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Oral history interview with Edward Landon

Interviewee:
Landon, Edward, 1911-1984  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Artists' Union (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Federal art project (Mass.)  Search this
National Serigraph Society  Search this
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Bridgman, George Brant, 1864-1943  Search this
Dove, Arthur Garfield, 1880-1946  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry, 1895-  Search this
Hartley, Dennis  Search this
Hughes, Marian  Search this
Lozowick, Louis, 1892-1973  Search this
Marin, John, 1870-1953  Search this
Mark, Henry  Search this
Mauer, Alfred  Search this
McCausland, Elizabeth, 1899-1965  Search this
O'Keeffe, Georgia, 1887-1986  Search this
Olds, Elizabeth, 1896-1991  Search this
Perry, Marvo  Search this
Rebay, Hilla, 1890-1967  Search this
Rogers, William T.  Search this
Sabbath, Bernie  Search this
Stein, Gertrude, 1874-1946  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Strand, Paul, 1890-1976  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Extent:
39 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1975 Apr. 17-May 28
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Edward Landon conducted 1975 Apr. 17-May 28, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Landon speaks of working with the local theater in high school; leaving Hartford at age 17 or 18 for Greenwich Village in New York and the Art Students League; studying figure drawing with George Bridgman; getting married and moving to Springfield, Mass.; exhibiting with the Springfield Art League; the Artist Union and the Artist Congress in the 1930s; spending a summer with Georgia O'Keeffe and Paul Strand in Taos, N.M.; the cooperation amongst artists that lasted into the 1950s to establish serigraphs as an American fine art print medium; when he received the Solomon Guggenheim Scholarship for Non-objective Art in 1939; when he made furniture and picture frames and the publishing of his book on making picture frames in 1946; when he began working as an easel painter in the Massachusetts Federal Art Project of the WPA in 1933; becoming president of the Western Chapter of the Artists Union in 1934; when he corresponded and visited Arthur Dove; his friendship with Elizabeth McCausland; his introduction to Harry Gottlieb and silk screen printing; the love of color and currently trying for emotional effects in his work; initiating silk screen exhibitions in the Springfield Museum; the beginning of the National Serigraph Society and his work as the exhibition secretary; his teaching approach; the first class held in his garage with fellow artists; more on his relationship with Elizabeth McCausland; Arthur Dove's influence on a recent painting Landon finished; his trip to Taos in 1930 and the importance of artist colonies for him early on; the feeling of not having roots, but being comfortable with the idea; the purpose of the National Serigraph Society; his feelings about printmakers moving away from traditional printing; organized exhibitions for the United States Information Service; his enjoyment in organizing things; the commercialization of creating "prints;" how photo-realism does not translate well in the print medium; the importance of trying to convey an idea in his work; his success in covering small boxes, address books and other items, as well as book binding; his preference for printing small editions of 25 to 35 prints; of a description of his method of printing; his Fulbright Fellowship in 1950 to travel to Norway and lecture; an interest in early Scandinavian art; publishing a silkscreen portfolio of pre-Viking art for the American Scandinavian Foundation; traveling through Europe; his influence as an innovator in France and Scandinavia; meeting with silk screen artists in Oslo; art forms in his work at this time; his inclusion in "Who's Who in American Art;" the avoidance of art movements; how by the 1950s the reason for the National Serigraph Society no longer existed because the medium was popular by that time; his move to Vermont in 1957 or 1958; work as a color mixer, book binder, and returning to framing because of health reasons; his second illness changing what he found important in his life; and how the content of his work became more emotional. Landon also recalls Louie Lozowick, Gertrude Stein, Marian Hughes, Elizabeth Olds, John Marin, Alfred Stieglitz, Berenice Abbott, Marvo Perry, Hilla Rebay, Sir William T. Rogers, Max Weber, Dennis Hartley, Alfred Maurer, Bernie Sabbath, and Henry Mark.
Biographical / Historical:
Edward Landon (1911-1984) was a printmaker from Weston, Vt.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 39 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Printmakers -- Vermont -- Weston -- Interviews  Search this
Printing -- Technique  Search this
Function:
Artist colonies
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.landon75
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9fc2f6099-4ac6-4cf6-b0a9-962e4fb7ba9b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-landon75
Online Media:

