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Barbara Latham papers

Creator:
Latham, Barbara, 1896-1989  Search this
Names:
Brett, Dorothy, 1883-1977  Search this
Cook, Howard Norton, 1901-1980  Search this
Foster, Vaneil  Search this
Leith-Ross, Harry, b. 1886  Search this
Pitts, Harry  Search this
Schulthess, Amalia  Search this
Sewell, Helen, 1896-  Search this
Extent:
3.5 Linear feet ((partially microfilmed on 4 reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Date:
1902-1972
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence, diaries, writings, business records, art works, printed material, and photographs.
REELS 2839-2841: Biographical materials; correspondence from her husband, Howard N. Cook; correspondence with Amalia Schulthess, Harry Leith-Ross, Harry Pitts, Dorothy E. Brett and others; personal writings; travel diaries from North Carolina and Alabama; 3 calendars, 1942, 1943, 1957; sales account of prints, 1928-1957; sketches and sketchbooks; prints; greeting cards by Latham, Cook and Vaneil Foster; 4 oil paintings by Harry Leith-Ross; exhibition catalogs and announcements; clippings; and photographs of Latham including one by Mildred Tolbert, ca. 1960 (a copyprint microfilmed on reel 1817, fr. 726-727) and her work; and a tribute to illustrator Helen Sewell.
REEL 3244: 11 portraits of Latham by Cook, including drawings in charcoal, ink, and pencil, and wood engravings and aquatints; and 3 self-portraits of Cook and 2 self-portraits of Latham.
UNMICROFILMED: Letters from Harriet Latham Robinson, Latham's niece, regarding family affairs, 1964-1968.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, illustrator, writer, etcher; Taos, N.M. b. 1896 in Walpole, Mass.; d. 1989, Sante Fe, N.M. Studied at the Pratt Institute, Art Students League and with Andrew Dasburg. Well known for her work as a children's book illustrator. Married to painter Howard Cook.
Related Materials:
Barbara Latham papers relating to her work as a children's book illustrator Located at; Kerlan Collection at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.
Provenance:
Donated 1972-1973 by Latham.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Correspondence with Harriet Latham Robinson: ACCESS RESTRICTED: Written permission required.
Occupation:
Illustrators  Search this
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Illustration of books  Search this
Painting -- New Mexico  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Greeting cards  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Identifier:
AAA.lathbarb
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lathbarb

Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers

Source:
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Creator:
Stocksdale, Bob, 1913-2003  Search this
Names:
Central Utah Relocation Center  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Tanforan Assembly Center (San Bruno, Calif.)  Search this
War Relocation Authority  Search this
Anderson, Norman  Search this
Collingwood, Peter, 1922-2008  Search this
Larsen, Jack Lenor, 1927-2020  Search this
Maloof, Alfreda Ward  Search this
Maloof, Sam  Search this
Merrill, Forrest L.  Search this
Okubo, Miné, 1912-2001  Search this
Shawcroft, Barbara  Search this
Stocksdale, Bob, 1913-2003  Search this
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Turner, Tran  Search this
Uchida, Yoshiko  Search this
Former owner:
Stocksdale, Kay Sekimachi  Search this
Extent:
19.5 Linear feet
0.125 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Sound recordings
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Photographs
Date:
circa 1900-2015
Summary:
The papers of woodturner Bob Stocksdale and fiber artist Kay Sekimachi measure 19.5 linear feet and 0.125 GB and date from circa 1900 to 2015. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, professional files, exhibition files, project files, personal business records, printed and digital material, scrapbooks, photographic material, and artwork. Of note are records from Sekimachi's forced internment during World War II at Tanforan Assembly Center and Topaz War Relocation Center from 1942 to 1944.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of woodturner Bob Stocksdale and fiber artist Kay Sekimachi measure 19.5 linear feet and 0.125 GB and date from circa 1900 to 2015. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, professional files, exhibition files, project files, personal business records, printed and digital material, scrapbooks, photographic material, and artwork. Of note are records from Sekimachi's forced internment during World War II at Tanforan Assembly Center and Topaz War Relocation Center from 1942 to 1944.

The bulk of biographical materials are from Kay Sekimachi with some originating from her time spent in forced internment at Topaz and Tanforan camps. These records include identification cards, War Relocation Authority printed materials, and school records. Also found are awards, resumes, and blank stationery. Some materials are from Stocksdale's 85th birthday and memorial service.

Letters and extensive greeting cards are from friends, family, and professional acquaintances. Correspondents include Norman Anderson, Peter Collingwood, Jack Lenor Larsen, Sam and Alfreda Maloof, Forrest L. Merrill, Miné Okubo, Barbara Shawcroft, and others.

Writings and notes are scattered and include two interviews with Kay Sekimachi, hanging instructions, and notes. Writings by others are by Jack Lenor Larsen, Tran Turner, and Yoshiko Uchida.

Sekimachi's and Stocksdale's professional activities are documented through files relating to their participation at conferences, awards ceremonies, and lectures. Also found are fiber samples, order forms for materials and equipment, and notes on techniques and design by Kay Sekimachi. Exhibition records include extensive documentation on Marriage in Form, In the Realm of Nature, and Loom and Lathe as well as files for various solo and group exhibitions for both Sekimachi and Stocksdale. Gallery and institution files include material on multiple or unnamed exhibitions. Exhibiton documentation may include correspondence, writings, proposals, printed material, financial and loan records, condition reports, and photographs. Project files contain material for proposed book projects, a retrospective, and portfolio, by and about Sekimachi and Stocksdale. Also found are three commissions files for works by Sekimachi. A proposed retrospective on the work of Bob Stocksdale by Kay Sekimachi includes a digital sound recording of recollections.

