits in 1890. Complications concerning appropriations and expenditures caused some difficulties. By 1893, however, preparations for the exhibits had all but superseded regular operations at the Smithsonian. The displays encompassed most of the departments of the Museum, including a combined effort by the Bureau of Ethnology and Department of Anthropology. The Smithsonian also loaned materials to other U.S. government agencies and to the Woman's Pavilion.

The Government Board of Management, which controlled the government exhibits, was chaired by Edwin Williams, Assistant Secretary of the Department of Agriculture. George Brown Goode, Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, represented the Smithsonian. R. Edward Earll assisted Goode as chief special agent and served as the executive officer to the exposition in Washington and Chicago. George P. Merrill, Robert Ridgway, Otis T. Mason, Frederick W. True, and other curators from the National Museum contributed substantially to preparations.

The series documents the Smithsonian Institution's participation in the World's Columbian Exposition. Correspondence between the Smithsonian Institution and the Government Board of Management is extensive. The majority of the collection consists of correspondence, records, and reports pertaining to the preparation of Smithsonian exhibits and subsequent acquisitions, including correspondence of Goode, Earll, and various curators. The collection reflects all phases of Smithsonian involvement, from the first exhibit proposals to the return of exhibits to Washington. Administrative records are also incorporated in the collection.

For photographs, see Record Unit 95, Series 7. For related materials, see Series 6, World's Industrial and Cotton Exposition, oversize.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 70, Smithsonian Institution, Exposition Records of the Smithsonian Institution and the United States National Museum
Identifier:
Record Unit 70, Series 10
See more items in:
Exposition Records of the Smithsonian Institution and the United States National Museum
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0070-refidd1e3212

Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection

Extent:
21.66 cu. ft. (34 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (11 3x5 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Scrapbooks
Clippings
Glass negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Place:
Alaska
Mexico
France
Saint Michael (Alaska)
Wrangell Island (Wrangell, Alaska)
Arizona
California
Date:
circa 1873-1946 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
This collection consists primarily of papers documenting the professional career and personal life of Edward William Nelson. A smaller amount of material was created by Edward Alphonso Goldman and relates to both professional and private matters. Apparently, Goldman assumed control of Nelson's papers after the latter's death, probably for reference in his continuing work summarizing the results of their Mexico field investigations. Due the pair's close professional relationship, it was decided to keep the collection intact. The papers of each individual have been kept distinct and reside in separate series, with the exception of photographs, which mostly document the Mexico field work. Other photographic materials have been placed in the same series as a matter of convenience.

Nelson's papers are valuable in documenting his work as a field naturalist, particularly in Alaska and Mexico; his administrative career with the Bureau of Biological Survey and consequential involvement in conservation issues of the day; his research on birds and mammals; his participation in professional societies and conservation organizations; personal and family matters; and commercial ventures, especially his ownership of fruit-growing businesses in California and Arizona.

The papers include a large file of incoming and outgoing correspondence that relates to all aspects of his professional life, but is particularly important in documenting his administrative tenure with the Bureau of Biological Survey, 1914-1927. The letters provide information on the role of the Biological Survey in conservation issues of the era, as well as Nelson's own attitudes on the matters--attitudes that sometimes clashed with other conservationists, including William Temple Hornaday. He corresponded extensively with most of the major figures in the conservation movement including Hornaday, John B. Burnham, Charles Sheldon, George Bird Grinnell, and John C. Phillips. Especially well represented by correspondence are the negotiations for the passage of the Migratory Bird Treaty between the United States and Great Britain, 1916, and the protracted fight over the Public Shooting Grounds-Game Refuge Bill during the 1920s. The correspondence also relates Nelson's role in the formative periods of several professional societies and conservation organizations including the American Society of Mammalogists, the American Game Protective Association, and the American Wild Fowlers.

Nelson's career as an explorer and field worker is documented in a series of journals and notebooks maintained between 1877 and 1930. The journals kept during his landmark work in Alaska and Mexico provide a running narrative of his daily activities and include notes on the fauna, flora, and physiography of the areas explored; information on specimens and artifacts collected; observations on native peoples and their cultures; and sketches of people, villages, fauna, and natural phenomena. The journals from his Alaska work are relatively complete; however, journals from the Mexico investigations from 1903 to 1906 are missing. Also included is a journal from the Death Valley Expedition, 1890-1891, and journals and notebooks kept during many of Nelson's official trips for the Bureau of Biological Survey.

The collection includes a series of records documenting Nelson's private life and business affairs. Especially well represented is his involvement with the Nelson-Goldman Orchard Company, 1911-1933, and the Arizona Orchard Company, 1921-1923. Also included is a voluminous correspondence with his brother, Fred W. Nelson, which concerns family and business matters; and various records concerning health issues, investments, real estate, and other financial matters.

Nelson's research is documented in a large series of notes, lists, manuscripts, newspaper clippings, photographs, and publications. Most of the material concerns his work on birds and mammals. The file also contains collected materials on many of the conservation issues of the day.

The papers of Edward Alphonso Goldman found in this collection are just a fragment of the material generated during his long career with the Bureau of Biological Survey. They are most valuable in documenting his biological survey of Mexico with Nelson. Included is an incomplete series of journals which contain a chronological narrative of Goldman's activities. Specific volumes are devoted to notes of birds and mammals observed and collected. Other papers of Goldman include correspondence, mostly with Nelson, and his brothers, George and Luther; and materials documenting his research on mammals.

The collection contains a series of photographs, photograph albums, and glass plate negatives documenting the careers of both men. Most of the material relates to their biological investigations of Mexico, 1892-1906. Included are images of areas visited, native peoples, and flora and fauna. Many of the photographs are unidentified. Also included are photographs of Nelson and Goldman; photographs of colleagues; and photographs taken in France during Goldman's service in World War I.

The collection also contains some papers of the conservationist Charles Sheldon, a close personal friend of Nelson. Apparently, Nelson acquired the papers when he was writing a biographical memorial on Sheldon. They consist of correspondence, notes, photographs, manuscripts, and related materials documenting Sheldon's work in conservation and natural history.

Finally, the collection includes a manuscript (with Nelson's annotations) of George Shiras' "Hunting Wild Life with Camera and Flashlight; A Record of Sixty-Five Years' Visits to the Woods and Waters of North America," and a few pieces of correspondence concerning the manuscript.

Additional materials documenting field work of Nelson and Goldman can be found in Smithsonian Institution Archives Record Unit 7176, Field Reports of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, 1860-1961, Field Reports. Voluminous field notebooks, lists, and other specimen related records for both men are housed in the Division of Birds and the Division of Mammals, National Museum of Natural History.
Historical Note:
The biological explorations made by Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman in Mexico from 1892 to 1906 have been described as ". . . among the most important ever achieved by two workers for any single country." They conducted investigations in every state in Mexico, collecting 17,400 mammals and 12,400 birds, as well as amassing an enormous fund of information on the natural history of the country. The best account of the work is Goldman's Biological Investigations in Mexico, Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, vol. 115, July 1951.

EDWARD WILLIAM NELSON (1855-1934)

Described by Theodore Roosevelt as ". . . one of the keenest naturalists we have ever had . . .," Edward William Nelson was born in Manchester, New Hampshire. He developed an interest in the outdoors around his boyhood home in New England, and in Chicago where his family moved in 1868. Shortly after enrolling in Cooke County Normal School in 1872, Nelson was invited to join Edward Drinker Cope and Samuel Garman on a fossil collecting trip to the Badlands of Wyoming. After returning to Chicago, his interest in natural history continued to grow as he became acquainted with Joel Asaph Allen, Robert Ridgway, Stephen A. Forbes, Henry W. Henshaw and others.

In the winter of 1876, Nelson traveled to Washington, D.C., to meet Spencer F. Baird, Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, and enlist his help in securing a position as a field naturalist. Through Baird's influence, Nelson traveled to Alaska as a weather observer in the Signal Corps of the United States Army in April 1877. From June 1877 to June 1881, he was stationed at St. Michael on the Bering Sea coast of Alaska with a charge to ". . . secure an unbroken series of meteorological observations, and, in addition, to obtain all the information possible concerning the geography, ethnology, and zoology of the surrounding region." Nelson made several dog-sled excursions around the region, compiling data on the lives and customs of the native people, and making ethnological and natural history collections for the Smithsonian. The results of his work were published in "Report upon Natural History Collections Made in Alaska between the Years 1877-1881," 1887, and "The Eskimo about Bering Strait," 1900. In June 1881, he accompanied the revenue steamer Corwin on its search for the missing arctic ship Jeannette. The expedition was the first to reach and explore Wrangell Island.

Nelson spent most of the period from 1882 until 1890 in Arizona recovering from pulmonary tuberculosis contracted in Washington, D.C., while preparing his report on the birds of Alaska. In 1890, he accepted an appointment as a Special Field Agent with the Death Valley Expedition under C. Hart Merriam, Chief of the Division of Ornithology and Mammalogy, United States Department of Agriculture. This was the start of a career with the Division and its successor, the Bureau of Biological Survey, that would continue until 1929. In January 1892, Nelson received orders to conduct a three-month field survey in Mexico with Edward Alphonso Goldman, whom he had recently hired as an assistant. The trip evolved into an exhaustive, fourteen-year biological investigation of the entire country.

After concluding the Mexico work, Nelson's duties with the Bureau of Biological Survey gradually shifted from scientific to administrative. He was Chief Field Naturalist, 1907-1912; Assistant in charge of Biological Investigations, 1913-1914; Assistant Chief, 1914-1916; Chief, 1916-1927; and Senior Biologist, 1927-1929. Nelson was also an honorary Research Associate of the Smithsonian Institution from 1930 until his death. During the decade in which he led the Biological Survey, Nelson was actively involved in most of the major conservation issues of the era. He helped negotiate the Migratory Bird Treaty of 1916 with Great Britain and was an enthusiastic supporter of the Public Shooting Grounds-Game Refuge Bill, the Alaska Game Law Bill, and the Migratory Bird Conservation Act. He was also instrumental in developing policies to improve conditions of domestic reindeer herds in Alaska, and the promoting of bird-banding as a method of ornithological research.

In the field, Nelson was an all-round naturalist, observing and collecting most things that he encountered. He was a prolific author, and his bibliography included over two hundred titles, mostly concerning birds and mammals. Over one hundred animals and plants were named in his honor. Nelson Island and Nelson Lagoon, along the coast of the Bering Sea, and Nelson Range, a short mountain range in California, also bear his name. Nelson was President of the American Ornithologists' Union, 1908-1909, the Biological Society of Washington, 1912-1913, and the American Society of Mammalogists, 1920-1923. He received an honorary M.A. from Yale University in 1920, and an honorary Doctor of Science from the George Washington University in the same year.

Nelson was involved with the Goldman family in the operation of fruit orchards in California and Arizona. He was a co-owner and director of the Nelson-Goldman Orchard Company, 1911-1934, and the Arizona Orchard Company, 1921-1923.

For more detailed biographical information on Nelson, see Edward Alphonso Goldman, "Edward William Nelson - Naturalist," The Auk, April 1935, vol. 52, no. 2; Margaret Lantis, "Edward William Nelson," Anthropological Papers of the University of Alaska, December 1954, vol. 3, no. 1; and William W. Fitzhugh and Susan A. Kaplan, Inua. Spirit World of the Bering Sea Eskimo, (Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1982).

EDWARD ALPHONSO GOLDMAN (1873-1946)

Edward Alphonso Goldman, field naturalist and mammalogist, was born in Mount Carroll, Illinois. His family moved to Tulare County, California, in 1888, and he went to work as a foreman in a vineyard near Fresno at the age of seventeen. After a fortuitous meeting between his father and Edward William Nelson of the Bureau of Biological Survey, Goldman was hired by Nelson in January 1892 to assist his biological investigations of California and Mexico. Thus began an association with Nelson and the Biological Survey that would continue for the remainder of his life. Shortly thereafter, he received appointment as a Field Naturalist with the Biological Survey, and he spent most of the next fourteen years with Nelson collecting in every region of Mexico.

Goldman served in a variety of positions with the Biological Survey. He was Field Naturalist, 1892-1917; Biologist in Charge, Division of Biological Investigations, 1919-1925; Biologist in Charge, Game and Bird Reservations, 1925-1928; and Senior Biologist, Division of Biological Investigations, 1928-1943. Goldman also had an honorary position with the Smithsonian Institution as Associate in Zoology from 1928 to 1946. His service with the Biological Survey was marked by extensive field investigations in every region of the United States.

In 1911-1912, Goldman conducted faunal studies as part of the Biological Survey of Panama during construction of the canal. His results were published in The Mammals of Panama in 1920. During World War I, he was a Major in the Sanitary Corps of the American Expeditionary Forces, in charge of rodent control in France. In 1936, he was chosen to assist the United States Government in negotiations with Mexico for the protection of migratory birds and game mammals.

Goldman's bibliography included more than two hundred titles. He named over three hundred forms of mammals, most of them subspecies. Approximately fifty mammals, birds, reptiles, mollusks, and plants bear his name. Goldman Peak in Baja California was also named in his honor. A member of many professional organizations, Goldman was President of the Biological Society of Washington, 1927-1929, and the American Society of Mammalogists, 1946.

For additional biographical information on Goldman, see Stanley P. Young, "Edward Alphonso Goldman: 1873-1946," Journal of Mammalogy, May 1947, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 91-109.
Chronology:
-- CHRONOLOGY OF THE LIFE OF EDWARD WILLIAM NELSON

1855 -- Born in Manchester, New Hampshire, May 8

1868 -- Family moved to Chicago

1872 -- Assisted Edward Drinker Cope and Samuel Garman on a fossil collecting expedition to the Badlands of Wyoming

1876 -- Visited Washington, D.C. and met Spencer F. Baird

1877-1881 -- Weather Observer for the Signal Corps of the U.S. Army at St. Michael, Alaska. Made extensive natural history and ethnology collections and observations of the Bering Strait Eskimos.

1881 -- Accompanied revenue steamer Corwin on search for missing arctic exploring ship Jeannette. Was a member of the first party to explore Wrangell Island.

1887 -- "Report upon Natural History Collections made in Alaska between the years 1877-1881" (Arctic Series of Publications Issued in Connection with the Signal Service, United States Army, no. 3)

1890-1891 -- Special Field Agent, Death Valley Expedition, Division of Ornithology and Mammalogy, United States Department of Agriculture

1890-1907 -- Field Naturalist, Bureau of Biological Survey

1892-1906 -- Field investigations of Mexico with Edward Alphonso Goldman

1899 -- "Revision of the Squirrels of Mexico and Central America" (Proceedings of the Washington Academy of Sciences, vol. 1)

1900 -- "The Eskimo about Bering Strait" (Eighteenth Annual Report, Bureau of American Ethnology, Pt. 1)

1907-1912 -- Chief Field Naturalist, Bureau of Biological Survey

1908-1909 -- President, American Ornithologists' Union

1909 -- "The Rabbits of North America" (U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey, North American Fauna, no. 29)

1911-1934 -- Part owner, Nelson-Goldman Orchard Company, Orosi, California

1912-1913 -- President, Biological Society of Washington

1913-1914 -- Assistant in charge of Biological Investigations, Bureau of Biological Survey

1914-1916 -- Assistant Chief, Bureau of Biological Survey

1916-1927 -- Chief, Bureau of Biological Survey

1918 -- "Wild Animals of North America" (National Geographic Society; rev. ed., 1930)

1918-1919 -- Vice-President, American Society of Mammalogists

1920 -- Honorary Master of Arts, Yale University

1920 -- Honorary Doctor of Science, George Washington University

1920-1923 -- President, American Society of Mammalogists

1921-1922 -- President and Director, Arizona Orchard Company

1922 -- "Lower California and its Natural Resources" (Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 16)

1927-1929 -- Senior Biologist, Bureau of Biological Survey

1930-1934 -- Research Associate, Smithsonian Institution

1934 -- Death, May 19

-- CHRONOLOGY OF THE LIFE OF EDWARD ALPHONSO GOLDMAN

1873 -- Born in Mount Carroll, Illinois, July 7

1888 -- Family moved to Tulare County, California

1891 -- Hired by Edward William Nelson as a field assistant, beginning a long professional and personal association

1892-1917 -- Field Naturalist, Bureau of Biological Survey

1892-1906 -- Biological investigations of Mexico, mostly with Nelson

1910 -- Revision of the Wood Rats of the Genus Neotoma (U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey, North American Fauna, no. 31)

1911 -- Revision of the Spiny Pocket Mice (genera Heteromys and Liomys) (U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey, North American Fauna, no. 34)

1911-1912 -- Conducted faunal studies as part of the Biological Survey of the Panama Canal Zone

1913-1917 -- Biological investigations of Arizona

1918 -- Rice Rats of North America (U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey, North American Fauna, no. 43)

1918-1919 -- Major, Sanitary Corps, American Expeditionary Forces, in charge of rodent control in France

1919-1925 -- Biologist in Charge, Division of Biological Investigations, Bureau of Biological Survey

1920 -- Mammals of Panama (Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, vol. 69, no. 5)

1922-1937 -- Reserve Major, Sanitary Corps, U.S. Army

1925-1928 -- Biologist in Charge, Game and Bird Reservations, Bureau of Biological Survey

1928-1944 -- Senior Biologist, Division of Biological Investigations, Bureau of Biological Survey

1928-1946 -- Associate in Zoology, United States National Museum

-- 1936 assisted with negotiations of United States-Mexico migratory bird and mammal treaty

1944 -- "The Wolves of North America," with Stanley P. Young (American Wildlife Institute)

1944-1946 -- Collaborator, United States Fish and Wildlife Service

1946 -- President, American Society of Mammalogists

1946 -- "The Puma: Mysterious American Cat," with Stanley P. Young (American Wildlife Institute)

1946 -- Death, Washington, D.C., September 2

1951 -- Biological Investigations in Mexico (Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, vol. 115)
Topic:
Mammalogy  Search this
Ornithology  Search this
Orchards  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Scrapbooks
Clippings
Glass negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7364, Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 7364
See more items in:
Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7364
Online Media:

Curators' Annual Reports

Creator::
United States National Museum  Search this
Extent:
49 cu. ft. (98 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1881-1964
Descriptive Entry:
The administration of the United States National Museum required curators to submit regular reports on the activities of the departments, divisions, and sections. Prior to about 1900 these reports were often made monthly and semiannually as well as annually. The reports were traditionally submitted to the Director of the National Museum to be used in preparing the published Annual Report of the United States National Museum. The individual reports, however, were not reproduced in their entirety in the published Annual Report and generally contain more information than is to be found in the published version.

Reports were stored by the Office of Correspondence and Reports (later known as the Office of Correspondence and Documents), and then by the Office of the Registrar.

Includes reports submitted to the Director of the United States National Museum by curators and administrators.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 158, United States National Museum, Curators' Annual Reports
Identifier:
Record Unit 158
See more items in:
Curators' Annual Reports
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0158
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Western Union Telegraph Expedition Collection

Creator::
Western Union Telegraph Expedition (1865-1867)  Search this
Extent:
0.75 cu. ft. (1 document box) (1 half document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Place:
Alaska
Date:
1865-1867
Descriptive Entry:
This collection includes correspondence, mostly to Spencer F. Baird, from members of the Scientific Corps of the Western Union Telegraph Expedition, including Kennicott, Dall, Bannister, and Elliott; copies of reports submitted to divisional chiefs from expedition staff members; newspaper clippings concerning the expedition; copies of notes on natural history taken by Robert Kennicott; and a journal containing meteorological data recorded by Henry M. Bannister from March to August, 1866.
Historical Note:
The Western Union Telegraph Expedition, 1865-1867, also known as the Russian-American Telegraph Expedition, was undertaken to study the possibility of setting up a communications system with Europe by way of Alaska, the Bering Straits, and Asia. The expedition was organized in three divisions, working in Canada, Russian-America (Alaska), and Asia. Robert Kennicott, the veteran Alaskan explorer, was placed in charge of the Russian-American division. Under the auspices of the Smithsonian Institution and the Chicago Academy of Sciences, a Scientific Corps was established, with Kennicott in command, to accompany the Russian-American division and make collections in natural history. Naturalists William H. Dall, Henry M. Bannister, and Henry W. Elliott served as members of the Scientific Corps. On the death of Kennicott on May 13, 1866, Dall became chief of the Scientific Corps until the expedition was terminated in July 1867 due to the successful laying of the Atlantic Cable.
Restrictions:
It appears that some of the material in this collection was removed from the official correspondence files of the Smithsonian.
Topic:
Natural history  Search this
Scientific expeditions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7213, Western Union Telegraph Expedition Collection
Identifier:
Record Unit 7213
See more items in:
Western Union Telegraph Expedition Collection
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7213
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Doris Holmes Blake Papers

Creator::
Blake, Doris Holmes, 1892-1978  Search this
Extent:
18.5 cu. ft. (37 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Scientific illustrations
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Date:
1899-1985
Introduction:
This finding aid was digitized with funds generously provided by the Smithsonian Institution Women’s Committee.
Descriptive Entry:
The Doris Holmes Blake papers consist of correspondence, diaries, photographs and related materials documenting in great detail Blake's personal life and, to a lesser degree, her professional career.

The heavy correspondence she maintained with her mother and daughter, her essays and children's books, and the 70 years' worth of daily journals all attest to her infatuation with the written word and preoccupation with her inner life. Blake's diaries and family papers stunningly illuminate the contrasts in the daily lives of herself, her mother, and her daughter.

The papers relating to her professional life are less complete. Although she spent almost 60 years (1919-1978) in association with the entomological staffs of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and the Smithsonian Institution, published numerous professional papers, produced all of her own illustrations, and illustrated many of her husband's botanical works as well, this collection contains only a very limited amount of material documenting those activities. The papers do, however, include her extensive correspondence with fellow entomologists, both in the United States and abroad.

In the course of transferring her husband's papers to the University of Texas, some of Blake's own papers were included as well. They are presently in the collection of the Humanities Research Center of the University of Texas at Austin and include letters to her parents, 1906-1950; school and college notebooks, papers, essays and drawings; and clippings, genealogical notes, and miscellaneous family letters and papers.
Historical Note:
Doris Holmes (1892-1978) was born in Stoughton, Massachusetts, to a middle-class grocer and his wife. Essentially an only child (two siblings died in early childhood and infancy), her natural intelligence, stubbornness, and extremely competitive nature were well fostered by her parents, who steadily encouraged and supported her determination to excel.

Holmes left Stoughton for Boston University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in 1909, where she pursued studies in business and the classics, earning her A.B. in 1913. Her business skills led to her association with the Boston Psychopathic Hospital in 1913, initially as a clerk, and later as aide to Dr. Herman Adler. Her interests in science and psychology led her to an A.M. from Radcliffe College in zoology and psychology in 1917.

After a short time as a researcher at Bedford Hills Reformatory for Women, Holmes married her childhood sweetheart, botanist Sidney Fay Blake. Early in 1919, Doris Blake found work as a clerk for the Department of Agriculture's Bureau of Entomology under Frank H. Chittenden, and began the entomological studies that would continue for the rest of her life.

Blake worked her way up to junior entomologist and, when Chittenden retired, continued her work under Eugene A. Schwarz at the United States National Museum. The birth in 1928 of daughter Doris Sidney (an infant son had died shortly after birth in 1927) was not a sign for her to slow down -- Blake hired a nurse to watch the baby while she continued to watch beetles. In 1933 her official employment came to an end with the institution of regulations prohibiting more than one member of a family from holding a government position (Sidney Blake was then working for the Department of Agriculture).

Although no longer on the payroll, Blake continued her taxonomic work on the family Chrysomelides for almost 45 more years, first as a collaborator and then as a research associate of the Smithsonian Institution. Shortly after her husband's death, Blake traveled to Europe in 1960 on a National Science Foundation grant to revise the genus Neobrotica Jacoby. She ultimately published 97 papers in various journals (see "Doris Holmes Blake," Froeschner, Froeschner and Cartwright, Proc. Entomol. Soc. Wash., 83(3), 1981, for a complete bibliography) and continued her active research until shortly before her death on December 3, 1978.
Topic:
Entomology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Scientific illustrations
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7310, Doris Holmes Blake Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7310
See more items in:
Doris Holmes Blake Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7310
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Minutes

Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents  Search this
Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
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Martin H. Moynihan Papers

Creator::
Moynihan, M.  Search this
Extent:
4 cu. ft. (4 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Field notes
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Audiotapes
Place:
Barro Colorado Island (Panama)
Date:
1952-1996
Descriptive Entry:
These papers consist primarily of field notes, and include correspondence, photographs, sonograms and spectograms, and a small number of audio tapes.

Many of the materials in this collection are available online.

View Digitized Materials.
Historical Note:
Dr. Martin H. Moynihan (1928-1996) was a world authority on animal behavior, with major contributions to the study of communication in birds, primates, and cephalopods. In 1957 he became the Resident Naturalist and Director of what was then a small field station on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, later named the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI). He transformed the station into a major research institution in tropical biology. After retirement in 1973, he served as Senior Scientist at STRI and continued writing and researching the behavior of various species of wild and imported pheasants at his farmhouse in France.

Curriculum Vitae

Born: February 5, 1928, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

Education: A.B. Princeton University, 1950; D.Phil. Oxford University, 1953.

Positions held: Visiting Fellow, Cornell University, 1953-1955; Research Fellow, Harvard University, 1955-1957; Resident Naturalist and Director, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, 1957-1973; Senior Scientist, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, 1973 to 1996; Research Associate, Stazione Zoologica "Anton Dohm", Naples, Italy.

Fellowships and Grants: 1950-1951, Fulbright Fellowship; 1952-1953, NSF Grant; 1953-1955, Public Health Service Postdoctoral Fellowship; 1958-1963, 1963-1967, NSF Research Grants for studies on the ecology and behavior of birds and primates; 1971-1972, and 1980's, various Smithsonian research awards for the study of Cephalopod behavior.

Honors and Societies: 1967, Walker Prize, Boston Natural History Society, for "meritorious published scientific investigation and discovery in the general area of Natural History," 1976, The Henry Medal (Board of Regents) "for outstanding contributions to the Smithsonian Institution"; 1992, New York Academy of Sciences.

Publications

1946 Evolution in the Rhipidura rujifrons group. Amer. Mus. 1321: 2-21. (With E. Mayr).

1952 Head flagging in the Black-headed Gull: its function and origin. Brit. Birds 45: 19-22. (With N. Tinbergen).

1953a Some displacement activities of the Black-headed Gull. Behaviour 5: 58-80.

1953b Some comments on conflict and thwarting in animals. Behaviour 6: 66-84. (With M. Bastock and D. Morris).

1954 Hostile, sexual and other social behaviour patterns of the Spice Finch (Lonchura punctulata) in captivity. Behaviour 7: 33-76. (With M.F. Hall).

1955a Some aspects of reproductive behavior in the Black-headed Gull (Larus ridibund ridibundus L.) and related species. Behaviour Supplement 4, 201p.

1955b Remarks on the original sources of displays. Auk 72: 240-246.

1955c Types of hostile display. Auk 72: 247-259.

1956a Behavior of a pratincole. Auk 73: 268-27 1.

1956b California Gulls and Herring Gulls breeding in the same colony. Auk 73: 453-454.

1956c Notes on the behavior of some North American gulls. I. Aerial hostile behavior. Behaviour 10: 126-178.

1957 Notes on the sea-birds of Sand Island of the Johnston Island group. Elepaio 18: 35-37.

1958a Notes on the behavior of some North American gulls. II. Non-aerial hostile behavior of adults. Behaviour 12: 95-182.