William H. Johnson Biographies and Chronologies

Collection Creator:
Johnson, William H., 1901-1970  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1939, 1956
Collection Restrictions:
The bulk of the collection is digitized. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
William H. Johnson papers, 1922-1971, bulk 1926-1956. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
William H. Johnson papers
William H. Johnson papers / Series 1: Biographical Material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e96f243e-200a-45fa-8790-3479c41901be
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-johnwill-ref15
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The Beachcombers records, 1916-1975

Creator:
Beachcombers (Organization)  Search this
Citation:
The Beachcombers records, 1916-1975. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Theme:
Art organizations  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7616
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209779
AAA_collcode_beachcom
Theme:
Art organizations
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209779

Photograph album relatiing to Celia Thaxter and her circle on Appledore Island, Isle of Shoals, circa 1898-1900

Creator:
John, Hutchinson  Search this
Subject:
Brown, John Appleton  Search this
Hassam, Childe  Search this
Thaxter, Celia  Search this
Place:
Isles of Shoals (Me. and N.H.) -- Views
Citation:
Photograph album relatiing to Celia Thaxter and her circle on Appledore Island, Isle of Shoals, circa 1898-1900. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Painting -- New Hampshire -- Isles of Shoales -- Photographs  Search this
Artist colonies -- New Hampshire -- Isles of Shoales -- Photographs  Search this
Theme:
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10764
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214379
AAA_collcode_hutcjohn
Theme:
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_214379

Jack Tworkov papers

Creator:
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Names:
Egan Gallery  Search this
Leo Castelli Gallery  Search this
Nancy Hoffman Gallery  Search this
Poindexter Gallery  Search this
Stable Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Ashbury, John  Search this
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Bartlett, Jennifer, 1941-  Search this
Blinken, Donald M., 1925-  Search this
Calfee, William H. (William Howard), 1909-1995  Search this
Cavallon, Giorgio, 1904-1989  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Demarco, Ricky  Search this
Dickinson, Edwin Walter, 1891-1978  Search this
Forge, Andrew  Search this
Hartigan, Grace  Search this
Herzbrun, Helene  Search this
Katz, Paul  Search this
Knaths, Karl, 1891-1971  Search this
Lindeberg, Linda, 1915-1973  Search this
Matter, Herbert, 1907-1984  Search this
Newman, Arnold, 1918-2006  Search this
Newman, Michael  Search this
Osborn, Robert Chesley, 1904-1994  Search this
Ponsold, Renate  Search this
Praeger, David A.  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Summerford, Joe  Search this
Thorne, Joan, 1943-  Search this
Westenberger, Theo  Search this
Wheeler, Dennis  Search this
Wise, Howard  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Extent:
9.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Video recordings
Interviews
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sound recordings
Sketches
Diaries
Date:
1926-1993
Summary:
The Jack Tworkov papers measure 9.7 linear feet and are dated 1926-1993. Tworkov's work as a painter and influential teacher, as well as his personal life, are documented by extensive journals and substantive correspondence that record his ideas about art and teaching, and illuminate his relationships with friends, colleagues, and students. Many sketchbooks, writings, interviews, photographs, and moving images are also included.
Scope and Content Note:
The Jack Tworkov papers measure 9.7 linear feet and are dated 1926-1993, with the bulk from the period 1931-1982. Tworkov's work as a painter and influential teacher, as well as his personal life, are documented by extensive journals and substantive correspondence that record his ideas about art and teaching, and illuminate his relationships with friends, colleagues, and students. Many sketchbooks, writings, interviews, photographs, and moving images are also included.

Biographical material includes Tworkov's citizenship certificate, awards, diplomas, a copy of Jack Tworkov: Video Portrait, produced by Electronic Arts Intermix, and a motion picture film, USA Artists: Jack Tworkov, produced by National Education Television.

