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Oral history interview with Dale Goss, 1965 June 2

Interviewee:
Goss, Dale M., 1910-  Search this
Goss, Dale M., 1910-  Search this
Interviewer:
Bestor, Dorothy K., 1913-  Search this
Subject:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Theme:
New Deal  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11794
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213493
AAA_collcode_goss65
Theme:
New Deal
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213493

Oral history interview with Joanna Eckstein, 1983 April 7

Interviewee:
Eckstein, Joanna, 1903-1983  Search this
Eckstein, Joanna, 1903-1983  Search this
Interviewer:
Ragen, Suzanne  Search this
Subject:
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Seattle Art Museum  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art patronage -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Art, American -- Northwestern States  Search this
Art patrons -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Theme:
Art Collectors  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12765
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212428
AAA_collcode_eckste83
Theme:
Art Collectors
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212428
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Michael W. Monroe, 2018 January 22-March 1

Interviewee:
Monroe, Michael W., 1940-  Search this
Monroe, Michael W., 1940-  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E., 1936-  Search this
Subject:
Bellevue Art Museum (Wash.)  Search this
Smithsonian American Art Museum. Renwick Gallery  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Arts administrators -- Washington (D.C.) -- Interviews  Search this
Arts -- Management  Search this
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Curators -- Washington (D.C.) -- Interviews  Search this
Curators -- Washington (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)17549
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)393144
AAA_collcode_monroe18
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_393144
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Don G. Abel, 1965 June 10

Interviewee:
Abel, Donald G.  Search this
Abel, Donald G.  Search this
Interviewer:
Bestor, Dorothy K., 1913-  Search this
Subject:
Hinckley, Robert H.  Search this
Hopkins, Harry Lloyd  Search this
Inverarity, Robert Bruce  Search this
Roosevelt, Eleanor  Search this
Federal Art Project (Wash.)  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art and state  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Theme:
New Deal  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11611
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213248
AAA_collcode_abel65
Theme:
New Deal
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213248
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Dorothy Malone, 1983 Jan. 27

Interviewee:
Malone, Dorothy, 1912-  Search this
Malone, Dorothy, 1912-  Search this
Interviewer:
Ragen, Suzanne  Search this
Subject:
Anderson, Guy  Search this
Callahan, Kenneth  Search this
Fuller, Richard E. (Richard Eugene)  Search this
Graves, Morris  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Seattle Art Museum  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Northwest school of artists  Search this
Art -- Northwestern States  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12184
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212439
AAA_collcode_malone83
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212439
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Wellington Groves, 1965 Apr. 23

Interviewee:
Groves, Wellington  Search this
Groves, Wellington  Search this
Interviewer:
Bestor, Dorothy K., 1913-  Search this
Subject:
Inverarity, Robert Bruce  Search this
Federal Art Project (Wash.)  Search this
Index of American Design  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Theme:
New Deal  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12815
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213535
AAA_collcode_groves65
Theme:
New Deal
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213535

Oral history interviews with Robert Bruce Inverarity

Creator:
Inverarity, Robert Bruce, 1909-1999  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Interviewer:
Phillips, Harlan B. (Harlan Buddington), 1920-  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (Wash.)  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
4 Sound tape reels (Sound recordings (1 hour 30 min.), 7 in.)
75 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 Oct. 29-Nov. 4
Scope and Contents:
Interviews of Robert Bruce Inverarity conducted 1964 Oct. 29-Nov 4. by Harlan Phillips for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, lecturer, state director of the Federal Art Project; Seattle, Wash. Studied at the University of Washington, Fremont University and with Kazue Yamagishi and Mark Tobey. Exhibited in one-man shows and group exhibitions in the U.S. and Canada. Directed the Museum of International Folk Art, the Adirondack Museum, and the Philadelphia Maritime Museum. Wrote and illustrated BLOCKPRINTING AND STENCILLING and A MANUAL OF PUPPETRY.
General:
Sound quality is poor.
The conclusion of the interview was over-recorded by another interview.
An interview of Audrey McMahon conducted by H. Phillips, 11/4/64 is also on this tape.
An interview of Gordon M. Smith conducted by H. Phillips, 11/4/64 is also on this tape.
An interview of Julius Davidson conducted by H. Phillips is also on tape 2.
An interview of Lincoln Rothschild conducted by H. Phillips is also on one tape.
An interview of Henry Billings conducted by H. Phillips is also on one tape.
An interview of Peter Pollack conducted by H. Phillips is also on one tape.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.invera64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw92b60d8c4-755d-4d18-969c-b6730a256e54
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-invera64