Personal business records include sales books, purchase records for works of art by others, appraisals, contracts, consignment receipts, and insurance records.

Published books, clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, magazines, and newsletters are found within printed materials. Of note is a publication by the San Francisco Chronicle entitled "This World" which features illustrations by Miné Okubo.

Four scrapbooks compiled by Kay Sekimachi date from 1937 to 1944. Most of the scrapbooks contain printed material from magazines and other sources with images such as children, valentines, food, birds, clothing, and may include scattered sketches and notes by Sekimachi. One scrapbook dates from the end of Sekimachi's internment at Topaz and relocation to Cincinnati, Ohio. This scrapbook includes sketches and printed materials concerning local and global events. Loose material found in this series was likely meant to be pasted into a new or the forth scrapbook. These materials include relocation information, Japanese-American publications, maps, clippings, sketches, and printed programs.

The bulk of photographic materials consist of slides of various vacation locations and homes and date from the 1960s to the 1980s. Also found are scattered portraits of Kay Sekimachi and Bob Stocksdale, as well as a photo of Miné Okubo with Roy Leeper and Cecil Thompson. Artworks are largely by Kay Sekimachi and include watercolor and pencil sketches as well as designs for fabrics and a weaving portfolio. Watercolor and pencil sketches are of Tanforan Assembly Center and date from circa 1942.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1920-2003 (1.5 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1943-2014 (7.6 linear feet; Box 2-10)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1960s-2008 (0.2 linear feet; Box 10)

Series 4: Professional Files, 1950s-2011 (1.1 linear feet; Box 10-11, 22)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, 1951-2015 (2.9 linear feet; Box 11-14, ER01; 0.125 GB)

Series 6: Project Files, circa 1900-2004 (0.3 linear feet; Box 14)

Series 7: Personal Business Records, 1970s-2010 (0.7 linear feet; Box 14-15)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1943-2011 (2.3 linear feet; Box 15-17, 22)

Series 9: Scrapbooks, 1937-1946 (0.9 linear feet; Box 17, 21)

Series 10: Photographic Material, circa 1950-2001 (0.9 linear feet; Box 18)

Series 11: Artwork, 1942-circa 1970 (1.1 linear feet; Box 18-20, 22-23)
Biographical / Historical:
Bob Stocksdale (1913-2003) was a woodturner active in California. He was known for bowls he formed from rare types of wood. Kay Sekimachi (1926- ) is a Japanese-American fiber artist and educator also active in California. She began her career in weaving on and off the loom and was part of the New Basketry movement.

Born in Indiana, Bob Stocksdale began his interest in carving by whittling with a pocket knife. Later, he created his own lathe with a washing machine motor and turned items such as baseball bats. During World War II, he was a conscientious objector and worked at various camps performing forestry work. It was in one of the camps that he turned his first bowl on a lathe.

After the war, Stocksdale settled in the Bay Area of California where he established his own woodturning shop in his basement. He concentrated on making bowls out of rare woods. His work has been recognized throughout the world and in 1998, he received the American Association of Woodturners Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2003, he received the James Renwick Alliance Masters of the Medium Award.

Kay Sekimachi was born in San Francisco, California in 1926. As a high school student, she was forcibly interned through Executive Order 9066 issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt which incarcerated approximately 120,000 Japanese and Japanese-American citizens during World War II. Along with her mother and siblings, Kay lived at Tanforan Assembly Center and later moved to Topaz War Relocation Center in Utah. She continued her schooling at Topaz and after 1944, was resettled in Cincinnati, Ohio.

After graduating from high school, Kay Sekimachi enrolled at the California College of Arts and Crafts and the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts where she learned the craft of weaving under Trude Guermonprez and Jack Lenor Larsen. Her early works were tapestries and garments. She later used her weaving techniques as part of the New Basketry movement to create baskets and boxes out of fibers. Also an educator, Kay taught weaving at San Francisco Community College. She received the American Craft Council Gold Medal for Consummate Craftsmanship in 2002.

After the dissolution of his first marriage through which he had two children, son Kim and daughter Joy Stocksdale, Bob married Kay Sekimachi in 1972. The two had been acquainted for many years as they were both craft artists living in the Bay Area. Although they married later in life, Kay and Bob travelled the world and exhibited their art together in many exhibitions including Marriage in Form and Loom and Lathe.

Bob Stocksdale died in Oakland, California in 2003. Kay Sekimachi continues to exhibit her work and lives in Berkeley, California.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are an oral history interview of Bob Stocksdale conducted February 16-March 21, 2001, by Signe Mayfield and an oral history interview of Kay Sekimachi [Stocksdale] conducted July 26-August 6, 2001, by Suzanne Baizerman. Both interviews were conducted in Berkeley, California, during the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Provenance:
The Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers were donated in 2003, 2004, and 2015 by Kay Sekimachi Stocksdale as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of original audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Fiber artists -- California  Search this
Topic:
Concentration camps -- United States  Search this
Textile design  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Fiberwork -- Technique  Search this
Woodwork -- Study and teaching  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Textile crafts -- Study and teaching  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American fiber artists  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Photographs
Citation:
Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers, circa 1900-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stockbob
See more items in:
Bob Stocksdale and Kay Sekimachi papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stockbob