Correspondence consists largely of incoming letters. It is both professional and personal in nature and often combines both spheres. Correspondents include artists Jennifer Bartlett, William H. Calfee, Giorgio Cavallon and Linda Lindeberg, Grace Hartigan, Helene Herzbrun (also named Helene McKinsey), Karl Knaths, Joe Summerford, Joan Thorne, and Adja Yunkers; cartoonist Robert C. Osborn; collectors Donald M. Blinken and David A. Praeger (who was also Tworkov's lawyer); illustrator Roger Dovoisin; critics Dore Ashton and Andrew Forge; critic and poet John Ashbury; galleries that represented Tworkov: Egan Gallery, Leo Castelli, Nancy Hoffman Gallery, Poindexter Gallery, Stable Gallery and Zabriskie Gallery; and many museums, arts organizations, colleges and universities.

Interviews with Tworkov include one with Ricky Demarco videotaped in 1979 and two conducted on video by Twokov's daughter Helen in 1975. The remaining interviews are sound recordings, one conducted by Grace Alexander for the show Artists in New York in 1967, one conducted by Michael Newman in 1980, and the remainder by unidentified interviewers. None have transcripts.

All writings are by Tworkov and include poems, an artist's statement, and documentation for two children's books by Tworkov illustrated by Roger Duvoisin. Two additional notebooks contain miscellaneous notes, teaching notes, and some specific to identified courses. Lectures exist as untranscribed sound recordings.

Tworkov's journals (33 volumes) span a period of 35 years, from 1947 until 1982, with the final entry dated a few weeks before his death. They record his reflections on painting, his challenges as a painter, aesthetics, the role of the artist in society, Jewish identity, painters he admired (especially Cézanne and Edwin Dickinson), politics, and teaching. They also recount everyday life: the comings and goings of friends and family members, social engagements, professional activities, illness, and travel.

The lone subject file concerns Mark Rothko and includes a photograph of Rothko and the guest list for the dedication of the Rothko Chapel in Houston.

Artwork consists of a small number of sketches by Tworkov in pencil and ink. Tworkov's sketchbooks (28 volumes) contain sketches and some finished drawings. Most are in pencil, but scattered throughout are a few pencil sketches embellished with colored marker or pastel, and a small number in ink.

Photographs are of people, places and events. Most photographs are of Tworkov alone and with others including Giogio Cavallon, though most friends and students are unidentified. Of note are views of Tworkov producing a series of prints at Tamarind Institute. Also found is an informal portrait of Wally Tworkov. Events recorded include the jurying of "Exhibition Momentum" in Chicago, 1956. Among the places shown are Tworkov's studios at Black Mountain College and in Provincetown. When known, photographers are noted; among them are Paul Katz, Herbert Matter, Arnold Newman, Renate Ponsold, Theo Westenberger, Dennis Wheeler, and Howard Wise.

A separate series of audiovisual recordings was established for those recordings that could not be readily identified to be arranged in other series. They consist of three videocassettes (2 VHS and 1 miniDV).
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1933-1981 (Boxes 1, 9, 11, FC 13; 0.7 linear ft.)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1926-1993 (Boxes 1-5; 3.8 linear ft.)

Series 3: Interviews, 1978-1982 (Boxes 5, 9-10; 1 linear ft.)

Series 4: Writings, Notes, and Lectures, 1955-1982 (Boxes 5, 9; 0.5 linear ft.)

Series 5: Journals, 1947-1982 (Boxes 5-7; 2.0 linear ft.)

Series 6: Subject File, 1961-1977 (Box 7; 1 folder)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1952-1981 (Box 7, OV 12; 0.1 linear ft.)

Series 8: Artwork, circa 1950s-1960s (Box 7: 3 folders)

Series 9: Sketchbooks, circa 1950s-1960s (Boxes 7-8, 11; 1.0 linear ft.)

Series 10: Photographic Materials, 1941-1981 (Boxes 8-9; 0.5 linear ft.)

Series 11: Audiovisual Recordings, 1961-1975 (Box 9; 0.1 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
New York School painter Jack Tworkov (1900-1982), best known for his Abstract Expressionist paintings and as a highly regarded teacher, lived and worked in New York City and Provincetown, MA.