Oral history interview with Joy Yeck Fincke

Interviewee:
Fincke, Joy Yeck  Search this
Interviewer:
Loomis, Sylvia Glidden  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (N.M.)  Search this
Index of American Design  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Barela, Patrociño, -1964  Search this
Hunter, Russell Vernon, 1900-1955  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recordings, 5 in.)
21 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 Jan. 9
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Joy Yeck Finke conducted by Sylvia Loomis on 1964 Jan. 9 for the Archives of American Art.
Fincke speaks of her background in Washington state and Oregon; going to work for the Federal Emergency Releif Administration (later the Works Progress Administration); meeting Vernon Hunter and becoming his secretary; how artists were selected for the project and how work was assigned; the work that was done by the Index of American Design in the Southwest; how Vernon Hunter supervised the project; art centers that were run by the project; community and public perception of the project; and the project's effect on artists' careers; She recalls Patrocino Barela.
Biographical / Historical:
Secretary to director of Index of American Design; Albuquerque, N.M. Index of American Design director in New Mexico was Vernon Hunter.
General:
Interviews of Louie H. and Virginia Ewing conducted by S. Loomis are also on this tape.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
This interview is open for research. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- New Mexico -- Albuquerque  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.fincke64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9caf5ee95-0e7a-4ebe-b6f6-5cc42eaef46f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-fincke64
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Don G. Abel

Interviewee:
Abel, Donald G.  Search this
Interviewer:
Bestor, Dorothy K., 1913-  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (Wash.)  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Hinckley, Robert H., 1891-  Search this
Hopkins, Harry Lloyd, 1890-1946  Search this
Inverarity, Robert Bruce, 1909-1999  Search this
Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962  Search this
Extent:
12 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1965 June 10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Don G. Abel conducted 1965 June 10, by Dorothy Bestor, for the Archives of American Art. Abel describes his position as state administrator for the WPA in Washington state, the levels of organization within the WPA, and his relationship with Robert Hinckley, Harry Hopkins, and Robert Bruce Inverarity. He also speaks of Eleanor Roosevelt's visits to Seattle Art Projects and her interest in the work of women artists. He also discusses communist opposition to the WPA, federal appropriations, the transition from Federal Art Project to the Washington State Project and the accomplishments of the WPA.
Biographical / Historical:
Don G. Abel was an art adminstrator with the Works Progress Administration, from Washington state.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 36 min.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Washington (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art and state  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.abel65
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e0e7ccd1-3122-4c50-b87a-58f704ba0bd3
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-abel65
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Dale Goss

Interviewee:
Goss, Dale M., b. 1910  Search this
Interviewer:
Bestor, Dorothy K., 1913-  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recordings, 5 in.)
20 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1965 June 2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Dale Goss conducted 1965 June 2, by Dorothy Bestor, for the Archives of American Art New Deal and the Arts Project.
Goss talks about the Works Progress Administration (WPA) Project, the involvement of the government and Federal support for art and schools, the importance of art in society (including the dramatic arts), teaching and the active love of art, the worth of "living art" in today's society, the artists involved in the WPA Project, the loss of independence in artists of the time, his experience during the Depression, Federal leadership in the arts, and the organization of artists through the formation of the Allied Arts Council. He recalls Kenneth Callahan, Bill Cumming, Jacob Elshin, Carl Morris, Lubin Petric, Mark Tobey, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Dale Goss (1910-) is an art administrator and painter from Seattle, Wash.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.goss65
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9d941f3e8-0217-47c4-b702-5e90a506c388
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-goss65
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Raymond Charles Pierotti

