Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
425 documents - page 1 of 22

Oral history interview with Phillip A. Bruno, 2009 January 13-21

Interviewee:
Bruno, Phillip A., 1930-  Search this
Bruno, Phillip A., 1930-  Search this
Interviewer:
McElhinney, James, 1952-  Search this
Subject:
Avery, Milton  Search this
Bacon, Francis  Search this
Baskin, Leonard  Search this
Bertoia, Harry  Search this
Bravo, Claudio  Search this
Brown, Joan  Search this
Calder, Alexander  Search this
Clews, Henry  Search this
Crawford, Ralston  Search this
Cuevas, José Luis  Search this
Ernst, Max  Search this
Estes, Richard  Search this
Giacometti, Alberto  Search this
Hefner, Hugh M. (Hugh Marston)  Search this
Hirshhorn, Joseph H.  Search this
Katz, Alex  Search this
Koenig, Fritz  Search this
Kubach-Wilmsen, Anna Maria  Search this
Kubach, Wolfgang  Search this
Matisse, Henri  Search this
Morgan, Randall  Search this
Nagare, Masayuki  Search this
Neuberger, Roy R.  Search this
Nevelson, Louise  Search this
Park, David  Search this
Peterdi, Gabor  Search this
Rothko, Mark  Search this
Schapiro, Meyer  Search this
Staempfli, George W.  Search this
Willard, Charlotte  Search this
Barnes Foundation  Search this
Columbia University  Search this
Grace Borgenicht Gallery  Search this
La Napoule Art Foundation, Henry Clews Memorial  Search this
Marlborough Gallery  Search this
Weyhe Gallery  Search this
World House Galleries  Search this
Widgeon Point Charitable Foundation  Search this
Exposition universelle et internationale (1958 : Brussels, Belgium)  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15648
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)282216
AAA_collcode_bruno09
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_282216
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Lawrence A. Fleischman

Interviewee:
Fleischman, Lawrence A. (Lawrence Arthur), 1925-1997  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound tape reels (Sound recording, 7 in.)
88 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1970 Feb. 28-Mar. 9
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Lawrence A. Fleischman conducted 1970 Feb. 28-Mar. 9, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art.
He discusses a show of American Art in Russia; international reactions to American Art; working for the United States Information Agency; art in the White House; the expansion of the Detroit Institute of Art. He gives his opinion on the state of collecting and dealing; on different approaches to dealing; the academic world. He discusses Ivan Albright, John Baur, Mrs. Edsel Ford, Lloyd Goodrich, Edith Halpert, John Marin, Edgar P. Richardson, Ted Richardson, George Schreiber, Ben Shahn, Franklin Watkins, Bill Woolfenden, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Lawrence A. Fleischman (1925-1997) was an art dealer, gallery owner, collector, and publisher; New York, N.Y.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Gallery owners -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- Interviews  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.fleisc70
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-fleisc70

Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers

Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Names:
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Bess, Forrest, 1911-1977  Search this
Congdon, William, 1912-1998  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Extent:
61.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Video recordings
Drawings
Date:
1916-1991
bulk 1946-1983
Summary:
The Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers measure 61.1 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1991, with the bulk of the material dating from 1946-1983. Records provide extensive documentation of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1946 to its closing in 1983 and of the activities of Betty Parsons as one the leading art dealers of contemporary American Art in the latter half of the twentieth century, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists. Over one third of the of the collection is comprised of artists files containing correspondence, price lists, and printed materials. Additional correspondence is with galleries, dealers, art institutions, private collectors, and the media. Also found are exhibition files, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales records, stock inventories, personal financial records, and photographs. Betty Parsons's personal papers consist of early curatorial files, pocket diaries, personal correspondence, and evidence of her own artwork, including sketchbooks, and files documenting her personal art collection.
Scope and Content Note:
The Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers measure 61.1 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1991, with the bulk of the material dating from 1946-1983. Records provide extensive documentation of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1946 to its closing in 1983 and of the activities of Betty Parsons as one the leading art dealers of contemporary American Art in the latter half of the twentieth century, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists. Over one third of the of the collection is comprised of artists files containing correspondence, price lists, and printed materials. Additional correspondence is with galleries, dealers, art institutions, private collectors, and the media. Also found are exhibition files, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales records, stock inventories, personal financial records, and photographs. Betty Parsons's personal papers consist of early curatorial files, pocket diaries, personal correspondence, and evidence of her own artwork, including sketchbooks, and files documenting her personal art collection. Personal papers also include personal photographs.

Artists files, the largest and most extensive series, consist of a wide variety of documents, including biographical materials, correspondence with or related to the artist, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales and expense invoices, clippings, price lists, and photographs of the artist, exhibitions, and artwork. The files reflect Parsons's close personal relationships with certain artists, particularly Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, and Barnett Newman. Extensive documentation is also found for Forrest Bess, William Congdon, Paul Feeley, Thomas George, Alexander Liberman, Seymour Lipton, Richard Pousette-Dart, Jesse Reichek, and Jack Youngerman. Historians and researchers will find these files to be an invaluable resource both in tracing Betty Parsons's role in promoting Abstract Expressionism and researching individual artists.

Exhibition files primarily document the gallery's infrequent group or themed exhibitions. Of particular note are the files on The Ideographic Picture, which was organized by Barnett Newman and included his work, as well as that of Pietro Lazzari, Boris Margo, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Theodoros Stamos, and Clyfford Still. Price lists, artist biographies and exhibition schedules are housed in the general exhibition files. Loan exhibition files provide documentation of artwork borrowed by other galleries or institutions for exhibitions, as well as shows outside of the gallery that were organized by Betty Parsons. Also found are gallery exhibition guest books, and announcements and catalogs.

Gallery correspondence is primarily with galleries and dealers, museums, arts organizations, and collectors. Scattered letters from artists are also found, although the bulk of the artists' correspondence is filed in the Artists Files. Also found here are memoranda and letters between Betty Parsons and her staff that contain detailed information concerning Parsons's schedule and gallery activities. Similar correspondence is found amongst the correspondence files within the series Betty Parsons papers.

Appraisal and conservation files include correspondence, appraisal invoices, forms, and appraisal requests and other information from the Art Dealers Association of America, and conservation invoices and reports. The majority of the appraisal records contain information about the specific works of art, including artist, title, date, current owner and the estimated value at the time of the request. Conservation records document conservation treatments undertaken by outside conservators to gallery stock.

Sales, purchases, stock and inventory are well documented in the sales and inventory records. The records provide detailed information about individual sales, prices of individual pieces of artwork, consignments, and loans. Most sales records also include detailed information about the buyer and are a valuable resource for provenance research. Files documenting the general administration, routine business operations, and financial transactions (not individual sales) of the gallery are housed in the general business and financial records. These records include ledgers, receipts, tax records, and banking records. There is some limited information about works of art scattered amongst the receipts and in the "in/out slips" files. Legal records house general legal documents and those concerning specific lawsuits. Of particular note is the file detailing the lawsuit between Betty Parsons and Sidney Janis over the fifth floor of 24 West 57th Street.

The remainder of the collection consists of Betty Parsons's personal papers which document her career prior to opening her own gallery, her work as an artist, and her personal art collection.

Some information about Parsons's work prior to opening her own gallery is found in the early curatorial files she retained from her curatorial and administrative work at the Wakefield Gallery and the Mortimer Brandt Gallery. Clippings, correspondence, announcements, exhibition lists and exhibition files are found. For both positions, she kept only the exhibition files for a small group of exhibitions organized around a specific theme, the most notable being the exhibition of Pre-Columbian Sculpture at the Wakefield Gallery.

Biographical materials include copies of her biography, family genealogies, photographs of Parsons, interviews with Colette Roberts and WYNC radio, memberships, photographs, and ephemera, including a collection of programs and invitations from events that she attended. Throughout her life Parsons gave generously of her time to various cultural and charitable institutions and was awarded for her contributions. There are also a number of files that document her speaking engagements, her participation as a juror in numerous juried exhibitions, charitable work, and awards that she received.

Parsons's personal correspondence files reflect how deeply Parsons's life was intertwined with the gallery. There are letters from museum directors, dealers, artists seeking representation, and personal letters from artists with whom she had close personal relationships, most notably Larry Bigelow, Alexander Calder, William Condon, and Ad Reinhardt. There are also letters from the English artist Adge Baker, with whom Parsons was romantically involved. Correspondence also includes several files of postcards and Christmas cards.

Pocket diaries and engagement calendars, spanning from 1933-1981, record social engagements, meetings, vacations, and telephone numbers. Also found are circa two linear feet of notebooks and sketchbooks, many of which are annotated with addresses, poetry, journal entries, and other observations of people, places, and travels. Writings by others include writings about Betty Parsons or the Betty Parsons Gallery, such as Lawrence Alloway's unpublished typescript titled "An American Gallery" and other topics.

Printed material consists of exhibition announcements and catalogs, art magazines, and newspaper and magazine clippings about Betty Parsons, her family and acquaintances, artists, and other art related topics, coupled with a miscellaneous selection of clippings, and a video recording, on topics that presumably captured Parsons's attention.

Personal art work records document Betty Parsons's career as an artist through inventories, group and solo exhibitions files, price lists, appraisals, sales and consignment invoices. Photographs are primarily reproductions of her works of art, although there are scattered photographs of exhibition installations.

Betty Parsons's private art collection files document her extensive personal collection of art that included works by Jackson Pollock, Agnes Martin, Romare Bearden, Barnett Newman, and Mark Rothko, in addition to Amlash sculpture from ancient Persia and primitive sculpture from New Hebrides. These files include inventories, lists, exhibition records, sales and purchase invoices, and photographs. There are also files for donations and loans from Parsons's personal collection to museums and fund raising auctions for several non-profit institutions.

Finally, the personal financial records provide information about the Parsons's family finances and her personal financial success as an art dealer. In addition to her own investments, Parsons inherited shares in family investments through the estates of her parents, J. Fred Pierson, Jr. and Suzanne Miles Pierson, and younger sister, Emily Rayner. Real estate files include correspondence, utility bills, receipts, area maps, and land plots for houses in Sheepscot, Maine and St. Maartens, Netherlands Antilles. Tax returns, ledger worksheets, receipts, banking statements, deposit slips, and cancelled checks are among the other financial records.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as seven series. Many of the series are further divided into subseries.

Series 1: Artists Files, 1935-1983 (19.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-18, 51, 55-56, OVs 53, 65)

Series 2: Exhibition Files, 1941-1983 (2.9 linear feet; Boxes 18-21, 51, 55, OVs 54, 66)

Series 3: Correspondence Files, 1941-1983 (3.9 linear feet; Boxes 21-24, 52, 56)

Series 4: Appraisal Files, 1954-1983 (0.7 linear feet; Box 24)

Series 5: Sales and Inventory Records, 1946-1983 (3.9 linear feet; Boxes 25-28, 51)

Series 6: General Business and Financial Records, 1946-1983 (9.3 linear feet; Boxes 28-38, 51, 56)

Series 7: Betty Parsons Personal Papers, 1916-1991 (21 linear feet; Boxes 38-51, 55-64, OVs 65-67)
Historical Note:
Betty Parsons (1900-1982) was one of the leading art dealers in New York City specializing in modern art, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists, and an abstract painter and sculptor in her own right. She opened Betty Parsons Gallery in 1946 at 15 E. 57th St., later moving to 24 W. 57th St.

The history of the Betty Parsons Gallery is inextricably bound to the life and experiences of its founder. Betty Parsons was born Betty Bierne Pierson on January 31, 1900 in New York City. She enjoyed a privileged childhood, which included vacation homes in Newport and Palm Beach. Her only formal education was a five-year stint at the prestigious Chapin School from 1910-1915, where she met many of the women who would become life-long friends and supporters. In the spring of 1920, she married Schuyler Livingston Parsons from one of New York's oldest families. The marriage ended after only three years and the couple traveled to Paris where they could obtain a divorce on the grounds of incompatibility. She retained her married surname and purchased a house on the rue Boulard in Paris, where she remained for ten years, pursuing studies in painting and sculpture.

Financial constraints forced Parsons to return to the United States in 1933. She first traveled west to California, but it was her return to New York in 1935 that marked the start of her career as an art dealer. Her first opportunity to connect with the New York art world came after a successful exhibition of her watercolors at the Midtown Galleries where the owner, Alan Gruskin, noted Parson's faithful and wealthy group of supporters and offered her work installing exhibitions and selling paintings on commission. Her work for the Midtown Galleries led to a second position in the Park Avenue gallery of Mary Sullivan, one of the founders of the Museum of Modern Art. Here, Parsons learned the business of running a gallery. By 1940 Parsons was ready to take on more independent responsibility and agreed to manage a gallery within the Wakefield Bookshop. In this job, she exercised full curatorial control by selecting artists and organizing exhibitions. She championed then unknown contemporary American artists and the gallery's roster soon included Saul Steinberg, Hedda Sterne, Alfonso Ossorio, Joseph Cornell, Walter Murch, and Theodore Stamos. Although the majority of the exhibitions were solo shows, there were a few group shows and themed exhibitions, such as Love in Art (1941) and Ballet in Art (1942). Under Parson's direction, the gallery hosted an important exhibition of Pre-Columbian sculpture, curated by Barnett Newman.

When the owners of the Wakefield Bookshop decided to close the gallery late in 1944, Mortimer Brandt, a dealer who specialized in Old Master paintings and drawings, offered her a position as head of the newly created contemporary section of his gallery. Many of the artists who had shown with Parsons at the Wakefield Gallery followed her to her new gallery, where they were joined by Ad Reinhardt, Boris Mango, and Hans Hofmann. While the exhibitions garnered attention from the press and the interest of contemporary artists, the contemporary section was not a financial success and Brandt opted to close his gallery in 1946.

Using $1000 of her own money and an additional borrowed $4000, Parsons sublet the space that previously housed Mortimer Brandt's contemporary section, on the fifth floor of 15 East 57th Street, and opened the Betty Parsons Gallery.

In many respects the early years of the Betty Parsons Gallery were the most vital, as it was during the period of 1947-1951 that the gallery became linked with the Abstract Expressionists and the history of post-WWII American Art. In an unpublished history of the gallery, noted art critic Lawrence Alloway stated that the significance of the gallery's early exhibitions ranks with Durand-Ruel's Impressionists exhibitions or Kahnweiler's shows of the Cubists. Betty Parsons Gallery quickly became one of the most prestigious galleries in New York City associated with new American Art of all styles. Her close friend Barnett Newman organized the gallery's inaugural exhibition of Northwest Coast Indian Art and he soon began to exhibit his own work at the gallery. When Peggy Guggenheim's Art of This Century Gallery closed, Jackson Pollock, Clyfford Still, and Mark Rothko joined Parsons' growing stable of artists. Although Parsons continued to promote and exhibit many of the artists whom she had previously discovered, these four artists dominated this period. Newman, Pollock, Still, and Rothko worked closely together, holding themselves apart from the other artists somewhat. They were actively involved in the curatorial process and often hung their own shows. For these artists, the exhibition itself was an artistic act of creation.

Parsons provided a supportive environment and allowed her artists enormous freedom in planning and designing their exhibitions. She was not, however, an aggressive salesperson. During this early period the gallery ledgers document sales to an impressive array of museums including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago, as well as important collectors such as Edward Root and Duncan Phillips. Nevertheless, the art that the gallery promoted was not yet widely accepted. Sales were few, prices were low and the business would not turn a profit for several years. Meanwhile, there was mounting pressure from Pollock, Newman, Still, and Rothko to drop some of the other artists from Parsons' stable and focus all resources on them. They wanted to be promoted to a larger audience and have their work sold at higher prices, but Parsons enjoyed discovering new artists and did not want to be restricted in this endeavor. The year 1951 marks the last time that Pollock's drip paintings or the monumental works of Newman, Rothko or Still were shown at the Betty Parsons Gallery.

In the following years the Betty Parsons Gallery continued to attract a diverse group of talented artists. Ellsworth Kelly, Richard Tuttle, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jack Youngerman had their first New York exhibitions at the Betty Parsons Gallery. Parsons opened Section Eleven in 1958, a short-lived annex to the main gallery, so that she could promote younger, less well-known artists. It closed in 1960 due to the administrative difficulties in running two essentially separate galleries.

In 1962, Sidney Janis, another prominent art dealer, started proceedings to evict Parsons from the floor that they shared on 15 East 57th Street. The Betty Parsons Gallery moved to 24 West 57th Street in 1963, where it remained until it closed in 1983, following Parsons' death the preceding year. Throughout the gallery's history, Parsons continued to promote faithful artists such as Hedda Sterne and Saul Steinberg, who had been with her from the beginning and to seek out new talent, both for her main gallery and for other venues, such as the short-lived Parsons-Truman Gallery, which she opened in 1974 with former Parsons Gallery director Jock Truman to show works on paper by emerging artists.

In addition to being an art dealer, Betty Parsons was a respected artist and collector. With her connoisseur's eye and connections, Parsons amassed an impressive private collection of art. She bought her first piece while an art student in Paris in the 1920s, a small gouache by Zadkine, but did not begin acquiring works in earnest until she was established as an art dealer. Partial inventories of her personal collection show that the majority of her collection contained works by artists associated with the gallery. Mark Rothko, Hans Hofmann, Ad Reinhardt, Agnes Martin, and Kenzo Okada were among the artists represented. Many were gifts from the artists, such as an ink drawing by Jackson Pollock, inscribed "For Betty." Selections from her collection appeared in small museums across the United States, including a traveling exhibition organized by Fitch College, New York, in 1968. In her role as a promoter of contemporary American art, Parsons lent generously from her collection, particularly to the federal Art in the Embassies Program. Throughout her life she also donated works to a variety of museums, most notably, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark.

Parsons frequently claimed that her desire to pursue a career as an artist stemmed from a visit to the Armory Show when she was thirteen. In her late teens, after pressuring her father for art lessons, she studied with the sculptor Gutzon Burglum of Mount Rushmore fame. In Paris, she continued her studies first with Antoine Bourdelle, whose sculptures she had admired at the Armory Show, and later with Ossip Zadkine. The first exhibition of her work, figurative watercolors and sculptures, took place in Paris in 1927. As she matured as an artist, her art became more abstract. Her late works were painted wood sculptures that she pieced together from wood that she found near her studio in Long Island. Parsons's work was exhibited in more than thirty solo exhibitions, including, Betty Parsons; Paintings, Gouaches and Sculpture, 1955-1968, at the Whitechapel Gallery in London. During her lifetime, she would not allow her works to be shown in her own gallery. Shortly after she died of a stroke in 1982, In Memoriam, Betty Parsons: Late Sculptures, opened at the Betty Parsons Gallery.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are oral history interviews with Betty Parsons, June 4-9, 1969, by Paul Cummings, and June 11, 1981 by Gerald Silk.
Separated Material:
Some of the material originally loaned for microfilming in 1968 and 1969 was not included in later donations and can be viewed on microfilm reels N68/62-N68/74 and N69/105-N69/106. Loaned materials are not described in the container listing in this finding aid.
Provenance:
The gallery donated some records in 1974, many of which had been loaned earlier for microfilming. The bulk of the collection was donated in 1984 and 1986 by William Rayner and Christopher Schwabacher, executors of the Estate of Betty Parsons. Additional material was donated by William Rayner in 1998 and Christopher Schwabacher in 2017. Additional material was donated in 2018 by the Lee Hall estate via Carolyn Crozier and Deborah Jacobson, co-executors. Hall was Parsons's biographer and had the material in her possession at the time of Parsons's death. An additional photograph of Parons and Marie Carr Taylor by Henri Cartier-Bresson was donated in 2021 by Mary Carpenter, who inherited the photograph from her mother, Nan Thorton Jones, who received it as a gift from Taylor.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Gallery owners -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women art dealers  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Abstract expressionist  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Video recordings
Drawings
Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.parsbett
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-parsbett
Online Media:

Bertha Schaefer papers and gallery records

Creator:
Schaefer, Bertha, 1895-1971  Search this
Names:
Bertha Schaefer Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
New Bertha Schaefer Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Barnet, Will, 1911-2012  Search this
Ben-Zion  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Greene, Balcomb, 1904-1990  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Vasilieff, Nicholas  Search this
Zóbel, Fernando  Search this
Extent:
4.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Date:
1909-1975
bulk 1940-1965
Summary:
The Bertha Schaefer papers and gallery records measure 4.6 linear feet and date from 1909-1975, with the bulk of the material dating from 1940-1965. The collection documents the Bertha Schaefer Gallery as well as Bertha Schaefer, the interior designer, through correspondence with artists and galleries, artist files, client files, exhibition material, printed material, financial material, biographical material, photographs, and six scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents:
The Bertha Schaefer papers and gallery records measure 4.6 linear feet and date from 1909-1975, with the bulk of the material dating from 1940-1965. The collection documents the Bertha Schaefer Gallery as well as Bertha Schaefer, the interior designer, through correspondence with artists and galleries, artist files, client files, exhibition material, printed material, financial material, biographical material, photographs, and six scrapbooks. Also found here are oversized blue prints and sketched plans of interior design projects, as well as a number of oversized photographic prints and stereo slides. Correspondence contains handwritten notes by many notable artists, including Marcel Duchamp, Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Ad Reinhardt, and Fernando Zobel, with a bulk of the letters from Balcomb Greene.

Separated into three series, the Bertha Schaefer Gallery records document the artists represented by and function of the Bertha Schaefer Gallery. The Bertha Schaefer papers pertain to Bertha Schaefer as an interior designer through a large number of photographic materials and client files. Six scrapbooks document artists Will Barnet, Ben-Zion, Balcomb Greene, and Nicolai Vasilieff, as well as the Bertha Schaefer gallery and the New Bertha Schaefer Gallery.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 3 series. Records are generally arranged by material type and chronologically thereafter.

Series 1: Bertha Schaefer Gallery Records, 1909-1971 (0.8 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Bertha Schaefer Papers, 1914-1971 (2.6 linear feet; Boxes 1-3, 6-7, OV 8-9)

Series 3: Scrapbooks, 1944-1975 (1.2 linear feet; Boxes 3-5)
Biographical / Historical:
Bertha Schaefer (1895-1971) was an interior designer and director of the Bertha Schaefer Gallery in New York, New York. Schaefer was born in Yazoo City, Mississippi to Emil and Julia (Marx) Schaefer. She received her B.A. on June 1, 1914 from Mississippi State College for Women, and received a diploma for interior decorating from the Parsons School of Design in New York City. In 1924, after living in Paris for 5 months, she opened Bertha Schaefer Interiors in New York. In 1944, she opened the Bertha Schaefer Gallery of Contemporary Art, which featured American and European paintings and sculpture. "The Modern House Comes Alive" (1947-1948) is one of the key exhibitions she created. Schaefer designed furniture for Joe Singer of M. Singer and Sons Furniture Company in New York, 1950-1961.

Schaefer won design awards from the Museum of Modern Art (1952) and the Decorators Club of New York (1959). In 1958, she was given an award of recognition from the U.S. Department of State for her gallery's assistance in the American program for the Brussels Universal and International Exhibition, and an outstanding achievement in interior design award from the American Institute of Interior Designers. She was a member of several design organizations, including: the American Institute of Decorators, the Home Lighting Forum, the Illuminating Engineers Society, the American Federation of the Arts, and the Art Dealers Association of America. She was the president of the Decorators Club of New York from 1947-1948 and 1955-1957.