At age 13, Tworkov (born Yakov Tworkovsky) emigrated from Poland with his mother and sister to join his father already in the United States. In America, they chose to use the name of distant relatives, the Bernsteins, who were their sponsors. Eventually, Jack and his sister, Janice, reclaimed and shortened their name to Tworkov; later, she adopted the name of their hometown in Poland and became the painter Janice Biala.

As a high school student in New York City, Tworkov attended drawing classes. After graduating from Columbia University, where he had been an English major and considered becoming a writer, Tworkov instead turned to art. He studied with Ivan Olinsky at the National Academy of Design between 1923 and 1925, and from 1925 to 1926 attended painting classes taught by Guy Péne Du Bois and Boardman Robinson at the Art Students League. During his college years, Tworkov began visiting museums and became a great admirer of Cézanne. Tworkov's early paintings - still life, landscapes, and portraits - showed the influence of European modernism and Cézanne.

Tworkov spent his first summer in Provincetown while still a student and subsequently returned to study with Ross Moffet. In Provincetown he met and was greatly influenced by Karl Knaths and developed a lifelong friendship with Edwin Dickinson. By 1929, Tworkov was painting there year round. Over the years, Tworkov and his family continued to return for long stretches, and in 1958 he purchased a house in Provincetown.

During the Great Depression, Tworkov participated in the Treasury Department's Public Works of Art Project until 1934, and then moved to the easel division of the WPA Federal Art Project. He felt uncomfortable with the growing ideological and political influences on art and found it depressing to paint for the WPA rather than for himself, so he left the WPA in 1941. Tworkov, who had studied mechanical drawing while in high school, spent most of the War years employed as a tool designer and draftsman at an engineering firm with government contracts.

By the 1940s, Tworkov was painting in the Abstract Expressionist style. Between 1948 and 1953, he leased a studio on Fourth Avenue that adjoined that of his friend Willem de Kooning. During this time, they mutually influenced each other as they developed into mature Abstract Expressionists. At Yale in the 1960s, Tworkov became close friends with fellow student Josef Albers. Alber's influence on Tworkov resulted in a turn to geometric compositions of small, systematic, and repetitive strokes defined by a grid. He experimented with diagonal compositions, and later geometric work that featured large areas of color and soft texture.

Tworkov's first teaching experience was during 1930-1931 when he served as a part-time painting instructor at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School. His teaching career began in earnest when he joined the faculties of Queens College, 1948-1955, and Pratt Institute, 1955-1958. During the summers he taught at various schools, most notably Black Mountain College's 1952 summer session. Tworkov was a visiting artist at the Yale University School of Art and Architecture, 1961-1963, and became chairman of its Art Department from 1963 until his retirement in 1969. In retirement he lived in Provincetown and was a visiting artist for both short and extended periods at various universities and art schools.

An avid reader of literature and poetry, Tworkov also wrote poems and essays. He published essays in It Is, Art Digest, and Art In America; his most notable piece, "The Wandering Soutine," appeared in Art News, November 1950. Tworkov also kept a journal for 35 years (1947-1982) that recorded his thoughts on a wide range of subjects concerning professional, personal, and philosophical issues, as well as details of everyday life.

Tworkov was among the founders of the Artists' Club or The Club in 1949, and for a decade actively participated in the stimulating discussions for which the group was known. In 1968 he helped to establish the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. Its residency program enabled younger artists and writers to advance their careers and kept Provincetown's historic artists' colony active year round.

He was the recipient of the William A. Clark Award and Corcoran Gold Medal from the Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1963; Skowhegan School of Art's Painter of the Year Award, 1974; and Distinguished Teaching of Art Award from College Art Association, 1976. Tworkov was appointed to serve on the Massachusetts Art Commission, 1970-1971, and in 1981 was named a Fellow of The Cleveland Museum of Art and of the Rhode Island School of Design.

Following his second divorce in 1935, Rachel (Wally) Wolodarsky became Tworkov's third wife and their marriage endured. They had two daughters. Hermine Ford (b. 1939) is an artist married to fellow painter Robert Moskowitz. Helen Tworkov (b. 1943) is the founder of Tricycle: The Buddhist Review and the author of a book about yoga.