Interviewee:
Pierotti, Raymond Charles, 1932-  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E.  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
30 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2005 September 4
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Raymond Charles Pierotti conducted 2005 September 4, by Lloyd Herman, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Herman's home, in Seattle, Washington.
Pierotti speaks of his childhood in Bountiful, Utah; his Italian grandfather, who made ornamental plaster casts in a barn near their home; his time in France as a Mormon missionary; his military service in Korea, which led him to Paris on the GI Bill, allowing him to take classes at La Sorbonne; his early years in New York, which included a job at Rizzoli's Books starting up their music department; his sale during that time of his first paintings, and the opening of a gallery on 34th and 2nd; his position working for Paul Smith at the Museum of Contemporary Crafts (now the Museum of Arts and Design); his initial involvement with the American Craft Council; his eventual acceptance of the executive director position at Arrowmont; the various improvements and changes he instituted while director of the school; his reasons for leaving Arrowmont; and his involvement with other craft schools and art centers, including the Hambidge Center for Creative Arts and Sciences and the Sawtooth Center for Visual Art. Pierotti also recalls Don Wykoff, Marian G. Heard, Sandra J. Blain, Aileen Osborne Webb, Joan Mondale, Lucy Morgan, Mary Crovatt Hambidge, Verne Funk, Mark Peiser, Jim Wallace, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Raymond Charles Pierotti (1932- ) is a former director of the Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. Lloyd E. Herman (1936- ) is a curator and former director of the Smithsonian Institution's Renwick Gallery from Seattle, Washington.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 3 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 27 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.pierot05
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90f1e48ed-e746-4b68-8ff1-7ff869559ec6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-pierot05
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Harold C. Whitehouse

Creator:
Whitehouse, Harold Clarence, 1884-1974  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Interviewer:
Bestor, Dorothy K., 1913-  Search this
Names:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Extent:
6 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Date:
1965 November 20
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Harold C. Whitehouse conducted by Dorothy Bestor.
Biographical / Historical:
Harold C. Whitehouse (1884-1974) was an art administrator at the Spokane Art Center in Spokane, Washington.
Provenance:
Conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Patrons must use transcript.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Washington (State) -- Spokane -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.whiteh65
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw95a79cba5-77ec-443b-87c5-18c1b429dc7f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-whiteh65

Oral history interview with Alice Rooney

Interviewee:
Rooney, Alice, 1926-2019  Search this
Interviewer:
Herman, Lloyd E.  Search this
Extent:
9 Items (Sound recording, master: 9 sound files (2 hr., 42 min.), digital, wav)
61 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2011 Aug. 5-12
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Alice Rooney conducted 2011 Aug. 5 and 12, by Lloyd E. Herman, for the Archives of American Art, at Rooney's home, in Seattle, Wash.
Biographical / Historical:
Alice Rooney (1926-2019) was an arts administrator in Seattle, Wash. Lloyd E. Herman (1936- ) is director emeritus of the Smithsonian Renwick Gallery, Washington, D.C.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Women arts administrators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.rooney11
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9781b2a2c-32ee-41cb-81e0-8efc1a32dfcf
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rooney11
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Michael W. Monroe

Interviewee:
Monroe, Michael W.  Search this
Creator:
Herman, Lloyd E.  Search this
Names:
Bellevue Art Museum (Wash.)  Search this
Smithsonian American Art Museum. Renwick Gallery  Search this
Extent:
8 Items (sound files (3 hr., 59 min.) Audio, digital, wav)
71 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2018 January 22-March 1
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Michael W. Monroe conducted 2018 January 22-March 1, by Lloyd Herman, for the Archives of American Art, at the home of Michael Monroe and at the home of Lloyd Herman, in Seattle, Washington.
Monroe speaks of his childhood in Racine, Wisconsin; his Danish immigrant community and early exposure to Danish design; early experiences of art-making; his art and teaching education at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee; experiences with Midwestern art museums in adolescence and young adulthood; his graduate art education at the Cranbrook Academy of Art; his work as gallery director at SUNY Oneonta in the early 1970s; his approach to evaluating and curating craftwork; his curatorial tenure and close collaboration with Herman at the Renwick Gallery; securing the Renwick's Albert Paley gates; his lifestyle in the Washington, DC area; the American craft movement's shift towards the marketplace, social media, and quick do-it-yourself methods; organizing the "Craft Multiples" traveling exhibition; the beginning of the Renwick's collections policy; organizing "Celebration: A World of Art and Ritual;" organizing the White House Collection of Crafts and its eventual transfer to the Clinton Presidential Library; his continued involvement with the craft world after retirement from the Renwick; his tenure as executive director of the Bellevue Arts Museum; his mentorship of young craft artists; and his sense of the past and future of American crafts. Monroe also recalls Sylvester Jerry, Cherry Barr Jerry, Robert Verizer, Robert Kidd, George Ortman, Julius Schmidt, Richard DeVore, Steve Frykholm, Jon Eric Riis, Arturo Sandoval, Gretchen Bellinger, Bernadette Monroe, Robert Arneson, David Gilhooly, William Harper, Wendell Castle, Françoise Grossen, Claire Zeisler, Sarah Booth Conroy, Sheila Hicks, Dale Chihuly, Arthur Mason, Jane Mason, Betty Ford, Joan Mondale, Rosalynn Carter, Barbara Bush, Hillary Clinton, Paul Gottlieb, Peter Joseph, Matthew Kangas, Mark Haley, Nora Atkinson, and others. Herman recalls Susan Mellon, Joshua Taylor, Paul Gardner, Charles Eldredge, Elizabeth Broun, Paul Smith, Rose Slivka, Diane Douglas, Janet Kardon, William Morris, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Michael W. Monroe (1940- ) is director emeritus of the Bellevue Arts Museum in Bellevue, Washington. Lloyd Herman (1936- ) is the founding director (emeritus) of the Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C. who resides in Seattle, Washington.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
The transcript and recording are open for research. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Washington (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Arts administrators -- Washington (D.C.) -- Interviews  Search this
Arts -- Management  Search this
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Curators -- Washington (D.C.) -- Interviews  Search this
Curators -- Washington (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.monroe18
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw962a4c55d-eb2d-49eb-bf85-a031dfe33257
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-monroe18
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Wellington Groves

