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Gathered Visions: Artist Interviews

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
4 Video recordings (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1990
Scope and Contents:
African American women artists talked about their artwork in-detail, including technique and meaning of work; the various types of media and tools they use to produce their work; their creative and work processes; and when and how they became interested in the media they are working. Additionally, Gail Shaw-Clemons spoke of her Anacostia roots. Most of the interviews took place in the artists' studios; and some of the artists, such as printmaker Stephanie Pogue, demonstrated part of their work process. All interviews included samples of the artists' work. The painters, sculptors, printmakers, mixed media, and performance artists included Viola Burley Leak (7-25-90), Erlena Chisolm Bland (7-27-90), Joyce Wellman (7-31-90 and 9-22-90), Malkia Roberts (8-1-90), Stephanie Pogue (8-3-90), Renee Stout (8-6-90 and 9-5-90), Gail Shaw-Clemons (8-7-90), Lilian Thomas Burwell (8-8-90), Adell Westbrook (8-10-90), Margo Humphrey (8-15-90), Yvonne Pickering Carter (8-17-90), Martha Jackson Jarvis (8-20-90), Denise Ward-Brown (9-7-90), and Sylvia Snowden (9-22-90).
Interview. AV002070: dated 19900725, 19900727, 19900731, 19900801. AV002071: dated 19900803, 19900806, 19900807, 1990808. AV002072: dated 19900810, 19900815, 19900817, 19900820. AV002073: dated 19900820, 19900905, 19900907, 19900922.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002071

ACMA AV002072

ACMA AV002073
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Painters  Search this
Performance artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American women artists  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Mixed media (Art)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Series Citation:
Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-044, Item ACMA AV002070
See more items in:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-044: Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7bd21f11e-ebe0-4da3-999c-b07a1b9bed1e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-044-ref611

Kenneth Royster Oral History Interview

Created by:
National Museum of African American History and Culture, American, founded 2003  Search this
Recorded by:
Patrick Telepictures, Inc., American  Search this
Interview of:
Kenneth Royster, American, born 1944  Search this
Interviewed by:
Aaron Bryant, American  Search this
Medium:
digital
Dimensions:
Duration (2016.129.4.1a): 101.8 min.
Duration (2016.129.4.2a): 101.25 min.
166.47 GB
Type:
video recordings
oral histories
digital media - born digital
Place collected:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Baltimore, Maryland, United States, North and Central America
Date:
July 14, 2016
Topic:
African American  Search this
Art  Search this
Communities  Search this
Museums  Search this
Photography  Search this
Religion  Search this
Social life and customs  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2016.129.4.1a-.2a
Restrictions & Rights:
© Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
The Collection Donor Oral History Project
Classification:
Media Arts-Film and Video
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5b6e4a9ae-14ad-4fba-a595-b933577f668a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2016.129.4.1a-.2a

Dr. Juanita Patience Moss Oral History Interview

Created by:
National Museum of African American History and Culture, American, founded 2003  Search this
Recorded by:
Patrick Telepictures, Inc., American  Search this
Interview of:
Dr. Juanita Patience Moss, American, born 1932  Search this
Interviewed by:
Joanne Hyppolite  Search this
Subject of:
C. Edgar Patience, American, 1906 - 1972  Search this
Medium:
digital
Dimensions:
Duration (2016.129.17.1a): 38.07 min.
Duration (2016.129.17.2a): 37.72 min.
63.82 GB
Type:
video recordings
oral histories
digital media - born digital
Place collected:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
West Pittston, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, United States, North and Central America
Date:
November 3, 2016
Topic:
African American  Search this
Art  Search this
Communities  Search this
Families  Search this
Labor  Search this
Museums  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2016.129.17.1a-.2a
Restrictions & Rights:
© Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
The Collection Donor Oral History Project
Classification:
Media Arts-Film and Video
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd53c957027-1aad-4358-a023-9ab83634f09e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2016.129.17.1a-.2a