Schaefer was one of the first people to use fluorescent lighting in domestic spaces, with Percy Block as her first client, in 1939. In honor of Edison's birthday in 1953, she designed a bathroom for General Electric, applying new developments in lighting. She died on May 24, 1971, after which the gallery was renamed the New Bertha Schaefer Gallery.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Bertha Schaefer conducted by Paul Cummings, April 20-22, 1970.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming. Reel N69-115 is comprised of papers concerning Alfred H. Maurer, including a scrapbook about Maurer from 1946 to 1969. Reel N70-60 contains material concerning Hale Woodruff, including correspondence, sketches and drawings, articles, photographs, catalogs, announcements, clipping, notes kept while a student of Diego Rivera, and a scrapbook. Lent material was returned to the lender and is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The Bertha Schaefer papers and gallery records were donated in several installments from 1969 to 1974 by Bertha Schaefer and Bertha Schaefer Gallery Inc. She also loaned material for microfilming in 1970. Paul Creamer donated three scrapbooks from the Bertha Schaefer Gallery and the New Bertha Schaefer Gallery in 1979. Additional material was donated in 1984 by Syracuse University.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Gallery directors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Interior decoration  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Interior designers -- New York (State) -- New York
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Citation:
Bertha Schaefer papers and gallery records, 1909-1975, bulk 1940-1965. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.schabert
See more items in:
Bertha Schaefer papers and gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-schabert

Oral history interview with Phillip A. Bruno

Interviewee:
Bruno, Phillip A.  Search this
Creator:
McElhinney, James Lancel, 1952-  Search this
Widgeon Point Charitable Foundation  Search this
Names:
Barnes Foundation  Search this
Columbia University -- Students  Search this
Exposition universelle et internationale (1958 : Brussels, Belgium)  Search this
Grace Borgenicht Gallery  Search this
La Napoule Art Foundation, Henry Clews Memorial  Search this
Marlborough Gallery  Search this
Weyhe Gallery  Search this
Widgeon Point Charitable Foundation  Search this
World House Galleries  Search this
Avery, Milton, 1885-1965  Search this
Bacon, Francis, 1909-1992  Search this
Baskin, Leonard, 1922-2000  Search this
Bertoia, Harry  Search this
Bravo, Claudio, 1936-2011  Search this
Brown, Joan, 1938-1990  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Clews, Henry, 1876-1937  Search this
Crawford, Ralston, 1906-1978  Search this
Cuevas, José Luis, 1934-  Search this
Ernst, Max, 1891-1976  Search this
Estes, Richard, 1932-  Search this
Giacometti, Alberto, 1901-1966  Search this
Hefner, Hugh M. (Hugh Marston), 1926-  Search this
Hirshhorn, Joseph H.  Search this
Katz, Alex, 1927-  Search this
Koenig, Fritz, 1924-  Search this
Kubach, Wolfgang, 1936-  Search this
Kubach-Wilmsen, Anna Maria, 1937-  Search this
Matisse, Henri, 1869-1954  Search this
Morgan, Randall, 1920-  Search this
Nagare, Masayuki, 1923-  Search this
Neuberger, Roy R.  Search this
Nevelson, Louise, 1899-1988  Search this
Park, David, 1911-1960  Search this
Peterdi, Gabor  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Schapiro, Meyer, 1904-  Search this
Staempfli, George W.  Search this
Willard, Charlotte  Search this
Extent:
46 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2009 January 13-21
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Phillip A. Bruno conducted 2009 January 13-21, by James McElhinney, for the Archives of American Art, at the Archives of American Art, in New York, New York.
Bruno speaks of some his earliest impressions of art while growing up in New York and Paris; attending Columbia University, where he majored in the history of painting and architecture and studied under Meyer Schapiro; his first job at the Weyhe Gallery as a gallery assistant; helping create the Grace Borgenicht Gallery, where he served as director for five years; traveling to Mexico, meeting Jose Cuevas and exhibiting his work at the Edward Loeb Gallery in Paris; traveling to Brazil and meeting a family of naturalist painters who emphasized the importance of painting outdoors, unlike many painters from the New York school; working with Henry Clews and the La Napoule Art Foundation; selling a piece of Salvador Dali jewelry made by Carlos Alamanni to Hugh Hefner, founder of Playboy Magazine; working as director of The World House Gallery and selling works by Fancis Bacon and Max Ernst to clients such as Joseph Hirshhorn and Roy Neuberger; organizing a exhibition of artists shown at the Brussels World Fair in 1958 at World House and meeting George Staempfli through the artist Joan Brown; moving from World House to the Staempfli Gallery in 1960 to work as co-director; the Staempfli Gallery's role in the international art world; an original drawing by Leonard Baskin inscribed to Phillip in 1954; selling the work of artists such as Harry Bertoia, Fritz Koening, and David Park; meeting Henri Matisse in Paris at the age of 21; visiting the studios of Alexander Calder and Mark Rothko; the difference between galleries that can spot new talent and galleries that sell certain artists well; the art market becoming less idealistic and more commercial; the rising importance of auction houses and the possibility of their taking the place of traditional art galleries; the move of the Staempfli Gallery to the SoHo neighborhood and soon after, leaving Staempfli for Marlborough, where he was one of the New York directors for 18 years; his appreciation for the creativity of others, retirement and current plans to write his memoirs. Bruno also recalls Milton Avery, Gabor Peterdi, Hans Muller, Ralston Crawford, Randall Morgan, Charlotte Willard, Dorthy Satterlee, Masayuki Nagare, Claude Bemardin, Kubach-Wilmsen, Louise Nevelson, Cladio Bravo, Lopez Garcia, Alberto Giacometti, The Barnes Foundation, Richard Estes, Alex Katz, and Neil Wlliver.
Biographical / Historical:
Phillip A. Bruno (1930- ) is an art collector and director of Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hr., 45 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Gallery directors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.bruno09
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bruno09

Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt papers

Creator:
Smithson, Robert  Search this
Names:
Dwan Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art  Search this
Andre, Carl, 1935-  Search this
Atkinson, Terry, 1939-  Search this
Dibbets, Jan, 1941-  Search this
Dwan, Virginia  Search this
Flavin, Dan, 1933-  Search this
Graham, Dan, 1942-  Search this
Haacke, Hans, 1936-  Search this
Heizer, Michael, 1944-  Search this
Holt, Nancy, 1938-  Search this
Insley, Will, 1929-2011  Search this
Jenney, Neil, 1945-  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-  Search this
Kepes, Gyorgy, 1906-2001  Search this
LeWitt, Sol, 1928-2007  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Long, Richard, 1945-  Search this
Oppenheim, Dennis, 1938-2011  Search this
Valledor, Leo, 1936-1989  Search this
Wheeler, Dennis  Search this
Extent:
67.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Greeting cards
Photographs
Transcripts
Motion pictures (visual works)
Date:
1905-1987
bulk 1952-1987
Summary:
The papers of sculptor, writer, and earthworks artist Robert Smithson and his wife, sculptor, filmmaker, and earthworks artist Nancy Holt measure 19.1 linear feet and date from 1905 to 1987, with the bulk of the material dating from 1952 to 1987. Also included is Smithson's personal library of books, vinyl records, and magazine, measuring 48.4 linear feet. The papers consist of Smithson's biographical material; business and personal correspondence, much of it with artists; interview transcripts; extensive writings and project files; financial records; printed material; a scrapbook of clippings; holiday cards with original prints and sketches; photographic material; and artifacts. Also found are project files related to Nancy Holt's motion picture film Pine Barrens and her seminal environmental work of art Sun Tunnels, including a video documentary about Sun Tunnels.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of sculptor, writer, and earthworks artist Robert Smithson and his wife, sculptor, filmmaker, and earthworks artist Nancy Holt measure 19.1 linear feet and date from 1905 to 1987, with the bulk of the material dating from 1952 to 1987. Also included is Smithson's personal library of books, vinyl records, and magazine, measuring 48.4 linear feet. The papers consist of Smithson's biographical material; business and personal correspondence, much of it with artists; interview transcripts; extensive writings and project files; financial records; printed material; a scrapbook of clippings; holiday cards with original prints and sketches; photographic material; and artifacts. Also found are project files related to Nancy Holt's film Pine Barrens and her seminal environmental work of art Sun Tunnels, including a video documentary about Sun Tunnels.

Biographical material includes Robert Smithson's curriculum vitae, personal identification and medical documents, eight engagement/day planners Smithson and Holt maintained from 1966 to 1973, and Smithson's funeral register.

Correspondence is primarily with Smithson's family, friends, fellow artists, and business associates discussing personal relationships, proposed art projects, and exhibitions. Correspondents of note include Carl Andre, the Dwan Gallery (Virginia Dwan), Dan Graham, Will Insley, Ray Johnson, Gyorgy Kepes, Sol Lewitt, Lucy Lippard, and Dennis Wheeler. There is also substantial correspondence received by Holt upon Smithson's death in 1973, and between Holt and the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art regarding Smithson's retrospective exhibition in 1982.

There are nine interview transcripts with Smithson discussing his works and his general philosophy on art, and one transcript of the Andrew Dickson White Museum's Earth Art Symposium (1969) featuring the following artists: Mike Hiezer, Dennis Oppenheim, Robert Smithson, Neil Jenney, Gunther Uecker, Jan Dibbets, Richard Long, and Hans Haacke.

Writings are substantial and include 73 drafts of published and unpublished essays by Smithson on art, artists, and works in progress. The series also includes poems by Smithson, six notebooks containing notes and sketches by Smithson, and drafts of writings sent to Smithson and Holt by friends and colleagues, including Carl Andre, Terry Atkinson, Dan Flavin, Dan Graham, and Jack Thibeau.

Project files contain correspondence, project instructions, diagrams and sketches, research materials, photographic material, and maps related to over 50 of Smithson's artworks. These include concepts, proposed projects, sculptures, non-sites, and earthwork projects, including Spiral Jetty, Broken Circle, and Spiral Hill.

Personal business records include gallery related loan arrangements and receipts for miscellaneous art supplies. Financial records include tax forms and preparation documents, including cancelled checks, receipts, statements, and related correspondence.

Printed materials include books, clippings, and periodicals related to Smithson, either containing writings or sketches by him, or containing articles reviewing his work. There are also exhibition announcements and catalogs of Smithson's group and solo shows from 1959 to 1985.

The scrapbook contains clippings of Smithson's published articles from 1966 to 1973 with annotated shorthand notes.

Artwork consists of Christmas cards collaged by Smithson, and sketches by Smithson and Leo Valledor.

Photographic materials include prints and negatives of Smithson with friends, promotional Hollywood movie stills, and original prints and copyprints of other artists' artwork.

Artifacts consist of a paper bag silkscreened with a Campbell's soup can (Warhol), promotional buttons (N.E. Thing Co.), various organic materials, and two art kits.

Nancy Holt's papers consist of correspondence, a grant application, printed materials, and project files and audio visual material related to her motion picture film Pine Barrens (1975) and her seminal environmental work of art Sun Tunnels (1975).
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 14 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1905-1974 (Box 1; 14 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1959-1987 (Boxes 1-2, OV 21; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Interview Transcripts, 1966-1973 (Box 2; 11 folders)

Series 4: Writings, 1959-1975 (Boxes 2-3; 1.1 linear feet)

Series 5: Project Files, circa 1950s-1982 (Boxes 4-5, Boxes 17-18, OV 20, OV 22-26, OV 36, RD 28-30, RD 32-35; 6.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Personal Business Records, circa 1967-1970s (Box 5; 4 folders)

Series 7: Financial Records, 1962-1972 (Box 6; 1 linear foot)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1955-1985 (Boxes 7-11, Box 18, RD 31; 5.6 linear feet)

Series 9: Scrapbook, 1966-1973 (Box 11, Box 16; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 10: Artwork, circa 1950s-1970s (Box 11; 4 folders)

Series 11: Photographs, circa 1950s-1970s (Box 11, Box 18; 5 folders)

Series 12: Artifacts, circa 1950s-1970s (Box 11, Box 14, OV 19; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 13: Nancy Holt Papers, circa 1960s-1980s (Box 12-13, 15, OV 27, FC 37-38; 1.9 linear feet)

Series 14: Robert Smithson Personal Library (Boxes 39-87; 48.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Robert Smithson (1938-1973) was the pioneer of land and earthworks art. He was also a noted sculptor, painter, writer, and lecturer working primarily in New York City. Smithson's wife, Nancy Holt (1938-) was a noted sculptor and filmmaker and also worked as an earthworks artist.

Born in Passaic, New Jersey, Smithson expressed an early interest in art, enrolling in classes at the Brooklyn Museum School and the Art Student's League in New York while still attending high school. Smithson's early works were primarily paintings, drawings, and collages. In 1959, he exhibited his first solo show of paintings at the Artists' Gallery in New York and had his first solo international show in Rome with the Galleria George Lester in 1961.

During the early to mid-1960s, Smithson was perhaps better known as a writer and art critic, writing numerous essays and reviews for Arts Magazine and Artforum. He became affiliated with artists who were identified with the minimalist movement, such as Carl Andre, Donald Judd, Nancy Holt, Sol LeWitt, Robert Morris and others. In 1963, Smithson married sculptor and filmmaker Nancy Holt and a year later started to create his first sculptural works. In 1966, Smithson joined the Dwan Gallery, whose owner Virginia Dwan was an enthusiastic supporter of his work.

Smithson's interest in land art began in the late 1960s while exploring industrial and quarry sites and observing the movement of earth and rocks. This resulted in a series of sculptures called "non-sites" consisting of earth and rocks collected from a specific site and installed in gallery space, often combined with photographs, maps, mirrors, or found materials. In September 1968, Smithson published the essay "A Sedimentation of the Mind: Earth Projects" in Artforum that promoted the work of the first wave of land art artists. Soon thereafter, he began creating his own large scale land art and earthworks.

From 1967 to 1973, Smithson's productivity was constant as he wrote, lectured, and participated in several solo and group shows a year, both at home and abroad. He explored narrative art as essay in "The Monuments of Passaic" and fully committed to his idea of visiting sites and using them as the basis for creating non-sites, Non-Site, Pine Barrens, (1968); incorporated and documented the use of mirrors at sites in Mirror Displacement, Cayuga Salt Mine Project (1968-1969); and created his first site-specific works through liquid pours of mud, asphalt, and concrete, including Asphalt Rundown (1969). In 1969, he also completed his first earth pour at Kent State University with his project Partially Buried Woodshed. Later that year, he created the sculptural artwork for which he is best known, Spiral Jetty (1969) on the Great Salt Lake in Utah. This was the first of his pieces to require the acquisition of land rights and earthmoving equipment, and would be followed two years later by Broken Circle and Spiral Hill in 1971.

On July 20, 1973, while surveying sites in Texas for the proposed Amarillo Ramp, Smithson died in a plane crash at the age of 35. Despite his early death, Smithson's writings and artwork had a major impact on many contemporary artists.

Nancy Holt began her career as a photographer and video artist. Today, Holt is most widely known for her large-scale environmental works, Sun Tunnels and Dark Star Park. Holt has also made a number of films and videos since the late 1960s, including Mono Lake (1968), East Coast, West Coast (1969), and Swamp (1971) in collaboration with her late husband Robert Smithson. Points of View: Clocktower (1974) features conversations between Lucy Lippard and Richard Serra, Liza Bear and Klaus Kertess, Carl Andre and Ruth Kligman and Bruce Brice and Tina Girouard. In 1978, she produced a film about her seminal work Sun Tunnels.
Related Material:
The Archives also holds several collections related to Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt, including an oral history interview with Robert Smithson conducted by Paul Cummings in 1972; an interview with Robert Smithson conducted by Tony Robbin in 1968; Robert Smithson letters to George B. Lester, 1960-1963; and oral history interviews with Nancy Holt conducted by Scott Gutterman in 1992 and Joyce Pomeroy Schwartz in 1993.
Provenance:
The papers of Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt were donated by Nancy Holt in several accretions between 1986 and 2011.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Periodicals, and phonographs from Robert Smithson's personal library are currently stored offsite. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
The donor has retained all intellectual property rights, including copyright, that they may own in the following material: two holiday cards found in box 11, folders 23-24.
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Earthworks (Art)  Search this
Filmmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Greeting cards
Photographs
Transcripts
Motion pictures (visual works)
Citation:
Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt papers, 1905-1987, bulk 1952-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.smitrobe
See more items in:
Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-smitrobe
Online Media:

Stable Gallery records

Creator:
Stable Gallery  Search this
Names:
New York School of poets and painters  Search this
Groh, Alan, 1923-1996  Search this
Scull, Robert, 1917-1986 -- Art collections  Search this
Ward, Eleanor, 1912-1984  Search this
Extent:
2.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Video recordings
Sketchbooks
Sound recordings
Photographs
Date:
1916-1999
bulk 1953-1970
Summary:
The Stable Gallery records measure 2.9 linear feet and are dated 1916-1999 (bulk 1953-1970). The gallery was known for its representation of the New York School. Records consist mainly of artist files containing biographical notes, correspondence, price lists, sales and payment information, printed matter, and photographs. A small number of gallery administrative and financial records are included, along with printed matter, photographs, and personal papers and estate records of gallery founder and owner Eleanor Ward. There are also reminiscences by gallery owner Eleanor Ward and her assistant Alan Groh, a sound cassette recording of Eleanor Ward, and a videoreel (1/2 inch) documentary of a 1973 Sotheby auction of works from the Robert C. Scull collection.
Scope and Content Note:
The Stable Gallery records measure 2.9 linear feet and are dated 1916-1999 (bulk 1953-1970). The gallery was known for its representation of the New York School. Records consist mainly of artist files containing biographical notes, correspondence, price lists, sales and payment information, printed matter, and photographs. A small number of gallery administrative and financial records are included, along with printed matter, photographs, personal papers, and estate records of gallery founder and owner Eleanor Ward. There are also reminiscences by gallery owner Eleanor Ward and her assistant Alan Groh, a sound cassette recording of Eleanor Ward, and a videoreel (1/2 inch) documentary of a 1973 Sotheby auction of works from the Robert C. Scull collection.

The Stable Gallery's administrative records includes both general correspondence and copious letters from Eleanor Ward to Alan Groh, her assitant regarding gallery business, lists, floor plans, financial records, printed matter, and photographs of unidentified artwork and exhibition installations. There are also reminiscences by gallery owner Eleanor Ward and Alan Groh, a cassette recording of Eleanor Ward, and a film recording of a 1973 Sotheby auction of works from the Robert C. Scull collection. Additional Stable Gallery administrative and financial information, as well as related printed matter is included with the artist files.

Artist files contain biographical notes, correspondence, price lists, printed matter, and photographs of artists and artwork. The correspondence includes memoranda regarding payments to artists and sales information. Among the printed matter is documentation of the Stable Gallery and other exhibitions, reviews, and miscellaneous articles. Unfortunately, no records about the famous Stable Annuals held between 1953 and 1957 survive.

Artwork consists of 4 sketchbooks and loose sheets with charcoal drawings by unidentified artist(s).

The Eleanor Ward papers include miscellaneous personal papers and records concerning her estate. Photographs in the series are of Eleanor Ward, friends and family, parties, and the interior and exterior of Ward's Connecticut house.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as four series:

Series 1: Administrative Records, 1955-1986 (0.5 linear feet; Boxes 1, 4, 5)

Series 2: Artist Files, 1952-1997 (1.6 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 3: Artwork, circa 1955-1970 (3 folders; Box 4)

Series 4: Eleanor Ward Papers, 1916-1999 (0.5 linear feet; Boxes 2-4, 5)
Historical Note:
Established in 1953 by Eleanor Ward (1911-1984), the Stable Gallery derived its name from its first home, a former livery stable on Seventh Avenue at West 58th Street, New York City. Long interested in art and recognized for her "good taste" and "flair," Mrs. Ward had vaguely considered the idea of opening her own gallery for some time and received encouragement from Christian Dior, with whom she had worked in Paris. In 1952, opportunity arose to lease a suitable building that would later become a gallery. At first, Ward and a friend sold mannequins and made the large, empty space available for fashion photography; in December, she operated a Christmas boutique for a few weeks.

The Stable Gallery opened in 1953 with an exhibition of work by Ward's friend Mike Mishke, a commercial artist. She then arranged for the Stable Gallery to host a sequel to the 1951 Ninth Street Show (the initial show, organized by the Club with financial assistance from Leo Castelli, was held in an empty store on Ninth Street). The New York Artists Annual, better known as the Stable Annual, was selected by the artists themselves; this well-attended, widely-reviewed, and influential exhibition continued until 1957. Participating artists included Philip Guston, Franz Kline, Willem deKooning, Robert Motherwell, Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, Ad Reinhardt, Richard Stankiewicz, and Jack Tworkov.

The Stable Gallery soon became a gathering place for artists, including some not in Stable's "stable." Over the years, the Stable Gallery presented the first one-man shows of Robert Indiana, Cy Twombly, and Andy Warhol. Among the artists closely associated with the gallery were: Joseph Cornell, Edward Dugmore, John Ferren, Alex Katz, Conrad Marca-Relli, Marisol, Joan Mitchell, Isamu Noguchi, Richard Stankiewicz, Cy Twombly, Jack Tworkov, and Wilfred Zogbaum. The gallery was known for dramatic, somewhat theatrical installations, and occasionally presented exhibitions beyond its usual focus (photographs by Hans Namuth and pre-Columbian sculpture, which personally interested Ward).

When the block where the Stable Gallery stood was razed in 1960 to make way for a high rise apartment building, Mrs. Ward moved her gallery to 33 East 74th Street, where she was able to maintain an apartment for herself upstairs. Quite abruptly, Ward closed the Stable Gallery in 1970, noting changes in the art scene, growing commercialization, and a loss of enthusiasm that made the gallery merely a business for her. Alan Groh (1923-1996), who started as Eleanor Ward's assistant in 1956 and was eventually named gallery director, became director of A. M. Sachs Gallery. Mrs. Ward traveled widely and acted as an art consultant to selected clients.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Eleanor Ward conducted by Paul Cummings, February 8, 1972.
Provenance:
The Stable Gallery records were the gift of the Estate of Eleanor Ward. In 1984, artist files were received from Alan Groh, executor of Ward's estate and her assistant at the Stable Gallery. Additional records were donated in 1997 by Buzz Miller on behalf of the Estate of Eleanor Ward; Mr. Miller was Alan Groh's partner and executor of his estate. Another addition was received in 1999 from Paul Gardner, executor of the Estate of Buzz Miller. A final addition of 0.2 liner feet was donated in 2019 by Nancy Berner, Alan Groh's niece.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
New York school of art  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Exhibitions  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Video recordings
Sketchbooks
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Stable Gallery records, 1916-1999, bulk 1953-1970. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stabgall
See more items in:
Stable Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stabgall
Online Media:

Washburn Gallery records

Creator:
Washburn Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Names:
Peridot Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Washburn, Joan T., 1929-  Search this
Extent:
47.9 Linear feet
4.805 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Scrapbooks
Date:
1906-2017
bulk 1971-2010
Summary:
The Washburn Gallery records measure 47.9 linear feet and 4.805 gigabytes. The collection dates from 1906-2017, with the bulk of material dating from 1971-2010. Founded in 1971 by Joan Washburn, the New York gallery specializes in the work of 19th and 20th American artists, and has mounted hundreds of exhibitions in its four decade history. The collection documents the gallery's activities through administrative records, correspondence and subject files, artist files, exhibition files, art fair files, printed material, photographic material, and records from the Peridot Gallery, purchased by Washburn in 1971.
Scope and Contents:
The Washburn Gallery records measure 47.9 linear feet and 4.805 gigabytes. The collection dates from 1906-2017, with the bulk of material dating from 1971-2010. Founded in 1971 by Joan Washburn, the New York gallery specializes in the work of 19th and 20th American artists, and has mounted hundreds of exhibitions in its four decade history. The collection documents the gallery's activities through administrative records, correspondence and subject files, artist files, exhibition files, art fair files, printed material, photographic material, and records from the Peridot Gallery, purchased by Washburn in 1971.

Administrative records document the administrative and business operations of the gallery including building rentals, audits, insurance, and fraud and theft claims. Services sought by the gallery are also documented here and include advertising, conservation, framing, photography, and printing.

Correspondence and subject files pertain to the gallery's operation, promotion of its artists, research related to artworks, exhibitions, loans, sales, acquisitions, consignments, and publication requests and is with collectors, dealers, consultants, authors, journalists, curators, auction houses, as well as other colleagues.

Artist files comprise a significant bulk of the collection at 31.5 linear feet, and contain correspondence, appraisals, financial statements, sales records, inventories, loan agreements, consignments forms, photographic material, printed material, writings, and a few interview transcripts related to Washburn Gallery's stable of artists and those they exhibited. Frequent topics include sales, exhibitions at other institutions, special projects and commissions, conservation, and estate matters. With the exception of Ronald Bladen and Bruce Kurland, correspondence with the artists is rare.

Exhibition files document the gallery's four decade exhibition history and contain correspondence, price lists, floor plans, loan agreements, shipping receipts, invoices, sales records, photographic material of artworks and installations, digital images, and printed material including press releases, reviews and exhibition brochures. The exhibition files reflect the Washburn Gallery's history of mounting both solo exhibitions for their stable of artists as well as group exhibitions highlighting significant movements and themes in art history.

Art fair files document the Washburn Gallery's participation in the ACRO Art Fair, the Armory Show, Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach, Art Chicago, Art Miami, The Art Show, the San Francisco International Art Expo, VIP (Viewing in Private), and Works on Paper.

The printed material series primarily documents the activities of Washburn Gallery and its artists. Included is a comprehensive selection of brochures and announcements that the Washburn Gallery produced for each of its exhibitions. The photographic material series is small, and includes Joan Washburn and the gallery, artworks by various artists not included in the Art Files series, and slides for lectures given by Washburn. The bulk of the printed and photographic material is organized by artist and arranged in the Artist Files series.

Peridot Gallery records date from 1948-1971 and include printed material, photographs, and five scrapbooks. The scrapbooks contain clippings of reviews, as well as exhibition announcements and brochures from the gallery.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as eight series.

Series 1: Administrative Records, 1965-2011 (1.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 2: Correspondence and Subject Files, 1919-2016, bulk 1971-2005 (4 linear feet; Boxes 2-6)

Series 3: Artist Files, 1906-2017, bulk 1971-2011 (31.5 linear feet, Boxes 6-37, 48; 4.081 gigabytes, ER01-04)

Series 4: Exhibition Files, 1921-2014, bulk 1972-2014 (7.4 linear feet, Boxes 37-45; 0.724 gigabytes, ER05-07)

Series 5: Art Fair Files, 1988-2011 (1.4 linear feet; Boxes 45-46)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1970-2016 (0.7 linear feet; Boxes 46-47)

Series 7: Photographic Material, 1970-2010 (0.2 linear feet; Box 47)

Series 8: Peridot Gallery Records, 1948-1971 (1.3 linear feet: Boxes 47-50)
Biographical / Historical:
The Washburn Gallery (1971- ) is a gallery in New York, New York, founded by Joan Washburn and specializing in the work of 19th and 20th American artists. Prior to Washburn's ownership in 1971, the gallery was know as Peridot Gallery.

In its inaugural year, the gallery exhibited watercolors and paintings by Jean Xceron from the 1930s, portraits by Joshua Johnson (Johnston) from the early 1800s, and bronze figurative sculptures by Richard Miller. Over the years, Washburn Gallery has represented artists working in a range of styles including abstract expressionism, surrealism, folk art, and contemporary painting and sculpture. Their stable has included James Abbe, Richard Baker, Richard Benson, Ronald Bladen, Norman Bluhm, James Brooks, Byron Browne, Arthur B. Carles, Nicolas Carone, Stuart Davis, Elaine de Kooning, Burgoyne Diller, Arshile Gorky, Marsden Hartley, Martin J. Heade, John William and John Henry Hill, Harry Holtzman, Bill Jensen, Joshua Johnson (Johnston), Gerome Kamrowski, Alice Trumbull Mason, Gwynn Murrill, Ray Parker, Ammi Phillips, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Anne Ryan, Albert Pinkham Ryder, Rolph Scarlett, Charles Shaw, David Smith, Leon Polk Smith, George Sugarman, Jack Youngerman, among many others.

Joan Washburn graduated from Middlebury College in 1951 and worked at the Kraushaar Galleries, the Wadsworth Atheneum, the Museum of Modern Art, Graham Gallery, and Sotheby's Parke-Bernet before founding Washburn Gallery. Washburn purchased Peridot Gallery in January 1971 and formally changed the name to Washburn Gallery in September of 1972. The gallery has had a number of locations on the Upper East Side of Manhattan since opening its doors, including operating an additional downtown location at 113 Greene Street from 1980-1986. Before relocating to the Chelsea neighborhood in 2017, Washburn Gallery was located at 20 West 57th Street since 1992.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Joan Washburn conducted by James Wechsler in 2007 and letters from Washburn in response to Lee Hall's book, Elaine and Bill: Portrait of a Marriage.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives of American Art in 2017 by Joan Washburn, gallery founder and director.
Restrictions:
The collection is ACCESS RESTRICTED; use requires written permission. Contact Reference Services for more information.

Access to original papers, with permission, requires an appointment.
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Washburn Gallery records, 1906-2017, bulk 1971-2010. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.washbgall
See more items in:
Washburn Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-washbgall

Leo Castelli Gallery records

Creator:
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Names:
Amsterdam (Netherlands). Stedelijk Museum  Search this
Castelli Graphics (Firm)  Search this
Castelli-Sonnabend Tapes and Films, Inc.  Search this
Dwan Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Dwan Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Ferus Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Ileana Sonnabend (Gallery)  Search this
Jewish Museum (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Multiples, Inc.  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Sidney Janis Gallery  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Artschwager, Richard, 1923-  Search this
Barry, Robert, 1936-  Search this
Bloom, Barbara, 1951-  Search this
Castelli, Leo  Search this
Christo, 1935-  Search this
Chryssa, 1933-  Search this
Daphnis, Nassos, 1914-  Search this
Darboven, Hanne  Search this
Epstein, Ethel Steuer  Search this
Flavin, Dan, 1933-  Search this
Gorgoni, Gianfranco  Search this
Heller, Ben, 1925-  Search this
Johns, Jasper, 1930-  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-  Search this
Kiesler, Frederick  Search this
Klapheck, Konrad, 1935-  Search this
Koons, Jeff  Search this
Landsman, Stanley, 1930-  Search this
Lichtenstein, Roy, 1923-1997  Search this
Marisol, 1930-2016  Search this
Morris, Robert, 1931-2018  Search this
Namuth, Hans  Search this
Nauman, Bruce, 1941-  Search this
Paik, Nam June, 1932-  Search this
Panza, Giuseppe  Search this
Parker, Raymond, 1922-  Search this
Power, Alan  Search this
Powers, John, 1916-  Search this
Powers, Kimiko  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert, 1925-2008  Search this
Rosenquist, James, 1933-  Search this
Rowan, Carolyn  Search this
Rowan, Robert  Search this
Ruscha, Edward  Search this
Scarpitta, Salvatore, 1919-2007  Search this
Scull, Ethel  Search this
Scull, Robert C.  Search this
Serra, Richard, 1938-  Search this
Starn, Doug  Search this
Starn, Mike  Search this
Stella, Frank  Search this
Tremaine, Burton  Search this
Tremaine, Emily Hall, 1908-1987  Search this
Twombly, Cy, 1928-  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-  Search this
Weiner, Lawrence, 1942-  Search this
Extent:
215.9 Linear feet
0.001 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Video recordings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Notes
Visitors' books
Photographs
Notebooks
Awards
Date:
circa 1880-2000
bulk 1957-1999
Summary:
The Leo Castelli Gallery records measure 215.9 linear feet and 0.001 GB and date from circa 1880-2000, with the bulk of the materials dating from the gallery's founding in 1957 through Leo Castelli's death in 1999. The major influence of dealer Leo Castelli and his gallery on the development of mid-to-late twentieth century modern art in America is well-documented through business and scattered personal correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, extensive artists' files and printed materials, posters, awards and recognitions, photographs, and sound and video recordings. Also included are records for the subsidiary firms of Castelli Graphics and Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films.
Scope and Content Note:
The Leo Castelli Gallery records measure 215.9 linear feet and 0.001 GB and date from circa 1880-2000, with the bulk of the materials dating from the gallery's founding in 1957 through Leo Castelli's death in 1999. The major influence of dealer Leo Castelli and his gallery on the development of mid-to-late twentieth century modern art in America is well-documented through business and scattered personal correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, extensive artists' files and printed materials, posters, awards and recognitions, photographs, and audio and video recordings. Also included are records for the subsidiary firms of Castelli Graphics and Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films.