Roger Shimomura papers

Creator:
Shimomura, Roger, 1939-  Search this
Names:
Chin, Frank, 1940-  Search this
Day, Akiko  Search this
Hughes, Jonathan R. T.  Search this
Miller, Wayne  Search this
Extent:
2.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Scripts (documents)
Date:
1965-1990
Summary:
The papers of painter, printmaker, performance artist, and teacher Roger Shimomura measure 2.6 linear feet and date from 1965 to 1990. Found within the papers are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, notes, printed material, one scrapbook, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of painter, printmaker, performance artist, and teacher Roger Shimomura measure 2.6 linear feet and date from 1965 to 1990. Found within the papers are biographical materials, correspondence, writings, notes, printed material, one scrapbook, and photographs.

Biographical materials include a photograph of Shimomura and a resume. The bulk of the papers consist of correspondence files about exhibitions, grants, performances, lectures, and the Japanese-American redress movement. Correspondence is with friends, colleagues, galleries, and with universities and colleges. Correspondents include Frank Chin, Akiko Day, Jonathan R. T. Hughes, and Wayne Miller. Writings and notes include Shimomura's artist's statement, scripts to four plays, and one folder of miscellaneous notes. The papers also include clippings, exhibition announcements, catalogs and miscellaneous printed material. A scrapbook contains clippings of articles that document Shimomura's career. Photographs are of artwork by other artists.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1989-1990 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1969-1990 (Boxes 1-3; 2.3 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1984, 1987-1989 (Box 3; 5 folders)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1975-1990 (Box 4; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Scrapbook, 1975-1989 (Box 4; 1 folder)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1970s (Box 4; 1 folder)
Biographical Note:
Roger Shimomura (b. 1939) is a Japanese American painter, printmaker, performance artist, and teacher who has worked primarily in Kansas since 1969.

Roger Shimomura was born in 1939 in Seattle, Washington. He was a third generation Japanese-American and received his B.A. in Graphic Design from the University of Washington in 1961, and a M.F.A. in Painting from Syracuse University in 1969. Shimomura spent two childhood years in one of 10 concentration camps for Japanese-Americans during WWII, and later served as an officer in the United States Army from 1962 to 1965. He was active in the Japanese-American redress movement in the 1970s. Since the 1970s, Shimomura's work has combined American popular imagery with the Japanese ukiyo-e tradition.

He has had over 125 solo exhibitions of paintings and prints, as well as presented his experimental theater pieces at such venues as the Franklin Furnace, New York City, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and The Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Shimomura has been a visiting artist and lectured on his work at more than 200 universities, art schools, and museums across the country. Shimomura began teaching at the University of Kansas' Department of Art in 1969 and worked there until his retirement in 2004. At that time he started the Shimomura Faculty Research Support Fund, an endowment to foster faculty research in the Department of Art. Throughout his career, Shimomura has had numerous exhibitions and experimental theater pieces on a national level. In 1999, the Seattle Urban League designated a scholarship in his name that has been awarded annually to a Seattle resident pursuing a career in art. In 2002, the College Art Association presented him with the "Artist Award for Most Distinguished Body of Work," for his 4 year, 12-museum national tour of the painting exhibition, "An American Diary." Shimomura continues to live and work in Kansas.
Provenance:
Roger Shimomura donated his papers in 1990, as part of the Archives of American Art's Northwest Asian-American project in Seattle.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Kansas -- Lawrence  Search this
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Japanese American painting  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American printmakers  Search this
Asian American performance artists  Search this
Performance artists -- Kansas -- Lawrence  Search this
Printmakers -- Kansas -- Lawrence  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- Kansas -- Lawrence  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Scripts (documents)
Citation:
Roger Shimomura papers, 1965-1990. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.shimroge
See more items in:
Roger Shimomura papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-shimroge

Photographs

Collection Creator:
Shimomura, Roger, 1939-  Search this
Extent:
(Box 4; 1 folder)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1970s
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs are of works of art by other artists.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Roger Shimomura papers, 1965-1990. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.shimroge, Series 7
See more items in:
Roger Shimomura papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-shimroge-ref74

Roy Leeper and Gaylord Hall collection of Miné Okubo papers

Creator:
Okubo, Miné, 1912-2001  Search this
Names:
Central Utah Relocation Center  Search this
Hall, Gaylord  Search this
Hamilton, Howard  Search this
Leeper, Roy  Search this
Tono, Doris  Search this
Tono, Harry  Search this
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Drawings
Sketches
Illustrated letters
Date:
circa 1940-2001
Summary:
The Roy Leeper and Gaylord Hall collection of Miné Okubo papers measure 1.4 linear feet and date from circa 1940 to 2001. Roy Leeper and Gaylord Hall were long-time friends with and patrons of Okubo from the late 1950s until her death. The collection contains letters, writings, and sketches by Okubo. Among the printed materials is a copy of the 1944 special edition of Fortune magazine which was sympathetic to Japanese Americans interned during World War II and for which Okubo was hired to illustrate. Also found are scattered documents relating to Hall and Leeper.
Scope and Contents:
The Roy Leeper and Gaylord Hall collection of Miné Okubo papers measure 1.4 linear feet and date from circa 1940 to 2001. Roy Leeper and Gaylord Hall were long-time friends with and patrons of Okubo from the late 1950s until her death. The collection contains letters, writings, and sketches by Okubo. Among the printed materials is a copy of the 1944 special edition of Fortune magazine which was sympathetic to Japanese Americans interned during World War II and for which Okubo was hired to illustrate. Also found are scattered documents relating to Hall and Leeper.