Interviews with Artists

Collection Creator:
Mangravite, Peppino, 1896-  Search this
Extent:
(Boxes 3, 8; 0.65 linear ft.; Reel 5881)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1955, 1972
Scope and Contents note:
During the summer of 1955, sponsored by Columbia University, and with the assistance of the United States Information Agency, Mangravite traveled to England, France, and Italy, where he met with artists and scholars, and art department heads of several European universities to discuss Columbia University's plans for a new Art Center. He interviewed Georges Braque, Marc Chagall, Giorgio De Chirico, Marino Marini, Henry Moore, Giorgio Morandi, Georges Rouault, and Graham Sutherland. Original audio recordings (7" reel to reel audio tapes) of all interviews except Giorgio Morandi are found here, along with excerpts of Mangravite's conversations with Braque, Chagall, De Chirico, Marini, and Morandi copied for radio broadcast (three 33-1/3 rpm lp recordings). Transcripts of all interviews are included, though there is no English translation of Rouault's interview. Each artist was also photographed with Mangravite on the day of his interview, except for Henry Moore who is represented by a single photograph taken circa 1955. The photographs are filed in this series.

In 1972, Mangravite recorded an interview with Rufino Tamayo in Mexico City, and the two artists were photographed together on that occasion. No transcript of the recording is among the Mangravite papers.

Photographs of other artists are filed with Series 7: Photographs, and a manuscript "Language of the Hand and Eye: Artists on Art, Life, and Education," by Mangravite, based on his interviews with European artists, can be found with Series 4: Writings, Notes, and Lectures.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Peppino Mangravite papers, 1918-1982. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mangpepp, Series 3
See more items in:
Peppino Mangravite papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9433dab21-031f-4f98-a6c8-babcbce06810
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-mangpepp-ref29

Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show Interviews

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
Corcoran Gallery--Dupont Center  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Bronson, David  Search this
Cook, Dana  Search this
Davis, Gene, 1920-1985  Search this
Fralin, Frances  Search this
Gilliam, Sam, 1933-  Search this
Hopps, Walter  Search this
McGowin, Ed, 1938-  Search this
McNeill, Lloyd  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley, 1947-  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Atlanta (Ga.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Interviews with Dana Cook, Francis Fralin, and David Bronson for Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show, which focused on the formation of Workshop by Lou Stovall and Lloyd McNeill from its origins at the Corcoran Gallery of Art to its current location in northwest Washington, D.C. Cook, an illustrator and printmaker, discusses her experience working with and learning from Stovall at Workshop. Fralin speaks of Walter Hopps' outreach program idea leading to a relationship between Stovall and the Corcoran Gallery of Art, development of the Workshop at the Corcoran Gallery Dupont Circle, Stovall's and McNeill's poster collaboration, Stovall's silkscreening and drawing, Di Stovall's art and imagination, and other Workshop and Corcoran artists, including Sam Gilliam, David Bronson and Gene Davis. Bronson, a technician and craftsman, discusses his role at Workshop: helping to set up Workshop at Corcoran, learning silk screen process, working in woodshop, and creating prints for artists, including Ed McGowin for Name Change exhibition at Baltimore Museum of Art. All speak of Stovall's personality as a person, teacher and leader, particularly his perfectionist nature and high standards.
Interviews for slide show about Stovall Workshop Inc. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Dana Cook interview dated 19830801: AV003309-1. Frances Fralin interview dated 19830809: AV003309-1 and AV003309-2. David Bronson interview dated 19830810: AV003314. All recordings have some distortions or skips in sound recording.
Biographical / Historical:
Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression from posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Stovall Workshop Inc. was formed as a result of a poster collaboration between printmaker Lou Stovall and designer Lloyd McNeill in 1966. Printmaking, sculpture, photography, and furniture making were directed by Stovall in Workshop, first located at the Concoran Gallery of Art [Corcoran Gallery Dupont Circle]. By 1973, Stovall moved Workshop to northwest DC.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003309-2

ACMA AV003314
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Posters  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show Interviews, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003309-1
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-001: Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7e787faf3-2445-469d-92c0-fc3ed72efc9e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref70

Gathered Visions Artist Interview with Winnie Owens-Hart

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1990
Scope and Contents:
At the Anacostia Museum, Robert Hall interviewed artist Winnie Owens-Hart, who spoke of her work as a ceramist. Owens-Hart provided detailed description about two of her works: 'Trimesters' and 'Four Star Water Jar;' both works of art are part of the recording. She also spoke of her experience learning how to make traditional Nigerian pottery.
Interview. Dated 19901024.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American women artists  Search this
Ceramics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Series Citation:
Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-044, Item ACMA AV002129
See more items in:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-044: Gathered Visions: selected works by African American women artists audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f2e77b56-dc5c-4555-a439-ae505aedc7b0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-044-ref610