The records document the gallery's daily business operations, exhibitions, spaces/buildings, collaborations and joint ventures with other galleries and museums, and its relationship with many artists, dealers, and clients. Artists particularly well-represented throughout the collection include Hanne Darboven, Dan Flavin, Jasper Johns, Donald Judd, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and Lawrence Weiner.

Records pre-dating the gallery's establishment in 1957 are primarily newspaper and magazine clippings related to artists, personal photographs and photographs of works of art, and scattered personal business records of Leo Castelli.

General Correspondence is extensive at circa 25 linear feet and consists primarily of the gallery's and Leo Castelli's named and subject correspondence files concerning the gallery's daily operations, exhibitions, artwork installation and fabrication, appraisals, inquiries, loans, sales, consignments, personal and business relationships with artists, and other topics. The general correspondence is arranged either by name of correspondent or topic, and is with museums and galleries, collectors, business associates, artists, employees, and friends. Notes, scattered photographs and slides, and printed materials are often found as enclosures. Leo Castelli's personal correspondence is also found here and consists primarily of solicitations, requests for advice, notes of thanks, congratulations, and invitations.

Letters written by artists in the gallery's stable are somewhat limited. There are scattered letters from artists Christo, Chryssa, Nassos Daphnis, Hanne Darboven, Marisol, Dan Flavin, Jasper Johns, Frederick Kiesler, Robert Morris, Hans Namuth, Bruce Nauman, Nam June Paik, Ray Parker, James Rosenquist, Edward Ruscha, Salvatore Scarpitta, Frank Stella, Cy Twombly, and Jack Tworkov. There are also letters about artists in this series filed under the artists' name.

Collectors and dealers represented within the correspondence include the De Menil family, Mrs. Henry Epstein, Ben Heller, Giuseppe Panza, Alan Power, John and Kimiko Powers, Robert and Carolyn Rowan, Robert and Ethel Scull, and Burton and Emily Tremaine. Museums and galleries for which there is considerable correspondence includes the Dwan Gallery, Ferus Gallery, the Jewish Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Sidney Janis Gallery, Stedelijk Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Ileana Sonnabend Galerie.

The materials arranged in General Correspondence were originally marked by the gallery as "correspondence" files upon accessioning, and, are thus arranged into their own series. However, in some cases, there appears to be little difference between the General Correspondence and the Administrative Files. Thus, researchers are encouraged to reference both series.

Administrative Files document a wide variety of the gallery's activities and business. Essentially, these are files that were arranged by the gallery according to subject or topic and cover almost all activities except specific exhibitions. These files include records and correspondence about buildings and space, advertising, appraisals, auctions, consignments, loans, miscellaneous business correspondence, index cards, business arrangements with artists, information about artists, interviews with artists (transcripts), history of the gallery, mailings, photograph requests, shipping, and other topics. Few items are in digital format. There are staff notebooks and files and Leo Castelli's notebooks and notes from the late 1950s through the early 1990s. Extensive outgoing chronological correspondence filed in this series dates from 1964-1977. Also found are transcripts of interviews with Leo Castelli, biographical material, some of it in digital format, and scattered photographs.

Researchers should note that the Administrative Files often overlap and complement the General Correspondence. However, they focus slightly more distinctly on gallery business activities and are arranged mostly by subject or topic, except for the chronological business correspondence. Researchers are encouraged to reference both series. For example, correspondence with and about Jasper Johns may be found in both series, but the administrative files most likely focus on a specific loan, consignment, or business activity or transaction.

Exhibition files provide a thorough history of the gallery's exhibitions, as well as the fabrication and installation of artwork for exhibitions. These files include correspondence, exhibition catalogs, guest books, lists of exhibitions by artist and by year, press releases, sketches and notes, and scattered financial records. Photographs document over 650 exhibitions at Leo Castelli Gallery, including The Ninth Street Show organized by Castelli in 1951, and over 200 exhibitions at other galleries.

Extensive artists' files comprise approximately 40% of the records and are a rich resource of printed and compiled information about the careers of over 120 artists and their relationship with Leo Castelli and the gallery. There are exhibition announcements and catalogs, flyers, invitations, magazine articles and clippings, newspaper clippings, posters, press releases, photographs, and a handful of books. Nearly half of the series is comprised of black and white photographs of artwork, presumably handled by the Leo Castelli Gallery.

Additional printed materials include exhibition announcements, flyers, invitations, magazine articles and clippings, newspaper clippings, press releases, and exhibition posters. Exhibition catalogs are filed with the exhibitions files. The general archives files provide a chronological history of the gallery and its exhibitions. There are also files concerning Leo Castelli and numerous art-related topics. Exhibition posters are found here as well.

Artwork is limited and includes a few works of art and signed posters. Artists represented here include photographer Gianfranco Gorgoni, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra and Andy Warhol, as well as others.

The records of the subsidiary Castelli Graphics New York consist of correspondence and administrative files relating to general operations and the sale and loan of prints. Also found are exhibition files, sales records, and scattered financial records. The series provides a wealth of information about Castelli Graphics collaborations with Multiples Inc. in the 1970s.

Also found in the collection are records of Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films, a joint business venture between Leo Castelli Gallery and Sonnabend Gallery from 1974-1985. Records include correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, artists' files, printed materials, sales and rental records, photographs, and financial records.

The importance and stature of Leo Castelli and the Leo Castelli Gallery to the arts community in New York City and beyond is documented by numerous awards and recognitions, such as framed and unframed certificates, plaques, statues, medals, and scattered photographs.

Nearly seven linear feet of photographs include professional black and white original prints, scattered color photographs, color transparencies, slides and negatives, and disassembled photo albums. The photographs primarily depict social and art events and functions; family and friends of Leo Castelli; and portraits of Leo Castelli and artists and of Leo Castelli with artists, including Richard Artschwager, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Bruce Nauman, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Salvatore Scarpitta, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, and Andy Warhol. Photographs of exhibitions and exhibition installations are filed with the exhibition files.

Sound and video recordings include sound and video art, performances, interviews with artists and Leo Castelli, recordings from and of exhibitions, and television publicity recorded on sound cassettes, phonograph records (vinyl and lacquer), videocassettes (U-matic, VHS, Betamax), and videocartridges. Artists represented include Vito Acconci, Robert Barry, Barbara Bloom, Hannah Collins, Hanne Darboven, Dan Flavin, Laura Grisi, Jasper Johns, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha, Salvatore Scarpitta, Doug and Mike Starn, and Lawrence Weiner, among others.

See Index for list of Exhibitions at the Leo Castelli Gallery and Castelli Graphics
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Series 1: Correspondence, 1948-1999, bulk 1957-1997 (24.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-23, 191, OVs 233-236)

Series 2: Administrative Files, 1941-1999, bulk 1970s-1990s (17.3 linear feet; Boxes 24-39, 192-193, OVs 237-238, 0.001 GB; ER01-ER02)

Series 3: Exhibition Files, 1951-1999, bulk 1957-1998 (18.7 linear feet; Boxes 40-56, 192, 194-196, 308-309, OVs 239-241, 280)

Series 4: Artists Files, 1913-1999, bulk 1960s-1990s (80.8 linear feet; Boxes 57-133, 197-208, OVs 242-243)

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1949-1998 (23.5 linear feet; Boxes 134-153, 209-211, OVs 244-274, 276, 300, RDs 301-306)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 1960s-1990s (1.8 linear feet; Boxes 153, 212-213, OVs 275, 277-278, RD 307)

Series 7: Castelli Graphics, circa 1950-1999, bulk mid 1970s-early 1990s (16 linear feet; Boxes 154-169)

Series 8: Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films, 1969-1998 (5.6 linear feet; Boxes 170-174, 214, OVs 279-281)

Series 9: Awards and Recognition, 1962-1998 (6.9 linear feet; Boxes 175-176, 215-228, OVs 282)

Series 10: Photographs, circa 1880-1997, bulk 1960s-1990s (6.6 linear feet; Boxes 177-180, 229-231, OVs 283-299)

Series 11: Sound and Video Recordings, 1959-2000 (9.7 linear feet; Boxes 181-190, 232)
Historical Note:
Leo Castelli (1907-1999) was one of America's most noted contemporary art dealers and opened the Leo Castelli Gallery in New York City in 1957. The gallery showcased cutting edge American contemporary art, including Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Neo-Dada, Pop Art, Op Art, Color Field painting, Hard-edge painting, Lyrical Abstraction, Minimal Art, Conceptual Art, and Neo-expressionism, among other movements.

Leo Castelli was born as Leo Krauss on September 4, 1907 in Trieste, of Italian and Austro-Hungarian Jewish origin. He married art dealer Ileana Sonnabend in 1932 and the couple lived in Paris up until World War II. They had a daughter, Nina Castelli Sundell. In Paris, Castelli opened his first gallery in 1939. At that time, he was interested in the European Surrealists.

For years after Castelli moved to New York, he worked in his father-in-law's garment business. However, he organized his first American exhibition in 1951, the famous Ninth Street Show of 1951, a seminal event of Abstract Expressionism.

In 1957, he opened the Leo Castelli Gallery in his townhome on E. 77th Street between Madison and Fifth Avenues in New York City. Castelli initially featured European Surrealism, but also curated exhibitions of American Abstract painters, including Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Cy Twombly, Friedel Dzubas, and Norman Bluhm.

In 1958, Castelli discovered Pop artists Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns and forged a life-long nurturing relationship with both artists. The gallery then began focusing more on Pop Art, Minimalism and Conceptual Art. Beginning in the early 1960s, Castelli's stable included Richard Artschwager, Lee Bontecou, Chryssa, John Chamberlain, Ronald Davis, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Ellsworth Kelly, Joseph Kosuth, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Larry Poons, James Rosenquist, Ed Ruscha, Salvatore Scarpitta, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and Lawrence Weiner.

Leo and Ileana divorced in 1959, and Ileana returned to Europe. She later moved back to New York and opened a gallery close to Castelli's. The two remained close and together they established the joint venture of Castelli-Sonnabend Films and Tapes to accommodate artists interested in new media.

In the 1970s Leo Castelli opened a downtown SoHo branch of the Leo Castelli Gallery at 420 West Broadway. In the 1980s he opened a second larger downtown exhibition space on Greene Street also in SoHo.

Leo Castelli's second wife was Antoinette Castelli, with whom he also opened Castelli Graphics, an art gallery devoted to prints and photographs, mostly those by Castelli artists. The couple also had a son together, Jean-Christophe Castelli. In 1995 Leo Castelli married Italian art historian Barbara Bertozzi Castelli. She directs the Leo Castelli Gallery today, showing many of the same artists of the gallery's past.

Leo Castelli's unparalleled eye for quality, combined with his extraordinary skill for nurturing and promoting new art and artists, secured his position as one of the most respected and influential advocates of contemporary art for nearly five decades.
List of Exhibitions:
Below is a chronological listing of over 850 exhibitions and events held at the Leo Castelli Gallery from 1957 to 1999; included are exhibitions at 4 E 77 St (1957-1989), 65 Thompson (1989-1994), 108th St Warehouse (1968-1970), 142 Greene St (1980-1988), 420 W Broadway (1971-1999), and 578 Broadway (1988-1997). Castelli Graphics exhibitions from 1969-1996 and Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes and Films exhibitions from 1974-1984 are also included and are noted when known.

Note that this list is not comprehensive. In particular, Castelli Graphics exhibitions from the 1980s and early 1990s are incomplete. Sources used to compile this index include exhibition schedules and lists, installation photographs, announcements, clippings, and other printed materials from the Leo Castelli Gallery records, and the Leo Castelli Gallery website (www.castelligallery.com).

Exhibitions are listed in chronological order by title, if known, and gallery address.

1957 SeasonFeb. -- First Exhibition: de Kooning, Delaunay, Dubuffet, Giacometti, Hartley, Leger, Mondrian, Picabia, Pollock, David Smith, van Doesburg; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 4-23, 1957 -- Jon Schueler; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 25 - Apr. 13, 1957 -- Viseux; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 15 - May 4, 1957 -- Paul Brach; 4 E 77 St

May 6-25, 1957 -- New Work: Bluhm, Budd, Dzubas, Johns, Leslie, Louis, Marisol, Ortman, Rauschenberg, Savelli; 4 E 77 St

1957-1958 SeasonOct. 1-26, 1957 -- Norman Bluhm; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 16, 1957 -- Horia Damian; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 18 - Dec. 14, 1957 -- Marisol; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 17, 1957 - Jan. 18, 1958 -- Collector's Annual; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 20 - Feb. 8, 1958 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 10 - Mar. 1, 1958 -- Friedel Dzubas; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 4-29, 1958 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 1-26, 1958 -- Giuseppe Capogrossi; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 29 - May 31, 1958 -- Pioneers 1910-1950: de Kooning, Delaunay, Domela, Dubuffet, Giacometti, Hartley, Kandinsky, Leger, Miro, Picabia, Pollock, Schwitters, Smith, van Doejburg; 4 E 77 St

1958-1959 SeasonSept. 30 - Oct. 25, 1958 -- Angelo Savelli; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 22, 1958 -- Group Exhibition: Bluhm, Brach, Dzubas, Johns, Marisol, Rauschenberg, Schueler; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 25 - Dec. 20, 1958 -- Esteban Vicente, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 6-24, 1959 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 27 - Feb. 14, 1959 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Extramurals; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 17 - Mar. 7, 1959 -- Al Newbill; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 10-28, 1959 -- Gabriel Kohn; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 31 - Apr. 18, 1959 -- Norman Bluhm, Jean Dubuffet, and Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 21 - May 9, 1959 -- Jon Schueler; 4 E 77 St

May 12-30, 1959 -- Group Exhibition: Brach, Dzubas, Johns, Sander, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

1959-1960 SeasonOct. 6-17, 1959 -- Opening Exhibition of the New Gallery: Bluhm, Brach, Daphnis, Johns, Kohn, Rauschenberg, Sander, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 20 - Nov. 7, 1959 -- Work in Three Dimensions: Chamberlain, Follet, Giles, Johns, Klein, Kohn, Marisol, Nevelson, Ortman, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 10-28, 1959 -- Ludwig Sander; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 1-26, 1959 -- Paul Brach; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 5-23, 1960 -- William Giles; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 26 - Feb. 13, 1960 -- Norman Bluhm; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 15 - Mar. 5, 1960 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 8-26, 1960 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 29 - Apr. 16, 1960 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 19 - May 7, 1960 -- Salvatore Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

May 10-28, 1960 -- Edward Higgins; 4 E 77 St

May 31 - June 25, 1960 -- Summary 1959-1960: Bluhm, Bontecou, Daphnis, Higgins, Johns, Kohn, Langlais, Rauschenberg, Sander, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

1960-1961 SeasonSept. 27 - Oct. 15, 1960 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 5, 1960 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 9 - Dec. 3, 1960 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 6, 1960 - Jan. 7, 1961 -- Robert Rauschenberg, 34 Illustrations for Dante's Inferno; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 10-28, 1961 -- Frederick Kiesler; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 31 - Feb. 25, 1961 -- Jasper Johns, Drawings and Sculpture; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 28 - Mar. 18, 1961 -- Jack Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 21 - Apr. 8, 1961 -- Bernard Langlais; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 11-29, 1961 -- Yves Klein, Le Monochrome; 4 E 77 St

May 2-20, 1961 -- Ludwig Sander; 4 E 77 St

May 23 - June [10], 1961 -- Sculpture and Relief: Bontecou, Chamberlain, Higgins, Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

1961-1962 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 14, 1961 -- An Exhibition in Progress: Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Higgins, Johns, Langlais, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 17 - Nov. 4, 1961 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 7 - Dec. 5, 1961 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1961 - Jan. 10, 1962 -- Group Exhibition: Bontecou, Johns, Langlais, [Lichtenstein], Scarpitta, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 13 - Feb. 6, 1962 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 10 - Mar. 3, 1962 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 10 - Apr. 5, 1962 -- Robert Moskowitz; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 7-21, 1962 -- Group Exhibition: Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Higgins, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1962 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

May 26 - June 30, 1962 -- Drawings: Bontecou, Johns, Lichtenstein, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Stella, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

1962-1963 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1962 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Higgins, Johns, Klapheck, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella, Tinguely, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 16 - Nov. 7, 1962 -- John Chamberlain and Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 10 - Dec. 6, 1962 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1962 - Jan. 9, 1963 -- Gerald van de Wiele; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 12 - Feb. 7, 1963 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 9 - Mar. 7, 1963 -- Jack Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 9-30, 1963 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 2-25, 1963 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Higgins, Kiesler, Lichtenstein, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Stella, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 16, 1963 -- Salvatore Scarpitta; 4 E 77 St

May 20 - June 30, 1963 -- Group Drawing Exhibition: Bontecou, Daphnis, Johns, Lichtenstein, Moskowitz, Rauschenberg, Stella, Tworkov, van de Wiele; 4 E 77 St

1963-1964 SeasonSept. 28 - Oct. 24, 1963 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 26 - Nov. 21, 1963 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 23, 1963 - Jan. 2, 1964 -- Edward Higgins; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 4 - Feb. 6, 1964 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 8 - Mar. 12, 1964 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Johns, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 14 - Apr. 9, 1964 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 11-30, 1964 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

May 2 - June 3, 1964 -- Introducing Artschwager, Christo, Hay, Watts; 4 E 77 St

June 6-30, 1964 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Tworkov; 4 E 77 St

1964-1965 SeasonSept. 26 - Oct. 22, 1964 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 24 - Nov. 19, 1964 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Landscapes; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 21 - Dec. 28, 1964 -- Andy Warhol, Flower Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 9-27, 1965 -- John Chamberlain, Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 30 - Feb. 24, 1965 -- Richard Artschwager; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 27 - Mar. 24, 1965 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 27 - Apr. 14, 1965 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Racing Cars; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 17 - May 13, 1965 -- James Rosenquist, F-111; 4 E 77 St

May 15 - June 9, 1965 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Oracle; 4 E 77 St

1965-1966 SeasonOct. 2-21, 1965 -- Group Exhibition: [Chamberlain], Johns, Lichtenstein, Poons, Rauschenberg, Stella, [Warhol]; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 23 - Nov. 17, 1965 -- Robert Bart; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 20 - Dec. 11, 1965 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Brushstrokes and Ceramics; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1965 - Jan. 5, 1966 -- Benefit Drawing Exhibition for the Foundation for the Contemporary Performance Arts; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1965 - Jan. 5, 1966 -- Group Exhibition; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 8 - Feb. 2, 1966 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 5 - Mar. 2, 1966 -- Donald Judd; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 12 - Mar. 2, 1966 -- Cy Twombly, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 5 - Apr. 2, 1966 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 6-27, 1966 -- Andy Warhol, Wallpaper and Clouds; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 30 - May 25, 1966 -- James Rosenquist; 4 E 77 St

May 28 - June 13, 1966 -- Christo, Storefront; 4 E 77 St

June 14-30, 1966 -- Group Exhibition: Bontecou, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Poons, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1966-1967 SeasonOct. 8 - Nov. 8, 1966 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 12 - Dec. 3, 1966 -- Edward Higgins; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 6-10, 1966 -- Benefit Group Exhibition for Experiments in Art and Technology, Inc.; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 7, 1966 - Jan. 5, 1967 -- Stanley Landsman; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1966 - Jan. 5, 1967 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 7-31, 1967 -- Larry Poons; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 4-26, 1967 -- Tenth Anniversary Exhibition: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Higgins, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Poons, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 4-28, 1967 -- Robert Morris; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 1967 -- New Work: Chamberlain, Lichtenstein, Stella; 4 E 77 St

May 1967 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Revolvers; 4 E 77 St

1967-1968 SeasonOct. 7-26, 1967 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 18, 1967 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 25 - Dec. 23, 1967 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 30, 1967 - Jan. 23, 1968 -- Richard Artschwager, Sculptures and Reliefs; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 27 - Feb. 17, 1968 -- Bruce Nauman; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 24 - Mar. 16, 1968 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 23 - Apr. 11, 1968 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 20 - May 11, 1968 -- Robert Morris; 4 E 77 St

May 18 - June 8, 1968 -- Jack Krueger; 4 E 77 St

1968-1969 SeasonSept. 14-28, 1968 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 12-26, 1968 -- Robert Rauschenberg, White Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 2-23, 1968 -- Larry Poons; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 30 - Dec. 21, 1968 -- Cy Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 4-28, 1968 -- 9 at Leo Castelli: Anselmo, Bollinger, Hesse, Kaltenbach, Nauman, Saret, Serra, Sonnier, Zorio; 108th St Warehouse

Jan. 4-25, 1969 -- Donald Judd; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 1-22, 1969 -- John Chamberlain; 108th St Warehouse

Feb. 3-22, 1969 -- David Diao, Richard Pettibone, and Peter Young; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 1-22, 1969 -- Robert Morris; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 1-22, 1969 -- Robert Morris, A Continuous Project Altered Daily; 108th St Warehouse

Mar. 29 - Apr. 19, 1969 -- James Rosenquist, Horseblinders; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 29 - Apr. 19, 1969 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Racing Cars; 108th St Warehouse

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1969 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Carnal Clocks; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1969 -- Jack Krueger; 108th St Warehouse

May 24 - June 14, 1969 -- Bruce Nauman; 4 E 77 St

May 24 - June 21, 1969 -- 4 Painters for Spring: Bower, Cibula, Kalina, Roth, Yrisarry; 108th St Warehouse

June 21 - July 31, 1969 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Judd, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Young; 4 E 77 St

1969-1970 SeasonSept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1969 -- Group Exhibition: Lichtenstein, Serra, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 8, 1969 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 8, 1969 -- Ron Davis; 108th St Warehouse

Nov. - Dec., 1969 -- Joseph Kosuth; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 13, 1969 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Moonshot Series (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 18 - Dec. 6, 1969 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 11-13, 1969 -- Benefit Exhibition, Art for the Moratorium; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 16, 1969 - Jan. 10, 1970 -- Richard Serra; 108th St Warehouse

Jan. 10-31, 1970 -- Jasper Johns, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 17-24, 1970 -- Rafael Ferrer; 108th St Warehouse

Feb. 7-28, 1970 -- Dan Flavin, Tatlin Monuments; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 7-28, 1970 -- Robert Morris, Earthwork Projects (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 7-28, 1970 -- Keith Sonnier; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 7-28, 1970 -- Keith Sonnier; 108th St Warehouse

Apr. 11 - May 9, 1970 -- Donald Judd; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 11 - May 9, 1970 -- Donald Judd; 108th St Warehouse

May 16-30, 1970 -- James Rosenquist; 4 E 77 St

June 11-27, 1970 -- Benefit Exhibition for the New York Studio School; 4 E 77 St

June 30 - Aug. 28, 1970 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1970-1971 SeasonSept. 19-26, 1970 -- Benefit Exhibition for Referendum '70: Daphnis, Flavin, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Sept. 26 - Oct. 24, 1970 -- Roy Lichtenstein, New Editions: Lithographs, Sculpture, Reliefs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 3-18, 1970 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Stella, Twombly; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 24 - Nov. 14, 1970 -- James Rosenquist; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 21 - Dec. 12, 1970 -- Dan Flavin, Untitled (to Barnett Newman); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 19, 1970 - Jan. 9, 1971 -- Group Graphics Exhibition: Artschwager, Bontecou, Daphnis, Johns, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Schlossberg, Stella, Twombly, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 16 - Feb. 6, 1971 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 13 - Mar. 6, 1971 -- Bruce Nauman; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 13 - Apr. 9, 1971 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Mirror Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 17 - May 8, 1971 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 8, 1971 -- Robert Barry; 4 E 77 St

May 8 - June 5, 1971 -- Douglas Huebler; 4 E 77 St

May 18 - June 12, 1971 -- Lee Bontecou; 4 E 77 St

June 26 - Sept. 24, 1971 -- Group Exhibition: Davis, Flavin, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1971-1972 SeasonSept. 25 - Oct. 9, 1971 -- Group Film Exhibition: Jonas, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 2-16, 1971 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Eighth Investigation, Proposition Three; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 16 - Nov. 6, 1971 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 23 - Nov. 13, 1971 -- Dan Flavin; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 20 - Dec. 11, 1971 -- Nassos Daphnis; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 20 - Dec. 11, 1971 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 18, 1971 - Jan. [2], 1972 -- Group Film Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 18, 1971 - Jan. 15, 1972 -- Lewis Baltz (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 18, 1971 - Jan. 15, 1972 -- Richard Hamilton, Graphics (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 15 - Feb. 5, 1972 -- Cy Twombly; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 22 - Feb. 12, 1972 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Entablature Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 22 - Feb. 12, 1972 -- Larry Stark (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 12, 1972 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 19, 1972 -- Richard Landry, Concert; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 19 - Mar. 16, 1972 -- Object Show (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 19 - Mar. 25, 1972 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Serra, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 26 - Mar. 18, 1972 -- Keith Sonnier, Films and Videotapes; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 18 - Apr. 13, 1972 -- Andy Warhol, Electric Chairs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 25 - Apr. 15, 1972 -- Michael Balog; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 1-15, 1972 -- Richard Artschwager; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 15-29, 1972 -- Robert Barry, Projections; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 15 - May 6, 1972 -- James Rosenquist (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 18 - May 6, 1972 -- Robert Morris, Hearing; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 22 - May 13, 1972 -- Robert Morris, Projects; 4 E 77 St

May 6-20, 1972 -- Jasper Johns (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 6-20, 1972 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway

May 13, 1972 -- Philip Glass, Concert; 420 W Broadway

May 20 - June 10, 1972 -- Frank Owen; 4 E 77 St

May 20 - June 10, 1972 -- Donald Judd and Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway

May 20 - June 12, 1972 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Tares (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 27 - June 17, 1972 -- Richard Serra, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