Tworkov remained physically and intellectually active after a diagnosis of bone cancer around 1980, and continued to paint until shortly before his death in Provincetown on September 4, 1982.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American Art are two oral history interviews with Jack Tworkov, one conducted by Dorothy Seckler, Aug. 17, 1962, and another by Gerald Silk, May 22, 1981. There is also a small collection of three letters written by Jack Tworkov to friend Troy-Jjohn Bramberger.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel N70-38 and 62) including writings by Tworkov, notebooks, notes for teaching and talks, notes on art and miscellaneous subjects, poems, artist's statements, biographical data, the transcript of a 1970 interview with Tworkov conducted by Phyllis Tuchman, and a few letters and drafts of letters, 1950-1963. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Jack Tworkov lent the Archives of American Art papers for microfilming in 1970-1971. Jack Tworkov's daughters, Hermine Ford and Helen Tworkov, donated the rest of the collection in 2009, which included some of the material from the original loan.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
Reels N70-38 and 62: Authorization to publish, quote, or reproduce requires written permission from Helen Tworkov or Hermine Ford. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts  Search this
Topic:
Painting -- New York (State)  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Video recordings
Interviews
Motion pictures (visual works)
Sound recordings
Sketches
Diaries
Citation:
Jack Tworkov papers, 1926-1993. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.tworjack2
See more items in:
Jack Tworkov papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9345f5838-057f-4572-8063-0df7b8d00ad0
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tworjack2
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Edward Landon, 1975 Apr. 17-May 28

Interviewee:
Landon, Edward August, 1911-1984  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F  Search this
Subject:
Abbott, Berenice  Search this
Bridgman, George Brant  Search this
Dove, Arthur Garfield  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry  Search this
Hartley, Dennis  Search this
Hughes, Marian  Search this
Lozowick, Louis  Search this
Mark, Henry  Search this
Marin, John  Search this
Mauer, Alfred  Search this
McCausland, Elizabeth  Search this
O'Keeffe, Georgia  Search this
Olds, Elizabeth  Search this
Perry, Marvo  Search this
Rebay, Hilla  Search this
Rogers, William T.  Search this
Sabbath, Bernie  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred  Search this
Stein, Gertrude  Search this
Strand, Paul  Search this
Weber, Max  Search this
Federal art project (Mass.)  Search this
Artists' Union (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
National Serigraph Society  Search this
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Edward Landon, 1975 Apr. 17-May 28. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Printmakers -- Vermont -- Weston -- Interviews  Search this
Printing -- Technique  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12109
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212814
AAA_collcode_landon75
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212814
Online Media:

Peggy Bacon papers

Creator:
Bacon, Peggy, 1895-1987  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
Kraushaar Galleries  Search this
Alder, Jules  Search this
Bacon, Charles Roswell, 1868-1913  Search this
Brook, Alexander, 1898-1980  Search this
Bunner, Rudolph Francis  Search this
Lay, Charles Downing, 1877-1956  Search this
Remsen, Ira, 1846-1927  Search this
Schmidt, Katherine, 1898-1978  Search this
Varian, Dorothy, 1895-1985  Search this
Extent:
4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
1893-1973
bulk 1900-1936
Summary:
The papers of printmaker, illustrator, caricaturist, and writer Peggy Bacon measure 3.6 linear feet and date from 1893 to 1973, with the bulk of materials dating from 1900 to 1936. Much of the collection consists of family correspondence, although writings, photographs, artwork, and personal business records from Bacon's late career are also found.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of printmaker, illustrator, caricaturist, and writer Peggy Bacon measure 3.6 linear feet and date from 1893 to 1973, with the bulk of materials dating from 1900 to 1936. Much of the collection consists of family correspondence, although writings, photographs, artwork, and personal business records from Bacon's late career are also found.

Correspondence is found between Peggy Bacon and her parents, Elizabeth and Charles Roswell Bacon. Letters to her mother describe in detail her life as an art student and artist at the Art Students League; summer schools in Port Jefferson, Long Island and Provincetown, Massachusetts; the Woodstock artists' colony; and her early years in New York City. Letters from her husband, Alexander Brook, to her mother are also present. Letters to Bacon include letters from her early teacher Jonas Lie, and from friends and fellow artists Catherine Wiley, Dorothy Varian, Katherine Schmidt, Anne Rector Duffy, and others. Her parents' extensive correspondence includes letters to her father from the artists Jules Adler, Rudolph Bunner, Ira Remsen, and Charles Downing Lay.