1958b Notes on the behavior of the Flying Steamer Duck. Auk 75: 183-202.

1958c Notes on the behavior of some North American gulls. III. Pairing behavior. Behaviour 13: 112-130.

1959a A revision of the family Laridae. Amer. Mus. Novitates. November 1-42.

1959b Notes on the behavior of some North American gulls. IV. The ontogeny of hostile behavior and display patterns. Behaviour 14: 214-239.

1960 Some adaptations which help to promote gregariousness. Proc. 12th Int. Orn. Cong., Helsinki 1958, pp. 523-541.

1962a The organization and probable evolution of some mixed species flocks of Neotropical birds. Smithsonian Misc. Coll. 143: 7, 1-140.

1962b Hostile and sexual behavior patterns of South American and Pacific Laridae. Behaviour, Supplement 8, 365 p.

1962c Display patterns of tropical American "nine-primaried" songbirds. 1. Chlorospingus. Auk 79: 310-344.

1962d Display patterns of tropical American "nine-primaried" songbirds. II. Some species of Ramphocelus. Auk 79: 655-686.

1963a Display patterns of tropical American "nine-primaried" songbirds. III. The Green-backed Sparrow. Auk 80: 116-144.

1963b Interspecific relations between some Andean birds. Ibis 105: 327-339.

1963c Two papers on the evolution of communal displays. Auk 80: 381-384.

1964 Some behavior patterns of platyrrhine monkeys. I. The Night Monkey (Aotus trivirgatu), Smithsonian Misc. Coll. 146: 5, 1-84.

1966a Display patterns of tropical American "nine-primaried" songbirds. IV. The Yellow-rumped Tanager. Smithsonian Misc. Coll. 149: 5, 1-34.

1966b Communication in the titi monkey, Callicebus. J. Zool. Soc. Lond. 150: 77-127.

1967 Comparative aspects of communication in New World Primates. In: Primate Ethology, edited by D. Morris, pp. 236-266. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson.

1968a Social mimicry: character convergence versus character displacement. Evolution 22: 315-331.

1968b The "Coerebini"; a group of marginal areas, habitats and habits. Amer. Natur. 102: 573-581.

1970a Some behavior patterns of platyrrhine monkeys. II. Saguinus geoffroyi and some other tamarins. Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology 28: 1-77.

1970b The control, suppression, decay, disappearance and replacement of displays. L. Theor. Biol. 29: 85-112.

1971 Successes and failures of tropical mammals and birds. Amer. Natur. 105: 371-383.

1973a Species proportions - a reply. Amer. Natur. 107: 155-156.

1973b The evolution of behavior and the role of behavior in evolution. Breviora 415: 1-29.

1975 Conservatism of displays and comparable stereotyped patterns among cephalopods. In: Function and Evolution in Behaviour, edited by B. Baerends, C. Beer and A. Manning G., pp. 276-291. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

1976a THE NEW WORLD PRIMATES: Adaptive Radiation and the Evolution of Social Behavior, Languages, and Intelligence. New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 262p.

1976b Notes on the ecology and behavior of the Pygmy Marmoset, Cebuella pygmaea, in Amazonian Colombia. Neotropical Primates. In: Field Studies and Conservation, pp. 79-84. Washington: National Academy of Sciences.

1977 Communication, crypsis, and mimicry among cephalopods. In: How Animals Communicate, edited by T. Sebeok, pp. 293-302. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. (With A.F. Rodaniche).

1978 An "Ad hoc" association of hornbills, starlings, coucals, and other birds. Terra et Vie 3: 357-376.

1979 GEOGRAPHIC VARIATION IN SOCIAL BEHAVIOR AND IN ADAPTATION TO COMPETITION AMONG ANDEAN BIRDS. Publ. Nuttall Orn. Club 18:162p.

1980 The coincidence of mimicries and other misleading coincidences. Amer. Natur., 117(4): 372-378.

1982a Spatial parameters and interspecific social relations: some differences between birds and fishes. J. Theor. Biol. 95: 253-262.

1982b THE BEHAVIOR AND NATURAL HISTORY OF THE CARIBBEAN REEF SQUID SEPIOTEUTHIS SEPIOIDEA. Zeitschr. f. Tierpsychol., Advances in Ethology 25, 150p. (With A. Rodaniche).

1982c Why is lying about intentions rare during some kind of contests? J. Theor. Biol., 97(l): 7-12.

1982d Introduccion. In: Evolucion en los Tropicos, edited by Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and Editorial Universitaria. Impresora Panama: Panama, pp. 11-14.

1983a A slight discrepancy. Amer Natur., 121: 301.

1983b Notes on the behavior of Euprymna scolopes (Cephalopoda: Sepioidae). Behaviour 85: 25-41.

1983c Notes on the behavior of Idiosepius pygmaeus (Cephalopoda: Idiosepiidae). Behaviour 85: 42-57.

1984 Transpositions of signals and the persistence of releasing mechanisms. Zeitschr. f. Tierpsychol., 64: 269-282.

1985a Why are cephalopods deaf? Amer. Natur. 25(3): 465-469.

1985b COMMUNICATION AND NON-COMMUNICATION BY CEPHALOPODS. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 141p.

1987a Social relations among Halcyon kingfishers in Senegal. Rev. Ecol. (Terre et Vie) 42: 145-166.

1987b Notes on the behaviour of Giant Kingfishers. Malimbus 9(2): 97-104.

1988 The opportunism of the Abyssinian Roller (Coracias abyssinica) in Senegal. Rev. Ecol. (Terre et Vie) 43: 159-166.

1990 Social, sexual and pseudosexual behavior of the blue-bellied roller, coracias syanogaster; the Consequences of Crowding or Concentration. Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology 491: 1-23.

1991 Structures of Animal Communication. In: Man & Beast Revisited, edited by Michael H. Robinson and Lionel Tiger, pp. 193-202. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press.

1995 Social structures and behavior patterns of captive and feral Reeves' Pheasants (Syrmaticus reevesi) in France. Alauda 63(3):41-56.

1997 Self Awareness, with Specific References to Coleoid Cephalopods. In: Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals, edited by Robert W. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson, and H. Lyn Miles, pp. 213-219. Albany: State University of New York Press.

1998 THE SOCIAL REGULATION OF COMPETITION AND AGGRESSION IN ANIMALS. Washington and London: Smithsonian Institution Press, 158p.
Topic:
Squids  Search this
Ornithology  Search this
Primates  Search this
Pheasants  Search this
Ornithologists  Search this
Animal behavior  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Field notes
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Audiotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 01-096, Martin H. Moynihan Papers
Identifier:
Accession 01-096
See more items in:
Martin H. Moynihan Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa01-096

Records

Creator::
United States National Museum. Division of Grasses  Search this
Extent:
13.84 cu. ft. (8 record storage boxes) (1 half document box) (13 12x17 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Place:
China -- History $y Civil War, 1945-1949
Fuzhou Shi (Fujian Sheng, China)
South America
Africa
Canada
Brazil
Date:
1884, 1888, 1899-1965
Descriptive Entry:
These papers document the history of the agrostology section of the Bureau of Plant Industry, United States Department of Agriculture (1901-1939), and the Section of Grasses, United States National Herbarium, United States National Museum (1912-1963) at the time Albert Spear Hitchcock and Mary Agnes Chase worked for the USDA and the USNH, as well as the scientific endeavors of Hitchcock and Chase. Included are personal papers, which also predate Hitchcock's and Chase's tenure with the USDA and USNH. Records of the USDA were probably transferred to the Smithsonian when Hitchcock became custodian of the grass section, USNH. These papers include loose incoming and outgoing correspondence with U.S. and foreign botanists; directors and botanists of herbaria; agrononomists; collectors of botanical specimens; seed laboratories, floral companies; USDA staff members; Smithsonian Institution staff members; agricultural schools and agricultural experiment stations; colleagues; friends; publishers; and scientific societies, regarding identification, examination, and reports on plants and grasses; exchange and transfer of specimens, gifts and loans of specimen collections; information regarding plants and grasses for sheep and other livestock; explorations and botanical collecting expeditions; taxonomy; nomenclature; sick and annual leave; requests for positions with the USDA; recommendations for colleagues for positions, recommendations for fellowships; recommendations for publication of manuscripts; requests for publications; election to scientific societies; administrative status of the grass section, USNH (1938), Mary Agnes Chase Fund (1953-1961); feminist movement; pacifism and politics in Europe before and during the Second World War; political and economic conditions during the Chinese Civil War, especially in Foochow (1949); outgoing letterpress correspondence (1905-1923) concerning the above; also biographies, manuscripts, newspaper clippings, photographs, and scrapbook.
Historical Note:
Albert Spear Hitchcock, botanist, a distinguished authority on the grasses of the world, was born in Owasso, Michigan, on September 4, 1865. After spending his early years growing up in Kansas and Nebraska, Hitchcock entered Iowa State Agricultural College, receiving his B.S. in 1884, and an M.S. in 1886. Though influenced by botanists Charles Edwin Bessey and Herbert Osborn, Hitchcock majored in chemistry and accepted his first position in 1886 as an instructor of chemistry at Iowa State University. During the summer months, Hitchcock returned to Ames to botanize the region.

In 1889, Hitchcock gave up his chemistry position for a lesser salary in order to work under William Trelease at the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis, working as an instructor in the Engelmann School of Botany, Washington University, curator of the herbarium, and librarian at the Botanical Garden. Hitchcock left St. Louis to become professor of botany at Kansas Agricultural College, 1892-1901; and in 1901 began his association with the United States Department of Agriculture as an assistant agrostologist under Frank Lamson-Scribner. The association was to last until Hitchcock's death in 1935.

Until 1905, most of Hitchcock's work at the USDA was in the economic field of grasses. In 1905 he changed places with Charles Vancouver Piper and took over the grass herbarium in order to conduct taxonomic studies. Hitchcock became the systematic agrostologist at the USDA, and after 1928 held the title of principal botanist in charge of systematic agrostology, USDA.

Hitchcock's relationship with the Smithsonian dates back to October 10, 1912, when he was made custodian of grasses, Section of Grasses, Division of Plants, United States National Museum. Apparently, though the USDA herbarium was transferred to the Smithsonian and merged with the Smithsonian collections in 1896 (see description of the Hunt Institute collection 105), the grass section of the herbarium remained with the USDA and was not transferred until later, possibly in 1912 when Hitchcock held joint positions with the USDA and the Smithsonian. Hitchcock remained custodian (without remuneration) of the Section of Grasses until his death. Under Hitchcock, the grass herbarium increased to become the largest and most complete collection of its kind in the world.

Hitchcock was very much interested in nomenclature and helped educate botanists throughout the world on the advantages of basing specimen names on the type method rather than on previous authority. His writings and support for the Fourth International Botanical Congress project on nomenclature reunion at Ithaca, New York, in 1926, helped lay the foundation for an international agreement on nomenclature at the Congress meeting held at Cambridge in 1930.

Hitchcock also originated the idea of preserving a portion of tropical jungle in the canal zone. While he was chairman of the Executive Committee of the Institute for Research in Tropical America, Barro Colorado Island was made into a permanent preserve. (See STRI records, Record Units 134 and 135, for a history of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.)

Hitchcock traveled widely collecting botanical specimens, including the entire United States, most of Latin America, and parts of Africa, Asia, and Europe. In 1929 he was the botanist representative from the United States at the British Association for the Advancement of Science meeting held in South Africa.

Among Hitchcock's 250 articles and books, his major works consisted of studies on the grasses of the United States. Included in his works are, Genera of Grasses of the United States; Manual of Farm Grasses; Manual of Grasses of the United States; Methods of Descriptive Systematic Botany; and Text-Book of Grasses.

Hitchcock received an Sc.D. from Iowa State College in 1920, and in 1934 he was awarded an honorary D.Sc. degree from Kansas State College.

Feminist and botanist Mary Agnes Chase, considered "one of the world's outstanding agrostologists and preeminent among American students in this field," by the Botanical Society of America upon presentation of her Certificate of Merit in 1956, was born in Iroquois County, Illinois, on April 20, 1869. Educated in the public and private schools of Chicago, Chase became interested in botany at an early age, working at night as a proofreader and botanizing during the day. Though Chase took extension course work from the Lewis Institute and the University of Chicago, the only degree she received was an honorary degree of Doctor of Science from the University of Illinois in 1958.

In 1901, Chase became an assistant in botany at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, working with Charles Frederick Millspaugh and illustrating each species with line drawings for his article, "Plantae Yucatanae." Chase left Chicago in 1903 to become a botanical illustrator for the United States Department of Agriculture in Washington, D.C. Working beyond office hours, Chase spent her time on the collections of the grass herbarium in order to prepare a series of articles on the genera of Paniceae.

From 1907 to 1923, Chase held the position of scientific assistant in systematic agrostology, becoming assistant botanist in 1923 and associate botanist in 1925. Upon the death of Albert Spear Hitchcock, Chase became senior botanist in charge of systematic agrostology in 1936, and at the same time, became custodian of the Section of Grasses, Division of Plants, United States National Museum. She retired from the USDA in 1939, retaining her position as custodian for the grass section in the USNM. When the Division of Plants reorganized in 1947, becoming the Department of Botany, the Section of Grasses became the Division of Grasses, with Jason Richard Swallen becoming assistant curator and then curator of the Division. Chase was made a research associate in the Department, but still, it appears, retained a position as honorary custodian of the grass herbarium.

In 1959, Chase was made an Honorary Fellow of the Smithsonian, the eighth fellow in the history of the Institution. Among Chase's publications, her important works are First Book of Grasses; a revision of the Manual of Grasses of the United States; and a three-volume index to grass species that contains information from approximately 80,000 index cards. This last undertaking was published in 1962. Chase died September 24, 1963.
Topic:
Botany  Search this
Scientific expeditions  Search this
Botanists  Search this
Feminism  Search this
Pacifism  Search this
Political science  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 229, United States National Museum. Division of Grasses, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 229
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0229

Joseph P. E. Morrison Papers

Creator::
Morrison, Joseph Paul Eldred  Search this
Extent:
1.5 cu. ft. (3 document boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1923-1973 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
The largest portion of Morrison's papers consists of professional correspondence written and received between 1923 and 1973. It documents his research interests and the extent of his influence as an adviser and research editor to students and colleagues worldwide in malacological matters. In addition there are small groups of letters, notes and other materials that relate to Morrison's employment, participation in expeditions, work as an author, and his special interest in collecting equipment and methods. Also included are research notes and information he collected which show the breadth of his interest. Although some of Morrison's expeditions and advisory work are incompletely documented or not covered at all, the papers are representative of most of his interests and expertise.

The bulk of Morrison's papers are dated between 1944 and 1970, covering a large portion of his Smithsonian career. His earlier career is covered less well, and there is little except a few letters dated prior to 1925. There are no papers dated before 1923 or after 1973. Additional information about Morrison's Smithsonian career may be found in the records of the Division of Mollusks (Record Unit 73) in the Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Historical Note:
Joseph Paul Eldred Morrison (1906-1983), a respected authority in malacology, was born at South Bend, Indiana. His parents, Robert and Edith Eldred, were missionaries in Congo Belge [Belgian Congo], Africa, where his two brothers were born. After their mother's death in 1912 and father's death in 1913, the three boys became foster sons of Dr. and Mrs. Hugh Tucker Morrison.

Joseph Morrison was interested in zoology from his childhood, and at age 12 took a correspondence course in taxidermy. He spent much of his spare time collecting animals around his home in Springfield, Illinois. He graduated from the University of Chicago in 1926 and went on to earn his M.S. (1929) and Ph.D. (1931) from the University of Wisconsin. While in school, Morrison worked as a researcher in zoology at the Illinois State Museum; the Mount Desert Island, Maine, Biological Survey; and the Wisconsin State Natural History Survey. He also taught briefly before joining the Division of Mollusks, United States National Museum, as a senior scientific aid in 1934. He was made assistant curator on September 1, 1942, and associate curator in 1946, where he remained until his retirement in 1975.

While at the Smithsonian, Morrison collected mollusks locally and on expedition. He did research for the Army Chemical Warfare Service in San Jose, Panama, in 1944. He also participated in both Operation Crossroads and the Bikini Scientific Resurvey research of the atomic bomb test sites in the Marshall Islands in 1946 and 1947. Aside from traveling and collecting, Morrison acted as a consultant on medical and veterinary topics for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Surgeon General, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. He also served as an editorial consultant for National Geographic Magazine, as well as adviser to many colleagues and students. He was known as an expert in all three major areas of molluscan study: freshwater, land, and marine. He was a prolific writer, with over 100 publications and 175 new molluscan taxa introduced. Especially interested in specimen collection equipment, he designed or modified various dredges, nets, traps and firearms, including a .30 caliber M1 carbine that was used in a survival kit for World War II troops.
Chronology:
1906 -- Born December 17 at South Bend, Indiana

1912-1913 -- Parents deceased, Congo Belge

1919 -- Northwestern School of Taxidermy, correspondence course

1922-1924 -- Attended Transylvania College, Lexington, Kentucky

1923 -- Illinois State Museum, zoological specialist, summer

1923-1924 -- Student assistant in Zoology, Transylvania College

1924-1926 -- Attended University of Chicago, B.S., 1926

1925 -- Expedition to British Guiana as student at Kartabo Laboratory of University of Pittsburgh

1927 -- Illinois State Museum, zoological specialist, summer

1927-1928 -- Zoologist, Mt. Desert Island, Maine, Biological Survey, summers

1927-1931 -- Attended University of Wisconsin, M.S., 1929, Ph.D., 1931

1927-1931 -- Graduate assistant in zoology at University of Wisconsin

1928 -- Elected to Phi Sigma

1929 -- Married Dorothy Louise Dunn

1929 -- Elected to Sigma Xi

1929 -- Published first article on mollusks, "A preliminary list of the Mollusca of Dane County, Wisconsin"

1929-1930 -- Zoologist, Wisconsin State Geological and Natural History Survey, summers

1931-1933 -- Professor in Zoology at Crane Junior College, Chicago

1931 -- Elected to the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters

1933-1934 -- Taught botany and zoology at Kelly Senior High School, Chicago

1934-1942 -- Senior scientific aid, Division of Mollusks, U. S. National Museum

1939 -- Invented collapsible funnel fish trap

1940-1952 -- Member, National Speleological Society

1942-1946 -- Assistant curator, Division of Mollusks, U. S. National Museum

1944 -- Expedition to San Jose Island, Pearl Islands, Panama, for U. S. Army Chemical Warfare Service, with Alexander Wetmore

1946 -- Expedition to Bikini Atoll, Marshall Islands, for U. S. Army/Navy Operation Crossroads, with Leonard P. Schultz

1946 -- Promoted to associate curator, Division of Mollusks, U. S. National Museum

1946 -- Member, Washington Biologists Field Club

1946-1955 -- Member, Atoll Research Panel of the Pacific Science Board

1947 -- Bikini Scientific Resurvey, Marshall Islands

1948-1951 -- Associate editor, Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences

1950 -- Vice-President, American Malacological Union

1951 -- President, American Malacological Union

1951-1953 -- Editor, Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences

1952 -- Expedition to Raroia, Tuamotu Islands, for Pacific Science Board

1953 -- Life member, American Malacological Union

1953-1954 -- Senior editor, Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences

1959 -- Life member, National Rifle Association

1960 -- Trip to Mt. St. Hilaire, Quebec, with American Malacological Union

1961 -- Expedition to New Caledonia

1961-1963 -- Vice-President, Biological Society of Washington

1962 -- Research trip to St. Petersburg, Florida

1962 -- Member, Society of Systematic Zoology

1962 -- President, National Capitol Shell Club

1963-1964 -- Acting president, Biological Society of Washington

1964 -- International Conference on Estuaries, Jekyll Island, Georgia

1965 -- Expedition to Dominica

1966-1967 -- Expedition to Mexico

1975 -- Retired from Smithsonian Institution

1983 -- Death, December 12
Topic:
Mollusks  Search this
Malacologist  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7376, Joseph P. E. Morrison Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7376
See more items in:
Joseph P. E. Morrison Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7376

A. Stanley Rand Oral History Interviews

Creator::
Rand, A. Stanley (Austin Stanley), 1932-2005, interviewee  Search this
Extent:
4 audiotapes (Reference copy).
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Place:
Barro Colorado Island (Panama)
Panama
Brazil
Date:
1986, 1989-1990
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Austin Stanley Rand was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his distinguished scientific career, and long tenure at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute as both researcher and administrator. Additional interviews of Rand can be found in Record Unit 9580, Barro Colorado Island Group Oral History Interview, and Record Unit 9553, Conservation of Endangered Species Videohistory Interviews. Additional information about Rand can be found in the Records of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the A. Stanley Rand Papers which are also housed in Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Descriptive Entry:
The Austin Stanley Rand Interviews were conducted during three sessions from December 1986 through June 1990. The first interview was in December 1986 by Daryl Jones, a student at the University of Maryland; the second, in April 1989 by Smithsonian Institution Archives historian, Pamela M. Henson, and Joel Bartholemew Hagen, a Smithsonian postdoctoral fellow; and the third, in June 1990 by Pamela Henson. They consist of 3.5 hours of audiotape and audio cassette recordings and 81 pages of transcript

The Austin Stanley Rand Interviews discuss his background, education and early interest in zoology; career at STRI; recollections of colleagues and life on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), including Martin Humphrey Moynihan, Neal Griffith Smith, and Dagmar I. Werner; discussions of his and his colleagues' major research interests; STRI's regional role; and changes at STRI over the years.
Historical Note:
Austin Stanley Rand (1932-2005), was a herpetologist and Senior Biologist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI). He was born on September 29, 1932, in Seneca Falls, New York. He received his B.A. in zoology from DePauw University in 1955, served in the U.S. Army from 1955-1957, and received his Ph.D. in Biology from Harvard University in 1961. In 1961 he married Patricia Rand, and they had three children, Hugh, Margaret and Katherine.

Rand began his scientific career in 1950, when he worked three summers as an Assistant in the Division of Amphibians and Reptiles at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, Illinois. In 1957, he worked as an Assistant in the Division of Mammals at the Field Museum. Upon completing his Ph.D., Rand served as a Research Assistant in Herpetology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ) at Harvard University from 1961-1962, and as a Zoologist for the Secretary of Agriculture in Sa Paulo, Brazil from 1962-1964. Rand first arrived at STRI in 1964 as a herpetologist. From 1973-1979, Rand also served as Coordinator of the Tropical Program of the Smithsonian's Environmental Sciences Program, coordinating research projects on marine and terrestrial monitoring. In 1974, Rand was appointed STRI's Assistant Director, with special responsibilities for the operation of the Barro Colorado Island field station, as well as budget and planning for STRI. In 1979, he was appointed Senior Biologist, a position which he held until his death. In 1988, he also became responsible for coordinating scientific activities at STRI's facilities in Gamboa, Panama. At STRI, Rand supervised graduate student and postdoctoral research, and consulted for the Panamanian government as requested.

Rand's research interests were primarily in studies of the behavior and ecology of tropical reptiles and amphibians, particularly social behavior and vocal communication in lizards (Iguana iguana and Anolis limifrons) and Tungara frogs (Physalaemus pustulosus). His major field work included a month or more in Brazil, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Jamaica, Haiti, Panama, Puerto Rico, St. Kitts, Santo Domingo, and Venezuela, as well as shorter visits elsewhere. He was a prolific producer of articles, both alone and as co-author, and both organized and participated in various symposia.

Rand was a member of various professional societies, including the American Society of Naturalists, the Society for the Study of Evolution, the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles, Association for Tropical Biology, Herpetologist's League, and Animal Behavior Society.
Topic:
Tropical biology  Search this
Herpetology  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Amphibians  Search this
Frogs  Search this
Herpetologists  Search this
Anura  Search this
Iguanas  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9579, A. Stanley Rand Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9579
See more items in:
A. Stanley Rand Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9579

Harriet Green Kopp Papers

Creator:
Kopp, Harriet Green, 1917-  Search this
Extent:
4.75 Cubic feet (16 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Lantern slides
Lecture notes
Date:
1930-1950
Scope and Contents:
These papers relate to Kopp's work in visible speech technology, especially a project to develop a machine that would enable the deaf to understand the spoken voice; including biographical materials, research notes, lecture notes, spectrograms, research reports, log books, correspondence, slides and photographs, books, and documentation of grants for research projects.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 6 series.