Interviews and Lectures

Collection Creator:
Butterfield, Jan  Search this
Extent:
4.2 Linear feet (Boxes 1-5)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1959-1997
Scope and Contents:
Recordings in this series are mostly interviews of artists conducted by Butterfield between 1971 and 1987. Also found are slide talks, class discussions, and lectures given by artists, which are assumed to have been recorded by Butterfield in most cases. Artists of the United States who are associated with the Light and Space movement in sculpture are highly represented, as well as artists of the new crafts movement and contemporary West Coast artists in particular. Also among the recordings are recorded performances by John Cage, Joe Goode, Newton and Helen Harrison, Jim Roche, and George Greene.

Butterfield's interviews were mainly conducted for specific writing projects, either for articles, reviews, published artist interviews, catalog essays, or books Butterfield was writing. Some interviews were conducted over the phone. Some recordings are editing sessions in which Butterfield consults with her subjects during the editing process for a specific article or interview to be published. Multiple, extensive interviews are found with artists Sam Francis and Robert Irwin. A few interviews conducted by others are found, including a radio interview of Henry Hopkins regarding the Clyfford Still bequest to SF Moma, interviews by Henry Hopkins of Joe Goode, Philip Guston (in a recording of a public Q&A), Walter Hopps (with Jan Butterfield), and possibly Milton Resnick, and an interview with Ursula Schneider conducted by Lorri Surrihan. A transcript is found for the interview by Henry Hopkins with Walter Hopps. Additional transcripts, usually highly edited from the recorded version, are found among the published interviews in the Writings series. Most of the lectures found in this series take place in Texas and California, including multiple lectures that took place at the Berkeley Art Museum, the Northwood Experimental Artists Institute in Dallas, Texas, and the San Francisco Art Institute. In all, the series contains 107 sound tape reels, 97 cassettes, and 1 videoreel.

Panel discussions include two notable recordings that Butterfield seems to have acquired from Milton Resnick during his solo exhibition at the Fort Worth Art Center in 1971. These include a 1959 appearance of Edward Dugmore and Milton Resnick at Southern Illinois State University, and a 1961 debate between Ad Reinhardt and Milton Resnick which later became known as "The Attack," held at "The Club" in New York City. Also found are recordings of a 1976 conference at UCLA entitled "Space and Place" which included talks by Lloyd Hamrol, Richard Serra, Robert Irwin, and others.
Arrangement:
Interviews, lectures, and performances are filed in alphabetical order by their subject's name, and multiple recordings for a single subject are filed chronologically under his or her name. Recordings listed in this series are interviews conducted by Jan Butterfield unless otherwise indicated in the folder listing. Often physical tapes contained multiple recordings, and where an additional recording of a different subject is found on a single physical tape, it is noted with the main entry for that tape, and cross referenced under the additional artist's name alphabetically in the item list. Panel discussions are arranged chronologically at the end of the series.

Additional artist interviews conducted by Michael Karp in the early 1990s are found in the Pacific Enterprises files of series 3, Project files. Additional sound recordings are also found in the Waterfront Project files of series 3, the Lapis Press files of series 3, and in series 7, sound and video recordings.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Jan Butterfield papers, 1959-1998. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.buttjan, Series 1
See more items in:
Jan Butterfield papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw95e39c556-7637-4e1f-b9a8-f1eeeb9644a1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-buttjan-ref3

United States Foreign Agent Registration Form

Collection Creator:
Roberts, Colette, 1910-  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 22
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1943
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Colette Roberts papers and interviews with artists, circa 1930-1971. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Colette Roberts Papers and Interviews with Artists
Colette Roberts Papers and Interviews with Artists / Series 3: Personal Records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9764467c7-d23f-4031-888d-8ba6a0cda987
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-robecoli-ref110

Interview with Kristopher Sith

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Kristopher Sith . . .
Interview. Dated 20110320.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Kristopher Sith, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005231
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa72ef298f8-2d8f-4684-a327-d1f6a5b44fa1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref104