June 17 - Sept. 6, 1972 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

June 17 - Sept. [23], 1972 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

1972-1973 SeasonSept. 7-23, 1972 -- Furniture Designed by Artists: Chamberlain, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 11-23, 1972 -- Larry Stark, Fifty States (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 30 - Oct. 21, 1972 -- Group Drawing Exhibition: Barry, Bontecou, Daphnis, Flavin, Huebler, Johns, Judd, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Sept. 30 - Oct. 24, 1972 -- Satirical/Political Cartoons, Benefit for American Peace Action Coalition (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 7-21, 1972 -- New Works: Judd, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella; Videotapes: Jonas, Landry, Mann, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 27-28, 1972 -- Benefit Exhibition for the New York Collection for Stockholm; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 28 - Nov. 11, 1972 -- Frank Stella, Race Track (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 28 - Nov. 15, 1972 -- Jasper Johns, From Robert Scull Collection (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 4-25, 1972 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Ninth Investigation, Proposition One; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 4-25, 1972 -- Dan Flavin, an exposition of cool white and warm white circular fluorescent light; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 9-25, 1972 -- Andy Warhol, Mao Prints [Castelli Graphics]; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 9, 1972 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Mirrors (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 2-23, 1972 -- Joseph Kosuth, Early Works: Protoinvestigations; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 2-24, 1972 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Made in Tampa [Castelli Graphics]; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 9-23, 1972 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni, Photographs from the book "The New Avant-Garde"; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 16-30, 1972 -- Cirrus Editions: Anderson, Balog, Card Celmins, Cooper, Goode, Nauman, Price, Ruscha (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 4-6, 1973 -- Joan Jonas, Performance; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1973 -- Richard Serra, Prints from Gemini (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 6-27, 1973 -- Frank Stella; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 13 - Feb. 3, 1973 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 3-17, 1973 -- Edward Ruscha, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 3-24, 1973 -- Group Show (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 10 - Mar. 3, 1973 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 24 - Mar. 10, 1973 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Still Lifes; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 3-23, 1973 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Horsefeathers XIII (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 10-24, 1973 -- Nassos Daphnis, Retrospective 1958-1972; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 14-16, 1973 -- Lawrence Weiner, Film screening "A First Quarter"; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 17-31, 1973 -- Nassos Daphnis, Monoprints; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 17-31, 1973 -- Bruce Nauman, Floating Room; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 24 - Apr. 14, 1973 -- Bruce Nauman (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1973 -- Dan Flavin, 40th Birthday Drawing Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1973 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Venetian Series; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 7-28, 1973 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Curved Series; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 19, 1973 -- Group Show, Mirrors (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1973 -- Hanne Darboven; 420 W Broadway

May 5-26, 1973 -- Paul Waldman, Recent Paintings; 4 E 77 St

May 19 - June 6, 1973 -- Laura Grisi, Pebbles; 420 W Broadway

May 26 - June 7, 1973 -- James Rosenquist, Horseblinders (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 26 - June 16, 1973 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

June [3] - Sept. 15, 1973 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Darboven, Dibbets, Flavin, Huebler, Kosuth, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Waldman, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

June 8-22, 1973 -- Don Judd, Woodcuts, Silkscreens (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 23 - Sept. 9, 1973 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Bulls (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 23 - Sept. 22, 1973 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Davis, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella; 420 W Broadway

1973-1974 SeasonSept. 10-28, 1973 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Black and White Prints from Gemini (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 22 - Oct. 16, 1973 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Sept. 29 - Oct. 20, 1973 -- Videotapes by Twelve Artists: Benglis, Chamberlain, Freed, Jonas, Kos, Landry, Mann, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 29 - Nov. 16, 1973 -- Stockholm Show (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 10, 1973 -- Benefit Exhibition for the Committee to Save Venice: Cornell, Dine, Frankenthaler, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Louis, Noland, Oldenburg, Olitski, Rauschenberg, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 1-3, 1973 -- Group Film Exhibition: Chamberlain, Jonas, Ruscha, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 1-14, 1973 -- Group Show: Artschwager, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 10 - Dec. 1, 1973 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 15 - Dec. 1, 1973 -- Hans Namuth, Photographs; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 17 - Dec. 7, 1973 -- Lewis Baltz, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1973 -- Richard Artschwager; 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1973 - Jan. 12, 1974 -- Group Show of New Prints: Balog, Petersen, Rauschenberg, Sonnier (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 8, 1973 - Jan. 12, 1974 -- John Chamberlain; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 15, 1973 - Jan. 19, 1974 -- Edward Ruscha, Retrospective Show, Graphics from the Collection of Donald Marron (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St (upstairs)

Jan. 12-26, 1974 -- [García] Uriburu (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1974 -- Robert Barry; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 2-16, 1974 -- James Rosenquist (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 2-23, 1974 -- Ron Davis; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 16 - Mar. 2, 1974 -- Group Drawing Exhibition: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Darboven, Davis, Flavin, Huebler, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Serra, Stella, Twombly; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 23 - Mar. 9, 1974 -- Keith Sonnier, Video Still Screens (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 2-23, 1974 -- Dan Flavin; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 9-30, 1974 -- Keith Sonnier, Amplified Local Time: Radio Installation; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 16 - Apr. 6, 1974 -- Bruce Nauman (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 30 - Apr. 20, 1974 -- Edward Ruscha; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 6-20, 1974 -- Roy Lichtenstein (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 6-27, 1974 -- Robert Morris, Voice; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 27 - May 11, 1974 -- Jasper Johns (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 27 - May 18, 1974 -- Claes Oldenburg; 4 E 77 St

May 4-25, 1974 -- Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly; 420 W Broadway

May 18 - June 1, 1974 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Pages and Fuses (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 28 - June 15, 1974 -- Lucia Wilcox; 4 E 77 St

June, 1974 -- Ron Davis (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June, 1974 -- Richard Landry, Concert; 420 W Broadway

June 1-15, 1974 -- Group Video Exhibition: Acconci, Baldessari, Bell, Benglis, Campus, Gillette, Girouard, Haxton, Holt, Jonas, Kos, Landry, Mann, Morris, Oldenburg, Palestine, Serra, Smithson, Wegman (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

June 1-15, 1974 -- Richard Landry, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

June 21 - Sept. 14, 1974 -- Group Exhibition: Darboven, Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

June 21 - Sept. 14, 1974 -- Group Graphics Exhibition: Artschwager, Baltz, Bontecou, Daphnis, Huebler, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Petersen, Pistoletto, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Twombly, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

1974-1975 SeasonSept. 21 - Oct. 4, 1974 -- Frank Stella, Eccentric Polygons (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 21 - Oct. 5, 1974 -- Jasper Johns, Recent Four Panel Prints (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 21 - Oct. 12, 1974 -- Group Sculpture Show, In Three Dimensions: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Scarpitta, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 5-19, 1974 -- Peter Mauss, Recent Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 12-26, 1974 -- Richard Serra, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 19 - Nov. 9, 1974 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 26 - Nov. 9, 1974 -- Claes Oldenburg, Selected Show of Prints from 1968-1974 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 2 - 30, 1974 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Artist's Studio Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 12-30, 1974 -- James Rosenquist, Selected Show of Prints from 1965-1974 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 16-30, 1974 -- Hanne Darboven, 24 Songs; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 21, 1974 -- Philip Glass, Concert; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 7-21, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Hoarfrost Series; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 7, 1974 - [Jan. 4], 1974 -- Michelangelo Pistoletto, New Multiples (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 7, 1974 - Jan. 4, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Hoarfrost Editions (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Dec. 14, 1974 - Jan. 11, 1975 -- Andy Warhol, Hand Colored Flowers (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

Jan. 4-18, 1975 -- Bruce Nauman, Cones/Cojones; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 11-25, 1975 -- Edward Ruscha, Domestic Tranquility, Four New Lithographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 11 - Feb. 2, 1975 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Sleds; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 15-18, 1975 -- Peter Campus and Paul Kos, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Jan. 25 - Feb. 8, 1975 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Tenth Investigation, Proposition Four; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 1-15, 1975 -- Group Show: Huebler, Morris, Nauman, Sonnier (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Feb. 8-22, 1975 -- Keith Sonnier, Air to Air; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 15 - Mar. 8, 1975 -- Nassos Daphnis, A Continuous Painting; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 26 - Mar. 1, 1975 -- Benefit Exhibition for the Merce Cunningham Portfolio: Cage, Johns, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Stella, Warhol; 4 E 77 St

Feb. 26 - Mar. 1, 1975 -- Joan Jonas and Charlemagne Palestine, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-8, 1975 -- Frank Gillette and William Wegman, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Mar. 8 - Apr. 5, 1975 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Sculptures; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 15-29, 1975 -- Richard Artschwager, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 15-29, 1975 -- Larry Stark, Silkscreens on Canvas; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 15 - [Apr. 5], 1975 -- Richard Landry, "1, 2, 3, 4" from Videotapes (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 2-5, 1975 -- Benefit Exhibition for the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 12-26, 1975 -- Ellsworth Kelly, New Prints (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 12-26, 1975 -- Dan Flavin, Flourescent Light; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 12 - May 3, 1975 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Gray Series Paintings; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 19 - May 3, 1975 -- James Klosty, Around and About Merce Cunningham, Photographs 1968-1972; 420 W Broadway

May 3-17, 1975 -- Richmond Jones, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 3-31, 1975 -- Frank Stella, Metal Reliefs; 420 W Broadway

May 10-31, 1975 -- Ron Davis, Paintings; 4 E 77 St

May 10-31, 1975 -- Laura Grisi, Stripes; 420 W Broadway

May 24 - June 7, 1975 -- Laura Grisi, New Graphics (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 7 - Sept. 5, 1975 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Darboven, Grisi, Huebler, Judd, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Owen, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

June 7 - Sept. 20, 1975 -- Summer Group Exhibition, Black and White: Kelly, Rauschenberg, Ad Reinhardt, Serra, Stella; 4 E 77 St

June 14-28, 1975 -- Bruce Nauman, New Graphics (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

July 7-25, 1975 -- Group Exhibition (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

1975-1976 SeasonSept. 13-27, 1975 -- Autumn Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Davis, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Scarpitta; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 27 - Oct. 18, 1975 -- James Rosenquist, Drawings; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 4-18, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Bones and Unions (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 4-25, 1975 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 11-25, 1975 -- Frank Owen; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1975 -- Hans Namuth, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 1-15, 1975 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Bones and Unions (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

Nov. 1-22, 1975 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 22 - Dec. 13, 1975 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Morris, Stella; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 29 - Dec. 20, 1975 -- Lewis Baltz, The New Industrial Parks Near Irving, CA, 1974 (a portfolio of 51 photographs) (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway

Nov. 29 - Dec. 20, 1975 -- Paul Waldman, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 3-17, 1976 -- Ralph Gibson, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 10-24, 1976 -- Robert Barry, Recent Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 10-24, 1976 -- Alan Charlton; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 24 - Feb. 14, 1976 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 31 - Feb. 14, 1976 -- Peter Campus; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 31 - Feb. 14, 1976 -- Peter Campus and Frank Gillette, Videotapes (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Feb. 10, 1976 -- Lawrence Weiner, Film screening, "A Second Quarter"; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 21 - Mar. 13, 1976 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Jammers; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 21 - Mar. 13, 1976 -- Keith Sonnier, Abaca Code; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 28 - Mar. 20, 1976 -- Joseph Cornell; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 20 - Apr. 10, 1976 -- Dan Flavin, Colored Fluorescent Light; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 10, 1976 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 27 - Apr. 17, 1976 -- John Chamberlain; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 17 - May 8, 1976 -- Robert Morris; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 22-24, 1976 -- Benefit Drawing Exhibition for the New York Studio School; 4 E 77 St

Apr. 24 - May 15, 1976 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway

May 1-22, 1976 -- Hanne Darboven, For Jean-Paul Sartre; 4 E 77 St

May 15 - June 5, 1976 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway

May 22 - June 12, 1976 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni, Photographs; 420 W Broadway

May 29 - June 12, 1976 -- Robert Adams, Photographs (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

June 19 - Sept. 10, 1976 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Dibbets, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Noland, Oldenburg, Owen, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

June 26 - Sept. 10, 1976 -- Summer Group Drawing Exhibition: Artschwager, Barry, Bontecou, Darboven, Flavin, Morris, Ruscha; 4 E 77 St

1976-1977 SeasonSept. 11 - Oct. 2, 1976 -- Portraits: Cohen, Eggleston, Gibson, Gossage, Kelly, Namuth, Sonneman, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 15 - Oct. 2, 1976 -- Daniel Buren, To Transgress; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 25 - Oct. 16, 1976 -- Cy Twombly, Watercolors; 4 E 77 St

Oct. 9-30, 1976 -- Robert Morris, Black and White Felts; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 9-30, 1976 -- Paul Kos, Tokyo Rose (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 23 - Nov. 13, 1976 -- Kenneth Noland; 4 E 77 St

Nov. 2-27, 1976 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (back room)

Nov. 6 - Dec. 4, 1976 -- Claes Oldenburg; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 11-18, 1976 -- Poppy Johnson, Performance; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Dec. 11-22, 1976 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Noland, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Stella, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 8-29, 1977 -- Andy Warhol, Still Life Paintings and Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 5-26, 1977 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-19, 1977 -- Robert Barry, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, and Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-26, 1977 -- Hans Namuth and Georg Reisner, Photographs from the Spanish Civil War; 4 E 77 St

Mar. 5-26, 1977 -- Beryl Korot, Text and Commentary (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 5 - Apr. 2, 1977 -- Robert Rauschenberg (Castelli Graphics); [4 E 77 St]

Mar. 26 - Apr. 16, 1977 -- Louis Cane; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 28, 1977 -- Brazos River: Videotape by Viola Farber, Robert Rauschenberg, and David Tudor; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 2-16, 1977 -- Frank Gillette, Mecox (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 23 - May 21, 1977 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Spreads and Scales; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 30 - May 21, 1977 -- Billy Apple, Extension of the Given; 420 W Broadway

May 7-28, 1977 -- Drawings: Artschwager, Flavin, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Twombly, Waldman, Warhol (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

May 7-28, 1977 -- Drawings - Castelli Uptown; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - June [18], 1977 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - Sept. 17, 1977 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

1977-1978 SeasonSept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1977 -- James Rosenquist, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 15 - Nov. 12, 1977 -- Jasper Johns (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 22 - Nov. 12, 1977 -- Architecture I: Abraham, Ambasz, Meier, Pichler, Rossi, Stirling, Venturi and Rauch; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 17, 1977 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Sculptures; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 25 - Dec. 17, 1977 -- William Eggelston, Color Photographs, 1966-1977 (Castelli Graphics); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 7-28, 1978 -- Numerals 1924-1977; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Billy Apple, Extension of the Given; 420 W Broadway (front office)

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Dan Flavin; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 4-25, 1978 -- Robert Barry, A Wall Drawing; 420 W Broadway (back room)

Mar. 4-25, 1978 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1978 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 1-15, 1978 -- Keith Sonnier, Black Ground Series Drawings; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 1-29, 1978 -- Hanne Darboven, Card-Index, Filing Cabinet; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 22-29, 1978 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Inside New York's Art World; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

May 6 - June 24, 1978 -- Joseph Cornell, Collages 1931-1972; 420 W Broadway

June 10-24, 1978 -- Alan Sonfist; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

July 5 - Sept. 23, 1978 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Dibbets, Flavin, Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Noland, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Serra, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

1978-1979 SeasonSept. 30 - Oct. 21, 1978 -- Jan Dibbets, Structure Panoramas 1977-78; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Sept. 30 - Oct. 21, 1978 -- Douglas Huebler, Mediations; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 28 - Nov. 18, 1978 -- Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 28 - Nov. 18, 1978 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Dec. 2-20, 1978 -- Film/Video 1976-78: Baldessari, Benglis, Campus, Downey, Freed, Girouard, Haxton, Holt, Jonas, Kos, Rappaport, Wegman, Wiener (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1979 -- Frank Stella, Indian Birds, Painted Metal Reliefs; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1979 -- Donald Judd, Survey of Work; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 3-24, 1979 -- Robert Morris, 6 Mirror Works; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 3-24, 1979 -- Robert Barry and Carole Gallagher, Again and Again; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1979 -- Hans Namuth, Todos Santos: Portraits (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1979 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1979 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1979 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Recent Paintings; 420 W Broadway

May 26 - June 16, 1979 -- Joseph Kosuth, Text/Context (New York); 420 W Broadway

May 26 - June 16, 1979 -- Keith Sonnier, Expanded Sel Series; 420 W Broadway

June 23 - Sept. 15, 1979 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Andre, Daphnis, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Morris, Noland, Owen, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Serra, Stella, Twombly; 420 W Broadway

1979-1980 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1979 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 10, 1979 -- Dan Flavin, 1960's and 1970's Installations; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1979 -- Kenneth Noland; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 5-19, 1980 -- Michele Zaza; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 5-26, 1980 -- Hanne Darboven; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1980 -- Jasper Johns; 4 E 77 St

Jan. 22-26, 1980 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Inside New York's Art World (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 2-23, 1980 -- Salvatore Scarpitta; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 2-23, 1980 -- Charles Gaines, Falling Leaves; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 19 - [Mar. 15], 1980 -- Leo Castelli: A New Space: Judd, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

Mar. 1-22, 1980 -- Nassos Daphnis, Paintings From the 50's; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 1-22, 1980 -- Robert Barry, Wall Piece; 420 W Broadway (back office)

Mar. 29 - Apr. 19, 1980 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 420 W Broadway

Apr. [5] - May 10, 1980 -- Ellsworth Kelly, "Color Panels for a Large Wall," 1978, from the Central Trust Company, Cincinnati; 142 Greene St

Apr. 12 - May 3, 1980 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Prints 1978-1980 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1980 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 26 - May 17, 1980 -- Cletus Johnson, Theaters; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

May 17 - June 21, 1980 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

May 24 - June 14, 1980 -- Claes Oldenburg; 142 Greene St

May 24 - June 14, 1980 -- Claes Oldenburg; 420 W Broadway

1980-1981 SeasonSept. 13 - Oct. 18, 1980 -- Group Exhibition: Lichtenstein, Nauman, Stella, Judd, Warhol, Kelly; 142 Greene St

Sept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1980 -- Edward Ruscha, New Paintings; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Sept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1980 -- Peter Young, Homage to Agnes Martin; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 27 - Oct. 18, 1980 -- Roy Lichtenstein (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 18 - Nov. 22, 1980 -- Architecture II Houses For Sale: Ambasz, Eisenman, Gregotti, Isozaki, Moore, Pelli, Price, Ungers; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1980 -- Hans Namuth, Pollock Painting, 1950-1951 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1980 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Nov. 1980 -- Group Exhibition; 420 W Broadway (rear office)

Nov. 29 - Dec. 6, 1980 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, American Architecture Now (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 29 - Dec. 13, 1980 -- Benefit Exhibition for Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, Inc.; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 29 - Dec. 20, 1980 -- James Turrell; 142 Greene St

Dec. 13-20, 1980 -- Group Installation: Huebler, Kosuth, Nauman, Sonnier; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 10 - Feb. 7, 1981 -- Jasper Johns, Drawings 1970-1980; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 17 - Feb. 21, 1981 -- James Rosenquist, Star Thief; 142 Greene St

Feb. 14-28, 1981 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 14-28, 1981 -- Edward Ruscha, Drawings; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 28 - Apr. 4, 1981 -- Richard Serra, Slice; 142 Greene St

Mar. 7-28, 1981 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1981 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 12 - Apr. 4, 1981 -- Richard Serra, Film screenings, "Railroad Turnbridge" and "Steelmill/Stahlwerk" (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

Apr. 4 - May 2, 1981 -- Julian Schnabel; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 4 - May 2, 1981 -- Douglas Huebler, Crocodile Tears; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 11 - May 9, 1981 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 142 Greene St

Apr. 18 - May 9, 1981 -- Michael Harvey, Film screenings, "Sub Rosa" and "Dead Letter" (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

May 13, 1981 -- Joan Jonas, Upsidedown and Backwards (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

May 16-30, 1981 -- Artists' Benefit For the Trisha Brown Dance Company; 142 Greene St

May 16 - Sept. 4, 1981 -- Dan Flavin, Barred Corridors; 420 W Broadway

1981-1982 SeasonSept. 15 - Oct. 31, 1981 -- Donald Judd; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Sept. 19 - Oct. 10, 1981 -- Richard Serra (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 19 - Oct. 10, 1981 -- Robert Barry and Carole Gallagher, Collaboration; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 17 - Nov. 7, 1981 -- Charles Gaines, Landscape: Assorted Trees with Regressions; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 17 - Nov. 7, 1981 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 14 - Dec. 19, 1981 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 17-21, 1981 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Visions and Images - American Photographers on Photography (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 21 - Dec. 12, 1981 -- Hermine Freed, Beads + Marbles [Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films]; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1981 -- Hanne Darboven; 142 Greene St

Nov. 28 - Dec. 19, 1981 -- Eight Lithographs to Benefit the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, Inc.; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 28 - Dec. 23, 1981 -- Julian Schnabel; 142 Greene St

Jan. 9-30, 1982 -- Bruce Nauman, Violins, Violence, Silence; 142 Greene St

Jan. 9-30, 1982 -- Andy Warhol, Dollar Signs; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 9-30, 1982 -- Andy Warhol, Reversals; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Jan. 9 - Feb. 13, 1982 -- Hans Namuth, Portraits; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 6-27, 1982 -- Claude Viallat; 142 Greene St

Feb. 6-27, 1982 -- Louis Cane; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 20 - Mar. 27, 1982 -- Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 6-27, 1982 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St

Mar. 6-27, 1982 -- David Salle; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 20-27, 1982 -- Sandro Chia; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Apr. 3-24, 1982 -- Richard Serra, "Marilyn Monroe-Greta Garbo," 1981,-(A Sculpture for Gallery-Goers.); 142 Greene St

Apr. 3-24, 1982 -- Joseph Kosuth; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 3-24, 1982 -- Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 3 - May 1, 1982 -- Frank Gillette; 142 Greene St

May 1-22, 1982 -- Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

June 1 - Oct. 23, 1982 -- Summer Group Show: Chia, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Schnabel, Stella, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Summer 1982 -- Castelli and His Artists 25 Years; 420 W Broadway

1982-1983 SeasonSept. 11 - Oct. 9, 1982 -- 25th Anniversary Exhibition of Leo Castelli, Castelli and His Artists 25 Years: Artschwager, Barry, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Darboven, Dibbets, Flavin, Grisi, Huebler, Johns, Johnson, Judd, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Scarpitta, Schnabel, Serra, Sonnier, Stella, Twombly, Waldman, Warhol, Weiner, Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St

Oct. 16-23, 1982 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Interior Design: The New Freedom; 142 Greene St

Oct. 16-23, 1982 -- Architectural Drawings and Models: Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture Charrette Competition Entries; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 16 - Nov. 6, 1982 -- Group Show: Flavin, Nauman, Oldenburg, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

Oct. 30 - Nov. 20, 1982 -- Frank Stella; 420 W Broadway

[Nov. 20 - Dec. 12, 1982] -- Salvatore Scarpitta, American Cycle: 1958-1982; 142 Greene St

Nov. 27 - Dec. 18, 1982 -- John Chamberlain; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 31, 1982 - Jan. 29, 1983 -- Robert Rauschenberg; 142 Greene St

Jan. 8-29, 1983 -- Margrete Sørensen; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 8-29, 1983 -- Robert Morris, Psychomachia; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1983 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Feb. 3-26, 1983 -- Diane Blell; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Feb. 5-26, 1983 -- Robert Longo; 142 Greene St

Feb. 5-26, 1983 -- Gerard Garouste; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Robert Mapplethorpe; 142 Greene St

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Douglas Huebler; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Nassos Daphnis; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 5-26, 1983 -- Sandy Skoglund; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 2-23, 1983 -- Julian Schnabel; 142 Greene St

Apr. 2-23, 1983 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 2-23, 1983 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Robert Morris, and Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 30 - June 3, 1983 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 30 - June 4, 1983 -- Sandro Chia; 142 Greene St

Apr. 30 - June 4, 1983 -- Julian Schnabel; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

May 11 - June 30, 1983 -- Michael Smith, Government Approved Home Fallout snack bar (Castelli Graphics); 43 West 61st St

June [11] - Aug. [4], 1983 -- Drawings/Photographs; 420 W Broadway

Summer 1983 -- Summer Show, Sculpture; 142 Greene St

1983-1984 SeasonSept. 17 - Oct. 8, 1983 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Photogravures (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Sept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1983 -- Ken Price; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Sept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1983 -- Robert Barry; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 1-[22], 1983 -- James Rosenquist; 142 Greene St

Oct. 22 - Nov. 19, 1983 -- Architectural "Follies": Drawings and Models; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 29 - Nov. 5, 1983 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Handmade in America; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 12-26, 1983 -- Marvin Torffield, Pandora's Tears; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Dec. 3-17, 1983 -- 8 x 8 to Celebrate the Temporary Contemporary; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Dec. 3, 1983 - Jan. 14, 1984 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Greene St Mural; 142 Greene St

Dec. 3, 1983 - Jan. 14, 1984 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 21 - Feb. 18, 1984 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Corten Wall Sculptures; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 28 - Feb. 25, 1984 -- Jasper Johns, Paintings; 142 Greene St

Feb. 18 - Mar. 10, 1984 -- Richard Serra; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 3-17, 1984 -- Artists Call Against US Intervention in Central America; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Mar. 3-31, 1984 -- Edward Ruscha; 142 Greene St

Mar. 10-31, 1984 -- Castelli Graphics 15th Anniversary Exhibition: Graphics, Photographs, Drawings, and Multiples (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Mar. 17 - Apr. 7, 1984 -- David Salle; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 31 - Apr. 21, 1984 -- Lucio Pozzi; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Apr. 3-28, 1984 -- Dan Flavin; 142 Greene St

Apr. 14 - May 12, 1984 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 28 - May 19, 1984 -- Eve Sonneman; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

May 19 - June 9, 1984 -- Jean-Charles Blais; 420 W Broadway

June 6, 1984 -- Michael Smith, Video: Go For It Mike (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

June 15 - July 27, 1984 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Morris, Rauschenberg, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

June 23 - Sept. 8, 1984 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Blell, Chia, Johns, Judd, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Salle, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

1984-1985 SeasonSept. 15-29, 1984 -- Billy Apple, Survey: 1962-1974; 142 Greene St

Sept. 15 - Oct. 6, 1984 -- Hanne Darboven, Ansichten '82; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 6 - Nov. 3, 1984 -- Bruce Nauman; 142 Greene St

Oct. 13 - Nov. 10, 1984 -- Charles Simonds; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 19, [1984] -- Mitchell Kriegman, Video, "The Effect of Gravity on Dogs" (Castelli/Sonnabend Tapes + Films); 142 Greene St

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1984 -- Donald Judd; 142 Greene St

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1984 -- Keith Sonnier; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 17 - Dec. 15, 1984 -- Donald Judd; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 29 - Dec. 8, 1984 -- Cunningham Dance Foundation Benefit Art Sale; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 5-26, 1985 -- Sandro Chia; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 12 - Feb. 9, 1985 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Feb. 2-23, 1985 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 16 - Mar. 23, 1985 -- Nassos Daphnis; 142 Greene St

Mar. 2-23, 1985 -- Joseph Kosuth; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 2-23, 1985 -- Ralph Gibson; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 30 - Apr. 13, 1985 -- Group Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Warhol; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 30 - Apr. 13, 1985 -- Ellsworth Kelly, New Wall Reliefs; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 30 - Apr. 20, 1985 -- Francesco Clemente; 142 Greene St