Series 1: Documents

Series 2: Books

Series 3: Photographs

Series 4: Slides

Series 5: Books

Series 6: Documents
Biographical / Historical:
Harriet Green Kopp was born on June 18, 1917 in New York City. She earned a Master of Arts fom Brooklyn College, 1939; diploma in education of deaf, Columbia University, 1939; and Doctor of Philosophy, Columbia University, 1962. Kopp was a professor in the School of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at San Diego State University. She died on February 11, 2007.
Kopp Names and Organizations:
Kopp Names

Adams, George F. -- region superintendent that signed off on HGK's request for an extension of leave from Detroit Day School for the Deaf (9/29/1972). See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Adkins, Millie -- ranked No. 13 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; Female Test Subject; 10/14/1966; Grade 4, Test 6 - Part A. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Adkins, Judy Lee -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 23 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968 . See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Adkins, Amelia -- Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968 . See: Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Ahern, Patrick (Pat) -- ranked No. 11 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Alcord, Miss -- Maine School, Mass. Private. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Aler, Miss -- Motor Coordination - Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program; administered test of coordination. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Alexander, C. -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Library Research. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Altman, Silver -- in Jacobs's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Alvarez, Jose (Joe) -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring and fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Alvarez, Christo -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Ames, Miss -- Deaf school teacher, N.J. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Ames, September -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Amrheim -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Anderson, Helene -- Co-wrote report on vocal therapy with George Kopp. See: Case Report by George Kopp and Helene Anderson on Vocal Therapy for Dysphonia Plicae Ventricularis (c. 1965)

Anderson, Dr. Irving -- Associate Professor of Speech Education, U. Michigan (1947); member of Visible Speech advisory committee; attended V.S. research committee meetings on 5/1/1947, 5/29/1947, 6/28/1947, 11/7/1947. See: Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947)

Anderson, Dr. Tom -- Texas School for the Deaf. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Anderson, Dr. William S. -- member of the committee on Adolescent Deaf of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Anderson -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Guidance and Personnel. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Anderson, Kenneth -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Anderson, Kathy -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Angelocci, Dr. Angelo A. -- Speech and Hearing Clinician, Rehabilitation Institutes, Metropolitan Detroit; born 10/16/1926, married with 4 children; B.S., Speech and English, Michigan State College (1950); M.A., Speech and Speech Correction, University of Michigan, 1954; speech teacher in Birmingham, MI for 6 years; doctoral student, Speech Pathology and Audiology, Wayne State University (1955); Research Associate during RD-526 project; budgeted for expenditures in grant proposal for project RD-526; Held copyright along with Harriet G. Kopp and Dr. George Kopp; taught the first experimental class for the RD-526 project and prepared material for the Visible Speech Manual. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Visible Speech Manual Original - to copy; Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526); Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526)

Arnold, Joyce -- 9 years old; Group 1 of exploratory program; congenitally deaf, severely hypacaustic, part of experimental study for Visible Speech Research at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947), experiment subject in U Mich study; scored for intelligibility in experiment 1 (1947); performance in Visible Speech Experiment #2 evaluated 1948. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); Supplement to Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Pattern Recognition Charts - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Avery, Miss Charlotte -- speech teacher, translator in U Mich study; performed Visible Speech Experiment #4 at the Rackham School (March 1947); limited training in visible speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Proposed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (summer 1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Aviles, Irma -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Ayres -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Bachman, Mrs. Dorothy L. -- experienced teacher of the deaf, Translator Project III; taught Group 2A, Experimenter in U Mich study, no training in visible speech; performed Visible Speech experiment #3 in March 1947; terminated her employment at the Rackham School at the end of the 1947 summer session. See: Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Proposed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (summer 1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Baker, George H. -- Executive Administrative Assistant, Dept. of Personnel, Detroit Public Schools; wrote HGK regarding administrative aspects of her new post at the Detroit Day School of the Deaf on 7/7/1958 and 10/15/1958. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Balbach -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Baldwin, Rev. DeWitt -- See: Dialogue between Martin Buber and Carl Rogers (4/18/1957)

Banks -- taught students at Detroit Day School; students labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Banton, James (Jim) -- Subject #18 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 35 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 9 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project; Male Test Subject; 10/13/1966; Grade 9, Test 6 - Part A. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Baozhong, Dr. Tu -- Deputy Secretary General and member of the Board of Trustees, Chinese Medical Association; in charge of medical education intern program. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Barberi -- new worker at Bell Labs. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Barlow, Susan -- in Jacobs's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Barnes, Dr. -- Sweden; came for instruction and demonstration of University of Michigan study, 3/17/1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Barney, Harold L. -- worked at Bell Telephone Laboratories; sent letter 11/1/1954 to Harriet and George Kopp. See: correspondence from Harold Barney to George and Harriet Kopp (11/1/1954)

Bastiau -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Bauer, Marvin G. -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Advanced Discussion, Classical Rhetoric, & British and American Rhetorical Theory. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Bayones, David -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 30 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 6 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Beekman, Marvin E. -- Director of Special Education, Michigan Dept. of Education; sent congratulatory letter to HGK on the dedication of the new school building on 6/3/1970. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Behrens, Dr. Thomas R. -- member of the Chairmen of the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf with HGK on 7/24/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Belheimer -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 12/06/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Bell, Mr. -- Bell Labs demonstration 12/12/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Benjamin -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Fundamentals of Electricity. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Bennett, Jeffrey (Jeff) -- ranked No. 38 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5 (1966-1967 school year). See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Bennett -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Benya, Jr., John J. -- salary as Research Asst. budgeted for Project No. RD-1483-S (1966). See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966)

Bierlin, Ruth -- Observed UMich demonstrations, special class of hard of hearing children . See: How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Biller, Mary E. -- Newark, NJ, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/21/1945

Bint, Linda -- ranked No. 22 overall in spring 1966 tests; 5th grade (1966-1967 school year). See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Bitter, Colleen -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 18 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience . See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Black, Melissa -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; HGK noted check vision on roster; ranked No. 44 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 6 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Blair, Miss -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 10/24/1946. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Bloom, Jr., Edgar -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Bloomer, Dr. Harlan H. -- Director of Speech Clinic, Associate Prof. of Speech, University of Michigan (1947); discussed visible speech research program with Ralph K. Potter on 4/18/1946 and 3/13/1947; member of Visual Speech advisory committee; attended V.S. research committee meetings on 1/5/1947, 2/12/1947, 2/21/1947, 3/3/1947, 5/1/1947, 5/29/1947, 6/28/1947, 11/7/1947; George Kopp requested a clerical assistant for Harriet Green and a graduate laboratory assistant from Bloomer on 2/2/5/1947; sent George Kopp notes on a proposed article on visible speech on 6/24/1947; highlighted in News and Notes article (Oct. 1947); requested that students doing research with the sound spectrograph be encouraged to publish (Aug. 1948). See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); News and Notes (9/22/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Bloomquist, Betty -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; completed Master's thesis on Diadochokinetic movements of children in May 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Blost, Phyllis E. -- Evaluation section, Dept. of Management and Budget; received letter from HGK about the delay of her retirement settlement on 9/11/1981. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Boatner -- Hartford School. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Bobb, David -- on clinic's fall 1975, spring and fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists . See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Bock, N.B. -- authored Correcting the Spoken English of Chinese and Japanese. See: Information on Phonetics and Dialects (6/6/1949-1/26/1950)

Boggs, Barbara -- grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; crossed off roster; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked 4 days. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Bohman, Dr. George -- Chairman, Dept of Speech, Wayne State University; associated with the George A. Kopp Memorial fund

Boldt, Jan -- on clinic's spring 1975, fall 1976, fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Boody, Barbara -- recorded spectrograms with cleft palate 4/4/1947. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-48)

Borst, John M. -- Some Experiments on the Perception of Synthetic Speech (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 24, No. 6, Nov. 1952); The Interconversion of Audible and Visible Patterns as a Basis for Research in Perception of Speech (from the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 37, No. 5, May 1951). See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Boskovich, James (Jim) -- Subject #6 in 1965 tests; grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked Bo. 43 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Bowen, Mr. -- Holmdel. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Bowen, Miss -- Skidmore. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Bowman, George -- Ohio State?. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Boyd -- Bell Labs Notebook - lunch 12/31/1945

Bozorgi, Farid -- ranked No. 37 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 8 (1966-1967 school year); sent thank you letter to HGK on 2/23/1971 regarding her help with his education; received letter back from her 3/10/1971. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Braboy, Gayle Lynn -- ranked No. 40 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5 (1966-1967 school year); Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966);Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Braswell, Shelly -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 26 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 6 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Bratsch, Don -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Breading, C.M. -- representing Central Press Clipping Service, soliciting business to review public relations of the Rackham School of Special Education. See: Correspondence to George A. Kopp from C.M. Breading of the Central Press Clipping Service (9/3/1947)

Brendle, Terry -- in Banks's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Brent, Billy -- ranked No. 12 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Brice, Arlene -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Brock, Christopher -- student at Detroit Day School shown in newspaper photograph. See: Clipping from The Detroit News (2/13/1966)

Brock, James T. -- wrote article on the Detroit Day School entitled: A War on Silence: Detroit Day School for Deaf Presents Students the Gifts of Speed, 'Hearing' . See: Clipping from The Detroit News (2/13/1966)

Broomfield, William S. -- Member of Congress, 18th District of Michigan; sent HGK a congratulatory letter on her reappointment to the National Advisory Committee on Education of the Deaf on 8/6/1970. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Brown, Richard -- replaced Loveel as engineer in charge of servicing the visible speech equipment in 1948. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44), Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Brownell, Dr. Samuel Miller -- Superintendent of Detroit Public Schools - offered HGK job as principal for the West Side School for the Deaf on 10/3/1958; received her acceptance letter sent 10/8/1958; recognized HGK's acceptance of the principal position on 10/14/1958; later assocatiated with Yale University Institute of Social Science; offered to write HGK a recommendation letter 11/26/1969; Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); received memo on the reorganization of the education of the deaf and hard of hearing from HGK on 6/14/1961; allowed research for project RD-526 to be conducted at the Detroit Day School for the Deaf; received letter 1/27/1960 about approval of a grant for Harriet and George Kopp's research. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970); Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971); Early draft of the final report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960)

Bruner -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Educational Foundations. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Brunstetter, Prof. Max -- asked to review manuscript by GAK on 8/13/1941. See: Original Manuscript of and comments on George A. Kopp's elementary opus (8/3/1941)

Brust -- re: Kopp- Ohio 12/28/45. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Buber, Martin -- famous German philosopher. See: Dialogue between Martin Buber and Carl Rogers (4/18/1957)

Buckley, Dr. Oliver E. -- President of Bell Telephone Laboratories; received reports from Chao on use of spectrograph for the study and teaching of Chinese; issues certificates recognizing contribution to war effort; discussed possibility of using voice print technology in crime-fighting. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); Certificate WWII, BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Buckner, Jim -- grade 5, in Simmons's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Buli, Mable -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Bumingham, Ann -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Burge, Linda -- ranked No. 52 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Burrows, Dr. Harold -- Vice President - Administration, Parke Davis & Company; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Bush, Dr. -- OSRD - interview. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Campbell, Janet C. -- secretary to B.R. Wolfram, M.D., president of Educational Media, Inc.; sent HGK invoices for her signature on 1/27/1970. See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Carlson, Beverly -- grade 9, in Martyka's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Carter, C.W. -- wrote report on Chao's testing of the Chinese language with the spectrograph. See: Memo on Visible Speech testing of Chinese langauage (4/17/1944)

Caswell, Prof. Hollis L. -- asked to review manuscript by GAK on 8/13/1941. See: Original Manuscript of and comments on George A. Kopp's elementary opus (8/3/1941); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Caufield, Colonel Norton -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Chang, Dr. -- Director, Maternal and Ob.Gyn. Hospital (associated with China Welfare Institute), Shanghai. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Chao, Jo -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Chao, Dr. Y.R. -- professor at Harvard University; provided Chinese samples to visible speech testing. See: Memo on Visible Speech testing of Chinese langauage (4/17/1944); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); Research report by Y.R. Chao on Chinese recordings (11/21/1944-2/17/1945)

Chapman -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Chase, Jeffrey -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Chelfant?, Jerme -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Cheng, Dr. -- Deputy Director, Head of Nursing Dept., Maternal and Ob.Gyn. Hospital (associated with the China Welfare Institute), Shanghai. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Cheng, Dr. -- Neurologist, Shanghai Medical College. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Chinitz, Ben S. -- Region One Superintendent, Detroit Public Schools; sent HGK a congratulatory letter on 6/1/1970. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Chou, Dr. -- Shanghai Medical College. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Christensen -- rep of Michigan Bell Telephone publications dept.; 10/10/1946 conference . See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Christopher, Harold M. -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Cirker, Mr. -- See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Clark, A.N. -- Editor, D. Van Nostrand Company, Inc.(published Visible Speech); received letter from George Kopp on 8/8/1947 expressing a need for new books in the field of speech correction. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Clark, Mr. -- Cleary Oral School, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/07/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Clark, Marla -- grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked No. 48 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Clark, Ross -- on clinic's spring 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Cleary, Miss -- Cleary Oral School, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/07/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Clement -- 6th and 9th grade teacher, Detroit Day School; 5 students in spring 1966 9th grade class. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Clemente, Mr. Joseph -- left position to join Project No. RD-1483-S on 2/1/1965; worked full time until Aug. 1965; resigned due to personal problems in Sept. 1965; budgeted salary as Research Assistant for Project No. RD-1483-S (1966). See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Cohen, Marsha -- teacher at Detroit Day School; shown in newspaper photograph teaching 4-year-olds. See: Clipping from The Detroit News (2/13/1966)

Cole, Samantha -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Coleman, David -- Experiment subject in U Mich Study; performance in Visible Speech Experiment #4 evaluated 1948. See: How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Collins, Kenneth M. (Ken; KC) -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Colpitts, Frank -- received Visible Speech Research Project Progress Report concerning plans for producting the testing-instruction materials on 10/17/1966; met with the General Film Lab., Co., Detroit about the creation of slides of spectrographic patterns; Research Associate for Visible Speech for the Deaf, worked part time starting September 1966 until the end of the project; mailed GAK the summary of the spring 1967 research study on 6/25/1968. See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Correspondence from Frank Colpetts to George A. Kopp (6/26/1968)

Comover, Donald -- on clinic's spring 1975, fall 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Connor, Leo E. -- member of the Editorial Policies Committee of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Connors, Kevin -- grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked No. 24 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5; marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Conroy, Colleen -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Cooper, Dr. Franklin S. -- NDRC demo; worked at Haskins Laboratories, NY, wrote Some Instrumental Aids to Research on Speech; Some Experiments on the Perception of Synthetic Speech (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 24, No. 6, Nov. 1952); Guidance Devices for the Blind (Physics Today, Vol. 3, No. 7, July 1950); Spectrum Analysis (Journal of Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 22, No. 6, Nov. 1950); The Interconversion of Audible and Visible Patterns as a Basis for Research in Perception of Speech (from the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 37, No. 5, May 1951). See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); Articles and Research Materials (1950-1957)

Cooper, Eugene B. -- Executive Secretary - Sensory Study Section; Department of Health, Education, and Welfare: Vocal Rehabilitation Administration. See: Information Concerning the Termination of Grant Project No. RD-1483-S (1963-1968)

Costello -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Costello, Mary Rose -- member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Coulton, Thomas -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - History of Oratory. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Cox, Admiral -- assistant Surgeon General, D.C. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Cox, Mr. -- of the Keystone Co. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Craig, Mary V. -- authored German Dialect. See: Information on Phonetics and Dialects (6/6/1949-1/26/1950)

Crile, Nick -- grade 5, in Simmons's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Cronon, Detective -- technician, Department of Research, New York Police Department; approached Dr. Buckley about using voice print identification in fighting crime. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (11/26/1943-6/10/1944)

Cross, Dwayne -- on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Croushore, Dr. James -- Head, Dept. of Otolaryngology at Wayne State University medical School; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Cruickshank, Kathy (Kate) -- Subject #19 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 15 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 9 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects, marked as original project; Female Test Subject; 10/11/1966; Grade 9B, Test 2. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Curran, Kathleen -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Curtis, Dr. Jack F. -- Member of the staff of the Detroit Day School for the Deaf who served in the maintenance and operation of all equipment. See: Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

David, Dr. E.E. -- Director, Acoustic and Visual Research, Bell Telephone Laboratories; provided GAK and HGK technical assistance with the translator. See: Early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963)

David, Dr. -- worked at Bell Labs, referenced in letter from M.R. Schroeder as showing continued interest in Kopp's research. See: Correspondence from M.R. Schroeder to Dr. George A. Kopp (3/25/1965)

David, Dr. E.E. -- Executive Director - Research Communications Systems Divison . Developed the transistorized visible speech translator and provided and experimental model of the equipment for use in the last year of the research project for Visible Speech. See: Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Davis -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

De Lair, Truman -- Subject #10 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being a child with some introduction; ranked No. 3 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Dean, M.D., C. Robert -- Director of the Rehabilitation Institute of Metropolitan Detroit; confirmed HGK's appointment as Clinical Director of Speech and Hearing on 5/18/1955. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Delattre, Pierre C. -- wrote The Physiological Interpretation of Sound Spectrograms (Publications of The Modern Language Association of America, Vol. 66, No. 5, Sept. 1951) and Some Experiments on the Perception of Synthetic Speech Sounds (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 24, No. 6, Nov. 1952). See: Articles and Research Materials 91950-1957)

Delikta, Donna -- Subject #21 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; ranked No. 12 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 9 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Dellas, Nick G. -- Subject #32 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; ranked No. 45 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 8 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience; Male Test Subject; 10/13/1966; Grade 8, Test 6 - Part A. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Denes, Dr. P.B. -- Head of Speech and Communication Research Department. Developed the transistorized visible speech translator and provided and experimental model of the equipment for use in the last year of the research project for Visible Speech. See: Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Densmore, G.E. -- member of Dept of Speech, U.Mich.?; asked Dean Lloyd Woodburne to reimburse George Kopp's expenses accrued when presenting at the convention of the Association of American Instructors of the Deaf on 5/29/1947. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Denton, Evelyn Louise -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; completed Master's thesis on frequency range and the principal zone of energy in May 1947. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Derderian, Gary -- Subject #7 in 1965 tests; grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked No. 17 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Deshon -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Di Franco, Franco -- in Banks's class; labelled Sp.; noted as being involved in original project. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Dincen, Miss -- 1/25/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Dobler -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Doerfler, Leo G. -- member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971); Actvities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Donahue, Dr. -- Psychology Bureau; saw spectrograph demonstration on 12/12/1946. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Drachler, Dr. Norman -- Superintendent of Detroit Public Schools who continued the opportunity to conduct the research in the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Draper, Lora -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Dreher, John J. -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; Ph.D. thesis on differences in melody of Chinese speaking acquired English and vice versa - in progress Aug 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Drennen, Genevieve J. -- speech teacher, teacher of deaf, experimenter in U Mich study; performed Visible Speech Experiment #5 at the Rackham School in March 1947. See: Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Propsed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (summer 1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Dudley, Homer -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Dunigan, Kathy -- grade 9, in Martyka's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Dunigan, Tanya -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 32 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 6 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Dupree, Richard (Ritchie) -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring and fall 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Dworkin, Doris -- served as family representative on George A. Kopp Memorial Fund advisory board; received correspondence from HGK 1/25/1971. See: George Kopp Memorial Scholarship Fund (1964-1973)

Eames, Mr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Ebbinger -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Edwards -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Eisonson, Jon -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Psychology of Speech. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948); Lectures and Seminar Notes(1957-1966)

Eliseou? -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Ellis, Miss -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Elsner, Todd -- on clinic's fall 1976, spring 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Elstadt -- Gallaudet, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/08/46

Emmens -- rep of Michigan Bell Telephone publications dept.; 10/10/1946 conference . See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Enkvist, Nils Erik -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; proposed thesis to GAK on 10/8/1947 on transitions to and from vowels i and u - approved 10/13/1947; Master's thesis completed May 1948. See: Thesis Proposals by George Kopp's Students (10/8/1947-3/1/1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Essig, Mr. Robert D. -- Technical services, hired for machine maintenance at the recommendation of Lewis Holland and Paul Geiger; found by Dr. Francis Lord to serve as electronic technician (11/24/1946); saw the translator for the first time on 1/22/1947; received memo about delayed payment from Dr. Lord on 5/19/1947; associated with spectrogram of indirect recording?. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-48); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Etkie, Dorothy -- ranked No. 6 overall in spring 1966 tests. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Evans, Miss -- Scranton School for Deaf. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Evendon -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Professional Education of Teachers. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Everingham, Patti -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Fairbanks -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Fairbanks, Grant -- Speech Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana; wrote Test of Phonemic Differentiation: The Rhyme Test (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 30, No. 7, Jul. 1958). See: Article in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America on Rhyme Testing (July 1958)

Falk, Dr. Mervyn -- Director of the Speech and Hearing Center, Wayne State University; Head of Communication Disorders and Sciences, Wayne State University; chosen to serve on the George A. Kopp Memorial Fund advisory board; wrote HGK concerning fund details on 7/26/1973. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970); George Kopp Memorial Scholarship Fund (1964-1973)

Featherstone, Richard K. -- planned photographs for Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision pamphlet. See: The Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision (1951)

Fein, Miss Judith G. -- representative of the Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare to the Working Groups of the National Advisory Council on the Education of the Deaf on 7/24/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Fellendorf, George W. -- member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Felne? -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Fernandez, Mr. -- Spanish Teacher. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Findlay -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Fischer, Leonard (Len) -- President, Trax Softworks, Inc., Culver City, CA; showed interest in borrowing Visible Speech Manual from her; sent HGK a pre-addressed Federal Express airbill for use in sending the Visible Speech Manual to him 10/29/1991. See: Correspondence between Harriet Kopp and Len Fischer (10/29/1991)

Flanagan, Dr. J.L. -- Head of Acoustics Research Department of the Bell Telephone Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey. Developed the transistorized visible speech translator and provided and experimental model of the equipment for use in the last year of the research project for Visible Speech. See: Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Fleets -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Fletcher -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Forsythe, Mrs. Patria G. -- Executive Secretary, National Advisory Committee on Education of the Deaf; representative of the Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare to the Working Groups of the NACED on 7/24/1969; thanked HGK on her participation in the Invitational Conference on Personnel Education in the Area of the Deaf on 10/27/1969; member of the Committee on the Adolescent Deaf of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Fowler, Dr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Frampton -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Survey, education of handicapped. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Freese, Mrs. Gertrude -- NY Telephone, Bell Labs demonstration participant 01/24/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

French, Norman G. -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Frisina, Dr. -- discussed Farid Bozorgi and his future at the National Technical Institute with HGK. See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Fry -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Gaeth, Dr. John H. -- Prof. of Audiology, Director of Audiology, Wayne State University; Professor of Audiology; Director of Hearing Clinic; B.S. Midland College and University of Nebraska (1940); M.A. University of Nebraska (1942); Ph.D. Northwestern University (1948); married with 2 children; specialization: teaching audiology, training teachers of the deaf, administration and research in audiology; Chairman of the American Speech and Hearing Association Committee on Standards in Hearing; Advanced Certification in Hearing in ASHACSH; budgeted for expenditures in grant proposal for project RD-526; Grad Asst, University of Nebraska (Sept 1942-Feb 1944); Officer, U.S.N.R. (1944-1946); Grad Asst, Northwestern University (1946-1948); Asst. Professor, University of Denver (1948-1949); Assoc. Prof. Northwestern University (1949-1957); Professor of Audiology, Wayne State University (1957-?); wrote HGK a letter about RD-526 funding on 10/26/1959; salary as consultant budgeted for Project No. RD-1483-S (1963, 1966); member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Gallagher -- PS 47, Bell Labs demonstration participant 02/14/1946

Galloway, Victor H. -- member of the Chairmen of the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf with HGK on 7/24/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Gamache, Keith -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Garcia, Danny -- on clinic's fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Gardella, Bonnie -- on clinic's fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Gardiner, Ray -- 5th grade teacher, Detroit Day School; 9 students in spring 1966 class; Member of the staff for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf, taught experimental classes with the translator from 1966-1968. See: Test Subjects (1965); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Garrett, James F. -- Assistant Commissioner of Research and Training, Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare - Vocational Rehabilitation Adminstration; Assistant Director - informed Thomas & Kopp about receipt of grant on 10/20/1959; contacted Van Buskirk about continuation of grant for Visible Speech for the Deaf on 5/31/1966. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966)

Garwood, V.P. -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; proposed thesis to GAK on visula discrimination of amplitude variations on sound spectrograms; completed Master's thesis May, 1948. See: Thesis Proposals by George Kopp's Students (10/8/1947-3/1/1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Gates, Miss -- Motor Coordination - Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program. See: How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Gawlik, Rev. Rudolph E. -- served as an interpreter for the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf on 7/24/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Gayda, Tonia -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Geiger, Dr. Paul -- recommended Robert Essig for employment. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Geles -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Gelnak, Barbara -- Subject #16 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 14 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Gerstman, Louis J. -- Some Experiments on the Perception of Synthetic Speech (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 24, No. 6, Nov. 1952). See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Gertz -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Gibson -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Glover, Evelyn -- grade 9, in Martyka's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Goddu -- member of Editorial Committee of NACED that submitted recommendations on 10/16/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Gore, Sue -- Subject #28 in 1965 tests; grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 13 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 6 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966);Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Gorman -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Gosen, John -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976, fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Graber -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Graham, Dr. A. Bruce -- Senior Audiologist, Henry Ford Hospital; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Graham, Craig -- ranked No. 47 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5 (1966-1967 school year); Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Grant, Margaret J. -- member of the committee on Adolescent Deaf of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Gray, Mr. Charles H.G. (CHG) -- signed front of Visible Speech; received information on voiceprint method of identifying individuals. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45); Research Report by Y.R. Chao on Chinese recordings (11/21/1944-2/17/1945); Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944)

Green, M.L. -- speech 01/26/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Green (Kopp), Harriet Clara (HCG) -- B.A. Brooklyn College (1937); M.A. Brooklyn College (1938); Ph.D. Columbia University (?); Assistant and Instructor at Brooklyn College (1936-1939); Teacher at Lexington School for the Deaf (1939-1940); Instructor at Indiana University (1940-1941); Grad. Asst. Teachers College, Columbia University (1941-1943); Member of Technical Staff, Bell Telephone Laboratories (1943-1946); Assistant Professor, University of Michigan (1943-46); Assoc. Prof. of Special Education, Michigan State Normal College (1947) and Research Assistant, University of Michigan (1947); performed Visible Speech Experiments #2, 6, 7 at the Rackham School for Special Education (associated with U.Mich.) (March 1947); mentioned in article in News and Notes (Oct. 1947); Public School Speech Correctionalist, Birmingham, MI (1948-1956); taught Visible Speech Program at Rackham School, summer 1948; Director, Speech and Hearing Division, Rehabilitation Institute of Metropolitan Detroit (1956-1959); specialties: teacher training, administration and research; Associate Editor of the Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders; holder of Advanced Certification in Hearing in the American Speech and Hearing Association; Associate Professor of Special Education - Michigan State Normal College, Research Assistant - U. Mich.; carried out experimental training program of visible speech; co-wrote article on visible speech for educators of the deaf, c. 1947; attended meetings of the visible speech research committee on 1/8/1947, 2/12/1947, 2/21/1947, 3/3/1947, 5/1/1947, 5/29/1947, 6/28/1947, 11/7/1947; co-wrote report on Visible Speech Educational Research Program, 6/7/1947; wrote text for Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision pamphlet; budgeted for expenditures in grant proposal for project RD-526; received letter from John H. Gaeth on 10/26/1959; Director of Speech and Hearing at the Rehabilitation Institute of Metropolitan Detroit; wrote S.M. Brownell on 1/27/1960 about the approval of a grant for research using the cathode ray tube translator; Project Co-Director of Grant RD-526, evaluating usefulness of the visible speech cathode ray tube translator as a supplement to the oral method of teaching speech to deaf and severly deafened children (1963); prepared Progress Report for Project No. RD-1483-S in Feb. 1965, 3/1/1965, and Feb. 1966; salary as consultant budgeted for Project No. RD-1483-S (1963, 1966); member of the Chairmen of the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf with HGK on 7/24/1969; Retirement Papers form the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970); Chairman of the committees on adolescent deaf and editorial policies of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. (3/1/1970); applied for extension of leave of absence from Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1972); Professor in the Dept. of Speech Pathology and Audiology, San Diego State College; Acting Dean of the College of Human Services at San Diego State University (7/6/1982); ; Chairman, Dept. of Speech Pathology, Audiology and Education of the Deaf, SDSC (9/4/1974); charted with female subjects. See: Visual Telephony Conferences (10/14/1943-2/23/1944); Voiceprint Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); transcript from Teachers College, Columbia University (3/15/1946); Spectrograms and Charted Results (11/17/1943); Research Report by Y.R. Chao on Chinese recordings (11/21/1944-2/17/1945); University of Michigan Project (July 1945-1948); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Progress Report Presented at American Speech Correction Conference, Chicago - U.Mich. (12/31/1946); Article on Visible Speech for Educators of the Deaf by George A. Kopp and Harriet C. Green - U.Mich. (c. 1947); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); Supplement to Progress Reports #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Pattern Recognition Charts - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Report on Visible Speech Educational Research Program by George A. Kopp and Harriet C. Green - U.Mich. (6/7/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Newspaper clipping: Visible Speech: Teaching Deaf Children to Hear (July 1947); Advance Advertisement for Visible Speech (5/28/1947); News and Notes (9/22/1947); Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948); Papers and Charts on Frequency Ranges and Principle Zones of Energy (Feb. 1948); Proposed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (summer 1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (8/13/1948); Information on Phonetics and Dialects (6/6/1949-1/26/1950); The Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision (1951); Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970); Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971); early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Description of Detroit School for the Deaf (2/26/1963); Rough Draft - Visible Speech Report (3/13/1963); Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1965); George Kopp Memorial Scholarship Fund (1964-1973); Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Information Concerning the Termination of Grant Project No. RD-1483-S (1963-1968); Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manuscript for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (hand-written) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Correspondence to George and Harriet Kopp from C.Van Riper (9/11/1968-9/26/1968); Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970); Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970); Correspondence between Harriet Hopp and Bernard O'Donnell (7/6/1982); Correspondence between Mara Mills and H. Kopp (1/4/2006); Visible Speech Manual Original - to copy; Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526); charts and spectrograph results (female test subjects)