Biographical materials consist of Roy Leeper's medical licenses. The bulk of the collection is comprised of Miné Okubo's letters, many of which are illustrated, to Hall and Leeper discussing her health, career, their purchase of her artwork, and mutual friends. Other correspondents include Howard Hamilton and Doris and Harry Tono. Writings and notes by Okubo inlcude a statement about the pricing of her artwork and a list of artwork. Leeper and Hall's personal business records concern the purchase and loan of Okubo's artwork for exhibitions.

Printed materials include a 1944 edition of Fortune magazine devoted to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. The issue includes reproductions of Okubo's illustrations of life in the World War II internment camp in Topaz, Utah. Photographs include snapshots of Okubo at an exhibition with her art and of works of art. Sketches and drawings depict mostly cats and flowers.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1942-1994 (1 folder; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1957-2001 (0.8 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1940-circa 1970 (3 folders; Box 1)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, 1957-1998 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1944-2000 (0.3 linear feet; Boxes 1-3)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1940-circa 1990s (3 folders; Box 1)

Series 7: Artwork, 1960s-1997 (0.1 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)
Biographical / Historical:
Miné Okubo (1912-2001) was a Japanese American painter, illustrator, and author. She is known for her book Citizen 13600in which she described her experience at the Topaz War Relocation Camp in Utah through prose and drawings.

Born in Riverside, California in 1912, Okubo began her arts education at Riverside Junior College and transferred to the University of California, Berkeley where she completed her BA and MA in Fine Arts (where she first met Roy Leeper). In 1938, she received an award to travel and study under Fernand Léger in Paris. When World War II began in Europe, she moved back to California and worked under the Federal Arts Project. She produced some solo murals and also assisted Diego Rivera on his Treasure Island mural Pan American Unity, (1940).

In April of 1942, Miné Okubo and one of her brothers were sent to the Tanforan Assembly Center under Executive Order 9066, which forcibly interned over 100,000 Japanese and Japanese-American citizens living on the West Coast of the United States. Six months later, they were sent to the Topaz War Relocation Camp in Topaz, Utah. There, Okubo taught art in the camp's school and often sketched camp life. She was art editor for the camp newsletter Trek, a supplement to the Topaz Times.

In 1944, Fortune magazine published a sympathetic special edition on the Japanese and Japanese American internment during World War II. The magazine hired Okubo to illustrate two of the articles. She was permitted to leave the camp and move to New York City, where she remained for the rest of her life, working as a painter and illustrator. She wrote and illustrated a book about her experiences in the Topaz confinement camp, Citizen 13600, which won the American Book Award in 1984. Miné Okubo died in 2001. Medical doctor Roy Leeper befriended Miné Okubo while they were both students at the University of California. Later, he and his partner dentist Gaylord Hall were reintroduced to Okubo and her artwork by a mutual friend. They began a life-long relationship with Okuba, both as friends and collectors.
Related Materials:
Riverside City College in Riverside, California also holds the Miné Okubo papers.
Provenance:
Roy Leeper and Gaylord Hall donated the collection of Miné Okubo papers in 2001.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Art patronage  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American women artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese American women artists  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American illustrators  Search this
Asian American authors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Drawings
Sketches
Illustrated letters
Citation:
Roy Leeper and Gaylord Hall collection of Miné Okubo papers, circa 1940-2001. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.okubmine
See more items in:
Roy Leeper and Gaylord Hall collection of Miné Okubo papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-okubmine

Kenjilo Nanao papers

Creator:
Nanao, Kenjirō, 1929-2013  Search this
Extent:
11.3 Linear feet
0.706 Gigabytes
11.3 Linear feet
0.706 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sketchbooks
Date:
circa 1885-1887
circa 1949-2017
circa 1885-1887
circa 1949-2017
Summary:
The Kenjilo Nanao papers measure 11.3 linear feet and date from circa 1885-1887 and circa 1949-2017, with the bulk of the papers dating from 1970 to 2000. Biographical material includes forms of international identification, travel documents, early academic writing on art, and interviews in the form of written typescripts and digital audio recordings. Correspondence is mostly personal between friends and family, in addition to a few folders of professional correspondence spanning Nanao's career. Correspondence drafts also appear as entries in bound journals. The Journals series includes bound journals of mixed content such as thoughts on art, to-do lists, and artwork in various media including watercolors and charcoal. Professional files include various professional portfolios that Nanao produced for the purpose of tenure review, a binder detailing relationships with various galleries, and various teaching materials and studio documents. Printed materials include exhibition catalogs, invitations, and clippings. Photographs are primarily of family and friends, with some images of artwork and exhibitions. Artwork includes sketchbooks, as well as some loose drawings and watercolors.
Scope and Contents:
The Kenjilo Nanao papers measure 11.3 linear feet and date from circa 1885-1887 and circa 1949-2017, with the bulk of the papers dating from 1970 to 2000. Biographical material includes forms of international identification, travel documents, early academic writing on art, and interviews in the form of written typescripts and digital audio recordings. Correspondence is mostly personal between friends and family, in addition to a few folders of professional correspondence spanning Nanao's career. Correspondence drafts also appear as entries in bound journals. The Journals series includes bound journals of mixed content such as thoughts on art, to-do lists, and artwork in various media including watercolors and charcoal. Professional files include various professional portfolios that Nanao produced for the purpose of tenure review, a binder detailing relationships with various galleries, and various teaching materials and studio documents. Printed materials include exhibition catalogs, invitations, and clippings. Photographs are primarily of family and friends, with some images of artwork and exhibitions. Artwork includes sketchbooks, as well as some loose drawings and watercolors.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1960-circa 2017 (0.3 Linear Feet, .706 GB; Box 1, ER01)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1951-2013 (4.9 Linear Feet; Boxes 1-6)