Larry Lebby Interview

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Lebby, Larry  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1982
Scope and Contents:
Artist Larry Lebby talks about what is important when producing art, including composition and medium, which is dependent on the subject and message he wants to convey through his artwork. Lebby explains his fascination with producing intricacies; his influences, including Michelangelo; and the process of printmaking and stone lithography in detail. He also talks about teaching art appreciation, producing work daily and specific pieces of his artwork.
Interview. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Dated 19820928.
General:
Title created by ACMA based on transcription from physical asset and contents of recording.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Lithography  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Larry Lebby Interview, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-054, Item ACMA AV003291
See more items in:
Here, Look at Mine! Exhibition Records
Here, Look at Mine! Exhibition Records / Audiovisual Materials
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa77bdba572-e749-4994-8d31-82e923a4c2a4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-054-ref544

Interview with Roderick Turner

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Artist Roderick Turner, raised in Providence and attended RISD, talks about his artistic family, his early art experiences, the murals he painted, his inspiration and sources of encouragement, and teaching and working with youth and senior citizens. He explains his creative thought process, importance of creating art for the artist, how an artist works in regards to his/her mind as well as technique, and the value of art to the community. Turner describes how his work has evolved, and how his European experience changed his life and affected his art. He also describes the relationship between his artwork and where he lives; he records the changes in his community - Ward 8 of Washington, D. C. - through his paintings.
Interview. Dated 20110519.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Roderick Turner, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005235
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7dc6544be-a879-471e-809b-202eb2531386
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref84

Interview with Kristopher Sith

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Artist Kristopher Stith grew up in southeast Washington, D.C., and attended Duke Ellington School of the Arts and American University. Stith states Dragon Ball Z inspired him to draw as a child. He describes drawing Pokemon cards in the back of the classroom when he was in elementary school, and cartooning and creating his own characters when he was in middle school. He talks about his experience as a youth council member and earning a stipend; preparing his portfolio for entrance to Duke Ellington School of the Arts; and how the students and teachers at Duke Ellington inspired and motivated him to do better. Stith states the Anacostia community inspired and encouraged him to pursue his artistic skills. He talks about his competitive nature, preference of working with acrylic and charcoal, interest in painting people, strive to paint better, creative process, and artistic style. There are a few shots of his artwork; Stith talks about each of the pieces. Stith describes the similarities and differences between Washington, D.C.'s Wards 3 and 8; he talks about the changes he observes in Ward 8. Stith talks about how the community support and the arts, particularly how he thinks information and resources should be shared, and his desire to help people when he becomes successful. He also talks about Picasso, the evolution of Picasso's style, and Picasso's connection to his community through his artwork.
Interview. Dated 20110320.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Kristopher Sith, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005231
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f731aca9-8c60-4490-9ba5-40509ebf8f11
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref100

Interview with Wanda Aikens

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Artist Wanda Aikens - Executive Director of Ward 7 Arts Collaborative - talks about the artistic endeavors of her parents and grandparents, and her early art experiences. She explains the importance of art and her family's deep appreciation for the arts. Aikens talks about her creative process, her research process, and her thoughts on color and the use of color in art. She describes her artwork; and her interest in rocks, nature, mother nature, trees; and how color travels through nature. She explains what people appreciate and do not appreciate about art. Aikens talks about securing funding and nonprofit status for the organization, Ward 7 Arts Collaborative, which is an arts collaborative with the mission is to build capacity in the community and build community in the arts. Aikens talks about the diversity of skills, education, techniques, media, types, and styles of the Ward 7 artists. She discusses the challenges in helping an underserved community to understand their self-worth and the importance of art as well as the work involved in gaining the interest and investment of the community. Aikens describes the public art in Marvin Gaye Park, at Nannie Helen Burroughs School, and on Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue as well as a mural by Rick Freeman. As a teacher and administrator at IDEA Public Charter School, Aikens also talks about working with high school students, and the importance of sharing to learn from one another.
Interview. Dated 20110317.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Wanda Aikens, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005205
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa74dcd10f3-998e-4276-8ed3-851e32f17f13
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref88

Interview with Tisha Thorne

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Tisha Thorne, founder and coordinator of the East of the River Sewing and Quilting Guild, talks about her techniques as a fabric media artist, when and how she started sewing, and teaching herself to sew when she was a teenager. She also talks about her involvement in the community, teaching and working with children and senior citizens, and her book projects. Thorne explains what creativity means to her, sources of inspiration, and her creative style and creative process. Thorne talks about the origin and goals of the East of the River Sewing and Quilting Guild, how the guild is involved in the community, and the diversity of the guild's membership. Footage of artwork - quilts, clothing, fashion accessories, and other mixed media fabric art - follows the interview.
Interview. Dated 20110425.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Tisha Thorne, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005234
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7205b8c2e-23f0-4e2f-a6dc-8c94ae329de8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref87