Interviewee:
Groves, Wellington  Search this
Interviewer:
Bestor, Dorothy K., 1913-  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (Wash.)  Search this
Index of American Design  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Inverarity, Robert Bruce, 1909-1999  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recording: (45 min.), 5 in.)
15 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1965 Apr. 23
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Wellington Groves conducted 1965 Apr. 23, by Dorothy Bestor, for the Archives of American Art.
Groves speaks of working as an administrator in the Federal Art Project under Robert Bruce Inverarity; some of the work produced by the Project including dioramas and hooked rugs; the Index of American Design; and the benefits of government support for the arts.
Biographical / Historical:
Wellington Groves was a painter and art administrator.
General:
Sound quality is poor.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Use requires an appointment.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.groves65
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw98816e1c4-ae42-4cba-847e-1675cc8597ce
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-groves65

Robert Bruce Inverarity papers

Creator:
Inverarity, Robert Bruce, 1909-1999  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (Calif.)  Search this
Federal Art Project (Ill.)  Search this
Federal Art Project (Iowa)  Search this
Federal Art Project (N.Y.)  Search this
Federal Art Project (Or.)  Search this
Federal Art Project (Utah)  Search this
Federal Art Project (Wash.)  Search this
Museum of International Folk Art (N.M.)  Search this
Deutsch, Hilda, 1911-  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968 -- Photographs  Search this
Graves, Morris, 1910- -- Photographs  Search this
Morris, Carl, 1911-1993  Search this
Ray, Man, 1890-1976 -- Photographs  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Extent:
13.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Photographs
Drawings
Place:
United States -- Economic conditions, 1918-1945 -- Washington (State)
Date:
circa 1840s-1997
Summary:
The papers of artist, photographer, museum director, anthropologist, and writer Robert Bruce Inverarity are dated circa 1840s-1997 and measure 12.7 linear feet. Biographical information, correspondence, writings and notes, subject files, art work, scrapbooks, sound recordings, printed material and photographs are found within the papers. They document Inverarity's work as Director of the Federal Art Project in Seattle and Director of the Art and Craft Project for the State of Washington, as well as his other professional work. Nineteenth century material consists of a Japanese print, printed material, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of artist, photographer, museum director, anthropologist, and writer Robert Bruce Inverarity are dated circa 1840s-1997 and measure 13.8 linear feet. Biographical information, correspondence, writings and notes, subject files, art work, scrapbooks, sound recordings, printed material and photographs are found within the papers. They document Inverarity's work as Director of the Federal Art Project in Seattle and Director of the Art and Craft Project for the State of Washington, as well as his other professional work. Nineteenth century material consists of a Japanese print, printed material, and photographs.

Among the biographical information are awards and certificates, biographical and genealogical notes, and educational records. Correspondence concerns Inverarity's activities as Director of the WPA Federal Arts Project in Washington State, 1936-1941. Additional personal and professional correspondence, 1929-1993, documents his activities as a museum director, consultant, collector, and writer. Among the friends and colleagues with whom he corresponded are: Max Ernst and Dorothea Tanning, Rockwell and Sally Kent, Stanton MacDonald-Wright, Wolfgang Palen, Juliet and Man Ray, Mark Tobey, Edward Weston, and various individuals associated with the WPA.