Grindem, Mark -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 42 overall in spring 1966 tests; list on Prospective subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Groht -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 11/29/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Gruenz, Jr., Otto O. -- attended conference about the translator on 12/31/1945; signed front of Visible Speech; member of Bell Telephone Laboratories, came to Detroit to fix the Translator after its move to the Detroit Day School from Wayne State University. See: Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hafer, Sarah -- on clinic's fall 1976 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Hall, Dr. Roy M. -- Assistant Commissioner for Research with Cooperative Research Division of the US Office of Education. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960)

Hamilton, Mr. -- Saskatechewan Deaf school, Bell Labs demonstration participant 02/21/1946 . See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hammond, Richard -- Subject #5 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 4 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Hardy, Miriam Pauls -- member of the Editorial Policies Committee of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Harlan, Tom -- Subject #34 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; ranked No. 11 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 8 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Harnish, Mike -- Subject #33 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 8 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 8 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Harrington, Dr. -- Winnetka Schools; came for instruction and demonstration of U Mich Study, 11/10/1947. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Harris -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 11/29/1945, Comparative Linguistics 12/11/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Harris, Chris -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Hartin, Frank -- Employee of Customer Service - Dover Press; New York, NY. See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Hartley -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hasbrouck -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hatchett, Jeanette -- in Jacobs's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Hazelwood, Cheryl -- grade 9, in Martyka's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Hedstrom, Mr. -- copied on announcement of grant continuation for Visible Speech for the Deaf (5/31/1966). See: Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966)

Heggie, Don -- grade 9, in Martyka's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Heggie, Patricia (Pat) -- Subject #26 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; ranked No.2 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Heinrichs -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Henselmeier, Cindy -- on clinic's fall 1975, spring and fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists . See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Herkimer, Katherine -- 14 years old; Group 1 of exploratory program; congenitally deaf, severly hypacaustic, part of experimental study for Visible Speech Research at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947), experiment subject in U Mich study; scored for intelligibility in experiment 1 (1947); performance in Visible Speech Experiment #2 evaluated 1948. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Supplement to Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Pattern Recognition Charts - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Herold, Timothy (Tim) -- Subject #20 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; ranked No. 1 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Hertz, Dr. Richard C. -- Temple Beth El. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Hesson, Gary -- Proposed Experiment subject in Ypsilanti Study; scored for intelligibility in experiment 3 (1947); subject in experimental U. Michigan study with the Rackham School (3/25/1947), aged 10 yrs, 8 months; congenitally deaf and severely hypacusic. See: Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947)

Hester, Mrs. -- Functional test of vision- telebinocular. See: How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Hewitt, Barnard -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - History of Modern Theatre, History of Ancient Theatre, & Studies in Play Production

Hewittson, Dr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hibbit, George -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hicks, (William) Billy -- grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; HGK noted get to wear glasses on roster; ranked No. 53 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Higgins -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Higgins -- 4th grade teacher, Detroit day School; 9 students in Spring 1966 class . See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Hill, James E. -- Ed.D. degree; permanent replacement for J. Clemente in work for the RD-1483-S project; hired due to a background of training and experience in both electrical engineering and speech; salary as a consultant budgeted for Project No. RD-1483-S (1963, 1966); informally met with Mr. Powles of the General Film Lab., Co. concerning the creation of slides of spectrographic patterns (10/17/1966); assistant to GAK at Wayne State University; Background in speech and electrical engineering. Worked on Visible Speech project until 1966. See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Hoe, Dr. -- staff, Steel Complex Hospital, Nanking area. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Hoekstra, Dr. Marvin -- Wayne State University Electrical Engineering Dept. staff member; added to the RD-1483-S project staff on 1/27/1966 as a consultant in equipment maintenance; salary as Research Asst & Electronic Technician budgeted for Project No. RD-1483-S (1966); Employee of the Wayne State University Electrical Engineering Department. In January 1966 was appointed as a consultant in maintenance of equipment. Assisted Dr. Jack Curtis of the Speech and Hearing Center until the termination of the contract. See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Hoemann, Rev. Harry W. -- served as an interpreter for the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf on 7/24/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Hoerr, III, Chris R. -- member of the Editorial Policies Committee of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Hograth -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Hoit-Dalgaard, Jeannette -- co-authored Voice Onset Time Production and Perception in Apraxic Subjects with HGK in Brain and Language (Vol. 20, 1983, p. 329-339); affiliated with VA Medical Center, San Diego. See: Correspondence between Mara Mills and H. Kopp (1/4/2006)

Holbrook, Dr. Anthony -- specialties: training teachers of speech correction and research in Speech Science; Asst. Prof. of Speech, Wayne State University Speech and Hearing Clinic; married with 3 children; B.S. Speech Correction, University of California Santa Barabara (1951); M.A. Speech Pathology, University of Hawaii (1953); Ph.D. in Speech Science, Correction and Audiology, University of Illinois (1958); served as technical assistant in the maintenance and operation of equipment during research for project RD-526. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526)

Holland, David -- test subjects, Translator Project I, 8 years old; Group 2A of exploratory program; congenitally deaf with slight residual hearing, Experiment subject in U Mich Study with Rackham School; scored for intelligibility in experiment 1 & 3 (1947); performance in Visible Speech Experiment #4 evaluated 1948. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Holland, Prof. Lewis -- recommended Robert Essig for employment. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Honamen -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Hoth -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Howell, Louise -- worker at Cleveland State Hospital; George Kopp responded to her query about the visible speech research on 8/8/1947. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Howell, Jay -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Huang, Mr. -- staff, Steel Complex Hospital, Nanking area. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Hudgins, Dr. Clarence V. -- Director of Research, Experimental Phonetics, Clarke School for the Deaf, Northampton, Mass.; worked on rhythm and stress; colleagues with Dr. G.E. Peterson at Harvard University during World War II; Special Consultant to the Visible Speech Advisory project (1947); attended a meeting of the Visible SPeech Research Committee on 5/1/1947; submitted report to the Advisory Committe of the Visible Speech Research Project, Institute for Human Adjustment, U.Mich. on 6/10/1947; the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Policies Committee discussed publishing his articles and papers on 3/1/1970. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948); Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Hudson, Richard (Dick) -- 10 years old; Group 1 of exploratory program; congenitally deaf, severly hypacaustic, part of experimental study for Visible Speech Research at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947), experiment subject in U Mich study; scored for intelligibility in experiment 1 (1947); performance in Visible Speech Experiment #2 evaluated 1948. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); ;Supplement to Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Pattern Recognition Charts - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Humes, Larry E. -- co-authored Recognition of Synthetic Speech by Hearing-Impaired Elderly Listeners in the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (vol. 34, Oct. 1991, p. 1180-84). See: Excerpt from the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (Oct. 1991)

Hurst, Marlene -- Employee of Xerox- University Microfilms catalogs of Wayne State University Press. See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Hutchkins -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Hyde, Timothy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976, spring 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Hykes, John -- member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Ickes, James (Jim) -- Subject #31 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; ranked No. 34 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 8 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Ireland, Dwight B. -- Superintendant of Birmingham, MI public schools; wrote HGK a congratulatory letter on her new post at the Rehabilitation Institute on 11/6/1958. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Irwin, David -- test subjects, Translator Project I, 8 years old; Group 2A of exploratory program; congenitally deaf with slight residual hearing, Experiment subject in U Mich Study with Rackham School; scored for intelligibility in experiment 1 & 3 (1947); performance in Visible Speech Experiment #4 evaluated 1948. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Jackson -- Comparative linguistics 12/11/945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Jacobs -- See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Jacobs -- taught students at Detroit Day School; students labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Jacobs, Henry -- in Banks's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Jeffries, Charles -- in Banks's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Jersild, A. -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Child Psychology. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Johnson, Miss -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Johnson, Dr. Kenneth O. -- Executive Secretary at the American Speech and Hearing Association; sent material from the Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare in the Office of Education to encourage increased activity with the Cooperative Research Division on 1/4/1959. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960)

Johnson, T. Earle -- authored Southern Dialects. See: Information on Phonetics and Dialects (6/6/1949-1/26/1950)

Johnson, Michael (Mike) -- Subject #1 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 2 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Jones, Lloyd -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Guidance and Personnel. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Jones, Miss -- Teacher, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/21/45. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Jones, Michael (Mike) -- Subject #35 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; ranked No. 9 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Joos, Prof. -- professor at U.Mich. at the Linguistic Institute; received permission from Harlan Bloomer to use the spectrograph for linguistics research on 2/26/1947 . See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Kaczerowski, Janet -- marked off of clinic's fall 1976 list; on spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Kandel -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Educational Foundations. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Kane, Mr. Ronald -- 7th and 8th grade teacher, Detroit Day School; 7 students in spring 1966 7th grade class; realeased half time to work on Project No. RD-1483-S in Oct. 1964; salary as Research Asst. in budget for Project No. RD-1483-S (1966); received Visible Speech Research Project Progress Report concerning plans for producting the testing-instruction materials on 10/17/1966; Member of the staff of the Detroit Day School for the Deaf, taught experimental classes with the translator from 1965-1967. See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Karpel, Miss -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kavosi, Janice -- Subject #13 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; ranked No. 16 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Ke Ju, Dr. Cheng -- from Capital Med. Corp.; of the Chinese Medical Association. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Keilman, Joanne -- severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Keitz, Christine -- grade 5, in Simmons's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); ; Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Keller, Miss -- Bell labs demonstration participant 10/24/1946. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Kelley -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kelly, Joe (Joey) -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring and fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Kennedy, Miss Rosemary J. -- Bell Labs secretary; signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kennedy, Louise -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Speech Pathology. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Kerps -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kersta, Mr. -- U Mich Study; serviced sound spectrograph equipment 7/16/1948. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-48); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Kerster -- re: specs 01/16/46. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kester, Miss -- audited V.S. training course part time

King, Mr. -- Bell labs demonstration 12/12/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kinney, Richard -- Production Manager and Associate Director of Wayne State University Press . See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Knott, John -- University of Iowa; saw demonstration of spectrograph on 6/12/1946. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Koeing, Jr., Wallace -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kohr, Margaret -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Kolbusz, Gerald (Gerry) -- Grade 4, in Simmons's class, on list of students now using the machine; ranked No. 4 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; crossed off grade 8 list (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Kopp, George A. (GAK) -- specialities: training teachers in speech pathology and audiology, research in speech science, correction, audiology, and administration; Presidnet of American Speech and Hearing Association; held Advanced Certification in Speech in the ASHA; consultant on the staff of Sinai Hospital and the Rehabilitation Institute of Metropolitan Detroit; B.A. from Monmouth College, Manmouth, IL (1926); M.S. Speech Correction, University of Wisconsin (1930); Ph.D. Speech Pathology and Medical Science, University of Wisconsin (1933); Chairman, Dept. of Speech, Jamestown College, Jamestown ND (1926-1928); Instructor in Speech, University of Wisconsin (1928-1931); Asst. Prof. of Speech, University of Wisconsin (1931-1936); Asst. Prof. of Speech, Director of Speech and Hearing Clinic, Columbia University (1939-1943); taught course on Sppech Correction at Columbia in 1941; Associate Prof. of Speech at Teachers College, Columbia University; Consultant to Bell Labs on technical speech problems(Member of Technical Staff Bell Telephone Laboratories, NY (1943-1946)); Research Associate, U.Mich. (c. 1947); presented with John Steinberg at the 1945 American Speech Correction Conference, Columbus, OH, on the development of Visible Speech; presented a progress report at the American Speech Correction Conference, Chicago on 12/31/1946; wrote report on Visible Speech Educational Research Program with Harriet Green, 6/7/1947; co-wrote Article on Visible Speech for Educators of the Deaf, c. 1947; attended meetings of the Visible Speech research committee on 1/8/1947, 2/12/1947, 2/21/1947, 3/3/1947, 5/1/1947, 5/29/1947, 6/28/1947, 11/7/1947; requested clerical assistant for Harriet Green and graduate laboratory assistant from Harlan Bloomer on 2/25/1947; received comments on a proposed article on visible speech in the Volta Review from Clark Tibbitts on 5/31/1947 and Harlan Bloomer on 6/24/1947; Research in visible speech: Associate Professor of Speech and Research Associate, University of Michigan and Director of Visible Speech Research (1946-1948); sent letter to A.N. Clark on 8/8/1947 expressing a need for new books in the speech correction field; highlighted in an article in News and Notes (Oct. 1947); Prof. of Speech, Director, Speech and Hearing Clinic, Wayne State University (1948-?); director of 5-year cooperative research project with Bell Telephone Laboratories, University of Michigan, and Michigan State Normal College; responsible for phonetic organization of visible speech; taught HGK at Teachers College - Voice Science, Psychology of Speech, Research in Speech Education, Speech Pathology; signed front of Visible Speech; filled out Application for Research or Demonstration Grant with the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare on 8/19/1959; salary as Director budgeted in grant proposal for project RD-526 (1959, 1963, 1966); Project Co-Director of Grant RD-526, evaluating usefulness of the visible speech cathode ray tube translator as a supplement to the oral method of teaching speech to deaf and severly deafened children (1963). Social Security No. 127-05-4264; copied on announcement of grant continuation for Visible Speech for the Deaf; prepared Progress Report for Project No. RD-1483-S in Feb. 1965, 3/1/1965, and Feb. 1966; part of application for the continuation of grant for Project No. RD-1483-S (9/26/1963; 2/10/1966); received Visible Speech Research Project Progress Report concerning plans for producting the testing-instruction materials on 10/17/1966; member of Editorial Committee of NACED that submitted recommendations on 10/16/1969; wrote Meeting Speech Needs of Elementary School Children while an assoc. prof. at Columbia. See: Syllabus for Speech Correction - Education 261K, Teachers College, Columbia University (1941); Original Manuscript of and comments on George A. Kopp's elementary opus (8/3/1941); Visual Telephony Conferences (10/14/1943-2/23/1944); Voiceprint Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); Research report by Y.R. Chao on Chinese recordings (11/21/1944-2/17/1945); University of Michigan Project (July 1945-1948); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Progress Report Presented at American Speech Correction Conference, Chicago - U.Mich. (12/31/1946); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); Correspondence form Adrian Leon y Marquez to George Kopp (3/14/1947); Newspaper clipping: Visible Speech: Teaching Deaf Children to Hear (July 1947); Correspondence to George A. Kopp from C.M. Breading of the Central Press Clipping Service (9/3/1947); News and Notes (9/22/1947); Advance Advertisement for Visible Speech (c. 1947); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Article on Visible Speech for Educators of the Deaf by George A. Kopp and Harriet C. Green - U.Mich. (c. 1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); Supplement to Progress Reports #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Pattern Recognition Charts - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Report on Visible Speech Educational Research Program by George A. Kopp and Harriet C. Green - U.Mich. (6/7/1947); Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948); Papers and Charts on Frequency Ranges and Principle Zones of Energy (Feb. 1948); Final Report of Visible SPeech Educational Evaluation Research Program (8/13/1948); Lectures and Seminar Notes(1957-1966); Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Description of Detroit School for the Deaf (2/26/1963); Rough Draft - Visible Speech Report (3/13/1963); Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); George Kopp Memorial Scholarship Fund (1964-1973); Case Report by George Kopp and Helene Anderson on Vocal Therapy for Dysphonia Plicae Ventricularis (c. 1965); Correspondence from M.R. Schroeder to Dr. George A. Kopp (3/25/1965); Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information Concerning the Termination of Grant Project No. RD-1483-S (1963-1968); Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manuscript for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (hand-written) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Correspondence to George and Harriet Kopp from C.Van Riper (9/11/1968-9/26/1968); Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970); Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963); Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980); Visible Speech Manual Original - to copy; Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526); Manuscript of Meeting Speech Needs of Elementary School Children by George A. Kopp; How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Seminar Notes of George A. Kopp - Speech 337

Kopp, Dr. Joseph B. -- George Kopp's son; designated to serve on the George A. Kopp Memorial Fund advisory board. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Koren, Mr. Norman -- appointed to temporarily replace J. Clemente in work on Project No. RD-1483-S from Sept to Jan, 1965; Temporary worker on the Visible Speech project ending December 1965. See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S; Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Kornacki, Kathryn -- 4-year-old student at Detroit Day School; shown in newspaper photograph . See: Clipping from The Detroit News (2/13/1966)

Koskos -- [n/a]

Kosztowny, Alan -- Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968 . See: Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Kovack, Joanne -- test subject - class 3B, age 10. See: Lip Reading Study (10/5/1943); Students' Spectrograms (fall 1943)

Kower? -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Kramer, Magalene -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Research in Speech Education; Chairman of the Department of the Teaching of Speech at Columbia University, noted in the acknowledgements page of Harriet Kopp's doctoral dissertation for her interest and help. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948); Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Kramer -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Krieger, Connie -- produced sound spectrograms with cleft palate on 4/4/1947. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-48)

Kroll, Geraldine -- ranked No. 10 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Kroll, Gary -- Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968 . See: Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Krug -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kubitsky, Eleanor -- age 10 (1947); Substitute for J. Keilman in U Mich study ; performance in Visible Speech Experiment #5 evaluated 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Kuezela -- recorder 01/16/46. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kuplicki, Paul -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; ranked No. 36 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 6 (1966-67 school year); on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Kurath, Prof. Hans -- Director of the Linguistic Institute, University of Michigan; received memo from Harland Bloomer on 2/26/1947 about use of the spectrograph during the summer of 1947 for linguistic research; recorded spectrograms in German 5/15/1947. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-48); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Kuzda -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Kuzela, Mr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Lacey, Wendy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Lage, Larry -- severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Lahera, Omar -- on clinic's spring 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Lassman, Frank M. -- member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971); Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Le Clerc, Sherry -- Subject #23 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 29 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 9 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Lee, John J. -- Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Department of Special Education and Vocational Rehabilitation, Wayne State University; wrote HGK a congratulatory letter on her new post at the Detroit Day School on 11/4/1958; Chairman, Special Education, Wayne State University (1963); member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf; wrote HGK a recommendation letter 7/31/1969

Lee, Mike -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Leon y Marquez, Adrian -- suggested Spanish words for Visible Speech tracings. See: Correspondence form Adrian Leon y Marquez to George Kopp (3/14/1947)

Leone, Berta -- drew illustrations for Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision pamphlet. See: The Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision (1951)

Lepre, Michael -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring and fall 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Levine, Mrs. -- Bell Labs secretary, Bell Labs demonstration participant 11/29/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Lewis, Mrs. E. -- Associate Editor Tide Magazine. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Leyland -- Bell Labs secretary. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Liberman, Alvin M. -- worked at Haskins Laboratories, NY, and University of Connecticut, Storrs; wrote Some Experiments on the Perception of Synthetic Speech (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 24, No. 6, Nov. 1952); Some Results of Research on Speech Perception (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 29, No. 1, Jan. 1957); The Interconversion of Audible and Visible Patterns as a Basis for Research in Perception of Speech (from the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 37, No. 5, May 1951) . See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Loertet, C.M. -- taught HGK at Indiana University - Psychological Testing. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Lorbaugh, Dr. -- NYU. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Lord, Dr. Francis E. -- Director of Rackam School of Special Education and Professor of Speech and Special Education, Michigan State Normal College; worked in conjunction with Clark Tibbitts on the visible speech research project at U.Mich.; received letter from Tibbitts about the research program on 11/27/1946; attended meetings of the Visible Speech Research committee on 1/8/1947, 2/12/1947, 2/21/1947, 3/3/1947, 5/1/1947, 5/29/1947, 6/28/1947, 11/7/1947; send Robert Essig a memo about delayed payment on 5/19/1947; mentioned in article in News and Notes, Oct. 1947. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); News and Notes (9/22/1947)

Lorge, Irving -- Noted in the acknowledgements page of Harriet Kopp's doctoral dissertation for her interest and help in the project. See: Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Lovato, Joseph -- on clinic's spring 1975 list

Lovell, James -- student engineer in charge of servicing equipment in U Mich study; worked on sound spectrograph on Jan 13-15, 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Lowell, Edgar L. -- member of the Editorial Policies Committee of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Lynch, Jennifer -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Lyons -- Western Electric. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

MacGinitie, Walter H. -- Member of Harriet Kopp's dissertation committee at Columbia University . See: Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Macoule, Mrs. -- Mentioned in a letter from Frank to Dr. Kopp regarding the index on 1/23/1968. See: Correspondence between Frank and George Kopp re. index of Visible Speech Research Materials (1/23/1968)

Madden, Shannon -- Subject #22 in 1965 tests; grade 7, Steffens's homeroom class; ranked No. 25 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 9 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Madson, Miss -- recorded spectrograms on 11/12/1946 of phrase This is the house that Jack built. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-1948)

MaGee, Harley W. -- Assistant to the Editor of Science Illustrated; requested pictures to go along with an up-coming Visible Speech story. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Magill, Dorothy -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Mahoney, Danny -- test subjects, Translator Project I, 12 years old; Group 1 of exploratory program; congenitally deaf, severly hypacaustic, part of experimental study for Visible Speech Research at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947); experiment subject in U Mich study; scored for intelligibility in experiment 1 (1947); performance in Visible Speech Experiment #2 evaluated 1948. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Logistics for Operation of Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/25/1947-6/2/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Supplement to Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); Pattern Recognition Charts - U.Mich. (4/21/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947); Intelligibility Scores and Graphs (April-Dec. 1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Majerowski, Michael (Mike) -- Subject #9 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being a child with some introduction; ranked No. 7 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Mallory -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 12/21/1945

Manning, Dr. J.J. -- physicist, Research Department of New York Police Department; approached Dr. Buckley about using voice print identification in fighting crime. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (11/26/1943-6/10/1944)

Mao, Mrs. -- HGK interviewed her about the commune primary school. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Marcus, Robert -- Subject #11 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being a child with some introduction; ranked No. 21 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Marge, Michael -- Coordinator Unit on Speech and Hearing Programs, Division of Training Programs, Bureau of Education for the Handicapped; Department of Health, Education, and Welfare- Office of Education. See: Information Concerning the Termination of Grant Project No. RD-1483-S (1963-1968)

Markel, Norman N. -- co-authored Judging Personality from Voice Quality in Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology (Vol. 64, No. 4, Oct. 1964). See: Markel and Meisels - Judging Personality from Voice Quality (Oct. 1964) [large sleeve]

Marrison -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Marshall, Steve -- ranked No. 8 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; Male Test Subject; 12/13/1966; Grade 4, Test S-D. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Martimer, Dr. Edgar -- Chief of Pediatrics, Harper Hospital; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Martin, Miss -- Manhasset Public School, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/07/46

Martin, Fred -- Official from Detroit Public Schools who signed off on HGK's application for an extension of leave (9/29/1972). See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Martin, Paul -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Martinez, Alfredo -- on list of Prospective Subjects, marked 5 exp. See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Martyka, Emilia -- staff member at the Detroit Day School for the Deaf; taught experimental classes with the Translator from 1964-1968; taught 9th grade students at the Detroit Day School already using the machine; 7 students in spring 1966 class. See: Early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968): Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Mase, Darrel -- Teachers College, Newark, NJ; 10/28/1946 demonstration. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (1/31/1947-10/10/1947)

Matthes -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Matthews, Mrs. M.G. -- Principal, Kennedy School; sent complimentary letter to HGK on 5/14/1970 . See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

May, Merri (Merrie) -- on clinic's fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Mayes, Thomas A. -- director of the Regional Conference for Coordinating Rehabilitation and Education Services for the Deaf on Oct 26-28, 1970; sent HGK an invitation to the conference on 10/12/1970

McCarthy, Julia M. -- Deputy Superintendent, Detroit Public Schools; sent HGK a congratulatory letter on 6/1/1970. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

McCrystal -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

McDonald, Henry S. -- member of Bell Telephone Labs engineering staff, came to Detroit to fix Translator after its move to the Detroit Day School from Wayne State University. See: Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526)

McGrew, Professor J. Fred -- Fresno State College. See: University of Michigan Project (July 1945-1948)

McLoughlin -- lunch 12/11/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

McManus, Kathy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Mealy -- (Meaghly)

Meisels, Murray -- co-authored Judging Personality from Voice Quality in Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology (Vol. 64, No. 4, Oct. 1964). See: Markel and Meisels - Judging Personality from Voice Quality (Oct. 1964) [large sleeve]

Melby, Dean -- Dean of NYU. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Merrill, Jr., Edward C. -- President of Gallaudet College; offered HGK a a position as Dean of Pre-College Programs and Directory of the Model Secondary School for the Deaf, 3/14/1970; HGK turned down this position 4/15/1970. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Meyer, Dr. John Stirling -- Head, Dept. of Neurology, Wayne State University Medical School; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Meyerson, Dr. Lee -- Vassar College; came for Instruction and Demonstration in U Mich Study, 9/22/1947. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Miguel, David -- on clinic's fall 1975, spring 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Miller, Ed.D., June -- President, Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc.; asked HGK to continue serving as Chairman of the Editorial Policies on 9/10/1970. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Milligan, Tony -- on clinic's spring 1976 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Mills, Mara -- Ph.D. Candidate at Harvard University; Instructor at Brown University; contacted HGK on 1/4/2006 to request an interview for more information on her research. See: Correspondence between Mara Mills and H. Kopp (1/4/2006)

Mock, Terri -- on clinic's spring 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Mohan, Mr. -- teacher from Rackham School of Education; training for Visual Speech. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Monroe, Thomas -- Superintendent of Region Two, Detroit Public Schools; wrote HGK informing her of his resignation 7/3/1969; wrote HGK a recommendation letter 8/6/1969 . See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Moore, Anthony -- ranked No. 7 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Moore, Paul -- co-authored Comments on Physiology of Hoarseness in Archives of Otolaryngology (Vol. 81, Jan. 1965). See: Moore and Thompson - Comments on Physiology of Hoarseness (Jan. 1965) [large sleeve]

Moore, Tony Loviece -- Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968 . See: Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Morison, Dr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Morley, D.E. -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; Ph.D. thesis on comparative study of visible speech patterns as transmitted by several hearing aids - in progress, Aug. 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Morris, Dr. -- Psychology Bureau; conference. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Morrisett -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Moss, Arnold -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Comparative Phonetics. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Mulgrave, Dr. Dorothy -- NYU, Bell Labs demonstration participant 01/24/1946

Mulholland, K. -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Theories of Oral Reading. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Munson, Mr. -- President, Michigan State Normal College; came for instruction and demonstration of U Mich study, 3/10/1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Murry, Thomas -- co-authored Voice Onset Time Production and Perception in Apraxic Subjects with HGK in Brain and Language (Vol. 20, 1983, p. 329-339); affiliated with VA Medical Center, San Diego. See: Correspondence between Mara Mills and H. Kopp (1/4/2006)

Myers -- Ac. Society. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Mysak, Edward D. -- Member of Harriet Kopp's dissertation committee at Columbia University . See: Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Nace, Dr. John G. -- member of the Chairmen of the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf with HGK on 7/24/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Nakaji, Daniel (Danny) -- on clinic's fall 1975, spring and fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists . See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Nelson, Kathleen J. -- co-authored Recognition of Synthetic Speech by Hearing-Impaired Elderly Listeners in the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (vol. 34, Oct. 1991, p. 1180-84). See: Excerpt from the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (Oct. 1991)

Nelson, Max -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; proposed thesis to GAK on 3/4/1947 on articulatory constancy - approved 3/6/1947; Master's thesis on articulatory constancy in May 1947. See: Thesis Proposals by George Kopp's Students (10/8/1947-3/1/1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