Apr. 20 - May 11, 1985 -- Gerard Garouste; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Apr. 20 - May 11, 1985 -- Charles Gaines; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Apr. 27 - May 18, 1985 -- James Rosenquist; 142 Greene St

May 18 - June 15, 1985 -- Dan Flavin; 420 W Broadway (front room)

May 18 - June 15, 1985 -- Dianne Blell; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

June 22 - July 27, 1985 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chia, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Serra, Sonnier, Warhol, Weiner, Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St

1985-1986 SeasonSept. 7-21, 1985 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Ruscha, Salle, Scarpitta, Sonnier, Warhol, Weiner; 142 Greene St

Sept. 28 - Oct. 19, 1985 -- Keith Sonnier; 142 Greene St

Sept. 28 - Oct. 19, 1985 -- Jiri Georg Dokoupil; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 26 - Nov. 16, 1985 -- Keith Haring; 142 Greene St

Oct. 26 - Nov. 16, 1985 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Oct. 26 - Nov. 16, 1985 -- Judy Tompkins; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 15 - Dec. 7, 1985 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Landscapes (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Nov. 23 - Dec. 21, 1985 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Nov. 23 - Dec. 21, 1985 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Nov. 30 - Dec. 21, 1985 -- Mario Merz; 142 Greene St

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Hanne Darboven; 142 Greene St

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Group Exhibition: Chia, Judd, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Sonnier, Warhol, Westerlund Roosen; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Robert Ryman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Jan. 11 - Feb. 1, 1986 -- Douglas Huebler; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 8 - Mar. 1, 1986 -- Laura Grisi; 142 Greene St

Feb. 8 - Mar. 1, 1986 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 8 - Mar. 1, 1986 -- Nassos Daphnis; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 8-29, 1986 -- Robert Combas; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Mar. 8-29, 1986 -- Dan Rodan; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 8 - Apr. 5, 1986 -- Richard Serra, Prints; 142 Greene St

Apr. 5 - May 3, 1986 -- David Salle; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 5 - May 3, 1986 -- Jean Kallina; 420 W Broadway (office)

Apr. 12 - May 3, 1986 -- Miquel Barceló; 142 Greene St

May 10 - June 14, 1986 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

May 17 - June 14, 1986 -- Joseph Kosuth, Selected Works, 1965-1986; 142 Greene St

June 14 - Sept. 13, 1986 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Barceló, Dokoupil, Kosuth, Morris, Moskowitz, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Scarpitta, Serra, Stella, Warhol; 142 Greene St

June 14 - Sept. 13, 1986 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Blais, Blell, Brown, Chia, Combas, Gibson, Johns, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Ryman, Salle, Serra, Therrien; 420 W Broadway

1986-1987 SeasonSept. 19-27, 1986 -- The Law and Order Show; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 20 - Oct. 11, 1986 -- Mia Westerlund Roosen, Sculpture and Drawings, 1983-1986; 142 Greene St

Oct. 4-11, 1986 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Color Video Selections; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Oct. 4-25, 1986 -- James Brown; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 18-25, 1986 -- Skowhegan: A Ten-Year Retrospective; 142 Greene St

Nov. 1-22, 1986 -- Lawrence Weiner; 142 Greene St

Nov. [1]-22, 1986 -- Robert Therrien, 1st Installation; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Nov. 1-22, 1986 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Gluts; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 13, 1986 - Jan. 24, 1987 -- Claes Oldenburg, Coosje van Bruggen, and Frank Gehry, The Course of the Knife; 142 Greene St

Dec. 13, 1986 - Jan. 24, 1987 -- Claes Oldenburg, Coosje van Bruggen, and Frank Gehry, The Course of the Knife; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- XXXth Anniversary, the first fifteen years, part 1: Artschwager, Bontecou, Chamberlain, Daphnis, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Scarpitta, Stella, Twombly, Warhol; 142 Greene St

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Barceló, Flavin, Grisi, Simonds; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- Robert Therrien, 2nd Installation; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 31 - Mar. 7, 1987 -- Jasper Johns; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1987 -- Charles Gaines, Numbers + Trees; 142 Greene St

Mar. 14 - Apr. 4, 1987 -- XXXth Anniversary, the first fifteen years, part 2: Barry, Darboven, Dibbets, Flavin, Grisi, Huebler, Judd, Kosuth, Morris, Nauman, Serra, Sonnier, Waldman, Weiner; 142 Greene St

Mar. 14 - Apr. 4, 1987 -- Roy Lichtenstein; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 26 - May 2, 1987 -- Group Exhibition: Grisi, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Warhol; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Apr. 18 - May 2, 1987 -- Jean-Charles Blais; 142 Greene St

Apr. 18 - May 9, 1987 -- Dan Flavin, A New Work; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 18 - May 9, 1987 -- Ti Shan Hsu; 420 W Broadway

May [9]-30, 1987 -- Group Show: Kosuth, Morris, Oldenburg, Serra, Stella, Therrien; 142 Greene St

May 12 - June 27, 1987 -- Robert Therrien, 3rd Installation; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

May 16 - June 6, 1987 -- Richard Artschwager, Bruce Nauman, and Frank Stella; 420 W Broadway

June 4-13, 1987 -- Art Against Aids; 142 Greene St

June 20 - July 31, 1987 -- Andy Warhol; 142 Greene St

1987-1988 SeasonSept. 26 - Oct. 17, 1987 -- Richard Serra, Three Sculptures; 142 Greene St

Oct. 3-31, 1987 -- Miquel Barceló; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 24 - Nov. 14, 1987 -- Peter Schuyff; 142 Greene St

Nov. 7-28, 1987 -- Meyer Vaisman; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1987 -- Edward Ruscha; 142 Greene St

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1987 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 5-22, 1987 -- Similia/Dissimilia; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Robert Morris; 142 Greene St

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Mike Bidlo, Picasso's Women; 142 Greene St (lower gallery)

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Richard Artschwager, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 9-30, 1988 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 6-27, 1988 -- Hanne Darboven; 142 Greene St

Feb. 6-27, 1988 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 6-27, 1988 -- Cletus Johnson; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Mar. 5-12, 1988 -- School of Visual Arts Alumni Show, 1977-87; 142 Greene St

Mar. 5-26, 1988 -- Nassos Daphnis; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 26 - Apr. 16, 1988 -- Chryssa, Cityscapes 1980-88; 142 Greene St

Apr. 2-23, 1988 -- Gerard Garouste; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 23 - May 14, 1988 -- James Rosenquist; 142 Greene St

Apr. 30 - May 21, 1988 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

May [28] - June 18, 1988 -- Richard Artschwager, His Peers and Persuasions, 1963-1988; 142 Greene St

May 28 - July 31, 1988 -- Frank O. Gehry, Furniture; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - July 31, 1988 -- Edward Ruscha, Drawings; 420 W Broadway

1988-1989 SeasonSept. 17 - Oct. 15, 1988 -- Joseph Kosuth; 578 Broadway

Sept. 17 - Oct. 22, 1988 -- The Last Show: Kelly, Lichtenstein, Serra, Stella; 142 Greene St

Sept. 24 - Oct. 15, 1988 -- Mike and Doug Starn; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 5 - Nov. 12, 1988 -- Jasper Johns, Bruce Nauman, and David Salle; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 22 - Nov. 19, 1988 -- Robert Cumming (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Oct. 22 - Nov. 19, 1988 -- Bruce Nauman and Richard Serra; 578 Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 22, 1988 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 8-30, 1988 -- Benefit for Foundation for Contemporary Performing Arts, Inc.; 420 W Broadway

Circa 1989 -- Castelli Graphics 1969-1989 (Castelli Graphics); 4 E 77 St

Jan. 7-28, 1989 -- Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 7-28, 1989 -- Robert Barry; 578 Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1989 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1989 -- David Lynch; 578 Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1989 -- James Rosenquist, Joseph Kosuth, and Meyer Vaisman; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1989 -- Dianne Blell; 578 Broadway

Apr. 1-22, 1989 -- James Brown; 578 Broadway

Apr. 1-29, 1989 -- Dan Flavin, To the Citizens of the Republic of France on the 200th Anniversary of their Revolution; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 8 - May 13, 1989 -- Walter De Maria; 65 Thompson

May 6-27, 1989 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway (front room)

May 6-27, 1989 -- Charles Simonds, Wall Smears and Rocks; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

May 19 - July 1, 1989 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Bronze Sculpture 1976-1989; 65 Thompson

May 20 - June 10, 1989 -- Dan Flavin; 578 Broadway

June 3-24, 1989 -- Summer Group Show: Artschwager, Johns, Kosuth, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Sonnier, Starn Twins; 420 W Broadway (front room)

June 3-24, 1989 -- Mike and Doug Starn; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

1989-1990 SeasonSept. 16 - Oct. 14, 1989 -- Lewis Baltz (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Sept. 23 - Oct. 14, 1989 -- Richard Serra, 8 Drawings: Weights and Measures; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 14 - Nov. 30, 1989 -- Dan Flavin, (To Sabine) Fall, 1989; 65 Thompson

Oct. 21 - Nov. 11, 1989 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Reflections; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 21 - Nov. 11, 1989 -- Group Drawing Show: Artschwager, Barry, Brown, Flavin, Johns, Kelly, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Therrien, Vaisman, Weiner; 578 Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 21, 1989 -- Miquel Barceló, Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 21, 1989 -- Miquel Barceló, Drawings from Mali; 578 Broadway

Nov. 18 - Dec. 21, 1989 -- Recent Prints (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Dec. 1, 1989 - Feb. 24, 1990 -- Dan Flavin, (To Sabine) Winter, 1989; 65 Thompson

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- Roni Horn, Thicket No. 1; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- Hanne Darboven, Requiem For M. Oppenheimer; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- The 60's Revisited: New Concepts/New Materials; 578 Broadway

Jan. 6-27, 1990 -- Edward Ruscha, Selected Portfolios (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Nassos Daphnis, Thirty Years With Leo Castelli; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Douglas Huebler; 578 Broadway

Feb. 3-24, 1990 -- Robert Petersen, Selected Works (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Mar. 3-24, 1990 -- Bruce Nauman; 65 Thompson

Mar. 3-31, 1990 -- Bruce Nauman; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 3-31, 1990 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Portraits: Recent Prints from Gemini G.E.L. (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Mar. 3-31, 1990 -- Bernar Venet, Drawings Scale: 1 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Apr. 1990 -- John Gutmann, Talking Picture; 578 Broadway

Apr. 7-28, 1990 -- Robert Morris; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 7-28, 1990 -- Taking the Picture: Photography and Appropriation; 578 Broadway

Apr. 7 - May 12, 1990 -- Hiroshi Teshigahara, Echizen Ware; 65 Thompson

May 5-26, 1990 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Currents '70 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

May 5 - June 2, 1990 -- Jan Dibbets; 420 W Broadway

May 12 - July 28, 1990 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 65 Thompson

June 9 - Sept. 15, 1990 -- Group Exhibition of Gallery Artists: Artschwager, Johns, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Sonnier, Starn Twins, Stella, Vaisman, van Bruggen, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

1990-1991 SeasonSept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1990 -- Robert Barry; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 22 - Oct. 13, 1990 -- David Salle, Recent Prints (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 17, 1990 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 17, 1990 -- Cletus Johnson; 578 Broadway

Oct. 20 - Nov. 17, 1990 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Reflections Series (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Nov. 27, 1990 - Jan. 12, 1991 -- Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 27, 1990 - Jan. 12, 1991 -- Claes Oldenburg, Works from Gemini G.E.L., 1988-1990 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Nov. 27, 1990 - Jan. 12, 1991 -- Robert Watts; 578 Broadway

Dec. 8, 1990 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Frank Stella, New Work; 65 Thompson

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Lawrence Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Chryssa; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Lewis Baltz, Rule without Exception (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Jan. 19 - Feb. 9, 1991 -- Hanne Darboven, Urzeit; 578 Broadway

Feb. 16 - Mar. 9, 1991 -- Jasper Johns; 420 W Broadway

[Feb. 16 - Mar. 9, 1991] -- [Robert Cumming; 578 Broadway]

Mar. 9 - Apr. 6, 1991 -- Robert Morris; 65 Thompson

Mar. 16 - Apr. 6, 1991 -- Richard Artschwager; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 16 - Apr. 6, 1991 -- James Brown, Prints (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Apr. 13 - May 4, 1991 -- Bertrand Lavier; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 13 - May 4, 1991 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Interior Series (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Apr. 13 - May 11, 1991 -- Group Drawing Show: Janie Lee Master Drawings; 65 Thompson

May 11-25, 1991 -- Edward Ruscha, Prints; 578 Broadway

May 11 - June 1, 1991 -- Edward Ruscha; 420 W Broadway

[May 11 - June 1, 1991] -- [Charles Simonds; 420 W Broadway (middle room)]

May 21 - [June 22], 1991 -- Robert Therrien; 65 Thompson

June 1-22, 1991 -- Charles Gaines; 578 Broadway

June 5-22, 1991 -- Group Drawings Exhibition; 578 Broadway

[July 16 - Nov. 9], 1991 -- Frank Stella; 65 Thompson

Summer 1991 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Flavin, Johns, Kelly, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Stella, Therrien, Vaisman, Warhol, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

1991-1992 SeasonSept. 21 - Oct. 12, 1991 -- Dianne Blell, Wild Lives, Photographic Portraits Documenting Africa's Vanishing Wildlife; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 21 - Oct. 12, 1991 -- Group Exhibition: Johns, Kelly, Lavier, Lichtenstein, Starn Twins, Stella, Ruscha; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Oct. 19 - Nov. 16, 1991 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 26 - Nov. 30, 1991 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Print Survey in Themes, 1952-1992; 578 Broadway

Nov. 23 - Dec. 14, 1991 -- Jean-Pierre Raynaud; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 14, 1991 - Feb. 1, 1992 -- Group Exhibition, Large Scale Prints: Kosuth, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Serra, Starn Twins; 578 Broadway

Jan. 4-25, 1992 -- Pruitt-Early; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 1-29, 1992 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Interiors; 65 Thompson

Feb. 1-29, 1992 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Interiors; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 1-29, 1992 -- Leo Castelli XXXV Anniversary, Installation; 578 Broadway

Feb. 8-29, 1992 -- Salvatore Scarpitta, Early Works; 578 Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1992 -- Laura Grisi; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 7-28, 1992 -- Hans Namuth; 578 Broadway

[Apr. - July], 1992 -- Elyn Zimmerman, Portals and Passages; 65 Thompson

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Keith Sonnier; 65 Thompson

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Charles Simonds, Stugg. Thebb?The Singing Monkey, 1992; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 4-25, 1992 -- Keith Sonnier, Prints, Drawings and Multiples 1990-1992; 578 Broadway

May 2-23, 1992 -- Mike and Doug Starn; 420 W Broadway

May 9 - June 6, 1992 -- James Brown, Survey of Work 1986-1992; 578 Broadway

May 30 - June 13, 1992 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Flavin, Lichtenstein, Kosuth, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Warhol, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Therrien; 420 W Broadway

June 6 - July 31, 1992 -- Group Exhibition, Drawings, Prints, Multiples, Photographs; 578 Broadway

June 23 - July 31, 1992 -- The Guggenheim in Europe: Architectural Models and Drawings; 420 W Broadway

Aug. 17 - Sept. 19, 1992 -- Summer Group Exhibition 1992, Part II: Artshwager, Lichtenstein, Kosuth, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Salle, Starn Twins, Therrien, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

1992-1993 SeasonSept. 19 - Oct. 24, 1992 -- Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Minimalist Works; 578 Broadway

Sept. 26 - Oct. 17, 1992 -- Meyer Vaisman, Turkey; 420 W Broadway

Sept. 26 - Nov. 7, 1992 -- Group Architecture Exhibition, Angels and Franciscans: Innovative Architecture from Los Angeles and San Francisco; 65 Thompson

Oct. 24 - Nov. 14, 1992 -- Miquel Barceló; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 31 - Dec. 5, 1992 -- Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra, Keith Sonnier, Post-Minimal Works; 578 Broadway

Nov. 14, 1992 - Jan. 9, 1993 -- Andrew Lord, Modelling: A Sculpture of 27 Pieces and Related Works; 65 Thompson

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1992 -- Ellsworth Kelly; 420 W Broadway (front room)

Nov. 21 - Dec. 19, 1992 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Waterlilies; 420 W Broadway (middle room)

Dec. 12, 1992 - Jan. 30, 1993 -- Group Sculpture Exhibit, Object Lessons; 578 Broadway

Jan. 9 - Feb. 6, 1993 -- Jasper Johns, 35 Years with Leo Castelli; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 16-23, 1993 -- Benefit for Cunningham Dance Foundation; 65 Thompson

Jan. 30 - Mar. 13, 1993 -- Richard Long; 65 Thompson

Feb. 6 - Mar. 6, 1993 -- Word Play: Darboven, Kosuth, Ruscha, Weiner; 578 Broadway

Feb. 13 - Mar. 13, 1993 -- Blind Color: Calle, Charlton, Klein, Manzoni, Rauschenberg, Richter, Rinehardt; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 13 - Mar. 13, 1993 -- Sophie Calle, Last Seen; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- Frank Stella and James Rosenquist, New Prints; 65 Thompson

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- James Rosenquist, Prints from "Welcome to the Water Planet" and "House of Fire"; 578 Broadway

Mar. 20 - Apr. 17, 1993 -- Keith Sonnier, Robert Morris, and Robert Rauschenberg, Soft Ware; 578 Broadway

Apr. 24 - May 22, 1993 -- Hanne Darboven; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 24 - May 29, 1993 -- Group Exhibition, Graphic Works; 578 Broadway

May 15 - July 31, 1993 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Chamberlain, Long, Lord, Morris, Rauschenberg, Sonnier, Stella; 65 Thompson

May 29 - Oct. 2, 1993 -- British and American Sculpture: Cragg, Deacon, Kapoor, Long, Kelly, Nauman, Serra, Stella; 420 W Broadway

June 5 - July 24, 1993 -- Group Exhibition, Faces and Figures; 578 Broadway

1993-1994 SeasonSept. 25 - Oct. 23, 1993 -- Robert Morris; 65 Thompson

Sept. 25 - Oct. 23, 1993 -- Robert Morris, Blind Time Drawings; 578 Broadway

Sept. 25 - Nov. 27, 1993 -- Group Exhibition: Artschwager, Kosuth, Morris, Ruscha, Starn Twins, Vaisman; 578 Broadway

Oct. 16 - Nov. 6, 1993 -- Joseph Kosuth, The Thing-in-itself is found in its Truth through the loss of its immediacy; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 30 - Nov. 27, 1993 -- Charles Simonds, Retrospective; 578 Broadway

Nov. 12 - Dec. 4, 1993 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 3, 1993 - Jan. 15, 1994 -- Frank Stella, Moby Dick Deckle Edges (New Prints from Tyler Graphics); 578 Broadway

Dec. 4, 1993 - Jan. 15, 1994 -- Andrew Lord; 578 Broadway

Dec. 9, 1993 - Jan. 8, 1994 -- Benefit for Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 22 - Feb. 19, 1994 -- Bruce Nauman, Falls, Pratfalls, and Sleights of Hand; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 22 - Mar. 5, 1994 -- Robert Morris; 578 Broadway

Jan. 22 - Mar. 5, 1994 -- Bruce Nauman, Prints and Drawings; 578 Broadway

Feb. 26 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Scores (Off Kilter Keys); 65 Thompson

Feb. 26 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Scores (Off Kilter Keys); 420 W Broadway

Mar. 12 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Barbaralee Diamonstein, Inside the New York Art World; 578 Broadway

Mar. 12 - Apr. 2, 1994 -- Group Exhibition: Lord, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Starn Twins, Stella, Therrien; 578 Broadway

Apr. 9 - May 7, 1994 -- Mike and Doug Starn, Spectroheliographs; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 9 - May 14, 1994 -- Lee Bontecou, Edward Higgins, and Robert Moskowitz, Sculpture and Painting from the Early 1960's; 578 Broadway

Apr. 30 - June 18, 1994 -- Sandro Chia, New Paintings; 65 Thompson

May 17 - June 11, 1994 -- Hannah Collins, Signs of Life; 420 W Broadway

May 21 - June 25, 1994 -- Jasper Johns, The Prints of Jasper John 1960-1993; 578 Broadway

June 18 - Sept. 10, 1994 -- Summer Group Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

July 5 - Oct. 8, 1994 -- Group Sculpture Exhibition, Major Works: Artschwager, Judd, Flavin, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Starn, Therrien; 578 Broadway

1994-1995 SeasonSept. 17 - Oct. 8, 1994 -- Richard Meier, Sculpture; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 8 - Nov. 12, 1994 -- Dan Flavin, Selected Works 1969-1990; 578 Broadway

Oct. 15 - Nov. 12, 1994 -- James Rosenquist; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 17, 1994 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Nudes; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 19 - Dec. 23, 1994 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Nudes: 9 Color Relief Prints; PACT 95 International America's Cup Class Yacht; 578 Broadway

Jan. 7-28, 1995 -- Lawrence Wiener, Stones + Stones + Stones; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 14 - Feb. 11, 1995 -- Robert Morris, Malaprops; The Fallen and the Saved; 578 Broadway

Feb. 4-25, 1995 -- James Brown; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 18 - Mar. 18, 1995 -- Richard Artshwager, Robert Therrien, and Edward Ruscha; 578 Broadway

Mar. 4-25, 1995 -- Kenneth Noland; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 25 - Apr. 29, 1995 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Tribute 21; 578 Broadway

Apr. 1-22, 1995 -- Hannah Collins; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 1-22, 1995 -- Edward Ruscha, Anamorphic Paintings; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 29 - May 20, 1995 -- Miquel Barceló; 420 W Broadway

May 6 - June 2, 1995 -- New Editions: Johns, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha; 578 Broadway

May 31 - June 30, 1995 -- Barbara Bloom, Pictures from the Floating World; 420 W Broadway

June 10 - July 8, 1995 -- Frank Stella, Imaginary Places (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

June 10 - July 8, 1995 -- Summer Group Exhibition: Collins, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Vaisman; 578 Broadway

July 11 - Sept. 1, 1995 -- Summer Group Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

1995-1996 SeasonSept. 16 - Oct. 14, 1995 -- Group Sculpture Exhibition: Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Serra; 578 Broadway

Sept. 16 - Oct. 14, 1995 -- Edward Ruscha, Sayings, Puddinhead Wilson; 578 Broadway

Sept. 18 - Oct. 7, 1995 -- Hanne Darboven, South Korean Calendar; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 14 - Nov. 4, 1995 -- Nassos Daphnis, Energies in Outer Space; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 21 - Nov. 18, 1995 -- Joseph Kosuth, Editions The Past 10 Years; 578 Broadway

Nov. 11 - Dec. 16, 1995 -- Frank Stella, Free Standing Murals; 420 W Broadway

Dec. 2, 1995 - Jan. 13, 1996 -- Frank Stella, Editions; 578 Broadway

Jan. 13 - Feb. 3, 1996 -- Paul Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 30 - Feb. 10, 1996 -- Bailey House Auction; 578 Broadway

Feb. 10 - Mar. 9, 1996 -- Group Exhibition, New Works by Gallery Artists: Johns, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Sonnier, Stella, Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 17 - Mar. 16, 1996 -- Collage - Gallery Artists: Brown, Darboven, Lichtenstein, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Starn Twins, Therrien, Vaisman; 578 Broadway

Mar. 16 - Apr. 13, 1996 -- Robert Therrien; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 23 - Apr. 20, 1996 -- Photography: Calle, Collins, Kosuth, Ruscha, Starn Twins, Therrien; 578 Broadway

Apr. 20 - May 18, 1996 -- James Rosenquist, Horizon Home Sweet Home; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 20 - May 24, 1996 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Eight New Prints; 578 Broadway

May 28 - July 26, 1996 -- Ralph Gibson, Infanta; 420 W Broadway

May 28 - July 26, 1996 -- Group Drawing Exhibition, Works on Paper: Chryssa, Daphnis, Darboven, Johns, Lichtenstein, Morris, Nauman, Rauschenberg, Ruscha, Serra, Stella, Sonnier, Therrien, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

June 1 - July 26, 1996 -- Summer Group Show: Johns, Kosuth, Lichtenstein, Ruscha, Stella, Therrien; 578 Broadway

1996-1997 SeasonSept. 14 - Oct. 12, 1996 -- Gianfranco Gorgoni, 25 Years of Artists Portraits; 578 Broadway

Sept. 14 - Oct. 12, 1996 -- Ellsworth Kelly, Prints; 578 Broadway

Sept. 28 - Oct. 26, 1996 -- Roy Lichtenstein, Landscapes in the Chinese Style; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 19 - Dec. 14, 1996 -- Jasper Johns, Prints 1960-1996 (Castelli Graphics); 578 Broadway

Nov. 2 - Dec. 14, 1996 -- Bruce Nauman, Bronze Heads and End of the World; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 11 - Feb. 8, 1997 -- Robert Morris, Horizons Cut Between Clio and Mnemosyne; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 18 - Feb. 22, 1997 -- Robert Therrien, Drawings; 578 Broadway

Jan. 18 - Feb. 22, 1997 -- Andy Warhol, Prints; 578 Broadway

Feb. 15 - Mar. 15, 1997 -- Lawrence Weiner, Then Now + Then; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 1-22, 1997 -- Dan Flavin; 578 Broadway

Mar. 22 - Apr. 26, 1997 -- Keith Sonnier, Alternating Currents; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 29 - Apr. 5, 1997 -- The Printmaking Workshop Benefit Exhibition and Auction; 420 W Broadway

Apr. 17 - May 17, 1997 -- Columbia University MFA Exhibition; 420 W Broadway

May 3 - June 7, 1997 -- Edward Ruscha, Cityscapes and "O" Books; 420 W Broadway

July - Sept., 1997 -- Summer Group Show: Kosuth, Morris, Serra; 420 W Broadway

1997-1998 SeasonSept. 27 - Oct. 18, 1997 -- Joseph Kosuth; 420 W Broadway

Oct. 25 - Nov. 15, 1997 -- 40 Years of Exploration and Innovation Part 1: Bontecou, Chryssa, Cornell, Johns, Lichtenstein, Oldenburg, Rauschenberg, Rosenquist, Ruscha, Twombly, Warhol; 420 W Broadway

Nov. 22 - Dec. 13, 1997 -- 40 Years of Exploration and Innovation Part 2: Daphnis, Flavin, Judd, Kelly, Morris, Serra, Stella, Therrien, Waldman; 420 W Broadway

Jan. 10-31, 1998 -- 40 Years of Exploration and Innovation Part 3: Barry, Darboven, Dibbets, Grisi, Huebler, Kosuth, Nauman, Scarpitta, Sonnier, Starn Twins, Weiner; 420 W Broadway

Feb. 7 - Mar. 14, 1998 -- Dan Flavin, Some Drawings and Installations of Fluorescent Light; 420 W Broadway

Mar. 28 - Apr. 25, 1998 -- Hannah Collins, True Stories; 420 W Broadway

May 2 - June 6, 1998 -- Mike and Doug Starn, Black Hole Sun Burned; 420 W Broadway

June 24 - Aug. 29, 1998 -- Summer Show; 420 W Broadway

1998-1999 SeasonSept. 26 - Oct. 31, 1998 -- Robert Morris, The Rationed Years; 420 W Broadway

Nov. - Dec., 1998 -- Joseph Kosuth, Richard Serra, Keith Sonnier; 420 W Broadway

Jan. - Feb. 1999 -- Robert Rauschenberg, Arcadian Survey; 420 W Broadway
Related Material:
Available in the Archives of America Art are three oral history interviews with Leo Castelli. Paul Cummings interviewed Castelli between May 14, 1969 and June 8, 1973; Barbara Rose in July, 1969; and Andrew Decker on May 22, 1997.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds items lent for microfilming (reel N68) including printed material. Lent material was returned to the lender and is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Leo Castelli loaned printed material for microfilming in 1968. Leo Castelli's wife, Barbara Bortuzzo Castelli, and his children, Nina Castelli Sundell and Jean-Christophe Castelli, donated the Leo Castelli Gallery records to the Archives of American Art in 2007.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- New York (State)New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- History -- New York (State)New York  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Video recordings
Sketches
Transcripts
Sound recordings
Notes
Visitors' books
Photographs
Notebooks
Awards
Citation:
Leo Castelli Gallery records, circa 1880-2000, bulk 1957-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.leocast
See more items in:
Leo Castelli Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-leocast
Online Media:

Richard York Gallery records

Creator:
Richard York Gallery  Search this
Names:
Art Dealers Association of America  Search this
De Forest, Lockwood, 1850-1932  Search this
Goldyne, Joseph R.  Search this
Hale, Ellen Day, 1855-1940  Search this
Hill, J. W. (John William), 1812-1879  Search this
Hill, John Henry, 1839-1922  Search this
Hornby, Lester George, 1882-1956  Search this
Lozowick, Louis, 1892-1973  Search this
Lucioni, Luigi, 1900-1988  Search this
MacRae, Emma Fordyce, 1887-1974  Search this
Mapplethorpe, Robert  Search this
Marin, John, 1870-1953  Search this
Marin, John, Jr., 1915?-1988  Search this
Smith, Houghton Cranford, 1887-1983  Search this
Stella, Joseph, 1877-1946  Search this
Stevens, Will Henry, 1881-1949  Search this
Wheeler, Steve, 1912-1992  Search this
York, Richard  Search this
Extent:
89.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Date:
circa 1865-2005
bulk 1981-2004
Summary:
The records of the Richard York Gallery, a New York gallery specializing in American art from early 1800s to 1950, measure 79.3 linear feet and date from circa 1865-2005, with the bulk of the material dating from 1981 to 2004. Three-fourths of the records are artists' artwork files, documenting the sale and consignment of nearly 6,500 works of art. The gallery's activities are also recorded through correspondence, client files, gallery invoices, inventories, business and financial records, printed materials, scrapbooks, photographic materials of artwork, and estate records for the John Marin estate and Sergio Stella estate (Joseph Stella). An addition of 10.2 linear feet, dated circa 1865 to 2005, includes artists' files arranged alphabetically containing printed material, clippings, exhibition announcements, and scattered correspondence and financial documents.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the Richard York Gallery, a New York gallery specializing in American art from early 1800s to 1950, measure 79.3 linear feet and date from circa 1865-2005, with the bulk of the material dating from 1981 to 2004. Three-fourths of the records are artists' artwork files, documenting the sale and consignment of nearly 6,500 works of art. The gallery's activities are also recorded through correspondence, client files, gallery invoices, inventories, business and financial records, printed materials, scrapbooks, photographic materials of artwork, and estate records for the John Marin estate and Sergio Stella estate (Joseph Stella). An addition of 10.2 linear feet, dated circa 1865 to 2005, includes artists' files arranged alphabetically containing printed material, clippings, exhibition announcements, and scattered correspondence and financial documents.