Manuscripts of a few of Inverarity's many articles on topics such as anthropology, museology, and information storage and retrieval are among his writings and notes. Also included are the manuscript of an unpublished book, Tobey Remembered, along with drafts, notes, correspondence, research materials, and photocopies of Tobey's letters to him and others. Other writings consist of book reviews, children's books, a catalog of the Inverarity Collection, and a copy of his 1946 master's thesis, "The Social-Economic Position of the American Artist." Several journals, 1928-1966, survive, including one that records his 1932 trip to study the Haida Indians of the Queen Charlotte Islands.

Subject files include general subjects such as "Folk Art" and "Preservation." Files on the museums where Inverarity was the director contain some official records as well as general information. Art work by Inverarity includes eight volumes of sketch books, 1928-1942, commercial work for Boeing, notes and drawings for book designs. Among the work by other artists are drawings, paintings and prints by friends. Of particular interest are display panels for a small exhibit on airbrush stencil prints produced by the Washington State WPA Federal Art Project. Other noteworthy items are pencil sketches and a watercolor by Mark Tobey, and prints by Hiroshige and Jan Matulka.

Five scrapbooks, 1928-1979, contain newspaper clippings, miscellaneous printed items, and a small number of photographs and letters. Three volumes document his career as an artist and museum director. One consists of biographical information and items designed by Inverarity, and another concerns publication and marketing of his monograph Art of the Northwest Coast Indians.

Sound recordings consist of interviews and conversations. An extensive interview with Inverarity about his life and career was conducted by Craig Gilborn in 1990. Bruce and Jane Inverarity in conversation with former colleague Ernie Johnson and his wife Helen about his departure from the Museum of International Folk Art were recorded in 1980. Also included is a 1981 conversation with Grace T. Stevenson containing references to Mark Tobey and Morris Graves.

Printed material includes many items about or produced by the WPA Federal Art Project. Among the items written by Inverarity are many articles on a wide variety of topics, his book Art of the Northwest Coast Indians, and two published portfolios. Printed material by other authors includes articles, books and reports about or mentioning Inverarity, and books designed or illustrated by him. Among the miscellaneous printed items are catalogs and brochures of the schools where Inverarity taught and studied, and a few ephemeral items designed by him.

Photographs are of art work, people, places, the Washington State WPA Federal Art Project, and miscellaneous subjects. All photographs known to be by Inverarity are clearly marked. Art work includes views of Inverarity's collection of his own work and that of other artists hanging in his home. Photographs of people include artists, friends, colleagues, and various groups. Of special interest are Inverarity's portraits of artists, among them Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Morris Graves, Hilaire Hiler, Rico Le Brun, Stanton Macdonald-Wright, Man Ray, Dorothea Tanning, and Mark Tobey. Photographs of places include the museums where Inverarity was director, places in which he lived, and travel pictures. Of note are a large group of photographs (copy prints) taken in 1932 while studying the Haida Indians in British Columbia. Nineteenth century photographs of family homes, Europe, and South America may have been taken by his father. Photographs of the Washington State WPA Federal Arts Project are of individual works of art, exhibition installations, mosaic procedures and local art centers. Many, probably intended for display, are mounted in groups on large cardboard panels. Miscellaneous subjects include art photographs by Inverarity and the microreader he invented.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as nine series. Correspondence is in chronological order, Biographical Information and Subject Files are arranged alphabetically by folder title. Other series have been organized into subseries and arrangement is as described in the Series Descriptions/Container List below. Unless noted otherwise, material within folders is arranged chronologically.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1934-1997, undated (Box 1, OV 18; 0.25 linear ft.)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1928-1993, undated (Box 1; 0.75 linear ft.)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1928-1993, undated, (Boxes 2-3; 1.5 linear ft.)

Series 4: Subject Files, 1938-1990, undated (Boxes 3-6, OV 19-20; 2.5 linear ft.)

Series 5: Art Work, circa 1840s-1969, undated (Boxes 6, 12, 16, OV 21; 1.3 linear ft.)

Series 6: Scrapbooks, 1928-1991, undated (Boxes 7-8; 1.1 linear ft.)

Series 7: Sound Recordings, 1980-1990 (Box 8; 3 folders)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1902-1995, undated (Boxes 8-13, OV 22; 3.4 linear ft.)