New -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 11/29/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Nicholls, Dorren -- age 13 (1947); severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study; performance in Visible Speech Experiment #5 evaluated 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Nio, Dr. -- pediatrician, Maternal and Ob.Gyn Hosptial (attached to the China Welfare Institute), Shanghai. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Nordstrom, Pat -- Aztec Shops Bookstore. See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Norton -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Educational Foundations. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Norvoine -- 1/22/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Nouhan, Eleanor -- Subject #8 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; ranked No. 5 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Nuccio, Philip -- grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked No. 19 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Nyquist -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

O'Connor, A. -- Bell Labs secretary, Bell Labs demonstration participant 11/29/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

O'Connor, C.D. -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Special methods in Teaching the Deaf & Practice Teaching Deaf. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

O'Connor, Mary New -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Teaching Speech to Deaf. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

O'Dell, Barbara -- on list of Prospective Students. See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

O'Donnell, Bernard -- Director, ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills; sent a letter to HGK concerning the inclusion of one of her documents in the ERIC system (7/6/1982). See: Correspondence between Harriet Kopp and Bernard O'Donnell (7/6/1982)

Olds, Mrs. -- administered test of visual acuity. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947)

Olinger, Kenneth -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

O'Neil -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 12/21/1945

O'Neill, James M. -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Seminar in Speech & Current Trends in Speech. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Ostrow, Dr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Overall, Natalie -- Subject #27 in 1965 tests; grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked No. 41 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Page (Paige), Mrs. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Paloheimo, Lily -- recorded spectrograms on 5/2/1947; charted with other female subjects. See: Spectrograms for Lily Paloheimo (5/2/1947); Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Parral, Ricky -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Pate, Aaron -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Patterson, W. Calvin -- Vice President, Public Relations, Michigan Bell Telephone Company; public relations to maintain interest in the program; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Newspaper clipping: Visible Speech: Teaching Deaf Children to Hear (July 1947); Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Pauls -- Navy, Philadelphia Hospital. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Pease, Gloria -- test subject - class 3B, age 10. See: Lip Reading Study (10/5/1943); Students' Spectrograms (fall 1943)

Peckham, Mr. Ralf A. -- authorized state agency official representing the Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare in George A. Kopp's grant application; copied on announcement of grant continuation for Visible Speech for the Deaf (5/31/1966); acknowledged receipt of application for continuation of grant RD-1483-S. See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966)

Peet, Miss Martha -- speech teacher, instructor in U Mich Study; performed Visible Speech Experiment #6 on congenitally deaf nursery school children at the Rackham School, March 1947; teacher, Visible Speech Program at the Rackham School, summer 1948. See: Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Proposed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (summer 1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Pegram -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Penn, John -- authored Scandinavian Dialect. See: Information on Phonetics and Dialects (6/6/1949-1/26/1950)

Peterson, Dr. Gordon E. -- staffer at Bell Telephone Laboratories; sent by Potter to Ypsilanti with a modified Sound Mirror the week of 4/28/1947; worked in speech correction; colleagues with Clarence Hudgins at Harvard University during World War II; sat in at conference at U.Mich. on 4/28/1947; Evaluation program, serviced spectrograph in U Mich study on Jan. 10-11, 1948; signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Peterson, Christine -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Petrie, Prof. -- from Lansing; at lab for cleft palate research 2/16/1947; produced spectrograms of phrase buy me one shoe. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-1948)

Piel, Ordway F. -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; proposed thesis to GAK on 3/1/1948 on visible speech reference patterns of 9- and 10-year-old boys - approved 3/9/1948; Master's thesis completed May 1948. See: Thesis Proposals by George Kopp's Students (10/8/1947-3/1/1948); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Pierce, Nancy -- in Jacobs's class; labelled Sp. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Pike, Professor -- University of Michigan; came for instruction and demonstration of U Mich study, 2/6/1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Pintner -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Psychology of Handicapped. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Pisoni, David B. -- co-authored Recognition of Synthetic Speech by Hearing-Impaired Elderly Listeners in the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (vol. 34, Oct. 1991, p. 1180-84). See: Excerpt from the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (Oct. 1991)

Pittman -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Poleski, Olivia -- aided in the preparation for the publication of the Visible Speech Manual . See: Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526)

Pompeo, Harry -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Poparad, Gayle -- on clinic's fall 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Popp, Kimberly (Kim) Marie -- ranked No. 39 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5 (1966-1967 school year); Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Potter, Dr. Ralph K -- Director of Transmission Research, Bell Telephone Laboratories; Approved 5 year research program at U. Mich; wrote Visible Patterns of Sound in Science magazine; received Y.R. Chao's report on using the sound spectrograh with Chinese recordings; originated visible speech and supervised its development; signed front of Visible Speech; Special Consultant to Visible Speech Research project (1947); discussed visible speech research program at the University of Michigan with Dr. Harlan Bloomer on 4/18/1946 and 3/13/1947; discussed visible speech research project with Clark Tibbitts on 4/17/1947; decided on Feb. 26-27, 1948 to send the sound spectrograph back to Bell Labs for servicing. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); Science Magazine with Ralph Potter article (Visible Patterns of Sound) (11/9/1945); Research Report by Y.R. Chao on Chinese recordings (11/21/1944-2/17/1945); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Advance Advertisement for Visible Speech (c. 1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948); Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Visible Speech Manual Original - to copy; Visible Speech Manual with Chapter Divisions (product of Contract No. RD-526)

Powles, Edward -- President and General Manager of General Film Laboratory, Inc.; also related administratively to the Dynamic Film Co.; provided quote to GAK for the production of 13/35mm black and white single frame filmstrips; contact person for the project. See: Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Proctor, Wanda Jean -- ranked No. 20 overall in spring 1966 tests; Female Test Subject; 10/17/1966; Grade 7, Test 6 - Part A. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Provenzano, Vincent -- on clinic's fall 1975, spring 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Pry, Jamie -- ranked No. 9 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Purnell, Mrs. Catherine C. -- representative of the Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare at the Working Groups of the National Advisory on the Education of the Deaf on 7/24/1969; member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Quigley, Dr. Stephen P. -- member of the Chairmen of the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf with HGK on 7/24/1969; served as committee chairman. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Raedler, Miss -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Rambeau, Jeremy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Raubicheck, Lettitia -- NYC, Bell Labs demonstration participant 01/24/46

Reed, L. Deno -- Executive Secretary - Sensory Study Section; Department of Health, Education, and Welfare: Social and Rehabilitation Service. See: Information Concerning the Termination of Grant Project No. RD-1483-S (1963-1968)

Reese -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Reissner -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Educational Foundations. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Reuther, Roy -- Director of Citizenship Dept., U.A.W.; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Reynolds, William -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/18/1946

Richardson, Elliot Lee -- Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare; on 8/5/1970, invited HGK to serve on the NACED from 7/1/1970 to 6/31/1974. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Richardson, Eugene -- Consultant for Higher Education and Certification for Michigan Dept. of Public Instruction; contacted HGK regarding the status of her elementary and secondary permanent certificates on 3/20/1951. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Riddell, Wendy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Riesz, Dr. Robert R. (Bob) -- Bell Telephone Labs employee; installed spectrograph equipment at the Speech Clinic, Institute of Human Adjustment, U.Michigan on 9/24/1946 and repaired in on10/30/1946; signed front of Visible Speech; sent George Kopp bulletins to be attached to the cathode ray translator maintenance notes (2/20/1947) delivered a replacement transformer for the spectrograph during the U.Mich. Study (Oct. 31, 1947). See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45); Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Robbins, Dr. -- NATS

Robertson, Scott -- on clinic's fall 1976, spring 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Robinson, Luther D. -- member of the committee on Adolescent Deaf of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Robinson, Cindy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976, fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Rogers, Carl -- professor of psychology and Executive Secretary of the Counseling Center, University of Chicago. See: Dialogue between Martin Buber and Carl Rogers (4/18/1957)

Rondut -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 12/06/1945

Rooney -- PS 47, Bell Labs demonstration participant 02/14/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Rosario, Bill -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Rosenstein, Dr. Joseph -- representative of the Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare at the Working Groups of the National Advisory on the Education of the Deaf on 7/24/1969; member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971); Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Rowell, Sartorious -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Guidance of Handicapped. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Ruppel, Alfred E. -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (11/26/1943-6/10/1944); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Rutland, Darryl -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Saenz, Raul -- grade 4, in Higgins's homeroom class; HGK noted slow on roster; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Samuelson -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Teaching Lip Reading. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Samuelson, Miss Estelle -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 02/21/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Sandlin, R. -- Author of An Analysis of the Intelligibility of Twenty-Six Selected Sentences Spoken by Four Deaf Individuals Before and After a Period of Instruction Using the Visible Speech Translator. M.A. Thesis, Wayne State University Speech and Hearing Clinic (1953). See: Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Saunders, M.D., William H -- author of The Larynx pamphlet. See: William H. Saunders, M.D. - The Larynx (1964) [large sleeve]

Sawyer, Dean -- Dean, University of Michigan graduate school; 11/26/1946 demonstration . See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947)

Schiappacasse, Ed -- Subject #14 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being a child with some introduction; ranked No. 28 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Schlagter, Charles -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists . See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Schmitz -- 6th and 8th grade teacher, Detroit Day School; 9 students in spring 1966 6th grade class. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Schott, Dr. Lionel -- worked in Bell Labs; installed spectrograph equipment at the Speech Clinic, Institute of Human Adjustment, U.Michigan on 9/24/1946; wrote report on Chao's testing of the Chinese language with the spectrograph; signed front of Visible Speech. See: Memo on Visible Speech testing of Chinese langauage (4/17/1944); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Schroeder, M.R. -- Director, Acoustics, Speech and Mechanics Research Laboratory at Bell Telephone Labs; offered a new transistorized translator for Kopp's research . See: Correspondence from M.R. Schroeder to Dr. George A. Kopp (3/25/1965)

Scott, Jean -- Subject #2 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; HGK noted check for glasses on roster; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No. 31 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Scott, Pam -- grade 9, in Martyka's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Scouten, Edward L. -- Prinicipal of the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind; sent an article entitled A.G. Bell, a friend of deaf people to Mrs. Ester M. Stoval on 12/9/1969. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Searcella, Vera -- on clinic's spring 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Seater -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Seawell, Miss -- re: Visible Speech 01/10/1946. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Secord -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 12/21/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Shaffer, Laurance F. -- Chairman of the dissertation committee for Harriet Kopp's doctoral dissertation, submitted to Columbia University in 1962. See: Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Sharkey, Dixie -- on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Sheridan, Miss -- Teacher, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/21/45

Sheridan -- Western Electric. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Shi, Mrs. -- Directress of Workers Commune (Workers New Liang Quarters). See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Shirk, Richard -- Executed Photographs for Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision pamphlet. See: The Birmingham Plan of Testing Hearing and Vision (1951)

Shohara, Dr. Hide -- Dept. of Languages; made some japanese spectograms; 12/13/1946 conference . See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Siegenthaler, Bruce -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; completed Master's thesis on relationship between measured hearing loss and the intelligibility of selected words in May 1948; first student to research with sound spectrograph to submit his study for publication. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Silverman, S. Richard (Dick) -- Director, Central Institute for the Deaf, St. Louis, MO; sent HGK congratulatory letter on 11/3/1958 about new post; Chairman of the Working Groups of the National Advisory Committee on the Education of the Deaf on 7/24/1969; member of Editorial Committee of NACED that submitted recommendations on 10/16/1969; agreed to write a recommendation letter for HGK on 11/24/1969. See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970); Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Silverstein, Miss -- NAPTSD Publicity Agent, Bell Labs demonstration participant 03/08/1946

Simmons, Michael -- staff member at the Detroit Day School for the Deaf; taught experimental classes with the Translator. See: Early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963)

Simmons -- teacher of 4th and 5th grade students at the Detroit Day School already using the machine. See: Test Subjects (1965)

Simon, Mr. Frank -- photographer with the Dynamic Film Co., Detroit; making slides of spectrographic patterns (10/17/1966). See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Simpson, Ruth -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Simson, Dr. Clyde B. -- Chief of Children's Services, Lafayette Clinic; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Sirois, Steve -- Grade 4, in Simmons's class, on list of students now using the machine; ranked No. 5 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Slater -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Smartwood, Miss -- audited V.S. training course part time

Smith, Mrs. -- recorded sound spectrograph in Jackson, MI on 12/9/1947. See: Sound Spectrograph results (1945-48)

Smith, M. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Smith, M. -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Research in Speech Education. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Snodgrass -- Western Electric. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Sonnenstrahl, Alfred -- test subject - class 3B, age 10. See: Lip Reading Study (10/5/1943); Students' Spectrograms (fall 1943)

Sperling -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Spishak, Joel -- Subject #29 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; ranked No. 1 in spring 1966 tests; grade 9 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Pictographic Tests; Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Spriestersbach, D -- Author of An Exploratory Study of the Motility of the Peripheral Oral Structures in Relation to Defective and Superior Consonant Articulation, Mentioned in Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation. See: Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Star, Miss -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Stark, Miss -- From Coronet, interview 01/28/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Steffen, Bonnie -- on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Steffens -- 7th and 8th grade teacher, Detroit Day School; 7 students in spring 1966 8th grade class. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Steinberg, Dr. John C. -- U Mich Study, Supervisor in Transmission Research, Bell Telephone Laboratories; signed front of Visible Speech; presented with George Kopp at the 1945 American Speech Correction Conference in Columbus, Ohio on the development of visible speech; Special Consultant to the Visible Speech Research Project (1947); attended meetings of the Visible Speech Research Committee on 5/1/1947, 6/28/1947; planned to sit in at conference at the Institute of Human Adjustment, U.Mich., on 4/28/1947; decided on Feb 26-27, 1948 to send the sound spectrograph back to Bell Labs for servicing. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45) Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Progress Report Presented at American Speech Correction Conference, Chicago - U.Mich. (12/31/1946); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evalution Research Program (8/13/1948)

Steinberg, Naomi -- test subject - class 6; age 13. See: Lip Reading Study (10/5/1943); Students' Spectrograms (fall 1943)

Steris, David -- made recording, station WPAG of all the children in the visible speech research program. See: Supplement to Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (4/21/1947)

Stewart, Mr. -- See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960)

Stewart, Glen -- Subject #4 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; ranked No. 52 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Stockbold, Mrs. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Stocker, Dr. Harold -- employed part-time on Project RD-1483-S to carry out satistical evaluations as data was compiled; Appointed in September 1966 to work part time for the Visible Speech project. See: Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Stoval(l), Esther M. -- worked for the Volta Bureau, Washington, DC; received letter from Ed Scouten on 12/9/1969; member of Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc. Editorial Politicies Committee (3/1/1970). See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Strang -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Guidance and Personnel. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Subrezi -- mechanic?. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Sumwolt, Dina -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Sunday, Richard -- Director, Detroit's Multi-Faceted Special Education Project in Detroit Public Schools; sent HGK a congratulatory letter 6/9/1970. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Tactile -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Tapley, Terry -- Subject #30 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Taylor -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 11/29/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Temple -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 12/21/1945. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Tenny, Dr. John -- Bell Labs demonstration participant 10/24/1946; associated with the George A. Kopp Memorial Fund. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947); Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970)

Tepoorton, Randy -- Other Research Participant at University of Michigan during Kopp's study; Master's thesis on degrees of nasality - in progress in Aug 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Thayer -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Therman, Miss -- University publications department; 12/19/1946 conference. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Thomas, Dr. Olin E. -- Vice President and Treasurer, Wayne State University; filled out Application for Research or Demonstration Grant with the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare on 8/19/1959; received letter from James F. Garrett on 10/20/1959 about the receipt of a grant for research with the cathode ray tube translator; copied on announcement of grant continuation for Visible Speech for the Deaf (5/31/1966); part of an application for the continuation of the grant for Project No. RD-1483-S (9/25/1963, 2/10/1966) . See: Information on Research Projects and Proposals (1959-1960); Research Information About Project No. RD-14-83-S (1964-1966); Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966)

Thompson -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Thompson, Carl L. -- co-authored Comments on Physiology of Hoarseness in Archives of Otolaryngology (Vol. 81, Jan. 1965). See: Moore and Thompson - Comments on Physiology of Hoarseness (Jan. 1965) [large sleeve]

Thompson, Richard E. -- member of the committee on Adolescent Deaf of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in March 1970. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Thompson, Robert H. -- Business Manager - Wayne State University Press. See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Thorndike -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Descriptive Statistics. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Thorpe, Leonard -- Subject #25 in 1965 tests; grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; ranked No. 50 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Thoubboron -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Tibbitts, Mr. Clark -- Director of University of Michigan Institute of Human Adjustment; worked in conjunction with Dr. Francis Lord of the Rackham School of Special Education on the visible speech research project; sent Dr. Lord letter 11/27/1946; called meeting of the visible speech committee on 1/8/1947; attended meetings of the Visible Speech research committee on 1/8/1947, 2/12/1947, 2/21/1947, 3/3/1947, 5/1/1947, 5/29/1947, 6/28/1947, 11/7/1947; discussed visible speech research project with Ralph K. Potter on 4/17/1947; sent George Kopp comments on a proposed visible speech article on 5/31/1947 . See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947); Minutes and Memos from the Visible Speech Research Committee - U.Mich. (1/3/1947-11/7/1947); Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); Proposed Outline: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (3/3/1947); Information on Visible Speech Education Evaluation Program - U.Mich. (5/28/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947)

Tiffany, Bernard -- severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Tiffin, Jos. -- taught HGK at Brooklyn College - Experimental Phonetics. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Toliver, Linda -- Grade 4, in Simmons's class, on list of students now using the machine; on list of Prospective subjects grade 4-5, marked some experience. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Toppin, Terrence (Terry) -- Subject #3 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being involved in original project; ranked No.3 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects, marked original project. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Trabman, Bernice -- staff member at the Detroit Day School for the Deaf; taught experimental classes with the Translator from 1964-1965. See: Early Draft of Final Report of Grant No. RD-526 (1963); Final Draft: Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Manual for Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968); Rough Draft (handwritten) - Visible Speech for the Deaf (1968)

Trayner, Larry -- ranked No. 6 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966; Male Test Subject; 10/14/1966; Grade 4, Test 6 - Part 6; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project# RD-1483-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test# 1 on 6/18/1968; Male Test Subject; 12/13/1966; Grade 4, Test S-D; Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project# RD-1483-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test Film Strip #1on 6/18/1968. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966); Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Provect #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Truex -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Tuarter? -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Turner, Jimmy -- on clinic's spring and fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Tweet, Cathy (Kathy) -- on clinic's spring and fall 1975, spring and fall 1976, spring and fall 1977 lists. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Twiner, James -- on clinic's fall 1976 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Upham, Jennifer -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Usdane, William M. -- Chief, Division of Research and Demonstrations: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare - Social and Rehabilitation Service. See: Information Concerning the Termination of Grant Project No. RD-1483-S (1963-1968)

Vadersen, Charles W. -- learn to use recorder 04/11/1946; signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Van Adestine, Elizabeth -- first principal of Detroit Day School for the Deaf in 1898. See: Description of Detroit School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Van Adestine, Dr. Gertrude -- principal of Detroit Day School for the Deaf in 1924

Van Brie -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Van Buskirk, Mr. Clifford M. -- Grant and Contract Officer, Wayne State University; contacted about the grant continutation for Visible Speech for the Deaf on 5/31/1966; signed Application for Continuation of Grant for Project No. RD-1483-S (9/25/1963, 2/10/1966); worked on the George A. Kopp Memorial Fund in Dept. of Grants and Contracts, Wayne State University; received letter from HGK concerning the advisory board on 11/3/1969 and one from George Bohman on 11/17/1969 . See: Harriet Kopp's personal correspondence (11/4/1949-6/3/1970); Research Information About Project No. RD-1483-S (1964-1966); Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966)

Van Horn -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Van Riper, C. -- worked in the Western Michigan University Dept. of Speech Pathology and Audiology; contacted GAK about his research in stuttering on 9/11/1968; sent condolences on the death of George to HGK on 9/26/1968. See: Correspondence to George and Harriet Kopp from C.Van Riper (9/11/1968-9/26/1968)

Velazquez, Carlos -- Subject #12 in 1965 tests; grade 6, in Clement's homeroom class; ranked No. 27 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 8 (1966-1967 school year); on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5; Male Test Subject; 10/12/1966; Grade 8B, Test 2. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966); Test Results and Charts (October 1966)

Vollmer, Alice -- charted with other female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Waddle (Waddell) -- Photog. 01/14/46. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Waisenen, Eva -- severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Walker, Alice -- taught HGK at Teachers College - Statistics of Inference. See: Registration for Harriet C. Green at the Office of Field Relations and Placement, Teachers College, Columbia University (c. 1948)

Walker, Elizabeth Prescott -- Junior League of Detroit; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Walker, Ginger -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Wallace. Jr., R.L. -- Worker at Bell labs starting 03/20/1945; signed front of Visible Speech . See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Ward, Iva -- London, England; came for instruction and demonstration on U Mich study, 2/6/1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Washington -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44)

Watkins, Stanley -- signed front of Visible Speech. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Weare, Christopher (Chris) -- on clinic's spring 1975 last; marked as dropped on fall 1975 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Weaver -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 1 (May '44); BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Webber, Ernie -- charted with female test subjects. See: Charts and Spectrograph Results (female test subjects)

Wedal, Norm -- in Wayne State University's accounting department; send memo to GAK regarding balance of Account 303-2911 (VRA grant) on 6/10/1966. See: Financial Information on the Continuation of the Federal Grant for Project RD-1483-S-66-C2 (May 1966)

Weekes -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Weill, Hannah W. -- Secretary for Harriet Green Kopp, Chairman, Department of Speech Pathology, Audiology & Education of the Deaf. See: Visible Speech Manual (3/9/1967-12/5/1974)

Weinberg, Dr. Sal -- Philadelphia. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Weinberger, Caspar W. -- invited HGK to serve on the National Advisory Committee on the Handicapped of the Office of Education for a term lasting Oct 1973-June 1974. See: Correspondence from Caspar W. Weinberger to Harriet Kopp (10/11/1973)

Weiner, Milton -- Director, ACSW, Dept. of School Social Work; sent congratulatory letter to HGK on 5/26/1970. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Wertzel, Mike -- on clinic's spring 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

Westerman, Mr. S. -- District Supervisor, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Westerwick, Robyn -- on clinic's fall 1977 list. See: Bell Telephone Laboratories notebook with student rosters (Spring 1975-Fall 1977)

White, Marian L. -- Author of Mental Age Norms for Vocabulary Scores in the 1937 Stanford-Binet - The Psychological Record Vol. 5, No. 5. Pamphlet included in Harriet Kopp's Masters Thesis. See: Harriet Kopp's Masters Thesis (April 1940)

Whitton, Harold -- Headmaster, Royal Schools for the Deaf (Manchester); sent a note HGK on 3/30/1969 thanking her for her hospitality in showing him her school and sharing her home. See: Activities and Speaking Engagements with Professional Organizations (3/30/1969-10/12/1970)

Wildgen, Tommy -- severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Williams, Miss E. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Williams, T.W. -- Asst. Pres of NY Telephone Bell Labs, demonstration participant 1/24/1946

Williams, Maureen -- ranked No. 14 among students who participated in less than 10 tests in spring 1966. See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966)

Williams, Pat -- Subject #24 in 1965 tests; grade 5, in Gardiner's homeroom class; on list of Prospective Subjects grade 4-5. See: Test Subjects (1965); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Williams, Maureen -- Student that completed an answer sheet for VRA Project #RD-143-S, Visible Speech for the Deaf; Test #1 on 6/18/1968; Test Film Strip #1 on 6/18/1968 . See: Mean Scores for Tests #1-10-VRA Project #RD-1483-S (June 1968)

Williams -- rep of Michigan Bell Telephone publications dept.; 10/10/1946 conference . See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947)

Wilson -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Win -- Columbia Institute Deaf - Washington, DC. See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Wishart, Dr. -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Witts -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Wojnarowski, Janice -- Subject #15 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Kane's homeroom class; noted as being a child with some introduction; ranked No. 10 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospective Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Wojnarowski, Joanne -- Subject #17 in 1965 tests; grade 8, Schmitz's homeroom class; ranked No. 49 overall in spring 1966 tests; on list of Prospetive Subjects. See: Test Subjects (1965); Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Wolfe, Charles J. -- Executive Deputy Superintendent, Detroit Public Schools; sent HGK a congratulatory letter on 5/26/1970. See: Retirement Papers from the Detroit Day School for the Deaf (1970)

Wolfram, Dr. B.R. -- president of Educational Media, Inc. See: Detroit Day School for the Deaf (6/14/1961-2/23/1971)

Woodburne, Dr. Lloyd S -- Associate Dean, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, University of Michigan; asked by G.E. Densmore on 5/29/1947 to defray costs to reimburse George Kopp's expenses accrued by presenting to a convention of the Association of American Instructors of the Deaf. See: Correspondence regarding the Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. study (4/18/1946-8/8/1947)

Wooden, Dr. -- 10/24/1946 demonstration. See: Progress Report #1: Visible Speech Research Program - U.Mich. (1/31/1947); How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (3/25/1947-10/10/1947)

Woods, Morris Wistar -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Wunsch, Ernest -- University of Detroit Law School Faculty; member of the Advisory Board for the Detroit Day School for the Deaf. See: Report to Detroit Board of Education on the Day School for the Deaf (2/26/1963)

Xu(a), Dr. Ma (Shuh) -- President, Peking/Beijing Medical College. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Yates -- See: BELL LABS NOTEBOOK 2 (JAN '45)

Yost, Janet -- age 16 (1947); severly hypacaustic, experiment subject in U Mich study; performance in Visible Speech Experiment #5 evaluated 1948. See: Final Report of Visible Speech Educational Evaluation Research Program (3/25/1947-8/13/1948)

Zeilauf, Donald (Don) -- test subject - class 3B, age 10. See: Lip Reading Study (10/5/1943); Students' Spectrograms (fall 1943)

Zhoc, Dr. Gian -- Deputy Director of Foreign Relations, Assoc. Professor of Surgery, Beiging Medical College. See: Notes from Medical Study Trip to China (4/18/1980-4/28/1980)

Zimmerman, Jane Dorsay -- Noted in the acknowledgements page of Harriet Kopp's doctoral dissertation for her interest and help in the project. See: Harriet Kopp's Doctoral Dissertation (1962)

Zisler, Janice -- ranked No. 33 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5 (1966-1967 school year). See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Zulczyk, Martin -- ranked No. 46 overall in spring 1966 tests; grade 5 (1966-1967 school year). See: Graphs of Students' Test Results (Spring 1966); Information on the Visible Speech Research Project (1966)

Kopp Organizations

American Association of University Women -- Important Demonstration in U Mich Study, 11/18/1947. See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 1 (Box 2, Folder 8), Visible Speech Research Program (Box 3, Folder 11)

American Speech Correction Conference, Chicago -- 12/31/46 progress report. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13)

ASH of H Convention -- See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 1 (Box 2, Folder 8)

Bruce School for the Deaf -- See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 2 (Box 2, Folder 11)

Hallowel Central Institute -- See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 2 (Box 2, Folder 11)

Horace H. Rackham School of Special Education -- University of Michigan Study Site. See: Proposed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (Box 3, Folder 18)

Lansing teachers -- 10/30/46 demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13)

University of Michigan Hospital Group -- Important Demonstration in University of Michigan Study (10/15/1947). See: How Funding Continued the Project at Ypsilanti (Box 3, Folder 1)

Michigan State School of the Deaf -- demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13)

National Association for the Deaf -- Austin, TX. See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 2 (Box 2, Folder 11)

Pi Lamda Theta -- 12/11/46 illustrated talk. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13)

Royal Canadian Commission of Education -- 1/22/47 demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13), How Funding Continued the Program at Ypsilanti (Box 3, Folder 1)

St. Joseph's School of Nursing -- 10/24/46 demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13), How Funding Continued the Program at Ypsilanti (Box 3, Folder 1)

St. Oln -- See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 1 (Box 2, Folder 8)

University of Michigan School of Nursing -- 11/20/46 demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13)

University of Michigan Speech Staff -- 12/6/46 demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13)

Empire State Association of the Deaf -- See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 2 (Box 2, Folder 11)

Union League of the Deaf -- 711 Eighth Avenue. See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 2 (Box 2, Folder 11)

Wayne County Health Guild -- 11/7/46 demonstration. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13), How Funding Continued the Program at Ypsilanti (Box 3, Folder 1)

Women's Research Club -- University of Michigan; 1/6/47 illustrated talk. See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13), How Funding Continued the Program at Ypsilanti (Box 3, Folder 1)

Ypsilanti -- See: Voice Print Identification Procedure and Information (1 of 3) (Box 1, Folder 13), How Funding Continued the Program at Ypsilanti (Box 3, Folder 1)

D. Van Nostrand Co. -- New York - Publisher of Visible Speech. See: Bell Laboratories Notebook 2 (Box 2, Folder 11)

Rackham School of Special Education at Michigan Normal -- housed spectrograph at the University Institute of Human Relations' speech clinic. See: Proposed Visible Speech Program for the Rackham School (Box 3, Folder 18)

Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare -- grant that supported RD-526 research. See: Progress Report for Grant #RD-526 (Box 3, Folder 30)
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Kathy Green and Philip Green in 2008.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Books  Search this
Deafness  Search this
Slides (Photography)  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Speech  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Lantern slides
Lecture notes
Citation:
Harriet Green Kopp Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1130
See more items in:
Harriet Green Kopp Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1130
Online Media:

Bobcat Company Records

Creator:
Nelson, Scott  Search this
Bobcat Company  Search this
Extent:
24 Film reels
56 Cubic feet (128 boxes, 8 oversized folders)
10 electronic discs (cd)
5 electronic discs (dvd)
14 videocassettes (betacamsp)
38 videocassettes (u-matic)
9 videocassettes (vhs)
1 videocassettes (digital betacam)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Film reels
Electronic discs (cd)
Electronic discs (dvd)
Videocassettes (betacamsp)
Videocassettes (u-matic)
Videocassettes (vhs)
Videocassettes (digital betacam)
Dvds
Compact discs
Christmas cards
Awards
Advertisements
Posters
Stickers
Tickets
Videocassettes
Photographs
Placemats
Invitations
Newsletters
Greeting cards
Place:
West Fargo (North Dakota)
Gwinner (North Dakota)
Date:
1940s-2009
Summary:
The Bobcat Company Records document a post-war invention process and American manufacturing system through the case study of a dynamic machine, the Bobcat skid-steer loader. The records focus primarily on Bobcat's products, marketing, and advertising through product literature, photographs, advertisements, posters, newsletters, and audiovisual materials.
Scope and Contents:
The records are divided into ten series which document a post-war invention process and American manufacturing system, through the case study of a dynamic machine, the Bobcat skid-steer loader. The records focus primarily on Bobcat's products, marketing, and advertising through product literature, photographs, advertisements, posters, newsletters, and audiovisual materials.