Correspondence includes both incoming and outgoing correspondence with collectors, clients, galleries and museums, primarily regarding appraisals, consignments, exhibitions, general inquiries, loans, and sales. Also found are scattered transactional records, information sheets for artwork, and photographic materials. Correspondence from the mid-late 1980s is poorly represented.

The sale and consignment of nearly 6,500 pieces of artwork at the Richard York Gallery are documented through transactional records, photographic materials, correspondence, and scattered printed materials found in the Artists' Artwork Files. Artists for which there are significant quantities of materials (over 50 folders) include Joseph Goldyne, Ellen Day Hale, John Henry Hill, John William Hill, Lester George Hornby, Louis Lozowick, Luigi Lucioni, Emma Fordyce MacRae, John Marin, Joseph Stella, William Henry Stevens, and Steve Wheeler. Also included are the files of the Richard York photography collection, which contained works by Robert Mapplethorpe.

Similar to the Artists' Artwork Files, Client Files document the sale and consignment of artwork, but are arranged by artist's and client's name. Materials found are primarily from the early 1990s and include correspondence, notes, photographic materials, photocopied client information cards, and printed materials.

The Richard York Gallery represented the John Marin estate and the Sergio Stella estate (Joseph Stella). The records of the John Marin estate are primarily artwork in-take sheets from 1998 and inventory lists from 2001. The Sergio Stella Estate records include correspondence, inventories of artwork by Joseph Stella, and some photographic materials.

Sales and inventory records contain a nearly complete set of gallery invoices from 1995-2000, and 2004. Inventories includes gallery inventory lists, and inventory cards of sold artwork from 1981-1997 (bulk 1981-1991).

The business and financial records include accounting records, bank deposit records, corporate records, index cards for contacts, invoices for gallery expenses, materials related to Richard York's involvement in the ADAA, mailing lists, records of payments to consignors, receipts, shipping records, and tax records. The gallery migrated from paper records to Artbase, an artwork management system, around 2000-2002. Included are two CDs of database data and digital images from Artbase, as well as inventories of the digital file names.

Printed materials contain advertising tear sheets from 1998-2002, exhibition catalogs, magazine and newspaper clippings of reviews and announcements, and other miscellaneous printed materials. Printed materials are also found in eight scrapbooks which document the activities of the Richard York Gallery, Richard York, and the gallery's exhibitions from 1981-2002. Materials in the scrapbooks include clippings, correspondence, photographs, exhibition catalogs, announcements, and invitations.

Photographic materials includes color photographs, transparencies, digital prints, and scattered printed materials, as well as over 600 slides of artwork, primarily works of art which were sold or consigned by the gallery. Artists for which there is significant volume of transparencies include Houghton Cranford Smith and Lockwood de Forest, Sr.

Materials with dates prior to 1981 in this collection are primarily research materials for works of art, such as printed materials, correspondence, and transparencies, as well as some artwork artifacts, such as back labels.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series:

Series 1: Correspondence, 1975-2005 (Boxes 1-7; 6.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Artists' Artwork Files, circa 1865-2004 (Boxes 7-64; 56.85 linear feet)

Series 3: Client Files, 1965, circa 1981-circa 2004 (Box 64; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Estate Records, 1983-circa 2004 (Boxes 64-65; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 5: Sales and Inventory Records, 1977-2004 (Boxes 65-70; 5.0 linear feet)

Series 6: Business and Financial Records, 1974-2005 (Boxes 70-77; 6.25 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Materials, 1980-2004 (Boxes 77-78; 1.1 linear feet)

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1981-2002 (Boxes 78, 80; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographic Materials, 1977-2004 (Boxes 78-79; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 10: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1865-2005 (Boxes 81-91; 10.2 linear feet)
Historical Note:
Richard T. York (circa 1950-2003) opened his eponymous gallery in the spring of 1981 on East 65th Street in New York City. Specializing in American painting and sculpture from early 1800s to 1950, the Richard York Gallery dealt in the artwork of hundreds of artists including Albert Bierstadt, Charles Demuth, Arthur Dove, Lockwood de Forest, John Graham, Georgia O'Keeffe, John Singer Sargent, Charles Sheeler, and Steve Wheeler. It also represented the estates of artists John Marin and Joseph Stella.

Richard York passed away in April 2003, and the gallery closed in May 2004.
Provenance:
The Richard York Gallery records were donated to the Archives of American Art in 2006 by Kevin Scott, the executor of Richard York's estate; and in 2015 by Lisa Bush Hankin, former gallery director.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Richard York Gallery records, circa 1865-2005, bulk 1981-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.richyorg
See more items in:
Richard York Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-richyorg
Online Media:

James Graham & Sons records

Creator:
James Graham & Sons  Search this
Names:
Coe Kerr Gallery  Search this
Duveen-Graham (Gallery)  Search this
Graham Gallery  Search this
Graham Modern (Gallery)  Search this
Cicero, Carmen, 1926-  Search this
Coheleach, Guy  Search this
Crile, Susan, 1942-  Search this
De Kooning, Elaine  Search this
Dickinson, Edwin Walter, 1891-1978  Search this
Duveen, Albert  Search this
Fogel, Seymour, 1911-1984  Search this
Fried, Nancy  Search this
Graham, Robert Claverhouse, 1913-1994  Search this
Kriesberg, Irving, 1919-  Search this
Melchers, Gari, 1860-1932  Search this
Perrine, Van Dearing, 1869-1955  Search this
Santlofer, Jonathan, 1946-  Search this
Schley, Reeve, 1936-  Search this
Stevens, Peter  Search this
Thorne, Joan, 1943-  Search this
Trieff, Selina, 1934-  Search this
Wyeth, Andrew, 1917-2009  Search this
Wyeth, Jamie, 1946-  Search this
Wyeth, N. C. (Newell Convers), 1882-1945  Search this
Extent:
103.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Visitors' books
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Date:
1821
1815
circa 1896-2011
Summary:
The records of the New York City gallery James Graham & Sons measure 103.2 linear feet and date from 1815, 1821, circa 1896-2011 (bulk 1950s-1980s). The collection generally documents the gallery's contemporary art department during the time in which Robert Claverhouse Graham, Sr. worked at the gallery (1940-1979); records prior to 1954 are sparse and scattered. Gallery records include artist files; correspondence; exhibition files; financial records; inventory records; printed materials; sales, loans, and consignment records; scrapbooks; and photographic materials. Also found are records from Coe Kerr Gallery regarding exhibitions.. There is a 8.0 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2018 that includes artists' files regarding exhibitions and photographs of works of art.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the New York City gallery James Graham & Sons measure 103.2 linear feet and date from 1815, 1821, circa 1896-2011 (bulk 1950s-1980s). The collection generally documents the gallery's contemporary art department during the time in which Robert Claverhouse Graham, Sr. worked at the gallery (1940-1979); records prior to 1954 are sparse and scattered. Gallery records include artist files; correspondence; exhibition files; financial records; inventory records; printed materials; sales, loans, and consignment records; scrapbooks; and photographic materials. Also found are records from Coe Kerr Gallery regarding exhibitions of artwork by Jamie Wyeth, and to a lesser extent, Andrew and N.C. Wyeth.

Over the years, the gallery changed names and established contemporary art departments. In addition to records of James Graham & Sons, the collection holds the records of Duveen-Graham Modern Art (in partnership with Albert Duveen), Graham Gallery, Graham Modern, JG|Contemporary, and, to a lesser extent, The Clapp and Graham Co.

Alphabetical files are a mix of business correspondence and business records. The bulk of the series contains correspondence with galleries, museums, other institutions, and, to a lesser extent, clients regarding sales, consignments, and loans of artwork. Also found are materials relevant to the daily operations of the gallery, including correspondence, subject files, and scattered financial, business and legal records.

Exhibition files provide scattered documentation of the gallery's exhibitions through catalogs, clippings, correspondence, guest books, notes, photographs, press materials, price lists, and sales receipts and other financial records.

Artists' Files document the numerous artists who have been represented by the gallery, especially modern American artists. Folders for each artist can contain a variety of materials, including correspondence with the artist or with institutions regarding consignments, loans, sales and exhibitions; photographic materials primarily of artwork; sales invoices; exhibition catalogs, postcards, and other printed materials; press releases; magazine and newspaper clippings; price lists; artist binders; and research materials on artists and artwork. Also found are some subject files, per original arrangement. There is extensive material related to artists Carmen Cicero, Susan Crile, Elaine De Kooning's portrait of President John F. Kennedy, Edwin Dickinson, muralist Seymour Fogel, Nancy Fried, Irving Kriesberg, Gari Melchers, Jonathan Santlofer, Reeve Schley, Peter Stevens, Joan Thorne, and Selina Trieff.

Artwork files document sales, consignments, and loans of artwork primarily from the mid-1980s to 2000s. Materials include agreements and contracts; condition reports; correspondence; invoices and receipts; photographs of artwork; shipping records; and photocopied printed material and other documentation. This series requires written permission from the donor in order to access.

Sales records from 1959-1984 (missing 1974) are found in the Financial Records series. Also found are check stub books from the mid-late 1950s; price lists; records for the Four Seasons Charter Corp.; and scattered banking, consignment, tax, and other financial records. Inventory cards from mid-1950s-1970s and inventory lists, often with notations and prices, are found in the series Inventory Records.

Coe Kerr Gallery Records regarding the Wyeths document Jamie Wyeth's exhibitions primarily from the mid-1970s-early 1980s. Also found is limited material regarding Andrew Wyeth and N.C. Wyeth. Materials include correspondence, photographs, exhibition printed materials, and extensive newspaper clippings.

There are exhibition catalogs, books, announcements, magazines, clippings, postcards, posters and other printed materials related to artists, John Graham & Sons exhibitions, and exhibitions by Graham artists held at other galleries and museums. Also found is an 1815 fifty cent note which was redeemed in 1821.

Seven scrapbooks document discrete aspects of the business, including the gallery's advertising, participation in an art fair, and the careers of artists Guy Coheleach and Van Dearing Perrine. Materials housed in the scrapbooks include clippings, catalogs, photographs, and other printed materials.

Photographic Materials include mostly black and white photographs, negatives, slides and transparencies of artwork; scattered photographs of installations, artists, and the gallery; and a handful of personal snapshots. The bulk of the photographs are undated, but were likely printed between 1950s-1990s.

There is a 8.0 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2018 that includes artists' files regarding exhibitions and photographs of works of art.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Series 1: Alphabetical Files, circa 1896, 1902-1999, bulk 1955-1986 (Boxes 1-15; 15 linear feet)

Series 2: Exhibition Files, 1912, 1947-2004 (Boxes 16-24; 8 linear feet)

Series 3: Artists' Files, circa 1907-2006, bulk 1955-1999 (Boxes 24-62, 95-96; 39.1 linear feet)

Series 4: Artwork Files, circa early 1900s-2011, bulk mid-1980s-2009 (Boxes 63-71, 94, 101; 9.3 linear feet)

Series 5: Financial Records, circa 1937-1993 (Boxes 72-76, 96; 4.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Inventory Records, circa 1954-1993 (Boxes 76-78, 96; 2.1 linear feet)

Series 7: Coe Kerr Gallery Records Regarding Wyeths, 1964-1988 (Boxes 78-80, 97; 2.7 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Materials, 1815, 1821, 1949-2006 (Boxes 81-82, 97; 2.1 linear feet)

Series 9: Scrapbooks, 1897-1990s (Boxes 82, 98-100; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographic Materials, 1929-1990s (Boxes 83-93, 96, 100-101; 11.5 linear feet)

Series 11: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1940-1980 (Boxes 102-109; 8 linear feet)
Historical Note:
The James Graham & Sons gallery has been owned and managed by the Graham family in New York City since 1857. Throughout its history, the gallery has specialized in decorative arts, antiques, and 19th-early 20th century and contemporary American art.

In 1857, Samuel Graham founded a gallery at 66 Third Street and specialized in furniture. Graham was joined by his son James in the 1880s and expanded the business to include antiques and decorative arts. James A. Graham, the third generation Graham, joined the gallery in the early 20th century. James Graham and antiques dealer Marshall Clapp created Clapp & Graham in 1914, a partnership which was dissolved around 1940.

James R. Graham, the fourth generation Graham, joined the gallery in 1937, followed by his brother Robert Claverhouse Graham, Sr. in 1940. The gallery was then named James Graham & Sons and was located at 514 Madison Avenue. At this time, the gallery specialized in bronzes, ceramics, silver, sculptures, and 19th-early 20th century American art. Robert C. Graham, Sr. introduced modern American art, especially The Eight, into the gallery's inventory.

In 1955, the gallery moved to 1014 Madison Avenue, where it remained until the late 2000s. That same year, Graham opened its first contemporary department with Albert Duveen. Duveen-Graham Modern Art gallery was based on the third floor of the Madison Avenue building and dealt solely in contemporary art until its closing in 1958. Robert C. Graham, Jr. (Robin) joined the gallery in 1963, becoming the fifth generation Graham to run the family business. The gallery is currently located at 32 East 67th Street.

Betsy Fahlman's "James Graham & Sons: A Century and a Half in the Art Business" (2007) was a valuable resource in constructing this Historical Note.
Related Material:
Among the other resources relating to James Graham & Sons in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Robert Claverhouse Graham, November 19, 1976, and the David Herbert papers, 1950-1995.
Provenance:
The James Graham & Sons records were donated in 2007, 2008, and 2012 by Priscilla Caldwell and Jay Grimm of James Graham & Sons and in 2018 by Cameron Shay of James Graham & Sons.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Artwork Files (Boxes 63-71, 94) and some photographic materials (Box 93 and 101) require written permission to access.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Painting -- United States  Search this
Sculpture -- United States  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Visitors' books
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Citation:
James Graham & Sons records, 1815, 1821, circa 1896-2011, bulk 1950s-1980s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.jamegras
See more items in:
James Graham & Sons records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-jamegras
Online Media:

André Emmerich Gallery records

Creator:
André Emmerich Gallery  Search this
Names:
Galerie André Emmerich  Search this
Sotheby Parke Bernet & Co.  Search this
Sotheby's (Firm)  Search this
Caro, Anthony, 1924-  Search this
Emmerich, André  Search this
Francis, Sam, 1923-1994  Search this
Frankenthaler, Helen, 1928-2011  Search this
Greenberg, Clement, 1909-1994  Search this
Hockney, David  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Louis, Morris, 1912-1962  Search this
Noland, Kenneth, 1924-2010  Search this
Olitski, Jules, 1922-2007  Search this
Pepper, Beverly  Search this
Extent:
311.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Visitors' books
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Etchings
Date:
circa 1929-2009
Summary:
The André Emmerich Gallery records and André Emmerich papers measure 311.4 linear feet and date from 1929 to 2009. The collection documents the business of the André Emmerich Gallery as well as André Emmerich's life and activities related to the business of selling art. Gallery records include correspondence; appointment books; administrative and subject files; exhibition files; artist files and accounts; inventory, sales, purchase, and consignment records; chronological files; financial and legal records; printed materials; original artwork; photographic and audiovisual materials. Also found are personal papers and records relating to André Emmerich. TheA small addition received in 2014 includes general correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, artists' files, inventory records, consignment records, printed material, photographic materials, and André Emmerich personal papers and records.
Scope and Content Note:
The André Emmerich Gallery records and André Emmerich papers measure 311.4 linear feet and date from 1929 to 2009. The collection documents the business of the André Emmerich Gallery as well as André Emmerich's life and activities related to the business of selling art. Gallery records include correspondence; appointment books; administrative and subject files; exhibition files; artist files and accounts; inventory, sales, purchase, and consignment records; chronological files; financial and legal records; printed materials; original artwork; photographic and audiovisual materials. Also found are personal papers and records relating to André Emmerich.

The records document the gallery's daily business operations, exhibitions, and relationships with artists, dealers, clients, galleries, and museums. Artists particularly well-represented throughout the collection include Anthony Caro, Sam Francis, Helen Frankenthaler, David Hockney, Hans Hofmann, Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, and Beverly Pepper.

Records pre-dating the gallery's establishment in 1954 are primarily newspaper and magazine clippings related to artists, personal photographs and photographs of artists, an original etching, and some of André Emmerich's personal records including biographical materials, correspondence, writings, and legal and financial records. Records post-dating the gallery's closure in 1998 are primarily residual business records related to the final disposition of artwork, clippings, photographs of André Emmerich and gallery staff, biographical materials, personal correspondence, writings, legal and financial records, and condolences received by Emmerich's wife upon his death in 2007.

Correspondence is primarily with galleries, museums and clients about business matters. Correspondence files also cover topics such as appraisals, authentications, offers of sale, artists seeking representation, image requests, job applications and recommendations. Also included are the New York gallery's copies of correspondence between the New York staff and the Zurich staff.

André Emmerich's appointment books document appointments, notes, and reminders about Emmerich's business and personal activities. Four appointment books relating to the birth of Emmerich's three sons and second marriage were kept by the family. The appointment books are access restricted and require written permission to use.

Administrative files include corporate records establishing the Andre Emmerich gallery's structure, records documenting the gallery's daily operations, advertising and publicity material, and records about the Sotheby's acquisition. There are also materials related to Top Gallant Farm, from its establishment to its closure. Travel records relate to André Emmerich's business trips and vacations along with some files on the travels of a several staff members at the gallery. Files about the operations of the Galerie André Emmerich in Zurich, Switzerland are included in the series as well.

Subject files relate to Emmerich's gallery business as well as personal and political interests, such as antiquities, art fairs and exhibitions, lecture research, art associations, and sculpture parks. There are several files on the art critic Clement Greenberg and former president of Gay Men's Health Crisis, Nathan Kolodner, who was also an art dealer and director of the Andre Emmerich Gallery.

Exhibition files contain numerous exhibition catalogs and printed materials related to exhibitions held or organized by the André Emmerich Gallery in Manhattan and Galerie André Emmerich in Zurich. The files contain materials ranging such as exhibition invitations, posters, printed materials, press releases, and guest books. Photographs of exhibitions can be found in the Photographic Materials series.

Artist files include biographical materials, clippings, correspondence, mailing lists, price lists, printed materials, and occasionally lectures, writings, and audiovisual materials for many of the artists represented or shown by André Emmerich Gallery. The General Correspondence files might contain duplicates or expanded versions of some of the correspondence. Photographs of artists can be found in the Photographic Materials series.

Artist accounts comprise account statements prepared periodically by the gallery documenting each artist's expenses and sales. Ledgers and general accounting files can be found in the Other Financial and Legal Records series.

Inventory records include inventory cards describing artwork entering and leaving the gallery and files containing various gallery inventories. Artist inventory cards, representing artists from both the New York and Zurich galleries, list the artist, title, date, media and measurements of an artwork. The cards also indicate whether the work was ultimately sold, returned to the artist, consigned, etc., and divided into categories accordingly. Inventory files show various gallery inventories.

Sales records document gallery sales and include paid invoices, records relating to Zurich sales, general sales records such as price lists and canceled sales, and Sotheby's Parke-Bernet auction reports. There are gaps in sales invoices in 1961-1964 and 1969-1971.

Purchase records include correspondence and invoices related to purchases and offers; annotated invoices for works of art bought by the gallery; André Emmerich, Inc. related purchase records; "Non-Modern" art related purchase records.

Consignment records include correspondence and consignment agreements documenting consignments to and from the André Emmerich Gallery; consignments from other galleries to André Emmerich, Inc.; and general consignment records.

Chronological files include copies of invoices or cover letters documenting the movement of artwork into and out of the gallery through sales, consignments, loans, and approvals. Records dating January through August 1968, January through March 1969, and September 1969 through July 1971 are missing.

Financial and legal records include client and partner account statements, resale and exempt organization certificates, accounting ledgers, and legal files related to disputes involving or of interest to the gallery.

Printed materials include auction catalogs and reports, books, and clippings describing André Emmerich, the galleries in New York and Zurich, Top Gallant Farm, and the art world. Also included is a large scrapbook created by the gallery containing clippings and gallery announcements dated 1955-1958. Clippings relating to particular artists can be found in the Artists Files series.

There are two pieces of original artwork in the collection. One is a 1974 print of a 1933 composite etching by Esther Dick Gottlieb, Adolphe Gottlieb, Edgar Levy, Lucille Corcos Levy, David Smith, and Dorothy Dehner Smith. The second is a 1998 lithograph by Louise Bourgeoise, called The Face of the Critic. The artist gave the lithograph as a gift in honor of Robert Hughes and the Archives of American Art and is numbered 61 out of a series of 300.

Photographic materials include prints, slides, negatives, and transparencies. Subjects include artists, André Emmerich, gallery installations, Top Gallant Farm, events, artists' studios, gallery staff, gallery space, and artwork. Photographs which show André Emmerich are indicated as such in the finding aid.

Audiovisual materials includes videocassettes and one audiocassette related to the art world. Videocassettes related to specific artists can be found in the Artists Files series. Videocassettes related to André Emmerich can be found in the André Emmerich Personal Papers and Records series. Videocassettes related to Top Gallant Farm and Sotheby's can be found in the Administrative Files series.

Personal papers and records relating to André Emmerich include biographical materials, personal correspondence, writings and lectures, and legal and financial records. The biographical materials include an address book, interviews and identifying documents. Writings include articles, edits, dissertations, lectures, etc. There are also some miscellaneous correspondence which is organized chronologically.

The small addition received in 2014 includes general correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, artists' files, inventory records, consignment records, printed material, photographic materials, and André Emmerich personal papers and records.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 19 series:

Series 1: General Correspondence Files, 1958-2006 (boxes 1-18, OV 314-315; 18.2 linear feet)

Series 2: André Emmerich Appointment Books, 1954-2007 (boxes 19, 325, 326; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Administrative Files, 1954-2003 (boxes 20-31, 306, OV 314, OV 316-319; 11 linear feet)

Series 4: Subject Files, 1958-1967, 1971-2000 (boxes 31-32, 306, OV 318, OV 320; 2 linear feet)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, circa 1954-1998 (boxes 32-40, 306, 307, OV 318-322; 8.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Artists Files, 1929-1932, 1938-2007 (boxes 40-68, 307, 308, OV 320-323; 28 linear feet)

Series 7: Artist Accounts, 1958-1998 (boxes 68-81; 13.5 linear feet)

Series 8: Inventory Records, circa 1954-2000(boxes 82-128; 46.5 linear feet)

Series 9: Sales Records, 1959-1998 (boxes 128-168; 40 linear feet)

Series 10: Purchase Records, 1961-1966, 1972-1994 (boxes 168-170; 2 linear feet)

Series 11: Consignment Records, 1961-2002 (boxes 170-177; 7.7 linear feet)

Series 12: Chronological File of Incoming and Outgoing Artwork, 1968-1998 (boxes 178-185; 8 linear feet)

Series 13: Other Financial and Legal Records, 1956-1999 (boxes 186-202; 16.5 linear feet)

Series 14: Printed Materials, 1955-1960, 1965-2008 (boxes 202-204, 308, 309; 3 linear feet)

Series 15: Original Artwork, 1933, 1974, 1998 (box 205, 310; 0.7 linear feet (2 folders))

Series 16: Photographic Materials, circa 1930-1935, 1941-1998, circa 2005 (Boxes 205-296, 311-313, OV 324; 92.8 linear feet)

Series 17: General Audio and Video Recordings, 1985, 1990-1995 (Boxes 297-298; 1.3 linear feet)

Series 18: André Emmerich Personal Papers and Records, 1937-1940, 1946-2008 (Boxes 298-305, OV 321, OV 323; 7.7 linear feet)

Series 19: Addition to the The André Emmerich Gallery records and André Emmerich papers, 1956-2009 (Boxes 328-329, OV 330; 2.1 linear feet)
Historical Note:
André Emmerich (1924-2007) was one of America's most noted contemporary art dealers and opened the André Emmerich Gallery in New York in 1954. The gallery showcased contemporary art, particularly Color Field painting and monumental sculpture.