Series 9: Photographs, circa 1870s-1990, undated (Boxes 11, 14-17, OV 23; 3.0 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Robert Bruce Inverarity (1909-1999) showed artistic leanings as a boy, and from an early age was fascinated by puppetry and Northwest Coast native culture. During much of his youth, Inverarity's family lived in Canada, but returned to their native Seattle when he was a teenager. After graduating from high school, he made a 500 mile journey on foot along the coasts of the Vancouver Islands, collecting Indian artifacts and studying the area's tribal legends.

He studied briefly with Mark Tobey in Seattle, where the two shared a studio; when Tobey departed for Chicago, Inverarity succeeded him as an art teacher at the Cornish School. He spent the next few years in California working as an artist, exhibiting, and occasionally teaching. From there, he moved to Vancouver where he was Director of the School of Creative Art. In 1932, Inverarity made a three month trip to the Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia, for the purpose of studying the Haida Indians.

Upon his return to the United States in 1933, Inverarity joined the University of Washington Drama School as a puppetry instructor; in 1938 he published a highly regarded Manual of Puppetry. During 1936-37, he took a leave of absence from the university to assume the position of State Director of the Federal Art Project, where he remained until 1939. He then became State Director of the Art and Crafts Project (1939-1941). The U.S. Navy appointed Inverarity Chief of Design for Camouflage (1941-1943) and he later served as an Official Navy War Artist (1943-1945).

During his early years as a teacher and administrator, Inverarity continued making art and participated in a wide variety of exhibitions. He published a portfolio, 12 Photographs by R. B. Inverarity (1940). In the following year, Movable Masks and Figures of the North Pacific Coast Indians, a portfolio of his watercolors reproduced as silkscreen prints, appeared. Although Inverarity stopped exhibiting in 1941, he continued to produce art; notable work of this period includes photographic portraits of a number of artist friends (Max Ernst, Dorothea Tanning, Marcel Duchamp, and Man Ray).

After World War II, Inverarity completed his formal education. He earned a Bachelor's degree in art and anthropology from the University of Washington (1946), and then studied with Hilaire Hiler at Freemont University in Los Angeles, where he was awarded a Master's degree in fine arts (1947) and a Ph.D. (1948).

Inverarity began his museum career in 1949 when he was appointed the first director of the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a position that combined his interest in, and knowledge of, anthropology and art. While in Santa Fe, he published Art of the North West Coast Indians (1950). During his five year tenure as director, the museum participated in a pilot study for coding visual files, a project of the anthropological group, Human Resources Area Files, Inc. When Inverarity was dismissed from the Museum of International Folk Art in 1954, most of the staff resigned in protest, and the American Association of Museums investigated the situation.

Inverarity then became the first director of the Adirondack Museum, Blue Mountain Lake, New York, where he remained for eleven years. In addition to planning the museum's building, and developing collections and programs, Inverarity continued his involvement with the visual files project of the Human Resources Area Files, Inc., studying information storage and retrieval, developing a "microreader," and publishing Visual Files Coding Index (1960). In addition, he published many articles on a variety of topics and was active in organizations for anthropologists and museum professionals.

After his 1965 departure from the Adirondack Museum, Inverarity went to California and worked as an illustrator and book designer at the University of California Press. He returned to the east coast in 1969 to assume the directorship of the Philadelphia Maritime Museum. During this period, he remained active in professional associations and traveled to study museums abroad. He retired in 1976 and moved to La Jolla, California.

Robert Bruce Inverarity died in 1999.
Separated Material:
Originals of most of the drawings and sketches loaned by Mr. Inverarity were returned to him after filming and were not subsequently donated. This material is available on 35 mm microfilm reel D/NDA/I, frames 392-409.
Provenance:
Robert Bruce Inverarity donated his papers to the Archives in several installments between 1965 and 1993. Additional papers were received from his estate in 1999. He also loaned a small number of additional drawings and sketches for microfilming which were returned to him. A few of these drawings were included with the papers he subsequently donated to the Archives of American Art.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators  Search this
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Puppet theater  Search this
New Deal, 1933-1939 -- Washington (State)  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Federal aid to the arts -- Washington (State)  Search this
Art and state -- Washington (State)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Photographs
Drawings
Citation:
Robert Bruce Inverarity papers, circa 1840s-1997. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.inverobe
See more items in:
Robert Bruce Inverarity papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9460b503e-0657-430a-9244-ead53bd5066f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-inverobe
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