Series 3: Journals, circa 1949-2013 (3.9 Linear Feet; Boxes 6-9, 12)

Series 4: Professional Files, circa 1967-2011 (1.0 Linear Feet; Box 10)

Series 5: Printed Material, circa 1885-1887, circa 1960-2010 (0.6 Linear Feet; Box 11)

Series 6: Photographic Material, circa 1960-2011 (0.1 Linear Feet; Box 11)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1976-2010 (0.4 Linear Feet; Boxes 11-12)
Biographical / Historical:
Painter and printmaker Kenjilo Nanao (1929-2013), was born in Aomori, Japan, and graduated with a degree in economics in 1953 from Nihon University before immigrating to the United States to study art in the San Francisco Bay Area. He received a bachelor's degree from the California School of Fine Arts in 1963 as well as a masters of fine arts from the San Francisco Art Institute in 1971, where he studied under Nathan Oliveira and met his wife and fellow artist, Gail Chadell Nanao.

Kenjilo's primary artistic medium was lithography in which he became known for Surrealist minimal figurative compositions. Eventually he immersed himself in painting in an Abstract Expressionist style that became his main form of artistic production from the 1980s on. Nanao taught lithography and painting at California State University at Hayward from 1971-1990, and lectured at various other schools in the San Francisco Bay Area. His work is included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, in New York City, City of San Francisco, Pasadena Art Museum, Los Angeles County Museum, Cincinnati Museum of Art, Honolulu Academy of Art, Gruenwald (University of California, Los Angeles), the Achenbach Foundation, and others.

Kenjilo Nanao died in Berkeley, CA in 2013 and is survived by his wife and son Max.
Provenance:
The Kenjilo Nanao papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in 2016 and 2018 by Gail Nanao, Kenjilo Nanao's widow.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Lithographers -- California  Search this
Painters -- California -- San Francisco Bay Area  Search this
Educators -- California  Search this
Lithographers -- California  Search this
Topic:
Japanese Americans  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American painters  Search this
Asian American printmakers  Search this
Asian American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Kenjilo Nanao papers, circa 1885-1887, circa 1949-2017. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.nanakenj
See more items in:
Kenjilo Nanao papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-nanakenj

Oral history interview with Johsel Namkung

Interviewee:
Namkung, Johsel, 1919-2013  Search this
Interviewer:
Takami, David  Search this
Lau, Alan Chong  Search this
Names:
Horiuchi, Paul, 1906-  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Tsutakawa, George  Search this
Yang, Chao-Chen, 1910-1969  Search this
Extent:
74 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1989 Oct. 5-1991 Feb. 25
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Johsel Namkung conducted 1989 Oct. 5-1991 Feb. 25, by Alan Chong Lau (1989) and David Takami (1991), in Seattle, Wash., for the Archives of American Art Northwest Asian American Project. Namkung discusses his family background and the effect of living under Japanese occupation in Korea; U.S. immigration in the late 1940's; studies in music; his determination to become a photographer, early color photography, his philosophy as a photographer; and the Asian American community in Seattle. Namkung recalls Paul Horiuchi, Mark Tobey, George Tsutakawa and Chao-Chen Yang.
Biographical / Historical:
Johsel Namkung (1919- ) is a Korean American photographer based in Seattle, Washington.
General:
Originally recorded on 5 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 37 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Photographers -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Korean American art  Search this
Korean American Artists  Search this
Asian American photographers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.namkun89
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-namkun89

Oral history interview with Kathy Vargas

Interviewee:
Vargas, Kathy  Search this
Interviewer:
Quirarte, Jacinto, 1931-2012  Search this
Extent:
70 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 November 7-25
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Kathy Vargas conducted 1997 November 7-25, by Jacinto Quirarte, in San Antonio, Texas, for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Kathy Vargas (1950-) is a photographer and art director in San Antonio, Texas. Vargas is the director of the visual arts program at the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center in San Antonio.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 6 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 8 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for this interview provided by the Smithsonian Institution's Latino Pool Fund.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Women artists -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Photographers -- Texas -- San Antonio -- Interviews  Search this
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Function:
Art centers -- Texas -- San Antonio
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.vargas97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-vargas97