Interview with Ira Blount

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Artist Ira Blount talks about the influence of his father and mother as well as the Shaker Movement and their belief in frugality on his life and his art. He talks about ROTC training while he was a student at Tuskegee Institute and training troops to go overseas when he was stationed at Fort Lee, Virginia. Blount states his life after the army was unpleasant because of his divorce. When he moved to Washington, D.C., he focused on craft making, particularly calligraphy, to overcome his drinking problems. Blount gradually became involved in different programs in his church, Asbury United Methodist Church, and eventually started a handbell choir in the early 1990s. Blount talks about his other creative endeavors in basket weaving, origami, and woodcarving as well as his interest in oriental arts. Specifically, Blount talks about his first attempt at basket weaving, his fondness of the egg basket, using natural grapevine frames with commercial reed for his baskets, making origami kimonos and cranes, and the beauty of the grain when he carving wood. He talks about his creative process and working hard to perfect a craft. Blount explains an inner need to create and his hope that his work will inspire other people to do craft work. He talks about the need to engage senior citizens in creativity and craft; and the lack, and therefore necessity, of a craft museum in Washington, D.C. He stresses the need of a vehicle to encourage untrained people to create particularly those who live in Ward 7.
Interview. Dated 20110316.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Ira Blount, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005209
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7bc3a4714-d0b4-4a7e-ae23-505c7360d91f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref103

Interview with Candice Taylor

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Candice Taylor - co-founder of production company Creative JunkFood - talks about the origin of the production company and its focus on music videos and animation. Taylor describes the neighborhood she grew up in and what she learned growing up in southeast Washington, D.C. She talks about what drew her to animation. She started animating as a high school student at Duke Ellington School of the Arts, located in northwest Washington, D.C., and studied communication and media arts at Virginia Commonwealth University. After college, Taylor had the opportunity to work on an animation project and then founded Creative JunkFood. Taylor talks about the creative style of Creative JunkFood's animation projects, thoughts on the creativity of music videos, and Creative JunkFood's approach to music videos. She discusses her personal creative process, what creativity means to her, how the community inspires her creativity, and working with musical artists to create music videos. Taylor talks about the future for Creative JunkFood and her personal goal to be creative the rest of her life.
Interview. Dated 20110422.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Candice Taylor, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005233
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7a98eac8d-c165-4397-b510-bdbf67a4c5a0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref99

Interview with Christylez Bacon

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2010
Scope and Contents:
Hip-hop artist Christylez Bacon plays the acoustic guitar, western African djembe, beat-boxing, ukulele, and spoons. Bacon explains he was raised to not curse in his music, and taught the importance of subject matter and topics in music. He performed his first open mic while attending Duke Ellington School of the Arts in northwest Washington, D.C. He studied web design and graphic design at Duke Ellington and during one semester at Montgomery College. Bacon explains he worked hard at his web design/graphic design while hitting the open mic scene hard throughout Washington, D.C. He states he realized what is happening in southeast Washington, D.C. is happening in other places through listening to the music of artists from other places. Bacon talks about the evolution of his career from open mics in Washington, D.C. to development of a children's album which led to a Grammy nomination to his present endeavors. He also talks about the MLK program with youth, Strathmore residency, what he learned during his residencies in Idaho and Utah, teaching hip-hop, and performing for children and adults. He states his performances are about teaching and education. Bacon discusses his musical style, the inspiration for his lyrical content, the future of his art, his desire to tour the world and learn about other types of music, and his advice for up-and-coming artists. At end of the interview, he raps freestyle a summary of his life.
Interview. Dated 20101203.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Christylez Bacon, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005207
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c44403d8-a8b9-4f2e-aca1-29b326bc5fac
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref107