Series 1, Historical Background, 1965-2007 and undated, is divided into nine subseries: Subseries 1, Company Histories, 1965-1996 and undated; Subseries 2, Organizational Materials, 1970s-2003 and undated; Subseries 3, Factories/Plants, 1965-1996; Subseries 4, Union Materials, 1971, 2005-2007; Subseries 5, Kaizen Materials, 2003-2004 and undated; Subseries 6, Company Christmas Cards, 1965-1974 and undated; Subseries 7, Company Picnics, 1966-1979; Subseries 8, Awards, 1969-1988; and Subseries 9, Subject Files, 1963-1985.

Subseries 1, Company Histories, 1965-1998 and undated, consists of published and unpublished accounts of the early history of Melroe Manufacturing and its corporate evolution. Of note is the undated A Modern Guide to North Dakota. This guidebook is intended for "foreign" visitors (anyone from Minneapolis, Chicago, New York, St. Louis, Los Angeles, Seattle, Canada, South America, Europe, Asia or outside the city limits of Gwinner, North Dakota) and provides historical background as well as information on the many diverse and interesting aspects of North Dakota.

Subseries 2, Organizational Materials, 1970s-2003 and undated, consists of mission statements, codes of conduct, a corporate directory, organizational charts, and letterhead. The organizational chart, while marketing and sales specific, does provide an overview of the company's administrative functions.

Subseries 3, Factories/Plants, 1965-1996, includes information about each plant.Factories represented include Belcourt, Bismarck, Cooperstown, and Gwinner, North Dakota; and Fort Benton, Montana. The materials document each plant and consist of a range of formats from articles and clippings to birthday cards, highway maps, fact sheets, field trip schedules, histories of the plant, service awards, product literature, guides, press releases, and employee information.

The Belcourt Plant was home to Melroe Manufacturing's welding division. Dedicated in 1975 at the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation (Chippewa Tribe), this plant was established to relieve the Bismarck Plant of a heavy workload in welding requirements. The plant closed in the 1980s.

The Fort Benton Plant manufactured thirty-two different models of chisel plows under Clark Equipment Company's Melroe Division for Ag Products. The Fort Benton Plant closed in 1982.

The Bismarck Plant served as Melroe Manufacturing's headquarters for the three Ag Product Plants: Bismarck, Benton, and Cooperstown. Opened in 1973, the Bismarck Plant made grain drills, the windrow pick-up combine attachment, the automatic reset plow and plow packers, and crop sprayer (the Spra-Coupe). The Bismarck Plant closed in 2009.

The Cooperstown Plant also manufactured Ag products such as grain augers, swathers, field sprayers, machinery trailers, raw crop harvesters, grain drill packers, steel buildings, and aluminum grain boxes. The best known products produced at this plant were the steel teeth for making hay stacks and the automatic reset moldboard plow. The plant also fabricated parts and components for the Bobcat skid-steer loader. Of note in the Cooperstown Plant materials are a black-and-white advertisement and programmatic brochures for Clark Equipment Company's 1975 International Teenage Exchange Program. Five teenagers from "Clark North America" were selected to live with Clark families in Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, France, or Germany. The Cooperstown Plant closed in 1977.

The Gwinner Plant remains open today and is the main manufacturing facility for Bobcat of North America. The Gwinner folder contains a high school paper title "Melroe" by Craig Allen Knudson, undated, and remarks given at a Dealer Advisory Council Meeting by Jim Strande about the "B Series" from the Engineering Department.

Subseries 4, Union Materials, 1971, 2005-2007, includes information about the United Steel Workers Local 560, the union that is currently in place at the Bobcat Company. Employees formally voted to unionize on April 2, 1970, under the Allied Industrial Workers (A.I.W.). In the early 1990s, the A.I.W. was becoming too small and could no longer provide the best financial backing or representation to Melroe employees, and therefore the employees decided to merge with the United Paperworkers International Union (U.P.I.U.). In 2005, the U.P.I.U. decided to merge with the delegates of the United Steel Workers of America and form the United Steelworkers (U.S.W.). Today, the Bobcat Company is represented by the U.S.W. in District 11 which includes Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota. The materials in this subseries consist of United Steel Workers Local 560 handbooks and agreements as well as authorized announcements from the local union members and Bobcat management that were posted for employees to read. These announcements/fliers were placed in authorized areas at the factory in Gwinner. There is one grievance record from 1971 detailing the request that certain jobs be posted so personnel can bid for the position.

Subseries 5, Kaizen Materials, 2003-2004 and undated, contains materials related to the Kaizen process, which is a Japanese philosophy that focuses on continuous improvement throughout all aspects of life. When applied to the workplace, Kaizen activities continually improve all functions of a business, from manufacturing to management and from the chief operating officer to the assembly line workers. These materials include An Introduction to the Bobcat Production System ( BPS), undated, and a booklet that provides a road map to all Bobcat employees in utilizing "lean" concepts versus traditional mass production manufacturing. The BPS is intended to redesign production systems, machinery and labor to be as efficient as possible. Other documents include copies of power point slides and materials from a Kaizen workshop.

Subseries 6, Company Christmas Cards, 1965-1974 and undated, includes Christmas cards sent by the Bobcat Company as well as "mock-ups" of cards created by Flint Communications. The Bobcat Company purchased merchandise from companies that specialized in promotional and specialty gifts. Additonal information from those companies is included in this subseries.

Subseries 7, Company Picnics, 1966-1979, contains information about the company's annual family picnic or "family feast" at Lisbon Park in Lisbon, North Dakota. The picnics typically included a program (musical entertainment), games for children, prizes, and a softball game. The documentation includes fliers announcing the picnic, tickets, and receipts and memos detailing the prizes available and the associated costs. Prizes included, but were not limited to, portable televisions, drills, binoculars, cookware, cameras, bicycles, camping equipment, vacuums, and clocks.

Subseries 8, Awards, 1969-1988, contains information about awards given to the Bobcat Company from external organizations as well as individual awards given by the company to its employees. The Export "E" Award is bestowed by the United States Department of Commerce. Awarded for success in boosting sales of American products abroad, Melroe Manufacturing won this honor in 1969 for its increased sales of farm implements and industrial equipment to Canadian and European markets. Material about the 'E" Award includes newspaper clippings and articles, presentation remarks, and photographs. The United States Senate Productivity Award is administered through the United States Senate Commerce Committee. Each United States senator is allowed to select one winner every year. The program was established to encourage competiveness in American industry and ensure its survival in the international marketplace through increased productivity. In 1984, Senator Mark Andrews (R) announced that the Melroe Division of Clark Equipment Company was a recipient of the Productivity Award. The file contains correspondence, newspaper clippings, black-and-white photographs of the presentation, a tour of the factory in Gwinner, North Dakota, and the medal itself. There are other files about awards that recognize employees: Employee Recognition Service Awards, Patents Awards Recognition Dinner, and the 1000 Club. These materials contain lists of awardees, award programs, invitations, and napkins.

Subseries 9, Subject Files, 1963-1985, captures a varity of documentation associated with the company's corporate structure such as testimonials from owners and users of Bobcat skid-steer loaders, the first invoice for the Bobcat skid-steer loader (1963), the celebration of the 100,000th Bobcat skid-steer loader being produced and the "Melroe Mission to Japan." In 1985, a cross-sectional group of Melroe employees were selected to tour Japanese manufacturing plants and examine new concepts in both manufacturing and engineering. The lessons learned from this valuable trip were implemented at Bobcat and ultimately manifested themselves in the Kaizen materials. See Series 1, Subseries 4. The report, Bobcat Reports: The Melroe Mission to Japan contains employee observations about the trip, insights into similarities and difference between Japanese plants and Melroe plants; life style differences; and what it meant individually to the employee.

Series 2, Clark Equipment Company, 1965-1994, contains documentation about the Clark Equipment Company, one of the largest producers of material handling equipment. There are three subseries: Subseries 1, Company Histories, 1965-1978, (not inclusive); Subseries 2, Annual Reports, 1974-1994 (not inclusive); and Subseries 3, Employee Information, undated. The histories consist of typescript documents that were used for various presentations as well as a printed history, "Growing Up with Clark," Clark Magazine, spring 1978, by Steve Lokker. The employee information contains an employee handbook titled "Your Circle of Security" detailing total compensation of pay, benefits, and career opportunities at Clark, and a Guide to Maintaining Non-Union Status and Combating Union Organizational Attempts, undated. The annual reports, 1974-1994, also include information about quarterly report and annual meeting summaries.

Series 3, Newsletters, 1965-2009, consists of published newsletters for both internal and external distribution. Arranged alphabetically by title, the newsletters represent a variety of Bobcat Company news items aimed at specific audiences such as current employees, former employees (alumni), dealers, prospective customers, and the industry. For example, Bobcat Briefs, a monthly publication, contains information for and about Melroe Manufacturing Company employees. The Summit (Bobcat Sales Masters) a monthly newsletter designed for salesmen at varying levels, allowed them to stay up-to-date on their progress in the Sales Masters Program. It was created to recognize the achievements of retail salesmen. Additional newsletters targeted at salesmen/dealers include the Bobcat's Pajamas, Feller Buncher Toppers, Melroe Scoop, Winners Circle, Territory Tales and Worksaver. Worksaver is published four times a year and sent directly to a dealer's mailing list of customers and prospects. Worksaver is part of the Bobcat Company's co-op advertising program, with the single most important feature being the ability to target the Bobcat sales message. Newsletters aimed at employees include Bobcat Briefs, Bobcat Messages, Melroe Pick-up, Clark Pick-up, Melroe and Messages. The only newsletter not represented in this series is the Spra-Coupe Reporter. See series 8 for this newsletter.

Series 4, Photographs, Negatives, Slides and Transparencies, 1960-2003 and undated, contains photographs, negatives, slides, and transparencies. The materials are arranged in alphabetical order following the original filing scheme created by the Bobcat Company. The only exception to this order is "Products" which are filed numerically by model number. For example, the B300 (Loader Backhoe), 2005, is filed before the 310 (Skid Steer Loader), 1977. Each model is identified parenthetically. The bulk of the materials consists of photographs, both black-and-white and color prints documenting the company's activities. They were created and assembled by Ernie Feland, the company's photographer for 37 years.

The images document almost every aspect of the company and its culture. Included are: products, employees, company picnics and outings, factory activities, trade shows, and dealerships. Well documented are the various company outings and activities that involved dealers and vendors. Elaborate theme-based activities were created for the dealers/vendors which were the highlight of the year. The company fostered a "family friendly" atmosphere and this is evident in the images. Many of the photographs documenting company products show the product in use in various industries and with various attachments. For example, there are photographs of skid-steer loaders removing snow, moving fertilizer, drilling holes, and hauling dirt.

Series 5, Dealer Materials, 1964-2003, documents the valuable connection between the customer, dealer, and the company. Dealers are an important part of the Bobcat success story. This series is further divided into eight subseries: Subseries 1, Dealer Advisory Council Meetings, 1967-1996; Subseries 2, Sales Meetings, 1964-1999; Subseries 3, District Manager Meetings, 1971-1990; Subseries 4, Conferences, 1973, 1974,1993; and Subseries 5, Specific Dealers, 1978, 1979, 2003; Subseries 6, Dealer Advertising and Sales Promotion Kits, 1967-1996; Subseries 7, Co-op Advertising Materials for Dealers, 1979-1982; and Subseries 8, Subject Files, 1965-2003.

Subseries 1, Dealer Advisory Council Meetings, 1967-1996, documents Dealer Advisory Council (DAC) activities and meetings. The first DAC was held in 1965 at the Ash Forks Camp on Lake of the Woods, Canada. Dealers competed in a sales contest prior to the meeting to determine which twelve of them would attend. Over the years the roster of dealers attending grew, and those chosen to serve on the council had an outstanding sales record. The company sought these dealers' advice on all aspects of Bobcat marketing, engineering and manufacturing, and both dealers and company management were encouraged to share their ideas and experiences. It is through a strong dealership system that the company sells its products and many times, it was a solid demonstration that sold the product. Dealers frequently were invited to the Bobcat Boot Camp in Lisbon, North Dakota, where they spent one week training on various Bobcat Company products as well as competitors' products.

To this day, dealers meet annually in different locations throughout the United States with particular emphasis on North Dakota, Minnesota, Idaho, Wisconsin, and parts of Canada. The meetings were well planned and followed a structure with receptions, orientations, dinners, plant tours, presentations, group discussions, and award presentations.

These records provide insight into the relationship between the company and its dealers with dealer distributor materials such as the dealer kits. The photographs in Series 4 document this aspect of the company well. Among one of the boot camp's first trainers was none other than inventor Cyril Keller.

The materials are arranged chronologically by meeting date and contain correspondence, agendas, memos, lists of dealers (in some instances with profiles), certificates (recognizing outstanding sales achievement), invitations, licenses for fishing, invoices for airline tickets, presentation scripts, photographs (the majority document fishing and hunting trips), and brochures. Many of the meetings also had programs for "ladies" since many of the dealer's wives accompanied them.

Subseries 2, Sales Meetings, 1964-1999, documents the annual gathering of all Bobcat dealers. Unlike the DAC Meetings, the annual sales meetings were larger in scale and had more programmatic functions. Meetings were held in a variety of locations throughout the United States, and almost all of the meetings were held either in January or February. The meetings are arranged chronologically and contain the location of the meeting if known. There is unevenness to the type and amount of documentation for each meeting. Many files include agendas, memos, correspondence, name tags, meeting programs, banquet programs, and presentation remarks. Some meetings contained more unusual materials. The 1974 Kona, Hawaii Meeting had a "Clark Money Tree Mid-Term Quiz" designed for dealers and dealer salesmen as a means of testing their knowledge of the Clark Retail Finance programs. The quiz was graded, and if the individual passed, a doctor of finance was issued along with a cash prize. Additionally, an audio disc from the 1974 Kona, Hawaii Meeting, Swing and Sway The Bobcat Way with Bobcat- The One and Only and Cattin Around was intended for use by dealers for a wide variety of promotional and selling situations: background music for radio and TV commercials, local fairs, exhibits, and conventions.

Subseries 3, District Manager Meetings, 1971-1990, consists of documentation for district managers' meetings which dealt with the "how" of demonstrating, advertising, financing, and servicing and the "why" of compact size, maneuverability, all-wheel drive, visibility, time, and labor for Bobcat products. These meetings appear to have been held in conjunction with the annual sales meeting.

Subseries 4, Conferences, 1973, 1974, 1993, includes speeches, photographs, agendas, invoices, memos, programs, and notes. The bulk of the materials consists of Clark Executive Conference materials from 1973.

Subseries 5, Specific Dealers, 1978, 1979, 2003, contains files for specific Bobcat dealers in the United States. The files are arranged alphabetically by dealership name and include advertisements, announcements, correspondence, and other branded materials with the Bobcat logo.

Subseries 6, Dealer Advertising and Sales Promotion Kits, 1967-1996, consists of folders filled with a memo or letter to the dealer, dealer lists, newsletters, logo types, line drawings, price lists, brochures, product information sheets, specifications, and posters designed to assist dealers in promoting a certain product, campaign, or sale. Reg Stansfield served as the dealer development manager (regional, European and worldwide) from 1978 to 1988. It's clear that the company was interested in measuring performance, seeking room for improvement, and knowing about problems. Stansfield had a great interest in training and in helping salesmen avoid making unnecessary mistakes. He created "Sales Success Strategy" cards with sales tips which were included in the dealer promotion kits. These tips were part of the "Melroe Success Formula," which was to promote, demonstrate, sell, and support. Arranged chronologically, these kits provide valuable information on what the company was sending its dealers and the accompanying instructions. The kits also provide a comprehensive overview of the types of industries using Bobcat products, such as colleges, cemeteries, landscapers, stockyards, rendering, and the poultry industry.

Subseries 7, Co-op Advertising Materials for Dealers, 1979-1982, includes materials that were assembled into binders and were distributed to dealers as a way to assist them in promoting and advertising Bobcat products. The binders were organized into categories: direct mail, newspaper, radio, television, Yellow Pages, specialties, signs and displays, and fairs and shows.

Subseries 8, Subject Files, 1965-2003, are arranged alphabetically by topic. These files include topics such as dealer financial profiles, golf tournaments, review guidelines, motivational concepts, sales specialist's guides, website programs, and Y2K compliancy. The dealer-initiated materials include examples of specific materials developed by dealers for promoting Bobcat products and sales. For example, the J.S. Equipment Company of Sacramento, California, developed a Bobcat Bulletin and the K.C. Bobcat of Kansas City, Missouri, developed a mailer card touting their Bobcat Center with equipment and accessories. Proper use of the Bobcat brand name adds value, helps develop customer loyalty and presents a consistent identity. Spelled out in a brochure of Brand Identity and Standards for Bobcat Dealers are the four trade name categories used by dealers: "Bobcat of (location);" "Bobcat (Name);" "(Name) Bobcat;" and "An Independent Trade Name." Additionally, it details unacceptable uses of the Bobcat trademark logo and the associated color standards.

The Melroe Annual Sands Hill One Invitational Engolfment (MASHIE) files chronicle the establishment of an annual golf tournament designed for the company (Melroe) and its dealers to get to know each other better and have fun while doing it. The golf tournament included visits to the factory and offices as well as an awards dinner.

The motivational concepts file contains a variety of notes and lists detailing motivational concepts for dealers. There is an untitled poem about Christmas, Santa, and a Bobcat as well as a 1977 planning session document from Flint Advertising. The Y2K compliancy materials consist of memos, correspondence, spreadsheets, and questionnaires for dealers about their computer compliancy for the year 2000.

Series 6, Marketing and Promotional Materials, 1954-2007, are divided into ten subseries: Subseries 1, Correspondence of Ferd Froeschle, 1974-1976, 1990; Subseries 2, Budget/Finances, 1961-2000 (not inclusive); Subseries 3, Advertisements, 1964-2001; Subseries 4, Artwork/Storyboards, undated; Subseries 5, Advertising Proof Books, 1954-1993; Subseries 6, Surveys/Profiles, 1977, 1979, 1990-1991; Subseries 7, Promotional Ideas/Retail Sales, 1970s-2007; Subseries 8, Sales Campaigns and Programs, 1972-2001; Subseries 9, Contests, 1965-1999, undated; and Subseries 10, Posters, 1977-2005, undated.

Almost all of the promotional pieces were created by Flint Communications of Fargo, North Dakota, under the direction of the Bobcat Advertising/Marketing Department. Flint was established in 1946, by Harold Flint. Today, Flint consists of a network of six companies, known as the Flint Group, serving a diverse list of businesses, industries, government entities, and not-for-profit clients. The Flint Group includes Flint Communications, Fargo, North Dakota; HatlingFlint, St. Cloud, Minnesota; SimmonsFlint, Grand Forks, North Dakota; WestmorelandFlint, Duluth, Minnesota; AadlandFlint, Anchorage, Alaska; and Flint Interactive, an online services firm with staff in multiple locations. In some instances the marketing and promotional pieces have a Knight Printing Company tag affixed to them. This tag provided critical information to both Flint and the Bobcat Company for reordering purposes and dating. For example KN-500-397-#650152-F translated means Knight Printing Company-quantity 500-March 1997-Bobcat Company job number, and the F equals Flint.

The marketing and promotional materials were intended for dealers in the Bobcat dealership network. Many of these pieces were distributed through targeted promotional programs which were designed to maintain regular contact with all existing users, to foster rental customers, and generate new inquiries. The promotional pieces consisted of giveaways, sponsorships, machine displays on dealership frontage, special displays at shopping centers, casual machine displays at stockyards and auctions, presentations and lectures to associations and colleges, group demonstrations, and highway billboards. The promotional methods included permanent advertisements, building and truck designs, ads in newspapers, local television and radio spots, envelope stuffers and stickers for correspondence, fairs, shows, and customer service schools, open houses at dealerships, handouts for salesmen and mechanics, and special telephone canvassing campaigns. These methods maximized the "Worksaver" Program.

Basic markets for the Bobcat include agriculture, agri-business (feed, fertilizer, grain elevators, meat packing), construction (excavating, landscaping, paving, utility, sewer, roofing, concrete, sand and gravel, snow removal, asphalt, and brick), industry (foundries, glass, steel mills, chemicals, coal and coke, lumber, papers, smelters and refiners, castings), forestry, rental yards, and miscellaneous (garbage, rubbish removal, waste paper, nurseries).

Subseries 1, Correspondence of Ferd Froeschle, 1974-1976, 1990, contains correspondence of Ferd Froeschle, the advertising manager and public relations director at Melroe Manufacturing from 1964 to 1981.

Subseries 2, Budget/Finances, 1961-2000 (not inclusive), includes budgets, price lists, advertising schedules (with proposed ad expenditures). There are monthly budget spreadsheets with actuals, budget, and variation for media, production, printing, film and photo, travel, conventions, co-op advertising, sales aids, and miscellaneous.

Subseries 3, Advertisements, 1964-2001, documents advertisements (both color and black and white), color proofs (used to evaluate the ads' final appearance), some examples of the four-color process-a printing process that combines different amounts of the four colors red, yellow, blue and black, copies and/or originals torn from trade and industry magazines. The advertisements are arranged chronologically and then alphabetically by language. There is some clip art with Bobcat Company logos and an advertising manual for the international market. The manual was intended to help dealers prepare their own advertising.

Subseries 4, Artwork/Storyboards, undated, include artwork-the visual components of many advertisements-with and without typeset text for a variety of Bobcat Company products. Many are black and color ink on tracing paper or a transparency such as a photographic image on clear plastic. Also included is documentation on the development of the Bobcat Company logo and storyboards for the Bobcat of Futureville with plans on how to set-up/lay out a Bobcat dealership.

Subseries 5, Advertising Proof Books, 1954-1993, consists of advertisements that were placed in newspapers or various industrial, construction, and farming publications. The proofs are arranged chronologically and then alphabetically by product or the industry in which the product was used; for example, agriculture, contruction, forestry, industry, and rental. In some instances, the alphabetical heading is further refined such as construction (regional) versus construction (national). This distinction was drawn to distinguish the type of advertisement and where it would appear. Advertisements appeared in publications such as The Dakota Farmer, Montana Farmer- Stockman, The Farmer, Canadian Machinery and Metalworking, and Heavy Construction News.

Subseries 6, Surveys/Profiles for Skid-Steer Loaders, 1977, 1979, 1990-1991, contains survey and summaries from research services that conducted interviews and analysis for the company on the use of skid-steer loaders. The testimonials contained within this section are from employees at Central Bi-Products, (a meat processing facility) in Long Prairie, Minnesota.

Subseries 7, Promotional Ideas/Retail Sales, 1972-2001, include pamphlets, brochures, point-of-purchase ads, stickers, calendars, and greeting cards (Christmas, birthday, and Thanksgiving).

Subseries 9, Contests, 1965-1999 and undated, contains documentation illuminating the company's many and varied contests. Held company-wide and worldwide, the contests were intended for dealers to promote the sale of new products. Incentives included cash, prizes, or attachments for various Bobcat skid-steer loaders. The Let's Do It! contest and campaign of 1972-1973, was a competiton for all employees to think more about their productivity efforts. Employees competed quarterly for corporate awards which were given to divisons and plants with the best nine month performance. Employees were judged on return on investment, inventory control, sales volume, and forecasting while the plants were judged on productivity improvement and inventory control.

Subseries 10, Posters, 1977-2005 and undated, consists of posters created by the company for dealers to use in conjunction with various campaigns, programs, and contests.

Series 7, Product Information, 1967-2008, contains brochures, specification sheets, and catalogs detailing the various products offered for sale by the Bobcat Company. Melroe product history file consists of histories of Melroe Ag products, memorable dates in the Melroe company history and speeches about Melroe Manufacturing.