Athena Tacha papers

Creator:
Tacha, Athena, 1936-  Search this
Names:
Brancusi, Constantin, 1876-1957  Search this
Nadelman, Elie, 1882-1946  Search this
Rodin, Auguste, 1840-1917  Search this
Extent:
37 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1960-2019
Scope and Contents:
The papers of sculptor and educator, Athena Tacha, measure 37.0 linear feet and date from 1960-2019. Material primarily relates to Tacha's public projects and research files compiled by Tacha, related to her publications and involvement on various committees, panels, and symposia. Included are proposals; correspondence; meeting minutes; sketches; financial material; research material; photographs and slides of Tacha, travel, and images used as source material and transparencies of works of art; and printed material about individual commissions. Also included are files on women artists and modern sculptors, each arranged alphabetically, and files on individual artists Eli Nadelman, Auguste Rodin, and Constantin Brancusi, video artists, performance artists, and film artists, and her Ph.D. thesis on light in sculpture; and files on Oberlin College visiting artists, 1973-1997.
Biographical / Historical:
Athena Tacha (1936-) is a sculptor, and educator from Oberlin, Ohio.
Related Materials:
Athena Tacha donated her teaching files, as well as her research files relating to Ellen Johnson's Frank Lloyd Wright house in Oberlin, Ohio, to Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, and her early and student writings to the Balch Institute of Ethnic Studies, Philadelphia, Pa. Tacha was also the executor of Ellen Johnson's estate, and worked with the Archives in donating Johnson's papers in 1994 (cataloged separately under Johnson).
Provenance:
Donated 1998, 2019 and 2021 by Athena Tacha.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Sculptors  Search this
Topic:
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.tachathe
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tachathe

Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records

Creator:
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art  Search this
Names:
Marks, Ben  Search this
Plagens, Peter  Search this
Smith, Robert Lewis  Search this
Spence, Judy  Search this
Extent:
18.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Date:
1973-1988
Summary:
The records of the Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art measure 18.9 linear feet, date from 1973 to 1988, and document the brief thirteen-year history of LAICA's activities as a Southern California visual arts organization and exhibition space for contemporary art. Records detail the founding of the organization, operations and administration, exhibitions, events, and publications. More than half of the collection is comprised of exhibition, program, and event files that include correspondence with artists, curators, and others; printed materials; and photographs, negatives, and slides. There is a 0.9 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2021 that includes slides; performance and exhibition notes and supplements; newsletters and other printed material; a chronology of exhibitions, projects, publications and activities. Materials date from 1974- 1987.
Scope and Content Note:
The Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records measure 18.9 linear feet, date from 1973 to 1988, and document the founding of the organization, board activities, general operations and administration, exhibitions, programs, events, and publications. There is a 0.9 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2021 that includes slides; performance and exhibition notes and supplements; newsletters and other printed material; a chronology of exhibitions, projects, publications and activities. Materials date from 1974- 1987.

Founding documents and Board of Director's files contained in the collection include the articles of confederation, by-laws, constitution, director's reports, board meeting minutes, and scattered correspondence of Peter Plagens and Judy Spence, both of whom served as Chair of the Board. These records detail the mission, organization, objectives, and goals of LAICA.

More than half of the records are comprised of exhibition, program, and event files covering LAICA's entire history of operation. Included are exhibition announcements and catalogs; correspondence with artists, curators, and organizers; press releases and other publicity; grant applications and proposals; and photographs, contact sheets, negatives, and slides which depict the exhibition's installation and works of art.

Two series of photographs and slides provide additional visual documentation of LAICA's exhibitions and events, including the installations and work of LAICA's Artists-in-Residence program. Slides depicting LAICA's buildings, offices, and staff activities are also found.

LAICA's production of its publications, including material related to their regular periodical, Journal, is well-documented through correspondence, manuscripts, and editorial files. Also found are unedited transcripts of interviews and material that was not used for publication. Meeting minutes and correspondence represent the activities of the publication committee from the mid 1970s to 1987.

The correspondence of LAICA directors Robert Smith (18 folders) and Ben Marks (one folder) contain information on almost all of the organization's activities, including exhibitions, events, funding, staffing, and general operations. General Operations files include Administrative Files and Financial Files that document members and donors, staff, financial activities, fundraising efforts, income, expenses, and grants.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 9 series.

Slides were separated from Series 1-6, and filed in Series 8 for better preservation housing.

Series 1: Board of Directors, 1973-1987 (Box 1; 0.5 linear feet )

Series 2: Correspondence, early 1970s-1987 (Boxes 1-2; 0.75 linear feet )

Series 3: General Operations, 1974-1988, undated (Boxes 2-3; 1.25 linear feet)

Series 4: Publicity, 1974-1986 (Box 3; 15 folders)

Series 5: Exhibitions and Programs, 1974-1987 (Boxes 3-13; 9.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Publications, 1974-1987 (Boxes 13-15; 2.75 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, mid-1970s-1983 (Box 15; 11 folders)

Series 8: Slides, 1974-1987 (Boxes 16-18; 3.0 linear feet)

Series 9: Unprocessed Addition, 1974-1987 (Boxes 19-21, 0.9 linear feet)
Historical Note:
The Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art was formed between 1973-1974 to provide a permanent exhibition venue for the visual contemporary arts in the Los Angeles area. The founding principle was to establish an arts organization that operated democratically and spoke with a multiplicity of voices. In order to remain flexible and minimize operating expense, LAICA did not establish a permanent collection.

Members of the Board of Directors included Peter Alexander, John Baldessari, Rosamund Felsen, Peter Plagens, Judy Spence, and other artists, gallery owners, and members of the art community. Committees that supervised exhibition programming and LAICA's published Journal were elected by members, and the duties of exhibition curator and periodical editor rotated among members, rather than being the responsibility of permanent staff. A registry of slides and biographical materials, begun in 1971, was open to submission by any Southern California artist. LAICA's first exhibitions were held in the fall of 1974, under founding director Robert Smith, a former curator at the Brand Library and Art Center in Glendale, California. The first issue of Journal was published in June of the same year.