André Emmerich was born on October 11, 1924 in Frankfurt, Germany. From age 7 he was raised in Amsterdam before emigrating with his family to New York City in 1940. He studied at Oberlin College and developed an interest in pre-Columbian art and antiquities. After graduation, he spent ten years in Paris working as a writer and editor before returning to New York. He married Constance Emmerich and the couple had three sons, Adam, Noah, and Toby.

In 1954 Emmerich opened the André Emmerich Gallery at 18 East 77th Street and initially specialized in contemporary American and European art and pre-Columbian antiquities. In 1956, the gallery moved to 17 East 64th Street, and in 1959 to the Fuller Building at 41 East 57th Street. Emmerich wrote two books about pre-Columbian art, Art Before Columbus in 1963 and Sweat of the Sun, Tears of the Moon: Gold and Silver in Pre-Columbian Art in 1965.

In 1961, Emmerich learned that French and Company, a gallery advised by art critic Clement Greenberg, was closing its department of contemporary art. French and Company had represented Color Field painters Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, and Jules Olitski. Emmerich immediately invited Louis and Noland to be represented by his gallery. In 1966 he extended the invitation to Olitski as well, and Helen Frankenthaler joined soon after. The gallery's reputation as one of the earliest and most important promoters of Color Field painters was launched.

In addition to Color Field painters, the gallery represented, among others, Pierre Alechinsky, Karel Appel, Milton Avery, Herbert Ferber, Sam Francis, John Graham, Al Held, David Hockney, Hans Hofmann, John Hoyland, Judy Pfaff, Miriam Schapiro, and Anne Truitt.

Until January 1983, sales of pre-Columbian art primarily went through an entity called André Emmerich Inc. (AE Inc.), while sales of contemporary went through the André Emmerich Gallery Inc. (AEG). In 1983, the two entities were merged and operated under the name André Emmerich Gallery Inc.

In 1971, Emmerich began operating a downtown gallery at 420 West Broadway, in SoHo, in space shared with Leo Castelli, Virginia Dwan, and Ileana Sonnabend. In 1972, Emmerich opened a branch of his gallery in Zurich. He incorporated the Galerie André Emmerich Gmbh primarily for the purpose of leasing gallery space in Zurich. Until February 1974, sales of Pre-Columbian art in Zurich were made by an entity called André Emmerich Gallery Inc., New York Filiale Zurich. The Galerie André Emmerich Gmbh was officially liquidated in May 1982. The Filiale was formally closed in October 1996. Galerie André Emmerich also enjoyed a short-lived joint venture with Gimpel & Hanover.

André Emmerich served as president of the Art Dealers Association of America from 1972-1974 and again from 1991-1994.

Emmerich opened a private 150 acre sculpture park, Top Gallant Farm, on his estate in Pawling, New York, in 1982, where he stored and exhibited monumental sculptures by artists his gallery represented including Anthony Caro, Beverly Pepper, Alexander Liberman, Alexander Calder, Mark di Suvero, George Rickey, and Keith Haring. David Hockney painted waves onto floor of the property's swimming pool in 1986. Emmerich operated the sculpture park until 1996.

Emmerich sold his gallery to Sotheby's in 1996. He continued to be affiliated with the gallery until Sotheby's closed the gallery in 1998. Emmerich then began work on his memoir, My Life With Art, excerpts of which have been published in Art News, the Wall Street Journal, and The New Criterion.

Andre Emmerich died in New York 2007 and is survived by his second wife, Susanne Emmerich.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with André Emmerich conducted by Mona Hadler on January 18, 1993.
Provenance:
The André Emmerich Gallery records and André Emmerich papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by André Emmerich in eight accretions between 1999 and 2002. Two additional accretions were donated by Emmerich's wife Susanne in 2008 and 2009; and by James Yohe, Emmerich's former business partner, in 2009 and 2014.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Access of diaries and appointment books required written permission.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Sculpture, Abstract  Search this
Color-field painting  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Art galleries, Commercial -- Switzerland
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Visitors' books
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Etchings
Citation:
André Emmerich Gallery records and André Emmerich papers, circa 1929-2009. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.andremmg
See more items in:
André Emmerich Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-andremmg
Online Media:

Holly Solomon Gallery records

Creator:
Holly Solomon Gallery  Search this
Names:
98 Green St. Loft  Search this
Anderson, Laurie, 1947-  Search this
MacConnel, Kim  Search this
Paik, Nam June, 1932-  Search this
Patkin, Izhar  Search this
Solomon, Holly  Search this
Wegman, William  Search this
Zucker, Joe, 1941-  Search this
Extent:
200.6 Linear feet
0.002 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Diaries
Interviews
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Daybooks
Date:
circa 1948-2003
Summary:
The records of Holly Solomon Gallery, a New York City gallery specializing in contemporary American art, measure 200.6 linear feet and 0.002 GB and date from circa 1948-2003. The gallery's activities are documented through dealer files, subject files, artists' files, inventories, sales and loan records, administrative and financial records, printed and digital materials, photographic materials of artwork and exhibitions, and sound, video, and film recordings. Also found are records of the alternative space, 98 Greene Street Loft, as well as Holly Solomon's personal papers.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of Holly Solomon Gallery, a New York City gallery specializing in contemporary American art, measure 200.6 linear feet and 0.002 GB and date from circa 1948-2003. The gallery's activities are documented through alphabetical files, dealer files, subject files, artists' files, inventories, sales and loan records, administrative and financial records, printed and digital materials, photographic materials of artwork and exhibitions, and sound, video, and film recordings. Also found are records of the alternative space, 98 Greene Street Loft, as well as Holly Solomon's personal papers.

Alphabetical files span from 1991-2000 and contain correspondence with clients, galleries, and museums, as well as related documentation regarding loans, inquiries, sales, exhibitions, and travel plans. These general files were maintained separately from the gallery's subject and artists' files but may overlap in subject matter.

The dealer files contain gallery correspondence to and from art dealers regarding inquiries on works and artists. These files are sparse and particular to the early 1980s. Subject files are mainly comprised of correspondence but also include printed materials, slides, and other related documents. Subjects include dealers, organizations, museums, clients, art fairs, travel, and projects that the gallery or Holly Solomon worked with.

Artists' files consist of correspondence, printed material, slides, photographs, and scattered inventory records, regarding the sale of artwork, as well as shipping records and insurance claims. Also included is correspondence between the gallery and the artist. There is substantial documentation on artists Kim MacConnel, Nam June Paik, Izhar Patkin, William Wegman, and Joe Zucker. Inventory records include inventory lists created by Holly Solomon Gallery as well as an art inventory card file. Inventory cards note the title, date, and size of the work as well as the dates and movements of the work, and may include a photograph. Some documents are also found in digital format in series 14, Born-digital records.

Administrative records contain general office materials such as phone messages books, staff notebooks, exhibition guest books, and business diaries, exhibition documentation, notes, and mail from prospective artists. Records primarily cover the 1980s and 1990s. In addition to business diaries, Holly Solomon also created "Dear Diary" binders which contain a collection of contact information and notes on clients and events. Some of these diaries were maintained for specific events. Some documents are also found in digital format in series 14, Born-digital records.

Sales and loan records consist of in and out sheets, consignments, and sales invoices. Also in this series are sales and loan logs and files that track the same information but from different access points, including sales by artist. Financial records document the financial activities of the galleries, apart from sales, and include shipping records, tax and insurance information, and accounting statements and reports. Also in this series are sales and loan logs and files that track the same information but from different access points, including sales by artist. Some documents are also found in digital format in series 14, Born-digital records.

Printed material consists of artist clippings, gallery exhibition catalogs, press releases, posters, and miscellaneous books, magazines, and clippings regarding the gallery. Included are clippings pertaining to the Pattern and Design art movement. Photographic material includes photographs and slides documenting artists' work and gallery exhibitions. Sound, video, and film recordings include artworks created by gallery artists, performances recorded live at the gallery, and the publicity Holly Solomon, the gallery and its artists received. The work of video artist Nam June Paik is highly represented through some of his video artworks, as well as television interviews with him. Prominent artists William Wegman and Laurie Anderson are also represented through original artworks and publicity. Publicity videos include Holly Solomon herself, being interviewed for television and documentaries.

The records of 98 Greene Street Loft include a large quantity of sound, video, and film recordings of poetry readings, live music, art, and theatrical performances that took place from 1971-1973, as well as scattered paper records such as play scripts, photographs, a guest book from 1971, printed material, and posters.

Holly Solomon's personal papers consist of biographical documents, correspondence, memorabilia, printed material, motion picture film, and photographs collected by Holly Solomon throughout her life. Included are school records, letters, notes and cards from friends and artists she represented at her gallery, photographs, invitations, event fliers, and other mementos. Printed material, mostly magazines and newspapers document her accomplishments.

Sound and video recordings include recordings collected by the Holly Solomon Gallery documenting the gallery itself and the artists it represented. Recordings include artworks created by gallery artists, performances recorded live at the gallery, and the publicity Holly Solomon, the gallery and its artists received. The recordings range from before the gallery's opening in 1975 until after its closure in 2002, with most recordings coming out of the 80s and 90s. The work of video artist Nam June Paik is highly represented within the series through some of his actual video artworks, as well as through numerous documentaries and television interviews with him. Prominent artists William Wegman and Laurie Anderson are both represented through original artworks and publicity.

Born-digital records consist of documents recovered from floppy discs included in the collection.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 14 series:

Series 1: Alphabetical Files, 1991-2001 (Boxes 1-9; 8.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Dealer Files, 1980-1990 (Box 9-10; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 3: Subject Files, circa 1975-2002 (Boxes 11-25; 15.0 linear feet)

Series 4: Artists' Files, circa 1975-2002 (Boxes 26-47; 22.0 linear feet)

Series 5: Inventory Records, 1975-2001 (Boxes 48-66, 157-162; 25.0 linear feet)

Series 6: Administrative Records, circa 1980-2003 (Boxes 67-81, OV 202; 15.1 linear feet)

Series 7: Sales and Loan Records, circa 1975-2001 (Boxes 82-87; 6.0 linear feet)

Series 8: Financial and Legal Records, circa 1969-2001 (Boxes 88-114, 191, 192; 27.7 linear feet)

Series 9: Printed Material, circa 1968-2002 (Boxes 115-135, 193-194, OV 203-222, RD 223; 23.5 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographic Material, circa 1969-2000 (Boxes 136-156, 194-196, 201, OV 224; 22.2 linear feet)

Series 11: 98 Greene Street Loft, circa 1969-1973 (Boxes 166-169, 194, FC 197-200, FC 228-236, OV 225-227; 5.6 linear feet)

Series 12: Holly Solomon Personal Papers, circa 1948-2002 (Boxes 170-182, 194, FC 237-241; 13.6 linear feet)

Series 13: Sound and Video Recordings, circa 1966-2001 (Boxes 183-190; 7.6 linear feet)

Series 14: Born-Digital Records, (ER01-ER04; 0.002 GB)

The collection has been minimally arranged into series based on the found arrangement upon receipt, assumed to be the original arrangement of the gallery. Folders have been arranged within series and general folder contents verified, but in most cases, item level arrangement has not been completed.
Historical Note:
The Holly Solomon Gallery was established in 1975 by Holly Solomon and her husband, Horace Solomon, at 392 West Broadway in New York City's SoHo area. The gallery focused on contemporary art.

The gallery represented artists such as William Wegman, Nam June Paik, Laurie Anderson, and Robert Kushner. In 1983, the gallery moved uptown to 724 Fifth Ave at 57th, but then moved again in the early 1990s back downtown to SoHo at 172 Mercer Street. After the gallery closed Holly Solomon continued to deal art from the Chelsea Hotel until her death in 2002.

Holly Solomon was born Hollis Dworken in Bridgeport, Connecticut in 1934. She started college at Vassar College, and later transferred to Sarah Lawrence College where she graduated in 1955. In 1953 she married Horace Solomon. Holly Solomon was an aspiring stage actress and was enrolled at Lee Strasberg's Actor's Studio shortly after moving to Manhattan. Although she was not a successful actress she and her husband began collecting art and were fans of the Pop Art movement. In 1969 the couple opened an alternative work and performance space for artists named 98 Greene Street Loft. The space provided a venue for poets, actors, and artists to work and perform. Solomon wrote and produced a five part documentary from performances at 98 Greene Street, and in 1972 it was shown at the Edinburgh International Film Festival. 98 Greene Street Loft closed in 1973. Holly Solomon was also a proponent of the Pattern and Decoration, or "P and D", art movement of the late 1970s and early 1980s. Many of the artists featured in her gallery were involved in the P and D movement including Robert Kushner, Kim MacConnel, Ned Smyth, and Brad Davis.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 2010 by Thomas and John Solomon, Holly Solomon's sons.
Restrictions:
This collection is access restricted. Use requires written permission. Financial and Legal Records (Series 8) are closed to researchers until they can be processed to a more detailed level. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Visitors' books  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Notebooks  Search this
Motion pictures (visual works)  Search this
Video art  Search this
Performance art  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Interviews
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Daybooks
Citation:
Holly Solomon Gallery records, circa 1948-2003. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.hollsolg
See more items in:
Holly Solomon Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hollsolg

Galerie Chalette records

Creator:
Galerie Chalette  Search this
Names:
Arp, Jean, 1887-1966  Search this
Bill, Max, 1908-1994  Search this
Diller, Burgoyne, 1906-1965  Search this
Fangor, Wojciech, 1922-  Search this
Fuller, Sue, 1914-  Search this
Gonzalez, Roberta  Search this
González, Julio, 1876-1942  Search this
Lejwa, Arthur  Search this
Lejwa, Madeleine Chalette, 1914-1996  Search this
Moholy-Nagy, László, 1895-1946  Search this
Reimann, William  Search this
Rickey, George  Search this
Smith, Leon Polk, 1906-1996  Search this
Vasarely, Victor, 1906-1997  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Extent:
24.15 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sound recordings
Lectures
Notebooks
Motion pictures (visual works)
Date:
1916-1999
bulk 1939-1994
Summary:
The records of the New York Galerie Chalette measure 24.15 linear feet and date from 1916-1999, with the bulk of the material dating from 1939-1994. The collection documents this contemporary art gallery's operations from its founding in 1954 through Madeleine Lejwa's later years as an independent dealer. Included are correspondence, artists' files, financial and legal records, printed materials, clippings, exhibition catalogs, audio and video recordings, and motion picture film; about half of the collection consists of photographs. Arthur Lejwa's profession as a biochemist prior to becoming a gallery owner is also documented in this collection. The collection also contains personal records of the Lejwas, including correspondence, legal papers, photographs, photo albums, and printed material.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the New York Galerie Chalette measure 24.15 linear feet and date from 1916-1999, with the bulk of the material dating from 1939-1994. The collection documents this contemporary art gallery's operations from its founding in 1954 through Madeleine Lejwa's later years as an independent dealer. Included are correspondence, artists' files, financial and legal records, printed materials, clippings, exhibition catalogs, audio and video recordings, and motion picture film; about half of the collection consists of photographs. Arthur Lejwa's profession as a biochemist prior to becoming a gallery owner is also documented in this collection. The collection also contains personal records of the Lejwas, including correspondence, legal papers, photographs, photo albums, and printed material.

Among the artists represented in the artists' files are Jean Arp, Max Bill, Burgoyne Diller, Wojciech Fangor, Sue Fuller, Julio Gonzalez, Roberta Gonzalez, Lazlo Moholy-Nagy, William Reimann, George Rickey, Leon Polk Smith, Victor Varsarely, Max Weber, and various Dada artists. Many artists are represented in the large collection of photographs as is the Lejwa's personal collection. Included in the business records are invoices, receipts for works sold, yearly sales and purchase ledgers, checks for artwork purchases, and index card files recording sales. Legal records include files related to litigation, primarily Lebenstein v. Lejwa. The collection includes film reels and audio recordings of lectures, broadcasts, and exhibits from the 1960s-1990s. It also includes two film reels from a French television program about Jean Arp.

Among the personal records are biographical information, correspondence, legal records mostly related to the settlement of Arthur Lejwa's estate, a significant quantity of snapshots, negatives and slides, and newspaper clippings chronicling Arthur Lejwa's work as a biochemist and the Robert Gould Research Foundation. Arthur Lejwa's scientific career is also represented in biographical information, publications, research notebooks, and photographs. Much of the personal correspondence is from 1939-1951 and is written in Polish, Yiddish and German. The Lejwa's philanthropic donations, especially in Israel, are documented in correspondence, papers, and photographs. Many of the photographs and photo albums record Madeleine Lejwa's travels in the 1970s-1990s.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series. The series are generally arranged alphabetically by type of material or subject, and chronologically thereafter.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1920-1995 (Boxes 1-2; 1.4 linear foot)

Series 2: Artists' Files, 1916-1996 (Boxes 2-6, 25; 4.3 linear feet)

Series 3: General Business Files, 1950-1994 (Boxes 6-8; 2.3 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed Materials, 1931-1996 (Boxes 9-10, 25; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Photographs, circa 1920s-1994 (Boxes 10-16, 24-25; 7 linear feet)

Series 6: Legal Records, 1938, 1959-1988 (Box 17; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 7: Personal Papers of Arthur and Madeleine Chalette Lejwa, 1925-1999 (Boxes 17-21, 25; 3.7 linear feet)

Series 8: Motion Picture Film, Audio, and Video Recordings, circa 1950s-1995 (Boxes 21-23, FC 29-42; 4.3 linear feet)
Historical Note:
Art dealers and collectors Madeleine Chalette (1915-1996) and Arthur Lejwa (1895-1972) opened the Galerie Chalette in New York on 45 West 57th Street in February, 1954. The gallery originally specialized in contemporary French graphics and later shifted its focus to contemporary twentieth century European and American art, particularly the work of Jean Arp. Over the years, Galerie Chalette relocated twice. In 1957, the gallery moved to 1100 Madison Avenue and then to 9 East 88th Street in 1964.

Madeleine Chalette was born in 1915 in Paris and grew up in Poland. In 1940, after Madeleine's efforts to secure the release of her father, Leon Chalette, from Sachsenhausen concentration camp near Berlin were successful, father and daughter traveled by boat to Shanghai. They stayed in Shanghai throughout World War II, arriving in the United States in 1946. Arthur Lejwa, a Polish-born biochemist, immigrated to the United States in 1939 and taught at Long Island University. In 1947, Madeleine and Arthur Lejwa were married in Cincinnati, Ohio, where Arthur was the Director of the Robert Gould Institute for Nutritional Research.

The gallery was very active in the 1950s and 1960s, as evidenced by the numerous exhibitions. Many of the exhibitions in the 1950s were thematic. Exhibitions in the 1960s were mostly organized around the work of a particular artist, such as Wojciech Fangor and Leon Polk Smith. In 1972, the Metropolitan Museum of Art showcased Jean Arp's work from the Lejwa's collection and a few works lent by Arp's widow, Marguerite Arp. The exhibition was expanded and traveled as "Arp 1877-1966," first exhibited at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and then shown in seven museums in the United States and six in Australia.

In the early 1970s, the Lejwas began supporting institutions in Jerusalem, including donating a 17th century Polish menorah to The Israel Museum and five sculptures to be displayed in public spaces: "The Threshold of Jerusalem" by Jean Arp, "The Loop" by Robert Engman, George Rickey's "Two Lines Oblique," "The Skedion Ekton" by Stephanie Scuris, and "Four Cubes Cut in Identical Halves" by Max Bill.

Following Arthur's death on October 27, 1972, Madeleine continued as an independent dealer and consultant and renamed the business Chalette International. In the 1980s, Madeleine Lejwa continued her philanthropic endeavors in Jerusalem, donating to a scholarship fund for Arab students. She was also a strong supporter of New York University's archeological site Aphrodisias, in southwestern Turkey. In the 1970s and 1980s, Lejwa traveled widely including Israel, Jordan, Egypt, Italy, Turkey, Japan, and China. Madeleine passed away at age 81 on June 9, 1996.
Related Material:
Addition papers related to Leon Chalette and Madeleine Chalette are located at Leo Baeck Institute, New York, N.Y.
Separated Material:
Papers related to Leon Chalette's imprisonment in Sachsenhausen concentration camp were transferred to the Leo Baeck Institute, New York, N.Y. in 2010.
Provenance:
The records were donated by Robert Warshaw, executor of the Madeleine Chalette Lejwa estate in two accessions in 1997 and 2005.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Biochemistry  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Lectures
Notebooks
Motion pictures (visual works)
Citation:
Galerie Chalette records, 1916-1996, bulk 1939-1994. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.galechal
See more items in:
Galerie Chalette records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-galechal
Online Media:

Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records

Creator:
Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries  Search this
Names:
Bartlett, Frederic Clay, 1873-1953  Search this
Bellows, George, 1882-1925  Search this
Brook, Alexander, 1898-1980  Search this
Burchfield, Charles Ephraim, 1893-1967  Search this
Chappell, Warren, 1904-  Search this
Clancy, John C., 1897-1981  Search this
Coleman, Glenn O., 1887-1932  Search this
Cook, Howard Norton, 1901-1980  Search this
Cuthbert, Virginia, 1908-2001  Search this
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Gellatly, John, 1853-1931  Search this
Hawthorne, Charles Webster, 1872-1930  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Hopper, Edward, 1882-1967  Search this
Hopper, Jo N. (Josephine Nivison), 1883-1968  Search this
James, Alexander, 1890-1946  Search this
Kroll, Leon, 1884-1974  Search this
Luks, George Benjamin, 1867-1933  Search this
Mangravite, Peppino, 1896-  Search this
Marsh, Felicia Meyer, 1912-1978  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
McFee, Henry Lee, 1886-1953  Search this
Melchers, Gari, 1860-1932  Search this
Orton, J. Robert  Search this
Pepper, Charles Hovey, 1864-1950  Search this
Phillips, Duncan, 1886-1966  Search this
Poor, Henry Varnum, 1887-1970  Search this
Russo, Alexander  Search this
Spalding, John T.  Search this
Sparhawk-Jones, Elizabeth, 1885-1968  Search this
Speicher, Eugene Edward, 1883-1962  Search this
Spruance, Benton, 1904-1967  Search this
Strater, Henry, 1896-  Search this
Tucker, Allen, 1866-1939  Search this
Tucker, Richard Derby, 1903-  Search this
Winters, Denny Sonke, 1907-1985  Search this
Young, Mahonri Mackintosh, 1877-1957  Search this
Extent:
21.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Date:
1858-1969
bulk 1919-1968
Summary:
The Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records measure 21.8 linear feet and are dated 1858-1969 (bulk 1919-1968). The records consist mainly of business correspondence with collectors, artists, museums and arts organizations, colleagues, and others. A small amount of Frank K. M. Rehns personal correspondence and a few stray personal papers of individual artists are interfiled. Also included are financial records, scrapbooks, printed matter, miscellaneous records, and photographs documenting most of the history of a highly regarded New York City art gallery devoted to American painting.
Scope and Content Note:
The Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records measure 21.8 linear feet and are dated 1858-1969 (bulk 1919-1968). The records consist mainly of business correspondence with collectors, artists, museums and arts organizations, colleagues, and others. A small amount of Frank K. M. Rehn's personal correspondence and a few stray personal papers of individual artists are interfiled. Also included are financial records, scrapbooks, printed matter, miscellaneous records, and photographs documenting most of the history of a highly regarded New York art gallery devoted to American painting.

Series 1: Correspondence contains correspondence with artists, museums and arts organizations, collectors, colleagues, and others documents the workings of Rehn Galleries from its earliest days through 1968. A small amount of Frank K. M. Rehn's personal correspondence and a few scattered personal papers of individual artists are interfiled with the business correspondence.

Series 2: Financial Records includes banking, insurance, and investment records, tax returns and related documentation, miscellaneous financial records and paid bills. Among the insurance records are detailed monthly schedules listing paintings with titles, artists, and insurance values. Miscellaneous financial records include inventories of gallery stock, notes regarding business expenses and income, and receipt books recording incoming paintings. Also included are a small number of items concerning the personal business of Frank Rehn and John Clancy.

Five volumes of Scrapbooks (Series 3) contain clippings and a small number of exhibition catalogs documenting the activities of Rehn Galleries and many of its associated artists. Additional Printed Matter in Series 4 includes material relating to Rehn Galleries and its artists, as well as publications produced by Rehn Galleries. General, art-related printed matter consists of articles, auction catalogs, advertisements, and publications of various museums, arts organizations, and schools. There is also material about artists not affiliated with Rehn Galleries. Additional printed items concern miscellaneous subjects that are not art-related.

Series 5: Miscellaneous Records, includes artwork, lists and notes, and writings. Photographs in Series 6 are of people including artists represented by Rehn as well as several not affiliated with the gallery. Noticeably absent are likenesses of Frank Rehn and John Clancy. Photographs of works of art are by Rehn Galleries' artists and others. Reginald Marsh's photographs consist of family and personal photographs that were either given to Rehn Galleries or perhaps loaned for research use, and include views of Marsh from early childhood through later life, photographs of family and friends, and a small family album. Also included are photographs are of Marsh's childhood drawings.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Correspondence is arranged alphabetically and Series 3: Scrapbooks is in rough chronological order. Series 2, and 4-6 are arranged in categories, as indicated in the Series Descriptions/Container Listing. Unless otherwise noted, items within each folder are arranged chronologically.

The collection is arranged into 6 series:

Series 1: Correspondence, 1858-1969, undated (Boxes 1-15; 14.4 linear ft.; Reels 5849-5869)

Series 2: Financial Records, 1919-1968, undated (Boxes 15-17; 2.6 linear ft; Reel 5869)

Series 3: Scrapbooks, 1919-1940 (Boxes 23-24; 0.6 linear ft.; Reels 5869-5870)

Series 4: Printed Matter, 1882-1969, undated (Boxes 18-20; 2.4 linear ft.; Reels 5870-5872)

Series 5: Miscellaneous Records, circa 1920-1968 (Boxes 20-21; 0.7 linear ft; Reel 5872)

Series 6: Photographs, 1871-1966, undated (Boxes 22, 24, OV 25; 1.0 linear ft.; Reel 5872)
Historical Note:
Frank K. M. Rehn (1886-1956), son of the marine painter Frank Knox Morton Rehn, after several years' experience as an employee of the Milch Galleries and as exhibition manager for the Salmagundi Club, opened his own art gallery in 1918. In its earliest years, the gallery operated as the Galleries of Frank K. M. Rehn. From the mid 1920s through the mid 1940s, the name used was Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries. As early as 1946, the gallery was referred to simply as Rehn Galleries. The gallery closed in 1981.

Throughout its existence, Rehn Galleries specialized in representing American painters. During the first five years Rehn's operation was a private gallery at 6 West 50th Street, New York City. Among the artists he first represented were older, established men such as J. Alden Weir, George Inness, Alexander Wyant, Theodore Robinson, Thomas Dewing, and John H. Twachtman. Occasionally, Rehn handled works by such luminaries of the period as Robert Henri, George Luks, and John Singer Sargent. Among the living artists affiliated with the gallery in its first years were Daniel Garber, Walter Griffin, Dodge MacKnight, and Robert Spencer. Rehn's most popular artist during this time was Childe Hassam, who sued for recovery of a painting that, although acquired by Rehn through a reputable dealer, had been stolen from Hassam's studio many years earlier.