Series 8, Melroe Ag Products/Spra-Coupe Materials, 1972-1998, is divided into two subseries: Subseries 1, Melroe Ag Products Division, 1973-1983 and Subseries 2, Spra-Coupe, 1972-1998, undated. Melroe Ag Products was a division of Melroe Manufacturing which specialized in farm equipment. The products included reset plows, multi-weeders, rock pickers, chisel plows, grain drills, harroweeders, windrow pick-ups and the Spra-Coupe. The Spra-Coupe materials consist primarily of advertisements, product information, and promotional materials. The Spra-Coupe was first built in 1963 by John D. Kirschmann and brought to market in 1965. In the spring of 1972, Melroe Manufacturing acquired the Spra-Coupe, which was designed to apply chemicals using a self-propelled sprayer. The Spra-Coupe was sold primarily to custom operators and was used to replace the airplane as a means of applying liquid spray.

Series 9, Press Related Materials, 1969-2005, is arranged chronologically and divided into four subseries: Subseries 1, Press Clippings, 1969-2005; Subseries 2, Scrapbook of clippings, 1977-1978; Subseries 3, Press Releases, 1972-1999, undated; Subseries 4, Press Conferences, 1978, 1989, 1994; and Subseries 4, Articles, 1967, 1979, 1993. The press releases were used by the company as "organizational announcements" and were released internally to announce promotions, new positions, scholarship recipients, and service awards. In some instances there are black-and-white photographs found in this series as well as "special" releases from 1972-1974 containing correspondence with television stations and industry specific publications such as the Montana Farmer- Stockman and Fertilizer Solutions.

Series 10, Audiovisual Materials, 1963-2007, is divided into seven subseries: Subseries 1, Corporate documentation, circa 1960s-2007, undated; Subseries 2, Promotional, 1967-2007, undated; Subseries 3, Sales, 1963-2003, undated; Subseries 4, Safety/training, circa 1970s-1983, undated; Subseries 5, Commercials, 2004, undated; Subseries 6, Spra-Coupe, 1988-1993, undated; and Subseries 7, Supplemental documentation, 1974-1975, 1983, undated.

Of note are the commercial films made by William Snyder. Snyder was born and raised in North Dakota, and after working in Hollywood, California, for Technicolor he returned to Fargo to form Bill Snyder Films, Inc. Most of Snyder's output was 16 mm film format in color and black-and-white for industrial programs produced by corporate entities and non-profit groups. Snyder supplemented this work by producing television commercials and commercial movies for industry, including Melroe Manufacturing. Melroe hired Snyder in the early 1960s to make a "short" demonstrating the company's skid-steer loader. Eventually more movies were made: The Story of the Bobcat Kid, Bobcat a Go- Go, and Farm Boy at Heart. The movies provide an insight into the marketing strategy of a small company looking for a new and creative marketing effort called the "info-mercial." Aired on local television in the five-state area (Minnesota, South Dakota, Montana, and Wyoming) and using Melroe employees, these movies boosted sales for the company.

Subseries 1, Corporate documentation, circa 1960s-2007 and undated, contains footage of corporate events (primarily National Dealer Meetings), the manufacturing process in the two North Dakota factories, employees at work, and other company-related moving images.

Subseries 2, Promotional, 1967-2007 and undated, consists of films that promote various models of Bobcats and attachments to consumers and dealers. Many films highlight the features, capabilities, and different uses of specific models and associated attachments. CD-ROMs were probably given to potential customers based on their interest in Bobcat products or could have been used in dealerships for customers to access the same information.

Subseries 3, Sales, 1963-2003 and undated, documents the material shown to salesmen and dealers of Bobcats for sales purposes. Methods for improving sales, techniques for selling against competitors' machines, and detailed information about Bobcats' capabilities and features are highlighted to educate salesmen on the products. Numerous motivational and instructional videos were made with Reg Stansfield, Regional Sales Manager, offering strategies to improve sales and increase productivity. Some films in this subseries may have been shown to customers.

Subseries 4, Safety/training, circa 1970s-1983 and undated, documents education of the safe operation of Bobcat machines.

Subseries 5, Commercials, 2004 and undated, contains tapes of thirty second television commercials promoting Bobcat skid-steer loaders.

Subseries 6, Spra-Coupe, 1988-1993 and undated, consists of material relating to the Melroe Spra-Coupe and its electrostatic spraying process. Customer testimonials, descriptions of the use of the machine, and the features and capabilities of the Spra-Coupe are included.

Subseries 7, Supplemental documentation, 1974-1975, 1983, and undated, consists of brochures, scripts, and descriptions for some of the audio visual materials.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged into ten series.

Series 1, Historical Background, 1965-2007

Subseries 1.1, Company Histories, 1965-1998 and undated

Subseries 1.2, Organizational Materials, 1970s-2007 and undated

Subseries 1.3, Factories/Plants, 1965-1996; 2007

Subseries 1.4, Union Materials, 1971, 2005-2007

Subseries 1.5, Kaizen Materials, 2003-2004 and undated

Subseries 1.6, Company Christmas Cards, 1965-1974 and undated

Subseries 1.7, Company Picnics, 1966-1979

Subseries 1.8, Awards, 1969-1988

Subseries 1.9, Subject Files, 1963-1985

Series 2, Clark Equipment Company, 1965-1994 and undated

Subseries 2.1, Company Histories, 1965-1978

Subseries 2.2, Annual Reports, 1974-1994

Subseries 2.3, Employee Information and undated

Series 3, Newsletters, 1965-2009 and undated

Subseries 3.1, Bobcat Alumni Newsletter, 1984 fall; 1987 spring

Subseries 3.2, Bobcat Brief, 1985-1993

Subseries 3.3, Bob Cat's Pajamas, 1965-2008

Subseries 3.4, Bobcat Messages, 2000

Subseries 3.5, Bobcat System, 1993

Subseries 3.6, Clark Pickup, 1975-1976

Subseries 3.7, Feller Buncher Toppers, 1984-1985

Subseries 3.8, Melroe Farm Reporter, 1973-1977

Subseries 3.9, Melroe Messages, 1987-1996, 1999

Subseries 3.10, Melroe Pickup, 1969-1975

Subseries 3.11, Melroe Scoop, 1970

Subseries 3.12, Newsloader, 1979-1982 and undated

Subseries 3.13, Scoop, 1991

Subseries 3.14, The Summit, 1990-1992

Subseries 3.15, Territory Tales, 1974-2002

Subseries 3.16, The Winner's Circle, 1983-1989

Subseries 3.17, Worksaver, 1977-2008

Series 4, Photographs, Negatives, Slides, and Transparencies, 1960-2003 and undated

Subseries 4.1, Alphabetical, 1960-2003 and undated

Subseries 4.2, Miscellaneous, 1963-1986 and undated

Series 5, Dealer Materials, 1964-2003

Subseries 5.1, Dealer Advisory Council Meetings, 1967-1996

Subseries 5.2, Sales Meetings, 1964-1999

Subseries 5.3, District Managers Meetings, 1971-1990

Subseries 5.4, Conferences, 1973, 1974, 1993

Subseries 5.5, Specific Dealers, 1978, 1979, 2003

Subseries 5.6, Dealer Advertising and Sales Promotion Kits, 1967-1996

Subseries 5.7, Co-op Advertising Materials for Dealers, 1979-1982

Subseries 5.8, Subject Files, 1965-2003

Series 6, Marketing and Advertising Materials, 1954-2007

Subseries 6.1, Correspondence of Ferd Froeschle, 1974-1976, 1990

Subseries 6.2, Budget/Finances, 1961-2000 (not inclusive)

Subseries 6.3, Advertisements, 1964-2001

Subseries 6.4, Artwork/Storyboards, undated

Subseries 6.5, Advertising Proof Books, 1954-1993

Subseries 6.6, Surveys/Profiles, 1977, 1979, 1990-1991

Subseries 6.7, Promotional Ideas/Retail Sales, 1970s-2007

Subseries 6.8, Sales Campaigns and Programs, 1972-2001

Subseries 6.9, Contests, 1965-1999, undated

Subseries 6.10, Posters, 1977-2005, undated

Series 7, Product Information, 1967-2008

Series 8, Melroe Ag Division/Spra-Coupe Materials, 1972-1998

Subseries 8.1, Melroe Ag Products Division, 1973-1983

Subseries 8.2, Spra-Coupe, 1972-1998, undated

Series 9, Press Related Materials, 1969-2005

Subseries 9.1, Press Clippings, 1969-2005

Subseries 9.2, Scrapbook of clippings, 1977-1978

Subseries 9.3, Press Releases, 1972-1999, undated

Subseries 9.4, Press Conferences, 1978, 1989, 1994

Subseries 9.5, Articles, 1967, 1979, 1993

Series 10, Audiovisual Materials, circa 1960s-2007, undated

Subseries 10.1, Corporate documentation, circa 1960s-2007 and undated

Subseries 10.2, Promotional, 1967-2007 and undated

Subseries 10.3, Sales, 1963-2003 and undated

Subseries 10.4, Safety/Training, circa 1970s-1983 and undated

Subseries 10.5, Commercials, 2004 and undated

Subseries 10.6, Spra-Coupe, 1988-1993 and undated

Subseries 10.7, Supplemental documentation, 1974-1975 and undated
Biographical / Historical:
The Bobcat Company Records document the evolution of the Bobcat skid-steer loader from a simple agricultural machine into a versatile and widely recognized tool. The Company's loaders, mini track loaders, and product attachments improved productivity in many industries such as shipping, landscaping, and construction. In 1958, approximately 20 loaders were built, and by the 1960s, the total number of units was in the few thousands. In the 1970s, 10,000 loaders were being manufactured a year. Today, Bobcat produces approximately 40,000 loaders a year and celebrated its 750,000th loader in 2008. Other companies, such as Caterpillar, Case, John Deere and New Holland all make loaders, but Bobcat dominates the market and its name is synonymous with the compact construction equipment industry. The records focus primarily on Bobcat's products, marketing, and advertising through product literature, photographs, advertisements, posters, newsletters, and audiovisual materials. The Bobcat Company is a story of individuals, simple ingenuity, independence, and innovation and improvement. The Kellers' problem of removing turkey manure from a barn was solved with a can-do, make-do ethos of the farm which spawned a global industry. The early roots of the Bobcat machine lie in the farming heritage of central Minnesota and the North Dakota plains with two blacksmith brothers, Louis (b. 1923-) and Cyril (b. 1922-) Keller. Out of farming necessity to make manual labor easier, a story of technology grew into a world-wide industry that would become known as the compact equipment industry and would be identified with the name Bobcat. In the fall of 1947, Louis Keller formed Keller Manufacturing (sometimes known as Keller Welding) in Rothsay, Minnesota, which provided a wide range of general repair services to customers, especially blacksmithing and welding services. In 1953, Cyril Keller joined his brother Louis as an equal partner in the business. The small family business noted that they "weld anything except a broken heart." In the summer of 1956, Eddie Velo, a local turkey farmer, approached the Kellers with the problem of cleaning manure out of his turkey barns after the turkeys had been taken to slaughter. Standard loader tractors could not be utilized because of their limited maneuverability, and they were too heavy to operate on the second story of a barn. Velo needed a tractor that could maneuver around the posts in his barn, move backwards and forward, and make sharp turns. The Kellers developed a drive system that was designed to provide the maneuverability required by Velo. A bucket was placed in the front, and a motor in the back. A third castor wheel was added to permit sharp turning. They employed a pulley-and-chain system to switch back and forth. They found that this system was too dangerous, and they abandoned it for a clutch system. The result was a system for "transmitting power from a power unit to propulsion wheels, drive shafts and the like, and in particular to a transmission system for self-propelled vehicles having independently rotatable propulsion or drive wheels."0F[1] A completed loader was delivered to Velo in fall 1957, but the Kellers continued to refine and test it. They manufactured six additional models on speculation and ultimately sold them to area poultry farms. To address the instability issues of having three wheels, they added a counter weight at the back. Additionally, they introduced attachments for the loader-snow blade, sweeper, a bucket, and a manure fork. The Kellers sought to mass-produce their loader. After pursuing various avenues, their uncle, Anton Christianson, a dealer with Melroe Manufacturing Company of Gwinner, North Dakota, introduced them to Melroe Manufacturing. Melroe Manufacturing Company was founded in 1947 by Edward Gideon "E.G." Melroe (d. 1955), a pioneer in agricultural technology. The Kellers were invited to bring their loader to the Melroe booth at the 1958 Minnesota State Fair, to determine the amount of interest in the loader. The interest was so great that Melroe decided to manufacture the loader. After the State Fair, an agreement was reached-Melroe would have exclusive manufacturing rights on a royalty basis. The Kellers would be employed by Melroe to further develop the loader. Access to the Melroe facilities allowed the Kellers' work to progress and be widely marketed. In the fall of 1958, Louis and Cyril Keller moved to Gwinner, North Dakota, to begin work. Louis worked on the manufacturing floor from 1958 to 1967 developing the loader, and Cyril worked from 1958 to 1980 as a salesman promoting and selling Melroe products and training dealers. Development of the first Melroe loader prototype (M60) began in November 1958 and was completed in early 1959. The prototype utilized the Keller patented drive design, which was used on various Melroe and later Bobcat models until 1982. The name "Bobcat" originated in 1962 with Lynn Bickett, of Gould, Brown and Bickett, a marketing agency in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Allegedly, Bickett found the word "bobcat" in the dictionary, and noted that it was a North American mammal that is "tough, quick, and agile." These traits perfectly described the Melroe loader to them, and the Bobcat slogan, "Tough, quick, and agile," was born. Officially designated the Bobcat Company in 2000, the company previously operated under the names: Melroe Manufacturing (1958-1969); Clark Equipment Company (1969-1995); and was also known as Ingersoll-Rand Company (1995-2007). In 1969, Clark Equipment Company of Buchanan, Michigan, acquired Melroe Manufacturing and pushed the Bobcat loader to even greater sales. Clark was a leader in forklifts, but adding the Bobcat product line expanded Clark's range and marketing potential. In 1995, Clark was acquired by Ingersoll-Rand (IR), a leading manufacturer of construction equipment and industrial machinery. IR wanted a strong brand name and the top market share that accompanied it, and Bobcat was just the thing. The IR Company provided Bobcat with a platform to focus on product innovation (front end attachments) and it encouraged global manufacturing and development. The Bobcat Company was acquired by Doosan Infracore International of South Korea in October 2007.

2 Louis Keller. Transmission system. US Patent 3,151,503, filed Dec. 1, 1958, and issued Oct. 6, 1964.
Related Materials:
These records complement many of the Archives Center's agricultural holdings such as the William C. Kost Farm Records (documenting a 20th century family-owned farm in Illinois); the Robinson-Via Family Papers (documenting daily farm life in Prince George's County, Maryland); the Everett Bickley Collection (documenting agricultural technology of bean sorting) and the Southern Agriculture Oral History Project Records (documenting the disappearing farm). These papers also complement the Archives Center's holdings of industrial equipment such as Caterpillar, Page Tractors, and B.B. Brown (documenting tractor engines). Construction related papers include the Clyde Learned Papers (documenting a highway engineer); Lloyd F. Rader Papers (documenting civil engineering); the Leon Struck Photo Album (documenting road building) and many of our collections of civil engineering materials.
Separated Materials:
The Division of Work and Industry holds one magnetic lifter, Accession 2007.0196.01-.02
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Scott Nelson, President of the Bobcat Company of North America on June 23, 2008.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.

Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audio-visual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow.

Viewing the film portion of the collection without reference copies requires special appointment, please inquire. Do not use original materials when available on reference video, DVD, or audio tapes.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. The Archives Center does not own rights to these photographs. All requests for permission to use these photographs for non-museum purposes must be addressed directly to the Bobcat Company. All duplication requests must be reviewed and approved by Archives Center staff. Potential users must receive written permission from appropriate rights holders prior to obtaining high quality copies.
Topic:
Construction industry  Search this
Construction equipment  Search this
Genre/Form:
DVDs
Compact discs
Christmas cards
Awards
Advertisements -- 20th century
Posters -- 20th century
Stickers
Tickets
Videocassettes
Photographs -- 20th century
Placemats
Invitations
Newsletters -- 20th century
Greeting cards
Citation:
Bobcat Company Records, 1940s-2009, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1129
See more items in:
Bobcat Company Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1129
Online Media:

Fletcher and Horace Henderson Music and Photographs

Creator:
Henderson, Horace, 1904-1988  Search this
Lewis, Barbara  Search this
Lewis, Barry  Search this
Henderson, Fletcher, 1897-1952  Search this
Extent:
22.5 Cubic feet (82 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Manuscripts
Parts (musical)
Photographs
Date:
1930s-1980s
Scope and Contents:
The Fletcher and Horace Henderson Collection contains original scores and band books, loose sheet music, both original and published, from both Fletcher and Horace's libraries, playlists, lyrics, photographs, personal papers and correspondences, newspaper clippings, jazz publications, an oral history manuscript of an interview with Horace, audio tapes, and other personal memorabilia documenting the lives and careers of the two brothers as pianists, band leaders, and arrangers. The majority of the material dates from the mid 1920s to the early 1980s.

Series 1: Fletcher and Horace Henderson's Music ca. 1930s - 1980s Boxes 1-68. Original band books and scores, lyrics, playlists, loose music, and published music either arranged or used by Fletcher or Horace Henderson during their careers as pianists, band leaders, and arrangers. The series is organized into six subseries: Subseries 1A: Horace's Band Books, Subseries 1B: Loose Music, Subseries 1C: Original Scores, Subseries 1D: Lyrics, Suberies 1E: Playlists, and Suberies 1F: Published Music.

Suberies 1A, ca. 1940s -1980s, boxes 1-21. Horace Henderson Band Books. Each Band Book stands on its own, and is identified by the musician who used it or the location where the music was performed. Some performers include Gail Brochman, Eddie Calhoun, and George Reed. Many of the band books were used for performances at the Trianon Ballroom in Chicago.

Subseries 1B, ca. 1930s - 1980s, boxes 22-58. Music in boxes 22-54 comes from Horace Henderson's band library, and boxes 55-58 from Fletcher Henderson's band library. The music consists of full scores, piano scores, and parts arranged or used by Horace or Fletcher Henderson. Arranged alphabetically by title; FS - Full Score, PS - Piano Score, and P - Parts. * Indicates an overlap between loose music, and music known to have been performed at the Trianon Ballroom in Chicago. **Indicates an overlap between Horace and Fletcher's Libraries. The music is arranged alphabetically by music title.

Subseries 1C, ca. 1930s - 1940s, boxes 59-60. Original scores arranged by Fletcher Henderson, many for Benny Goodman and other bandleaders, including AHoneysuckle Rose@, AKing Porter's Stomp@, and AStealin' Apples@. There is also a complete band book written and arranged by Fletcher. Arranged alphabetically by title.

Subseries 1D, ca. 1940s - 1980s, box 61. Original lyrics used in performances by Horace Henderson's bands. Arranged alphabetically by title where identified.

Subseries 1E, ca. 1940s - 1980s, boxes 62-63. Playlists compiled in preparation for performances by Horace Henderson's orchestras, listing titles played at various performances. Un-arranged.

Subseries 1F, ca. 1920s-1980s, boxes 64-68. Published sheet music and books for piano/vocal parts. Includes art music, method books, popular music, fake books, and music book covers. Folders are arranged by type of publication, and the music is arranged alphabetically by title within each folder.

Series 2: Photographs, ca. 1920s - 1980s Boxes 69-70. Photographs documenting the lives of both Fletcher and Horace Henderson's personal lives and careers. Photographs are arranged by category including Fletcher Henderson Candids with Friends, Horace Henderson Candids, Performance Marquees, and both brothers with their orchestra. Some unique pictures include portraits of Mr. and Mrs. Henderson (Fletcher and Horace's parents), candids of Fletcher with Benny Goodman, and Horace with Lena Horne.

Series 3: Personal Papers and Correspondences, ca. 1920s - 1980s Boxes 71-78. Programs and broadsides, newspaper articles, letters, essays, publications, and other personal documents tracing the lives of Horace and Fletcher, as well as some personal items of their parents. The series is divided into six subseries: Subseries 3A: Programs and Broadsides, Subseries 3B: Newspaper Articles and Clippings, Subseries 3C: Personal Papers and Correspondences, Subseries 3D: Miscellaneous Publishings, Subseries 3E: Transcript of an Oral History Interview, and Subseries 3F: Henderson Family Scrapbook.

Subseries 3A, ca 1930s - 1980s Boxes 71-72. Contains broadsides and ad clippings promoting both Horace and Fletcher's performances, along with programs for various jazz festivals. There are also three sets of Las Vegas Programs, advertising the weekly happenings during the years Horace was performing there, mainly at the Riviera Hotel and Casino (1959-1961). These include; Ken's Spotlight Las Vegas, Fabulous Las Vegas Magazine, On The Go, and other miscellaneous circulations. Arranged by category (Fletcher's broadsides, Horace's broadsides, Programs), and by date within each set of publications or programs.

Subseries 3B, ca. 1950s - 1980s, Boxes 73 & 78. Contains newspapers, articles, and clippings, ranging from 1951 to 1986, documenting the lives of Fletcher, Horace, and some of their contemporaries (ie: Duke Ellington) through the eyes of the media. Arranged by categories; reference to Fletcher, Horace, or Miscellaneous. Box 73 contains the oversized articles.

Subseries 3C, ca. 1920s-1980s, Box 74. Contains letters, contracts, and other personal documents of Fletcher, Horace, and their parents. Also contains a copied photo collection of Horace, a manuscript of AHorace Henderson Presents his Interpretation of Jazz@, and an essay (author unknown) about Fletcher's influence on jazz.

Subseries 3D, ca. 1960s - 1980s, Box 75. Contains miscellaneous publishings collected from the various locations Horace lived and worked. Includes weekly circulations from Denver and the surrounding area where Horace lived from the mid sixties until his death, along with various music magazines that he subscribed to (ADownbeat@, AInternational Musician@). Arranged by date within each category.

Subseries 3E, ca. 1975, box 76. Contains the original transcript of the Oral History Interview of Horace Henderson, for the Smithsonian Institution, performed by Tom MacCluskey on April 9-12, 1975.

Subseries 3F, box 77. Contains a Henderson Family Scrapbook which includes photographs of Fletcher's and Horace's father and mother, and various newspaper clippings commending the careers of Mr. Henderson, Horace, and Fletcher. The scrapbook's original order has been maintained.

Series 4: Audio Tape Recordings ca.1970s - 1980s Boxes 79-80. Contains a collection of recordings of live performances of Horace's orchestra in various Denver area locations such as the Esquire Supper Club and the Petroleum Club. Also includes a sample tape, a brief Atest@ recording by Horace and Angel, a radio tribute to Horace, and a few miscellaneous mix tapes. The tapes are arranged by date when available. Box 79 contains the original copies, and box 80 contains the duplicates.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into four series.

Series 1: Horace and Fletcher Henderson's Music

Series 2: Photographs

Series 3: Personal Papers

Series 4: Horace Henderson Audio Tapes
Biographical / Historical:
Fletcher Hamilton Henderson, Jr. (a.k.a. Smack) was born on December 18, 1897 in Cuthbert, Georgia. He was born into a middle class black family, and as a child studied European art music with his mother, a piano teacher. His sister later became the head of the music department at the Tuskeegee Institute in Alabama, and his younger brother, Horace, would eventually follow in his footsteps as a jazz musician, arranger, and band leader. Horace W. Henderson (a.k.a. Little Smack) was born on November 22, 1904. He also studied piano with his mother and sister, and like his brother, began formal music training as a teenager. Fletcher Henderson attended Atlanta University where he earned a degree in chemistry and math in 1919.

In 1920, Fletcher Henderson moved to New York City to find a job as a chemist. Because employment in this field was hard to come by, especially for African Americans, he began working as a song demonstrator for the Pace Hardy Music Company. Shortly after Fletcher Henderson's arrival Harry Pace founded Pace Phonograph Corporation to produce records on the Black Swan label in 1921. Fletcher joined Pace's music team and was responsible for contracting and leading a jazz bands to accompany the label's singers.

In 1924, Fletcher's orchestra, under the direction of Don Redman, began to perform at Club Alabam (sic) on New York City's Broadway Avenue. That same year he and the band was offered a job performing at the Roseland Ballroom, where the band remained for ten years and gained national fame. His band was no different than the hundreds of dance bands, springing up across the country in response to the growing demand for social dance music, such as Count Basie's Orchestra, King Oliver and his Dixie Syncopators, and McKinney's Cotton Pickers. Don Redman left the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra in 1927 to direct McKinney's Cotton Pickers. However the music collaboration of Redman and Henderson had by then established what would become the "standard" big band arrangement for several decades, specifically the dynamic interplay between the brass and reed sections of the orchestra that included interspersed solos made famous by such esteemed soloists of the band as Louis Armstrong and Coleman Hawkins. Some of the band's most notable recordings made between 1924 and 1925 include Copenhagen and Sugarfoot Stomp.

By this time Horace Henderson had formed his own college jazz band in 1924, The Wilberforce Collegians, after transferring from Atlanta University to Wilberforce University to pursue a music degree. His older brother sent him arrangements and piano parts used by the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra for performances by the Collegians. Later that year Horace Henderson left the university to travel and perform with his band in New York City. His newly formed band included such notable musicians as Benny Carter and Ben Webster. While in New York he also began playing as a guest musician in his brother's band and learning from such legends of jazz as Coleman Hawkins, Buster Bailey, Louis Armstrong, and Don Redman that were working for the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra. During a Smithsonian Institution sponsored oral history interview with Tom MacCluskey, Horace recalled late night jam sessions at Hawkins' (Hawk) apartment where they would play through pieces from "Fletch's" library and analyze each individual's performance. We would "stop and discuss what had transpired during that session, you know, that particular tune. And man, that was a lesson...It was a session that was actually to help everybody, so that they would try things out and take another tune, and use these particular little points that Hawk would tell 'em.'"

Until the 1930s, the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra was the principal model for big jazz bands. However, his management of the band and its finances led to frequent band break-ups. In 1934, severe financial problems forced Fletcher to sell some of his best arrangements to Benny Goodman. Horace Henderson and others suggested Goodman's rapid rise in popularity among swing bands for white audiences was largely due to Fletcher Henderson's innovative band arrangements. Fletcher Henderson continued to lead bands until 1939 when he joined Goodman's orchestra as a full time staff arranger. In 1941 he returned to band leading and arranging, but suffered a severe stroke in 1950. Fletcher was partially paralyzed from the stroke, and died on December 29, 1952.

Horace, also, formed many bands throughout the 1930s and 40s, and became a sideman for leaders such as Don Redman (1931-33) and, most notably, his brother. He was a pianist and arranger for Fletch's band intermittently between 1931 and 1947. During this time, Horace spent a lot of time in Chicago with Fletcher's band at the Grand Terrace, and formed his own band at Swingland. Horace also worked as a freelance arranger for Benny Goodman, Charlie Barnet, and Earl Hines3. From November 1942 through August 1943, Horace was the leader of the 732nd Military Police Band in Joliet, Illinois. The position was first offered to Louis Armstrong, who turned it down and recommended Horace for the position. After leaving the army, he played with Fletcher's band for two years. Horace began writing for Charlie Barnet in 1944, where he first came across Lena Horne. During a job at the Paramount, Charlie had Called Horace to say that his vocalist had laryngitis, and he needed a new singer. Horace went to the Apollo in Harlem in search of some talent, and they sent him to the Regent where he could find Lena Horne. She joined Charlie's show the next day, and from there went on to fame. Horace joined her for an extended tour as a pianist and arranger, and later worked with Billie Holiday3.