Interview with Frank Mobley

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2010
Scope and Contents:
Frank Mobley, an entertainer with the Anacostia Rollers & Friends, Inc., talks about playing roller derby with steel wheels on speed skates when he was younger, buying his own skates and learning to skate on his own, and discovering Anacostia Park Skating Pavilion, where he became more involved with the artistic skating. Mobley explains his transition from a rink skater to artistic skater to incorporating dance into his artistic skating, his first performance, skating with Tina Riddick Harris, and his motivation to take roller skating to the next professional level, including his desire to perform for videos and commercials. He also explains rink skating versus street skating, the differences between ice figure skaters' style and his roller skating style, how he visualizes and choreographs his performances, and why it is important to keep roller skating alive and to take roller skating to the next level. Mobley talks about the importance of fitness and healthy eating, setting priorities, being disciplined, staying focused, and knowing what makes one happy in life as well as the importance of God in his life and his skating. He also talks about the success he has had with his skating, the daily motivation skating provides him, places where Anacostia Rollers & Friends, Inc. have performed, and building his own financial services business as a self-employed accountant.
Interview. Dated 20101207.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Roller skaters  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Frank Mobley, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005227
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c13c18e6-e593-4e1d-953e-f070dd955120
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref95

Interview with Juanita Britton

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Entrepreneur Juanita Britton talks about her early entrepreneurial pursuits; traveling to Seoul, South Korea when she was 17; traveling overseas when she was a graduate student at Howard University; securing a job working with the state department so she could work with indigenous cultures overseas; the Anacostia Arts Gallery; Busy Bee Gift and Holiday Show at Shiloh Baptist Church in Anacostia; launching Red Bird water cleaning system in Senegal; and the importance of culture. Britton, who grew up in a middle class Detroit neighborhood, began her entrepreneurial pursuits selling lemonade at age 10 and expanding the business to 6 different corners by the age of 14. She held bake sales and built a relationship with the mayor so she could travel to Seoul, South Korea as an exchange student at the age of 17, and organized a reception for President Mugabe of Zimbabwe when she traveled overseas as a graduate student. Working with indigenous cultures overseas, Britton helped indigenous people sell goods at fair trade value, and she wanted as many people as possible to travel to Africa to see indigenous cultures and that life was fine in Africa. While visiting Anacostia in southeast Washington, D.C., Britton stumbled upon a house which she transformed into an art gallery and artistic community center. She was active in the Anacostia community taking neighborhood children on field trips. Britton speaks of the importance of spending time and mentoring children. She organized 78 Busy Bee Gift and Holiday Shows at the Shiloh Baptist Church over a 20-year period. Britton speaks of specific stories of artists and their successes, and teaching young people about business and entrepreneurship while they are working with her on the craft shows. Britton talks about the villages in Senegal in which she will launching Red Bird water cleaning systems; she states she figured out a way to transport the machine between communities in a single day so the communities will have clean water every day. Britton also talks about marketing events; how she brings culture into the corporate shops which she owns; East of the River artists including BK Adams; the development of an arts district in Anacostia; and the importance of involving the current community in the development. Britton - nicknamed 'Busy Bee' since she was a child - explains how her multitasking and networking abilities. Britton talks about her love of culture; anything different or unique; personal adornments; and learning other languages; and others' perceptions of culture and things that are different or unique.
Interview. Dated 20110302.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Businesswomen  Search this
African American businesspeople  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Juanita Britton, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005210
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa70034785d-2bf2-453a-a45c-23d66256b62e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref108

Interview with Mary E. Brown

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
2010
Scope and Contents:
Mary E. Brown, co-founder of Life Pieces to Masterpieces, talks about the origin, evolution, and culture of Life Pieces to Masterpiece, an organization which works with boys and young men. Brown states the Life Pieces to Masterpieces started as an opportunity for boys and young men to learn and create Larry Quick's art form, engage in conversations, eat, go to museums, and have fun. Once the founders (Brown, Quick, and Benjamin Johnson) gained further understanding of the boys and young men's needs, they added more programs, such as homework center and partnering with other groups; engaged the community more helping more boys and young men; creating and participating in public art, such as the Kites in the Heights project; and figuring out how to support them in really being children. Brown speaks of specific stories of success, specific backgrounds and life circumstances of the boys and young men, the involvement and contribution of each of the co-founders, and the big vision and goals for the future of Life Pieces to Masterpieces. Brown states Life Pieces to Masterpieces 'demonstrated art is essential for living,' and provided her with a fulfillment of purpose in life.
Interview. Dated 20101208.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Mary E. Brown, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005212
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7dba52ae9-f537-43fd-85f3-9f6bf4e30b6c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref86

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