LAICA's first exhibition space consisted of 4,200 square feet on the fifth floor of the Century City complex. During the mid-1970s, the organization hosted numerous exhibitions and events - all were were well attended, despite the lack of parking and restrooms. Exhibitions focused on a wide variety of contemporary painting, sculpture, decorative arts, fashion, performance art, video, music, architecture, social issues, and public art. Exhibitions were curated by both LAICA staff and guest curators, including Walter Hopps. Desiring to expand their space, LAICA had hopes of Frank Gehry redesigning the Century City space. The institute, however, was forced to relocate after losing their lease.

In March of 1977, LAICA reopened in an 8,000 square foot facility on 2020 South Robertson Boulevard. In addition to their public programming, the organization created an Artist-in-Residence program with funding made available by the Comprehensive Employment Training Act (CETA). By the end of the 1970s, LAICA was flourishing with increased budget and staff, and, by 1980, opened a second exhibition space at 815 Traction Avenue, referred to as the "Downtown Gallery." An additional storefront exhibition space in the Eastern Columbia building was donated by State Senator Alan Sieroty.

A decrease in public funding in the early 1980s forced LAICA to cut some of its public programs. The organization, however, still staged ambitious exhibitions, including one of contemporary Italian art that traveled to nine different venues, and a show of nine contemporary Australian artists in connection with the 1984 Olympics Art Festival.

Robert Smith resigned from his position as director in early 1985. Ben Marks, the former director of the Center of Contemporary Art in Seattle, was hired that summer. By March of 1986, however, Marks had resigned and the Board of Directors decided to sell LAICA's South Robertson location. Faced with financial burdens and the lack of a permanent exhibition space, LAICA staged exhibits at temporary spaces around Los Angeles. The Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art officially closed in 1987 after thirteen years of operation.
Related Material:
Found in the Archives of American Art are the Peter Plagens papers, 1941-1987, which include meeting minutes and correspondence relating to LAICA.
Provenance:
The bulk of the Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records were donated by Judy Spence, the former Chair of the LAICA Board of Directors, in 1986. Additional material was donated in 1997 by her husband, Stuart Spence and in 2021 by Robert Smith, founding director of LAICA.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Sculptors  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Photographers  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- California, Southern -- Exhibitions  Search this
Art centers -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Photographs
Slides (photographs)
Citation:
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records, 1973-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.losangin
See more items in:
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-losangin
Online Media:

Exhibitions and Programs

Collection Creator:
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art  Search this
Extent:
(Boxes 3-13; 9.5 linear feet)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1974-1987
Scope and Contents note:
Found within this series are the records documenting LAICA's exhibition and public programming. Exhibition Committee Files and Exhibition Files provide comprehensive documentation of LAICA's exhibition history, including exhibitions curated by LAICA staff and notable guest curators Walter Hopps, Llyn Foulks, and Mike Kelley. Focusing on broad and varied contemporary visual arts, the exhibitions included established and emerging artists of the Los Angeles area, the West Coast, Europe, and Asia. Contemporary Italian and Japanese artists were widely exhibited. Contemporary social and environmental issues were also covered in exhibitions, such as The James Bay Project, which documented the impact of hydroelectric stations in northwestern Quebec.

Extensive files are found for several significant LAICA exhibitions, such as Nine Senior California Painters, 1974-1975, which featured the work of Florence Arnold, Nick Brigante, Hans Burkhardt, Annita Delano, Lorser Feitelson, Peter Krasnow, Helen Lundeberg, John McLaughlin, and Emerson Woelffer, an exhibition of Leroy Neiman and Andy Warhol, 1981-1982, Cabin, Temple, Trailer curated by Charles Moore in 1983, Il Modo Italiano, 1984 that featured the work of 10 contemporary Italian artists, and Australia: Nine Contemporary Artists, 1984. The organization provided opportunities for emerging artists as well, including a "painting of the month" exhibition series.

Program Files document LAICA's public programming, including lecture series, workshops, and conferences. This series contains files for innovative fundraising events, such as fashion shows, film screenings, and "LAICA Sells Out", an innovative program that invited donors and artists to purchase portions of LAICA's exhibition space to display their artwork. Extensive documentation of LAICA's Artist Registry of Southern California artists and the CETA-funded Artist-in-Residence program is found here as well.

Also found in this series are LAICA's Artist Files, comprised of printed materials, photographs, and resumes of artists, as well as scattered correspondence.
Arrangement note:
The Exhibition and Programs series is arranged into 4 subseries:

5.1: Exhibition Committee Files, mid 1970s-1987

5.2: Exhibition Files, 1974-1987

5.3: Program Files, 1975-1986

5.4: Artist Files, circa 1980s
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records, 1973-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.losangin, Series 5
See more items in:
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-losangin-ref106

Exhibition Files

Collection Creator:
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1974-1987
Scope and Contents note:
LAICA's exhibition files are comprehensive and form the bulk of this collection. However, the extent of documentation for each exhibition varies - most are represented with one or two folders, although a few have numerous folders of documentation. Each exhibition file may contain a wide variety of materials, typically budgets; correspondence with artists, curators, and organizers; grant applications; loan agreements; and resumes. Visual documentation includes photographs, contact sheets, and negatives of artwork, installation views, and events. The file for Lecto Divina also contains audio documentation. Files also include printed materials such as press releases, clippings, announcements and invitations, and catalogs. Of special interest are questionnaires completed by ceramicists working in California which were collected for the exhibition Foundations In Clay. Files for proposed, but unrealized, exhibitions are also found here.