Horace moved to Denver with his wife, Angel, in the late 1960s. The Horace Henderson Combo performed at many nightclubs and resorts in the Denver area, including Estes Park, the Broadmoor Hotel, and the Petroleum Club. He began playing the organ in 1970 because the clubs didn't want to pay for four or five piece bands, and with an organ to replace the piano, a bass player was no longer necessary3. Horace continued to lead bands in the Denver area until his death on August 29, 1988.

Although both brothers had a major impact on the future of jazz, Horace is often thought of merely as a shadow to his more celebrated brother. Fletcher Henderson's career as a pianist, bandleader, and arranger is one of the most important in jazz history. Bands of leaders such as Count Basie, Charlie Barnet, Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, and Benny Goodman all played arrangements, which were either written or influenced by Fletcher Henderson. Fletcher constantly surrounded himself with the most talented musicians of his era, and patterned the basic formula, which were imitated throughout the big band era. However, at least thirty of Fletcher's arrangements, many for Benny Goodman, are accredited as Horace's work. His arrangement Hot and Anxious was based on the traditional riff that later became the basis for Glenn Miller's In the Mood. Christopher Columbus is the most notable example of Horace's potent piano style, which is often noted to be stronger than his brother's. Although the brothers had differences, Horace insists that they did not involve music. Fletcher's style and success had a huge influence on Horace's career, and he was incredibly grateful for all his brother taught him. In an interview in April of 1975, he was quoted as saying, "I idolize his way of thinking because he was successful. You don't fight success, you join it." 3

Sources

1. Biographical information derived from The New Grove Dictionary of Jazz, edited by Barry Kernfeld (New York: Macmillan Press Ltd, 1988). 2. The Pace Phonograph corporation was the first African-American-owned recording company in the United States. Historical information derived from The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Black Music; Biographical Dictionary of Afro-American and African Musicians, by Eileen Southern (USA: Greenwood Press, 1982).

3. Interview with Horace Henderson, April 2-12, 1975, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.
Provenance:
The Fletcher and Horace Henderson collection was acquired by the museum in December of 2001, donated by Barbara and Barry Lewis.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Manuscripts -- Music -- 20th century
Parts (musical)
Photographs -- 20th century
Citation:
Fletcher and Horace Henderson Music and Photographs, 1930s-1980s, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0797
See more items in:
Fletcher and Horace Henderson Music and Photographs
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0797
Online Media:

John-Manuel Andriote Victory Deferred Collection

Creator:
Feinblum, Sandi  Search this
Fauci, Anthony S.  Search this
Fera, Joe  Search this
Feldblum, Chai R.  Search this
Dirkin, Eileen  Search this
Deyton, Lawrence  Search this
Duberman, Martin  Search this
Dodds, Sally  Search this
Dechant, Chris  Search this
Dean, Lauran  Search this
Decker, Curt  Search this
Decker, Bruce  Search this
Cox, Spencer  Search this
Cooper, Sally  Search this
D'Emilio, John  Search this
Gay Men's Health Crisis, Inc.  Search this
Gebbie, Kristine M.  Search this
Gerald, Gil  Search this
Fryer, John E.  Search this
Gambrell, Alan  Search this
Gamrecki, Diane  Search this
Garfield, Charles  Search this
Franklin, Maurice  Search this
Freeman, Bill  Search this
Friedman, David  Search this
Frutchey, Chuck  Search this
Fleming, Patsy  Search this
Foley, Alice  Search this
Forstein, Marshall, 1949-  Search this
Francis, Donald P.  Search this
Bellinger, George  Search this
Bean, Carl  Search this
Bates, Christopher  Search this
Basile, Vic  Search this
Barnich, John Paul  Search this
Baker, Cornelius, 1961-  Search this
Bailey, William  Search this
Bahlman, Bill  Search this
Apuzzo, Ginny  Search this
Anthony, Cynthia  Search this
Andriote, John-Manuel  Search this
Akman, Jeff  Search this
Agosto, Moisés  Search this
Abrams, Donald I.  Search this
Conant, Marcus A.  Search this
Cooper, Ellen  Search this
Coates, Tom  Search this
Cochrane, John  Search this
Campbell, Linda  Search this
Christen, Pat  Search this
Bross, Dan  Search this
Cabaj, Bob  Search this
Braswell, Tony  Search this
Bray, Robert  Search this
Boneberg, Paul  Search this
Bowen, Steve  Search this
Bloom, Leonard  Search this
Blount, Tom  Search this
Benzer, Suzanne  Search this
Beswick, Terry  Search this
McFarlane, Rodger  Search this
Mayer, Kenneth H.  Search this
McGuire, Jean  Search this
McFeeley, Timothy  Search this
McNaught, Tom  Search this
McNaught, Brian  Search this
Meisenheimer, Bill  Search this
Mealy, Ron  Search this
Lynch, Catherine G.  Search this
LoPiccolo, Charles J.  Search this
Maguire, Ann  Search this
MacDonald, Gary B.  Search this
Mass, Lawrence, 1946-  Search this
Margarelli, Dominick  Search this
Maupin, Armistead  Search this
Mathiasen, Karl  Search this
National AIDS Network.  Search this
National Lesbian and Gay Health Association. (U.S.)  Search this
Newmeyer, John  Search this
Norman, Pat  Search this
O'Neill, Joe  Search this
Odets, Walt  Search this
Osborn, Torie  Search this
Ostrow, David G., 1947-  Search this
Miller, Randy  Search this
Millhofer, Larry  Search this
Montoya, Mauro  Search this
Morin, Stephen F.  Search this
Morrison, Cliff  Search this
Murphy, Patrice, Sister  Search this
Nardoza, Peter  Search this
Jean, Lori  Search this
James, John S., 1941-  Search this
Isay, Richard A.  Search this
Iasino, Dick  Search this
Jones, Cleve  Search this
Johnson, Fenton  Search this
Johns, Judith  Search this
Jellinek, Paul  Search this
Graham, Michael  Search this
Goodkin, Karl  Search this
Gomez, Miguel  Search this
Gittings, Barbara, 1932-2007  Search this
Huffman, Lindy  Search this
Holmes, Chuck  Search this
Hanley-Hackenbruck, Peggy  Search this
Gravesen, Les  Search this
Leach-Lemens, Carole  Search this
Lee, Peter  Search this
Krajeski, James  Search this
Kramer, Larry  Search this
Levi, Jeffrey, PhD  Search this
Lew, Steve  Search this
Lemens, Carol  Search this
Leonard, John  Search this
Kantrowitz, Arnie  Search this
Kawata, Paul  Search this
Kalleigh, Bea  Search this
Kameny, Franklin E., 1925-  Search this
Kisliuk, Margaret  Search this
Klein, Sandra Jacoby  Search this
Kessler, Larry  Search this
Killen, Jack  Search this
Scaitch, Fred  Search this
Salustro, Greg  Search this
Schietinger, Helen  Search this
Schatz, Ben  Search this
Seltzer, Michael  Search this
Schwartzberg, Steven  Search this
Sheridan, Tom  Search this
Sharp, Matthew  Search this
Rios, Anthony  Search this
Remafredi, Gary  Search this
Rofes, Eric E., 1954-2006  Search this
Robinson, Alexander  Search this
Rosser, Simon  Search this
Rose, Gary  Search this
Ryan, Pam  Search this
Ryan, Caitlin  Search this
Peyton, Jackson  Search this
Pieri, Frank  Search this
Pillard, Richard  Search this
Plumb, Marj  Search this
Davis, Paul  Search this
Pollatskek, Judy  Search this
Portelli, Chris  Search this
Prater, Larry  Search this
Rasi, Richard A., 1949-  Search this
Ostrow, Stosh  Search this
Ouelette, Susanne  Search this
Page, Peter  Search this
Pannell, Phil  Search this
Patterson, Bruce  Search this
Payne, Ralph  Search this
Peel, Jesse  Search this
Penn, Scott  Search this
Wolfred, Tim  Search this
Wohlfeiler, Daniel  Search this
Wilson, Phil  Search this
Wilson, Hank  Search this
Wood, Bob  Search this
Wakefield, Steve  Search this
Villareal, Henry  Search this
Vasquez, Carmen  Search this
Van Ness, Paula  Search this
Williams, Reggie, 1951-1999  Search this
Westmoreland, Tim  Search this
Washington, Robert  Search this
Ward, Bruce  Search this
Triantafillakis, Dmitri  Search this
Turney, Anthony  Search this
Sweeney, Tim  Search this
Thompson, Ron  Search this
Vaid, Urvashi  Search this
Van Gorder, Dana  Search this
Tuttle, Raymond  Search this
Uselmann, Michael  Search this
Silverman, Mervyn  Search this
Smith, Don  Search this
Shriver, Mike  Search this
Silver, Jane  Search this
Strub, Jean  Search this
Suarez, Gene  Search this
South, Ken  Search this
Stone, Terry  Search this
Names:
Gay and Lesbian Medical Association.  Search this
Mobilization Against AIDS. (San Francisco (CA))  Search this
Extent:
10.2 Cubic feet (32 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Oral history
Interviews
Date:
1901-2016
bulk 1995-1999
Summary:
John-Manuel Andriote interviewed numerous individuals involved in the AIDS crisis for his book, Victory Deferred: how AIDS changed gay life in America, this collection contains his interview tapes, transcripts, and materials related to the research, writing, and update of his book. It also contains interview transcripts for Andriote's later book, Stonewall Strong.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of interviews and research material collected by Andriote in researching his book, Victory Deferred: how AIDS changed gay life in America, published in 1999. Included are recorded and transcribed interviews Andriote conducted with activists, researchers, authors, and others involved in the fight against HIV and AIDS. The creator's original order and topic designations were maintained; span dates reflect the dates of the materials contained within the folder. All cassettes are ninety minutes in length unless otherwise noted. An addenda of interviews notebooks for interviews conducted in 2010 for the revised and updated version of Victory Deferred were added in 2021. Series four contains interview transcripts and master cd for interviews conducted for Andriote's Stonewall Strong published in 2017.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged into three series.

Series 1, Audio Materials

Subseries 1, Original Interview Audio Cassettes, 1995-1997

Subseries 2, Transcripts of Interviews, 1993-1996, undated

Series 2, Victory Deferred Correspondence, Manuscript Drafts, Publication Material, and Writings, 1982-2008

Series 3, Research Notes and Collected Reference Materials, 1901-1998

Subseries 1, National AIDS Network (NAN), 1987-1990

Subseries 2, Publications, 1989-1997

Series 4, Stonewall Strong, interview transcripts and CD, 2015-2016, undated
Biographical / Historical:
John-Manuel Andriote writes in the preface to his book, Victory Deferred: how AIDS changed gay life in America, "I wrote Victory Deferred because, despite the abundance of books written about AIDS, no one until now has examined both the 'big picture' and its finer detail in considering the many ways AIDS affected the nation's hardest hit community, gay men." [1] To do this Andriote interviewed hundreds of persons involved in various aspects of the HIV/AIDS experience. The University of Chicago Press catalog for 1999 describes the book this way: "John-Manuel Andriote chronicles the impact of the disease from the coming-out revelry of the 1970s to the post-AIDS gay community of the 1990s, showing how it has changed both individual lives and national organizations." [2]

[1] Andriote, John-Manuel, Victory Deferred: how AIDS changed gay life in America, page xi, Chicago, Illinois: The University of Chicago Press, 1999.

[2] "Spring Books 1999 The University of Chicago Press", pg. 2, Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 1999
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Michio and Aveline Kushi Macro-Biotics Collection (AC0619)

The Shamrock Bar: Photographs and Interviews, 1997-2003 (AC0857

Division of Science, Medicine, and Society HIV/AIDS Reference Collection (AC1134)

Archives Center Weddings Documentation Collection, 1945-2008 (AC1131)

Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual, Transgender (LGBT) Collection, 1953-2010 (AC1146)

John-Manuel Andriote Hot Stuff: A Brief History of Disco Collection (AC1184)
Provenance:
This collection was donated by John-Manuel Andriote in 2008. Addenda donated in 2021.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.

Researchers must use reference copies of audiovisual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow. Viewing film portion of collection requires special aarrangement with Archives Center staff. Do not use original materials when available on reference video or audio tapes.
Rights:
Copyright held by donor. Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Reproduction permission from Archives Center: reproduction fees may apply. All duplication requests must be reviewed and approved by Archives Center staff.
Topic:
Homosexuality  Search this
HIV/AIDS awareness  Search this
Political activists  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
AIDS (Disease) -- Prevention  Search this
Epidemics  Search this
Gay activists  Search this
LGBTQ  Search this
Gays -- California -- San Francisco -- Interviews  Search this
Lesbian and gay experience  Search this
Stonewall uprising-1969  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral history -- 1980-2000
Interviews -- 1980-2000
Citation:
John-Manuel Andriote Victory Deferred Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1128
See more items in:
John-Manuel Andriote Victory Deferred Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1128
Online Media:

Jeni LeGon Papers

Author:
LeGon, Jeni, 1916-  Search this
Names:
Robinson, Bill, 1878-1949  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (3 boxes, includes photographs)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Letters (correspondence)
Programs
Photographs
Clippings
Itineraries
Advertisements
Date:
1930-2002, undated
Summary:
Collection documents the career of Jeni LeGon as a dancer, dance instructor, and actress.
Scope and Contents:
Collection documents LeGon's career as a dancer, dance instructor, and actress. Materials include biographical information, correspondence, photographs, early travel itineraries, schedules, personal calendars, printed advertisements, invitations to dance events, programs, newspaper clippings, magazine articles, and awards. The collection is arranged into four series: Series 1, Biographical Information and Publicity, 1930s; Series 2, Theatre and Motion Picture Film, 1935-1945, undated; Series 3, Dance Instruction and Performances, 1953-2002, undated; and Series 4: Tributes and Awards, 1979-2002.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into four series:.

Series 1, Biographical Information and Publicity

Series 2, Theatre and Motion Picture Film, 1935-1945

Series 3, Dance Instruction and Performances, 1953-2002, undatred

Series 4, Tributes and Awards, 1979-2002
Biographical / Historical:
Jeni LeGon was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1916. Her long, successful career as an African American dancer and actress began in musical theatre and vaudeville. In the 1930s she traveled across the southern United States performing first with the Whitman Sisters company and then with her half-sister, Willa Mae Lane, as the LeGon and Lane song-and-dance team. By 1935, LeGon was working under contract with Fox Studios, RKO Pictures, and MGM performing with Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, Waters and Al Jolson, and Fred Astaire. Throughout the years she performed on Broadway and in other theaters and clubs including the Apollo, Cafe de Paris, Howard, Paramount, and Lincoln. Beginning in the 1950s she offered dance instruction in Los Angeles, California at the Jeni LeGon Dance Studio and Drama and Dance Playhouse; and in Vancouver, British Columbia, where she taught tap and pointe. She died on December 7, 2012 at the age of ninety-six.
Related Materials:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History

Smithsonian Jazz Oral History Program Collection (AC0808)

Ernie Smith Jazz Film Collection (AC0491)

Program in African American Culture Collection (AC0408)

Frank Schiffman Apollo Theatre Collection (AC0540)
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the Archives Center by Jeni LeGon in 2002.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American women entertainers  Search this
African American women  Search this
Dance in motion pictures, television, etc.  Search this
Dance, Black  Search this
Dancers  Search this
Actresses  Search this
Tap dancing  Search this
Genre/Form:
Letters (correspondence) -- 20th century.
Programs -- 1930-2000
Photographs -- 20th century
Clippings
Itineraries
Advertisements -- 20th century
Citation:
Jeni LeGon Papers, 1930s-2002, undated, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0829
See more items in:
Jeni LeGon Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0829
Online Media:

20th Annual Meeting, Chicago, Illinois

Collection Donor:
Engman, David  Search this
Simmons, David  Search this
Starbuck, David, Dr.  Search this
Collection Author:
Society for Industrial Archeology  Search this
Container:
Map-folder 7
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1991
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Society for Industrial Archaeology Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Society for Industrial Archaeology Records
Society for Industrial Archaeology Records / Series 11: Addenda / Posters
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0688-ref1385

Mr. Wizard Papers

Donor:
Mr. Wizard Studios (Firm)  Search this
Mr. Wizard Studios (Firm)  Search this
Creator:
Herbert, Don (Donald Jeffry), 1917-2007  Search this
Names:
Mr. Wizard  Search this
Extent:
26 Cubic feet (57 boxes, 1 oversize folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Television programs
Storyboards
Photographs
Research
Books
Scripts (documents)
Speeches
Contracts
Videocassettes
Dvds
Slides (photographs)
Notes
Awards
Scrapbooks
Motion pictures (visual works)
Date:
1906-2008
bulk 1951-1995
Summary:
The collection documents, through printed materials, photographs, audio and moving image, Don Herbert's career as a science educator under the persona of "Mr. Wizard" from 1951 until the 1990s.
Scope and Contents:
The collection documents the career of science educator Don Herbert, who created and hosted child-oriented television programs on science subjects in which he assumed the persona of Mr. Wizard. In addition to a documentation about his early personal life, the collection also documents his Watch Mr. Wizard television show as well as his other television, radio, and educational activities.

The collection includes correspondence, contracts, writings, publications, newspaper clippings, speeches; awards, photographs; episode files relating to Watch Mr. Wizard and other educational programming, moving image, and audio recordings.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into eight series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1906-2007

Series 2: Awards, 1948-2000

Series 3: Speeches, 1966-1994

Series 4: Publications/Writings, 1966-2004

Series 5: Newspaper Articles, 1944-2007

Series 6: Educational Programs/Projects, 1951-2008

Subseries 6.1: It's a Curious Thing, 1951, 1954

Subseries 6.2: Watch Mr. Wizard, 1954-1989

Subseries 6.3: General Electric Theater, 1956-1958

Subseries 6.4: Instructor Magazine, 1964-1965

Subseries 6.5: Experiment, 1963-2003

Subseries 6.6: Silence of Science, 1966

Subseries 6.7: CBS National Science Test, 1967

Subseries 6.8: General Electric, 1974-1976

Subseries 6.9: Mr. Wizard Collection...Fun Things, circa 1975

Subseries 6.10: Mr. Wizard Close-up, 1968, 1975

Subseries 6.11: Challenge with Mr. Wizard, 1976

Subseries 6.12: Science Twenty with Mr. Wizard, 1969-1974

Subseries 6.13: How About..., 1977-1989

Subseries 6.14: Mr. Wizard's Whadda Ya Know Show, circa 1981

Subseries 6.15: Correspondent Science News, circa 1987

Subseries 6.16: Just a Minute from Wizard, 1988

Subseries 6.17: Teacher to Teacher, 1993-2004

Subseries 6.18: Mr. Wizard's World, 1971-2004

Subseries 6.19: Mr. Wizard's Studio, 1990-1992

Subseries 6.20: Mr. Wizard Institute, undated

Subseries 6.21: Fan Mail, 1952-2007

Series 7: Photographs, 1951-2001

Series 8: Audio Visual Materials, 1951-2004

Subseries 8.1: Supplemental Documentation, 1972-2004

Subseries 8.2: Moving Image, 1951-2004

Subseries 8.3: Audio, 1966, 1977
Biographical / Historical:
Donald Herbert Kemske (1917-2007) was the creator and host of Watch Mr. Wizard (1951–1965), Mr. Wizard (1971–1972), Mr. Wizard's World (1983–1990), and other educational television programs for children devoted to science and technology. He also produced many short video programs about science and authored several popular books about science for children. So important was Mr. Wizard to scientific education on television that author Marcel LaFollette featured his photo on the cover of her book, Science on American Television: A History, University of Chicago Press, 2013.

Don Herbert was born Donald Herbert Kemske in Waconia, Minnesota on July 10, 1917. He was one of three children (sisters Betty and Dorothy) born to Herbert Kemske and Lydia Kemske (nee Poeppel). He officially changed his name in 1940 to Donald Jeffry Herbert. Herbert graduated from LaCrosse State Normal College in 1940 with a Bachelor of Science degree. In 1942, Herbert volunteered for the U.S. Army Air Corps and in 1943 began training as an aviation cadet and then pilot. During World War II, Herbert served in the 461 Bomb Group and 767 Bomb Squadron in Europe. He was discharged from the military service on July 29, 1945 as a captain and had earned the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal. After the war, Herbert worked at a radio station in Chicago and acted in children's programs, including It's Your Life (1949). During this time Herbert developed the idea of Mr. Wizard. In 1939, Herbert married Maraleita Dutton (1923-1995) and the couple adopted three children: Jeffrey (1954); Jay (1955); and Jill (1960). He later divorced Maraleita Dutton and married Norma Nix Kasell (1918-2010) in 1972.

Premiering on March 3, 1951 on WNBQ, a 14-station network in Chicago, Herbert's Watch Mr. Wizard differed considerably from earlier attempts at scientific education on television. Those shows were either very technical, like the Johns Hopkins Science Review, or used magic tricks and comedy to hold viewers' attention, like ABC's Science Circus and CBS' Mr. I. Magination. From the beginning, Herbert planned a serious, informative show for children, rather than their parents. Even though he had only minimal scientific training in college—he had been an English major at La Crosse State Normal College in Wisconsin—in his persona as Mr. Wizard, Herbert conveyed a sense of authority and expertise.

The show, broadcast live, was carefully scripted, meticulously researched, and smooth-flowing. Each week, Mr. Wizard—described by LaFollette as a "nonthreatening, easygoing, intelligent man with a smiling face" in shirtsleeves and tie (and the occasional lab coat)—carefully guided his youthful assistants through simple experiments. Using ordinary household items such as eggs, balloons, milk bottles, coffee cans, and knitting needles, Herbert explained larger scientific principles like gravity, magnetism, and oxidation. Although seemingly complex, the experiments actually were simple enough to be re-created by his young viewers in the classroom or at home.

Herbert's winning combination of personality, grasp of science, and use of ordinary objects made Mr. Wizard a hit with viewers and made a lasting impression on science education in America. As LaFollette writes, the program "enjoyed consistent praise, awards, and high ratings throughout its history. At its peak, Watch Mr. Wizard drew audiences in the millions, but its impact was far wider. By 1956, it had prompted the establishment of more than five thousand Mr. Wizard science clubs, with an estimated membership greater than one hundred thousand." After over 500 shows over fourteen and a half years, NBC abruptly canceled Watch Mr. Wizard in 1965. The last program under contract with NBC aired on June 27, 1965.

From 1954 to 1962, Herbert, appearing as Mr. Wizard, delivered "Progress Reports" during commercial breaks of the General Electric Theater. As with most commercially-sponsored shows, the progress being reported on was almost exclusively made by General Electric. Following the cancellation of Watch Mr. Wizard, he continued to use his Mr. Wizard persona in science education. In 1965-1966, he produced an eight-film-series, Experiment: The Story of a Scientific Search, which was broadcast on public television, and a series of twenty-minute films, Science Twenty, designed to complement the current science curriculum in the classroom (circa 1970).

Herbert's television show was briefly revived in 1971-1972 as Mr. Wizard, in response to protests over the cartoons and commercials that flooded children's Saturday morning prime viewing time, but it did not receive enough network support. Herbert appeared in commercials for several companies during the 1970s and briefly lobbied Congress on behalf of General Electric in 1975. In the early 1970s, Herbert also produced Mr. Wizard Close-Ups, thirty second spots that aired on NBC in the Saturday morning slot. In the late 1970s, he began collaborating with the National Science Foundation to create a series of short news briefs for television called How About…How About was an adult-oriented series of 80-second reports highlighting advances in science and technology. The reports were designed for insertion into existing commercial television programs.

In the early 1980s, Herbert returned to television in Mr. Wizard's World, a faster-paced version of the original show that ran on the Nickelodeon network from 1983-1990. After its cancellation, reruns ran until at least 2000. During this time Herbert made numerous appearances on television news and talk shows, particularly the Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson, where he was a popular guest. In the 1990s, Herbert produced Teacher to Teacher with Mr. Wizard, a video series that debuted on September 27, 1994 on the Nickelodeon cable channel. The innovative educational series provided a candid, close-up and in-depth visit to classrooms of outstanding teachers using hands-on, inquiry-based techniques.

Herbert also published several books, including Mr. Wizard's Science Secrets (1952); Mr. Wizard's Experiments for Young Scientists (1959); Mr. Wizard's 400 Experiments in Science (1968); and Mr. Wizard's Supermarket Science (1980). Additionally, he designed science kits involving chemistry, crystal growing, ecology, and electronics, which were marketed by Owens-Illinois in the 1960s.

Herbert's hands-on techniques in demonstrating scientific concepts to children were the inspiration for numerous educators who followed his lead. As popular TV science educator Bill Nye wrote in a special to the Los Angeles Times, his "techniques and performances helped create the United States' first generation of homegrown rocket scientists just in time to respond to Sputnik. He sent us to the moon. He changed the world."

Don Herbert died in 2007, shortly before his 90th birthday. Soon after, the U.S. House of Representatives marked his passing: "Resolved, that the House of Representatives (1) expresses its appreciation for the profound public service and educational contributions of Don Jeffry Herbert, (2) recognizes the profound public impact of higher educational institutions that train teachers, (3) encourages students to honor the heritage of Don Herbert by exploring our world through science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields; and, (4) extends its condolences to the family of Don Herbert and thanks them for their strong familial support of him."

Sources

LaFollette, Marcel. Science on American Television: A History, University of Chicago Press, 2013.

Nye, Bill. "Teaching Science with a Big `Poof!' Los Angeles Times, June 15, 2007.
Related Materials:
Materials at Other Organizations

UCLA Film and Television Archives

The collection consists of 770 moving image items in several formats: 16mm kinescopes; 1" videotapes; 2" videotapes; ¾" videotapes; and DVDs. The collection documents Don Herbert's career as Mr. Wizard, from the early 1950's to the mid 1990's and includes such programs as Watch Mr. Wizard, Mr. Wizard's World, and How About...
Separated Materials:
Materials at the National Museum of American History

Related materials were donated to the Division of Medicine and Science. See accession 2014.0141.

2014.0141.01, Mr. Wizard's Experiments in Ecology, Series One: Microbes (science kit)

2014.0141.02, Mr. Wizard's Experiments in Crystal Growing (science kit)

2014.0141.03, Mr. Wizard's Experiments in Chemistry (science kit)

2014.0141.04, Fun with the Mr. Wizard Science Set (science kit)

2014.0141.05, Mr. Wizard's Science Secrets (science kit)

2014.0141.06, Mr. Wizard's Experiments for Young Scientists (book)

2014.0141.07, Mr. Wizard's Supermarket Science (book)
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Mr. Wizard Studios, through Thomas E. Nikosey, President, and Kristen K. Nikosey, Vice President, in 2014.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Reference copies for audio and moving images materials do not exist. Use of these materials requires special arrangement. Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives.

Social Security numbers are present and have been rendered unreadable and redacted. Researchers may use the photocopies in the collection. The remainder of the collection has no restrictions.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Television personalities  Search this
Television -- educational shows  Search this
Science -- Study and teaching  Search this
Genre/Form:
Television programs
Storyboards
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- 20th century
Research
Books -- 20th century
Scripts (documents)
Speeches
Contracts
Videocassettes
DVDs
Slides (photographs) -- 20th century
Notes
Awards
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Motion pictures (visual works) -- 20th century
Citation:
Mr. Wizard Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1326
See more items in:
Mr. Wizard Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1326
Online Media:

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