Despite the newspaper publicity surrounding Hassam's lawsuit, the business was a successful venture almost immediately. Very early, a number of important collectors including Duncan Phillips, John Gellatly, John T. Spaulding, Albert McVitty, E. W. Root, and C. Vanderbilt Barton displayed confidence in Rehn's judgment and integrity, which enhanced his gallery's reputation and stature among both collectors and artists. In 1923, the gallery moved to 693 Fifth Avenue and began operating as Rehn Galleries, a commercial gallery in the same building that housed in a building that housed Kennedy and Company and the Bourgeois Galleries. At this time, Rehn hired an assistant, John C. Clancy (1897-1981), who had formerly been with Henry Reinhardt and Son and M. Knoedler.

The Rehn Galleries soon enjoyed a regular following among museum curators and collectors visiting from out of town. The gallery's roster of artists grew along with its reputation. Rehn focused almost exclusively on American painters, occasionally showing drawings and prints by artists who were primarily painters; notable exceptions were sculptor Mahonri Young and Henry Varnum Poor who, in addition to being a painter, was known for his work in ceramics. Among the painters eventually represented were: Peggy Bacon, George Bellows, Alexander Brook, Charles Burchfield, John F. Carlson, John Carroll, Howard Cook, Jon Corbino, Virginia Cuthbert, Andrew Dasberg, Sidney Gross, Edward Hopper, Alexander James, Irving Kaufmann, Yeffe Kimball, Leon Kroll, Peppino Mangravite, Reginald and Felicia Meyer Marsh, Henry Mattson, Henry Lee McFee, Kenneth Hayes Miller, Charles Rosen, Robert Riggs, Alexander Russo, Elizabeth Sparhawk-Jones, Eugene Speicher, Henry Strater, Richard Derby Tucker, Franklin C. Watkins, and Denny Winters.

In 1930, Rehn Galleries moved one block south to the Air France Building at 683 Fifth Avenue, and remained there for thirty years. John C. Clancy, Rehn's long-time assistant, became Gallery Director in 1953 after a stroke prevented Rehn from continuing to run his business in an active capacity. Eventually, Rehn's widow sold Clancy the gallery, which he continued to operate under varying names, including Rehn Gallery, Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries, Frank Rehn Gallery, and Rehn Galleries. From 1960 until 1966, The Rehn Galleries were at 36 East 61st Street from 1960 until 1966, when the gallery moved to a space formerly occupied by Kootz Gallery at 855 Madison Avenue, where it remained in business for another fifteen years.
Related Material:
John Clancy interview by Paul Cummings, July 10, 1970. Oral History Program, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Samuel Adler Papers, 1902-1979. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Contains a recording (1 cassette; untranscribed) of Beverly Chesler interviewing John Clancy about the history of Rehn Galleries, 1973; Samuel Adler is present and participates briefly in the interview.

In addition, the Archives of American Art has among its collections personal papers and oral history interviews of artists and collectors associated with the Rehn Galleries. Researchers are advised to conduct a name search in the Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS).
Provenance:
The Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records were loaned by John Clancy for microfilming in 1959; in 1966, this same material was donated to the Archives. Mr. Clancy made subsequent gifts of additional gallery records in 1978 and 1981. In 1985, the Whitney Museum of American Art donated to the Archives correspondence with Edward Hopper that John Clancy had loaned the museum many years earlier. A death mask of George Luks received with the collection is on extended loan to the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records, 1858-1969 (bulk 1919-1968). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.franrehg
See more items in:
Frank K. M. Rehn Galleries records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-franrehg
Online Media:

Kennedy Galleries Miscellaneous records

Creator:
Kennedy Galleries  Search this
Names:
Fleischman, Martha  Search this
Kuhn, Walt, 1877-1949  Search this
Extent:
1.28 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1864-circa 1983
Summary:
The Kennedy Galleries Miscellaneous Records date from 1864 - circa 1983 and measure 1.28 linear feet. These scattered records were compiled by gallery owner Martha Fleischman and relate to art collections and artists historically represented by or associated with the gallery. The collection includes a few letters, one essay, reports, ledger pages, a certificate, printed materials, and photographs of artists and artwork, particularly artwork by Walt Kuhn.
Scope and Contents:
The Kennedy Galleries Miscellaneous Records date from 1864 - circa 1983 and measure 1.28 linear feet. These scattered records were compiled by gallery owner Martha Fleischman and relate to art collections and artists historically represented by or associated with the gallery. The collection includes a few letters, one essay, reports, ledger pages, a certificate, printed materials, and photographs of artists and artwork, particularly artwork by Walt Kuhn.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into one series.

Series 1: Kennedy Galleries Miscellaneous Records, 1864-circa 1980 (1.1 linear feet; Box 1, OV 2)
Biographical / Historical:
Established in 1874 by Hermann Wunderlich as H. Wunderlich & Co. in Manhattan, Kennedy Galleries has a long history of dealing American art. When Wunderlich died in 1892, Edward G. Kennedy took over the gallery and changed the name in 1912 to Kennedy & Co. Kennedy was the first U.S. dealer to exhibit the etchings and paintings of James McNeill Whistler, and he compiled a 1910 catalogue raisonné of the artist's work. Kennedy retired in 1916, and Herman Wunderlich (Jr.) became senior partner.

Lawrence A. Fleischman, joined the gallery in 1966 as a partner with the late Rudolf G. Wunderlich. In the course of more than a century in business, the gallery has promoted work by artists the likes of Albert Bierstadt, William Merritt Chase, Frederic E. Church, John Singleton Copley, Thomas Eakins, Winslow Homer, Walt Kuhn, Georgia O'Keeffe and Ben Shahn, among others. Under Lawrence A. Fleischman, the gallery served as adviser to the Vatican Museum, Rome in the early 1970s assisting in the selection and acquisition of modern art. Lawrence Fleischman was also the founder of the Archives of American Art, now a part of the Smithsonian Institution. He also served on the White House Committee for the Fine Arts during the administrations of Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson.

In 1966, the gallery moved to East 56th street; and in 1974 moved again to a newly constructed gallery on West 57th Street. In 2005, the gallery became a private dealership under the direction of Martha Fleischman, Lawrence A. Fleischman's daughter.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art are the Lawrence and Barbara Fleischman Papers, 1837-1984, bulk 1935-1979; an interview of Lawrence A. Fleischman conducted in 1970, Feb. 28-Mar. 9, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art; an interview of Lawrence A. Fleischman conducted 1994 Apr. 18, by Gail Stavitsky, for the Archives of American Art; and an interview of Barbara Fleischman (Lawrence Fleischman's wife) conducted 2011 Dec. 27 and 2012 Jan. 5, 20, and 23 by Avis Berman for the Archives of American Art.
Provenance:
These records were donated to the Archives in 2005 and 2006 by Martha Fleischman, director of the Kennedy Galleries, who compiled these miscellaneous items from the Kennedy Galleries' storage.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Citation:
Kennedy Galleries miscellaneous records, 1864-1983, bulk 1900-1948. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.fleimart
See more items in:
Kennedy Galleries Miscellaneous records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-fleimart
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Leroy Davis and Cecily Langdale, 2007 June 26-August 7

Interviewee:
Davis, Leroy, 1922-  Search this
Davis, Leroy, 1922-  Search this
Interviewer:
Langdale, Cecily  Search this
Subject:
Shikler, Aaron  Search this
Barnes, Albert C. (Albert Coombs)  Search this
Bly, Boris  Search this
De Mazia, Violette  Search this
Davis, Terry Ritter  Search this
Bouché, Louis  Search this
Levine, David  Search this
Penn, Arthur  Search this
Hirschl & Adler Galleries  Search this
Tyler School of Art  Search this
Barnes Foundation  Search this
Widgeon Point Charitable Foundation  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Gallery owners -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Gallery owners -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13624
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)271983
AAA_collcode_davis07
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_271983
Online Media:

Bertha Schaefer papers and gallery records, 1909-1975, bulk 1940-1965

Creator:
Schaefer, Bertha, 1895-1971  Search this
Schaefer, Bertha, 1895-1971  Search this
Subject:
Duchamp, Marcel  Search this
Greene, Balcomb  Search this
Barnet, Will  Search this
Picasso, Pablo  Search this
Ben-Zion  Search this
Vasilieff, Nicholas  Search this
Pollock, Jackson  Search this
Zóbel, Fernando  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad  Search this
New Bertha Schaefer Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Bertha Schaefer Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Type:
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Topic:
Interior decoration  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Theme:
Art Market  Search this
Art Gallery Records  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9497
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211695
AAA_collcode_schabert
Theme:
Art Market
Art Gallery Records
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211695
Online Media:

Rose Fried Gallery Records

Creator:
Rose Fried Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Names:
Pinacotheca Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Baertling, Olle, 1911-1981  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Cunningham, Ben, 1904-1975  Search this
Delaunay, Sonia  Search this
Etrog, Sorel, 1933-  Search this
Ferren, John, 1905-1970  Search this
Fried, Rose  Search this
Hendler, Raymond, 1923-  Search this
Kandinsky, Wassily, 1866-1944  Search this
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton, 1890-1973  Search this
Mondrian, Piet, 1872-1944  Search this
Morgan, Russell  Search this
Picabia, Francis, 1879-1953  Search this
Richter, Hans, 1888-1976  Search this
Torres-García, Joaquín, 1874-1949  Search this
Xceron, Jean, 1890-1967  Search this
Extent:
8.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1936-1972
bulk 1945-1970
Summary:
The Rose Fried Gallery records measure 8.1 linear feet and date from 1936 to 1972 with the bulk of materials dating from 1945 to 1970. The majority of the collection consists of artists files documenting the gallery's relationship with abstract, modern, and Latin American artists; additional named subject files; and scattered administrative and financial files. Individual artists and subject files contain a wide variety of documentation, such as correspondence, photographs, financial records, and printed materials.
Scope and Contents:
The Rose Fried Gallery records measure 8.1 linear feet and date from 1936 to 1972 with the bulk of materials dating from 1945 to 1970. The majority of the collection consists of artists files documenting the gallery's relationship with abstract, modern, and Latin American artists; additional named subject files; and scattered administrative and financial files. Individual artists and subject files contain a wide variety of documentation, such as correspondence, photographs, financial records, and printed materials.

Scattered administrative records document the founding and history of the Rose Fried Gallery, biographical materials about Rose Fried, as well as scattered administrative correspondence, press releases, and gallery catalogs. There are two sound recordings of interviews with Rose Fried in which she discusses the origins of the Rose Fried Gallery and some of the gallery's shows.

The bulk of the records consist of alphabetical artists' and clients' files documenting the gallery's dealings with individual artists, clients, other galleries, museums, and universities. Contents of individual files vary but may include correspondence, contractual agreements, financial records, printed material, and photographs. A few of the artists represented in the files include Olle Baertling, Joseph Cornell, Ben Cunningham, Sonia Delaunay, Sorel Etrog, John Ferren, Raymond Hendler, Wassily Kandinsky, Stanton MacDonald-Wright, Piet Mondrian, Russell Morgan, Francis Picabia, Hans Richter, Joaquin Torres-Garcia, and Jean Xceron, among many others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as two series.

Series 1: General Administrative Records, 1947-1970 (9 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Artists' and Clients' Files, 1936-1972 (7.9 linear feet; Boxes 1-8, OV 9)
Historical Note:
Rose Fried established the Rose Fried Gallery in the 1940s in New York City, New York. Fried established the gallery when she took over the Pinacotheca Gallery owned by Dan Harris. The Gallery specialized in abstract and modern art, and represented cubists, futurists, Dadaists, and masters of Latin American art. The Rose Fried Gallery was instrumental in introducing the American public to many abstract painters, including Mondrian and Kandinsky. The Gallery remained operational until Fried's death in 1970.
Provenance:
The Rose Fried Gallery Records were donated by Rose Fried and her brother and executor Paul Fried in multiple accretions between 1968 and 1974.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy also requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Art, Abstract  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Rose Fried Gallery Records, 1936-1972, bulk 1945-1970. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.rosefrig
See more items in:
Rose Fried Gallery Records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rosefrig
Online Media:

Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records

Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Names:
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Andrejevic, Milet, 1925-  Search this
Aponovich, James, 1948-  Search this
Bailey, William, 1930-2020  Search this
Bell, Leland  Search this
Brassaï, 1899-  Search this
Cameron, Julia Margaret Pattle, 1815-1879  Search this
Cartier-Bresson, Henri, 1908-  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Dawson, Manierre, 1887-1969  Search this
Driggs, Elsie, 1898-1992  Search this
Erlebacher, Martha Mayer  Search this
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975  Search this
Fiske, Gertrude, 1878-1961  Search this
Freund, Gisèle  Search this
Horton, William S., 1865-1936  Search this
Ito, Miyoko, 1918-1983  Search this
Lachaise, Gaston, 1882-1935  Search this
Laderman, Gabriel, 1929-  Search this
Ligare, David  Search this
Matthiasdottir, Louisa  Search this
Matulka, Jan, 1890-1972  Search this
Myers, Ethel  Search this
Nadelman, Elie, 1882-1946  Search this
Schoelkopf, Robert J., 1927-1991  Search this
Stella, Joseph, 1877-1946  Search this
Storrs, John Henry Bradley, 1885-1956  Search this
Wiesenfeld, Paul  Search this
Extent:
29 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gallery records
Illustrated letters
Photographs
Date:
1851-1991
bulk 1962-1991
Summary:
The collection comprises 29 linear feet of records that document the day-to-day administration of the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery from 1962 to 1991, with additional items predating the founding of the gallery from 1851 to 1961. The collection records artist and client relations, exhibitions, and daily business transactions through artist files, correspondence, printed matter, and photographic material.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery comprise 29 linear feet of material from 1851 to 1991, with some items predating the founding of the gallery. The bulk of the records date from 1962 to 1991, providing researchers with fairly comprehensive coverage of the gallery's development and operations from its inception in 1962 until its closure in 1991. Items dated prior to 1962 relate principally to the period of transition during which Robert Schoelkopf ended his partnership with the Zabriskie Gallery and established his own business. There are also some items relating to artists of the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

The collection consists primarily of artist files documenting relations with contemporary artists, representation of deceased artists, and other works of art handled by the gallery. It also chronicles the gallery's exhibition schedule and the day-to-day administration of the business. The types of material that can be found here include correspondence, exhibition inventories, price lists, accounting and consignment records, shipping and insurance records, printed material, and photographs.

The collection is a valuable source of information on twentieth-century American art history, focusing primarily on early-twentieth-century modernists as well as an important group of American realist painters and sculptors from the latter half of the century. The collection illuminates, in detail, the developing market for these schools and, in the case of the latter group, provides personal insights from artists on the realist perspective.

The records also document the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery's significant contribution to the resurgence of interest in fine art photography during the 1960s and 1970s as reflected in an increase in the value of works by important American photographers such as Walker Evans.

Much of the outgoing correspondence from the gallery consists of copies of letters written by Robert Schoelkopf, with additional business being handled by assistant staff and, from the mid-1970s, Schoelkopf's wife, Laura Jane Schoelkopf. The records offer insight into the personalities of the Schoelkopfs and how their congenial and candid management style influenced their relationships with the contemporary artists they represented.
Arrangement:
Originally the collection was organized as one large file arranged alphabetically by folder title, with titles ranging from names of artists to general subject headings such as "Correspondence." During processing it became clear that the gallery delineated operations into three main functions: artist relations, client-dealer relations, and exhibitions. Consequently the collection is arranged as three main series based on these areas of concern. A small group of miscellaneous photographs of artists constitutes an additional series at the end of the collection.

Originally paper records throughout the collection were generally arranged chronologically, although this order was not strictly adhered to. Frequently, correspondence and memoranda were attached to related records going back several years. To preserve the relationship between such documents, records stapled together in this way have been left together. They are arranged in reverse chronological order and filed in the folder corresponding to the primary date (i.e., the date of the first and most recent paper in the group). Researchers should be aware that date ranges provided on folders refer to the primary dates of documents contained therein and that some items in the folder may predate that range. Otherwise, the general chronological scheme has been retained throughout the collection, with undated material placed at the beginning of the appropriate file.

Printed material is arranged in chronological order, with undated material at the beginning of the folder, and may include press releases, exhibition announcements, exhibition catalogs, posters, clippings from newspapers, magazines, and journals, and other publicity material. Large amounts of printed material are broken down into several discrete folder units.

The most consistent labeling system for photographic material apparent throughout the collection was title of work of art. The majority of images are not dated with a printing date or the date that the work of art was produced, and although many of them have a processing number, these are by no means consistent and there are no master lists that can be used to interpret them. Consequently, images are arranged primarily by media type and then alphabetically by title. Untitled images are placed at the beginning of a media group; "the" in a title is ignored. Exceptions to this method are addressed in the appropriate series descriptions.

Files labeled "Photographs of Works of Art" will typically include any or all of the following: black-and-white copy prints, black-and-white transparencies, color transparencies, slide transparencies, Polaroid prints, color snapshots, contact sheets, and separation sheets. Often the same image will be duplicated in several different formats. Any notes on photographic material found in or on the original folder in which the material was filed have been preserved with the material or transcribed onto a sheet of acid-free paper that either encloses or is placed directly before the item to which the information applies.

The designation "General" indicates that a file may contain any or all of the types of material outlined above.

Series 1: Artist Files, 1851-1991, undated (Boxes 1-23; 23 linear ft.)

Series 2: General Business Files, 1960-1991, undated (Boxes 24-28; 4.74 linear ft.)

Series 3: Group Exhibition Files, 1960-1988, undated (Boxes 28-29; 1 linear ft.)

Series 4: Photographs of Artists, undated (Box 29; 0.25 linear ft.)
Historical Note:
Robert Schoelkopf, Jr., was born in Queens, New York, in 1927. He graduated from Yale College in 1951 with a bachelor of arts degree and then taught briefly at his alma mater while conducting graduate research in art history. Schoelkopf began his career in commercial art in 1957 as an independent dealer of American painting and sculpture and became a member of the Art Dealers Association of America in 1958. In 1959 he formed a partnership with Virginia Zabriskie, of the Zabriskie Gallery in New York, which lasted until 1962. The gallery exhibited late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century American painting, together with contemporary painting of a somewhat conservative style.

In 1962 Schoelkopf signed a three-year lease for the fourth floor of a building at 825 Madison Avenue in New York, where he opened the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery. From the outset, Schoelkopf aimed to specialize in American painting of the nineteenth and twentieth century and sculpture of all schools. He predicted a burgeoning market for the Hudson River School in particular, believing that American painting was increasingly perceived as being worthy of serious attention. In a letter dated January 3, 1963, Schoelkopf congratulated John Spencer for his decision to collect nineteenth-century American paintings for the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College, assuring him that "progressive chauvanism [ sic] will operate to elevate prices in American painting. Every year more colleges teach Art History, and soon they shall have reached the level of sophistication and development where they will be obliged (for face) to offer tuition in specifically American art - hitherto neglected of academicians.... I and many other dealers have plans for exhibitions of nineteenth-century American painting, especially the Hudson River School."

Schoelkopf's instincts regarding the Hudson River School were undoubtedly correct, and consequently nineteenth-century American painters formed a permanent mainstay of his inventory. He is perhaps remembered more, however, for his dedication to reviving interest in lesser-known American painters from the turn-of-the-century who were impressionist or modernist in style. Schoelkopf developed something of a reputation for unearthing forgotten talent that, while sometimes mediocre or inconsistent, was occasionally exceptional and certainly worthy of note. He was committed to reinstalling Joseph Stella in the pantheon of major American artists, representing Stella's estate from 1963 to 1971 and holding regular exhibitions of the artist's work from 1962 on. In 1969 the gallery held the first New York exhibition of the paintings of Manierre Dawson, who was subsequently acclaimed by the critics for his important and innovative contributions to modernism. In 1970 Schoelkopf began showing the work of Jan Matulka, an artist whose work had been neglected since the 1930s, and his enthusiastic representation of the Matulka estate paved the way for a retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1979.

Schoelkopf's interest in turn-of-the-century artists also extended to sculptors such as John Flannagan, Ethel Myers, Elie Nadelman, and John Henry Bradley Storrs, and he directed considerable energy to furthering Gaston Lachaise's reputation as an artist of major stature. When Lachaise died at the peak of his career in 1935, his estate was left to his wife, Isabel, and in 1957 to Isabel's son, Edward. When Edward died shortly thereafter, John B. Pierce, Jr., a nephew of Isabel Lachaise, was appointed trustee of the estate and formed the Lachaise Foundation. In 1962 Pierce entered an agreement with Robert Schoelkopf and Felix Landau to represent Lachaise's sculpture on the East and West Coasts, respectively. In this capacity Schoelkopf helped to launch a major retrospective of the artist's work at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1964 and a traveling exhibition that began circulating in 1967.

The gallery's other major commitment was to painting and sculpture by contemporary American realists, many of whom worked in a figurative style and explored elements of allegory and classical mythology in their work, presenting landscapes, still lifes, and portraits from a realist perspective. The bulk of the gallery's exhibitions were, in fact, of work by contemporary artists, including metaphysical still-life painter William Bailey, colorist Leland Bell, figurative painter Martha Mayer Erlebacher, landscape and narrative painter Gabriel Laderman, and Icelandic artist Louisa Matthiasdottir. William Bailey was one of the gallery's most commercially successful artists, and his first one-person exhibition in New York was held there in 1968. Demand for Bailey's paintings often far exceeded his output, and by the late 1970s Schoelkopf invariably sold out his exhibitions and had compiled a lengthy waiting list for his work.

In its early years the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery contributed considerably to the development of interest in fine art photography that fostered an increasingly lucrative market for photographic prints during the 1960s and 1970s. In 1965 Schoelkopf began incorporating photography into the gallery's exhibition schedule and, in the spring of 1974, opened a gallery dedicated to photography on the second floor at 825 Madison Avenue. Between 1965 and 1979 Schoelkopf's was the only serious New York gallery dealing in painting and sculpture that also regularly exhibited photography as fine art. His interests lay primarily in antiquarian photography and the work of nineteenth-century and twentieth-century masters including Eugéne Atget, Mathew Brady, James Robertson, and Carleton Watkins. Schoelkopf organized shows examining specific photographic processes, the photogravure and the cyanotype, and presented surveys of genres such as portrait and landscape photography. In 1967 he held the first exhibition in many years of the work of Julia Margaret Cameron, an important figure in the history of Victorian photography, timing it to coincide with a show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art that focused on Cameron as one of four Victorian photographers.

Schoelkopf also handled the work of several influential contemporaries, most notably Brassaï, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Walker Evans, and Gisèle Freund. The gallery held Freund's first exhibition in the United States in 1975 and was, for a time, the only place in New York where one could see and purchase prints by Cartier-Bresson. Schoelkopf began exhibiting Evans's work in 1966 and regularly thereafter, including a 1971 exhibition that coincided with a major retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.

In the fall of 1976 the second-floor gallery space was turned over to Marcuse (Cusie) Pfeifer, then the gallery's director, who planned to use it to show the work of young photographers in a gallery under her own name. Schoelkopf continued to hold several photography exhibitions a year in the fourth-floor gallery but decided to concentrate primarily on nineteenth-century masters.

In March 1971 a fire in the building at Madison Avenue resulted in substantial water damage to the gallery space. Although very little of the inventory was destroyed, the incident forced Schoelkopf to close until September. This temporary loss of revenue compounded with a nationwide recession cut into Schoelkopf's financial resources and left him questioning his commission policy and his level of commitment to contemporary work in all media. A letter to artist Adolph Rosenblatt dated May 3, 1971, records how Schoelkopf had become increasingly disenchanted with "all contemporary work" and would begin taking 40 percent commission on sales, instead of 33.3 percent. "Beside the matter of enthusiasm is the matter of economics," Schoelkopf remarked, "and the last year and a half have been really dreadful for the art business."

This difficult period was followed immediately by more prosperous times. January 1973 proved to be the gallery's most successful month to date, encouraging Schoelkopf to purchase a house in Chappaqua, New York, later that year. In November 1974 Schoelkopf wrote to Anthony D'Offay that business "is as slow as it has ever been, but what sales we make are big ones" and revealed that auctions had, at that point, become his primary avenue for trade.

Around 1975 Schoelkopf's wife of eleven years, Laura Jane Schoelkopf, began working in the gallery. Although seemingly dubious of the work at first, she became a considerable asset to the business and reputedly complemented her husband's relationship with the gallery's contemporary artists through her warmth and hospitality, qualities often noted by artists who corresponded regularly with the couple.

The financial instability that characterized the 1970s undoubtedly influenced Schoelkopf's decision to cease exhibiting photography in 1979. By 1978 however, his investment in early-twentieth-century art appeared to be paying off. Jan Matulka, Joseph Stella, and John Henry Bradley Storrs had all been represented in exhibitions at major museums, and sales of their work had increased considerably. Gaston Lachaise's reputation continued to grow, and the traveling exhibition still circulated, garnering far more interest than had originally been anticipated.

Although contemporary artists continued to take up the largest portion of the gallery's changing exhibitions, Schoelkopf's interest in contemporary work was growing more conservative, tending toward a narrower focus on the narrative and allegorical. By 1979 he no longer exhibited contemporary sculpture, admitting to a lack of enthusiasm for the work of any of the current figurative sculptors and a dislike of all contemporary abstract work. In a letter to Lillian Delevoryas, dated March 17, 1982, he confessed, "With age has come a hardening of the aesthetic arteries perhaps. What we have been showing is realism, but getting tighter all the time."

In April 1984 the gallery was moved to 50 West Fifty-seventh Street, and, during the years that followed, the Schoelkopfs pared down the number of contemporary artists they represented, handling only those to whom they felt most strongly committed while continuing to specialize in nineteenth-century and early-twentieth-century American painting and sculpture. As the gallery approached its thirtieth anniversary, Schoelkopf's achievements were considerable. He had operated a successful New York gallery for almost three decades, rejuvenated the reputations of several important American artists, and was respected by artists and clients alike for the integrity, intelligence, and humor with which he conducted his business affairs. In 1987 he had been appointed to the board of trustees of the Williamstown Regional Art Conservation Laboratory. By this time he was also a member of the advisory board to the National Academy of Design, and in 1988 he became a co-trustee of the Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation.

In March 1990, Robert Schoelkopf was diagnosed with leukemia and underwent a regimen of cancer treatment that resulted in a brief remission by the summer. Schoelkopf returned to work temporarily, but by 1991 his condition had worsened and he died in April of that year. Having known for some time that her husband's prognosis was poor, Laura Jane Schoelkopf had apparently decided that she would not continue the gallery in the event of his death. With the help of the youngest of their two sons, Andrew, she settled final accounts and assisted the gallery's contemporary artists in finding representation elsewhere before closing the business in August 1991.
Provenance:
Twenty-seven linear feet of records were donated to the Archives of American Art by Laura Jane Schoelkopf, Robert Schoelkopf's widow, and the Coe Kerr Gallery in 1991 and 1992. An additional gift of 3.4 linear feet was donated by Laura Jane Schoelkopf in 1996. The collection was reduced slightly during processing.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Realism  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Gallery records
Illustrated letters
Photographs
Citation:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, bulk 1962-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.robeschg
See more items in:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-robeschg
Online Media:

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By