Exhibition Files have been arranged chronologically by date of exhibition opening. Proposed exhibition files are filed under "P". For preservation housing, slides from the exhibition files have been removed and are now housed in Series 8, Slides. Photographs, however, have not been separated and remain within the exhibition files.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records, 1973-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.losangin, Subseries 5.2
See more items in:
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records / Series 5: Exhibitions and Programs
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-losangin-ref121

Program Files

Collection Creator:
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1975-1986
Scope and Contents note:
Found here are files documenting LAICA's public programming and special events, such as lectures, conferences, fund-raising events, films, dinners, concerts, and book sales. Individual files for each program or event include a wide variety of materials, including flyers, pamphlets and brochures, announcements, press releases, resumes, budgets, sales records, grant applications, and correspondence.

Files documenting LAICA's CETA-funded Artist-in-Residence program are found here. Among the participating artists were Peter Alexander, Vija Celmins, and Allen Ruppersberg. Files for LAICA's Artist Registry of Southern California artists typically consist of biographical information and representative slides and/or photographs of representative artwork.

Program files have been arranged in chronological order by the month the event took place. Slides have been filed in Series 8, Slides.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records, 1973-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.losangin, Subseries 5.3
See more items in:
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records
Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art records / Series 5: Exhibitions and Programs
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-losangin-ref649

William Anderson Coffin papers, 1886-1924

Creator:
Coffin, William A. (William Anderson), 1855-1925  Search this
Coffin, William A. (William Anderson), 1855-1925  Search this
Subject:
Stella, Joseph  Search this
Warren, Whitney  Search this
Mauer, Alfred  Search this
Benson, Frank Weston  Search this
Blashfield, Edwin Howland  Search this
Zorach, William  Search this
Gay, Walter  Search this
Gussow, Bernard  Search this
Bouché, Louis  Search this
Cortissoz, Royal  Search this
Pan-American Exposition  Search this
Société des artistes français  Search this
Exposition d'artistes de l'école Américaine  Search this
American Rights Committee  Search this
American Artists' Committee of One Hundred  Search this
Lotos Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Musée d'histoire et d'art (Luxembourg)  Search this
Committee for the Exhibition of American Painting and Sculpture (Paris, France)  Search this
Type:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Topic:
Harper's Weekly  Search this
New York Post  Search this
Art Exhibitions France Paris  Search this
Landscape painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, American  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- Civilian relief -- France  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7476
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209634
AAA_collcode_coffwill
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209634
Online Media:

Abraham Walkowitz [drawing] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Artist:
Katz, Leo 1887-1982  Search this
Subject:
Walkowitz, Abraham  Search this
Type:
Photograph
Date:
1943
Topic:
Portrait male--Bust  Search this
Portrait male--Occupation--Artist  Search this
Occupation--Art--Painter  Search this
Image number:
JUL J0010669
See more items in:
Photograph Archives
Data Source:
Photograph Archives, Smithsonian American Art Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_jul_10669

Onyx [photomechanical print]

Artist:
Gilbert, Charles Allan 1873-1929  Search this
Photographic firm:
Moffat, Yard & Company  Search this
Physical description:
1 photomechanical print : color
Type:
Photomechanical prints
Date:
Copyrighted 1905
Topic:
Figure female--Head  Search this
Image number:
LOC LC000879
See more items in:
Photograph Archives
Library of Congress Copyright Deposit Collection
Data Source:
Photograph Archives, Smithsonian American Art Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_jul_138516

Topaz [photomechanical print]

Artist:
Gilbert, Charles Allan 1873-1929  Search this
Photographic firm:
Moffat, Yard & Company  Search this
Physical description:
1 photomechanical print : color
Type:
Photomechanical prints
Date:
Copyrighted 1905
Topic:
Figure female--Head  Search this
Image number:
LOC LC000885
See more items in:
Photograph Archives
Library of Congress Copyright Deposit Collection
Data Source:
Photograph Archives, Smithsonian American Art Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_jul_138522

George A. Fish [photograph] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Photographic firm:
Peter A. Juley & Son  Search this
Subject:
Fish, George A  Search this
Type:
Photograph
Topic:
Portrait male--Bust  Search this
Portrait male--Occupation--Artist  Search this
Occupation--Art--Painter  Search this
Image number:
JUL J0001586
See more items in:
Photograph Archives
Data Source:
Photograph Archives, Smithsonian American Art Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_jul_1586

Furman Finck [photograph] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Photographic firm:
Peter A. Juley & Son  Search this
Subject:
Finck, Furman  Search this
Type:
Photograph
Topic:
Portrait male--Bust  Search this
Portrait male--Occupation--Artist  Search this
Occupation--Art--Painter  Search this
Image number:
JUL J0001602
See more items in:
Photograph Archives
Data Source:
Photograph Archives, Smithsonian American Art Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_jul_1602

Carl Rungius in his studio [photograph] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Photographic firm:
Peter A. Juley & Son  Search this
Subject:
Rungius, Carl  Search this
Type:
Photograph
Topic:
Portrait male--Knee length  Search this
Portrait male--Occupation--Artist  Search this
Occupation--Art--Painter  Search this
Occupation--Art--Illustrator  Search this
Architecture interior--Studio--Rungius  Search this
Object--Art Object--Painting  Search this
Image number:
JUL J0002135
See more items in:
Photograph Archives
Data Source:
Photograph Archives, Smithsonian American Art Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_jul_2135

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