The collection also contains Peggy Bacon's school reports and writing assignments, a marriage certificate, scattered poetry manuscripts and notes by Peggy Bacon, and fiction manuscripts by Charles Roswell Bacon. Personal business records date from the 1960s and 1970s and include publisher's royalty statements, gallery sales statements, and scattered business correspondence with Antoinette Kraushaar and other staff at the Kraushaar Galleries. Photographs depict Bacon and her family, friends, homes, and works of art. Artwork includes several original drawings and sketches by Bacon, as well as artwork by Alexander Brook, Charles Roswell Bacon, and others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1893-1913 (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1893-1939, 1969-1972 (Boxes 1-3; 3 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1897-1934, 1963-1972 (Box 4; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1905-1920 (Boxes 4-5; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1905-1935, 1973 (Box 5; 3 folders)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1900-1963 (Box 5, OV 6; 4 folders)

Series 7: Artwork, undated (Box 5, OVs 6-8; 9 folders)
Biographical Note:
Peggy Bacon was born in 1895 in Ridgefield, Connecticut, and grew up an only child after the death of two younger brothers in infancy. Her parents, Charles Roswell Bacon and Elizabeth Chase Bacon, had met at the Art Students League, where her father had studied with Robert Henri. Her father pursued a career in painting and writing until his suicide in 1913, and her mother painted miniatures.

A child of artists, Bacon began to draw at a very early age, and by age ten she was already earning money for her illustrations, drawings of literary characters made for dinner place cards. She did not attend school until 1909, when her parents sent her to a boarding school in Summit, New Jersey. She began her formal art training shortly after her father's death, enrolling in the School of Applied Arts for Women at the end of 1913. In the summer of 1914, she attended Jonas Lie's landscape class in Port Jefferson, Long Island, and continued private studies with him in New York City. Lie gave Bacon her first solo exhibition in 1915. From 1915 until 1920, she studied at the Art Students League under John Sloan, Kenneth Hayes Miller, George Bellows, Mahroni Young, and others. In the summers, she took classes first in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and then in Woodstock, New York, where she studied with Andrew Dasburg.

Bacon's circle was formed at the Art Students League, and the League's summer school in Woodstock. She met her husband, Alexander Brook, in Woodstock, and they were married in 1920. Both were active in the Woodstock Artists Association. Other artists in their close-knit group included Dorothea Schwarz (Greenbaum), Anne Rector (Duffy), Betty Burroughs (Woodhouse), Katherine Schmidt (Kuniyoshi Shubert), Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Molly Luce, Dorothy Varian, Edmund Duffy, Dick Dyer, David Morrison, and Andrew Dasburg. Many from this group were involved in the short-lived satirical magazine at the League called Bad News, published in 1918 with several of Bacon's earliest satirical drawings. Her first book, The True Philosopher and Other Cat Tales, was published in 1919. Brook and Bacon traveled to England in 1920, where their daughter Belinda was born. A son, Sandy, was born in Woodstock in 1922. In the early 1920s, Brook worked with Juliana Force at the Whitney Studio Club, and they were involved in the cultural life that sprang up around the gallery, which featured up-and-coming artists. For many years, Bacon and her family split their time between New York and Woodstock, and later summered in Cross River, NY. After divorcing Brook in 1940, Bacon spent summers in Ogunquit, Maine.

Though she initially thought of herself as a painter, she built her reputation on her drawings and prints, which often satirized the people around her in their natural habitats - artists in life classes, at dances, and in social situations, or a throng of people in a museum, on a city sidewalk, or a ship's deck. She became sought after for her illustrations and witty, topical verse in magazines such as Dial, Delineator, The New Yorker, New Republic, Fortune, and Vanity Fair. She helped to establish the American Print Makers, an artists' organization based in the Downtown Gallery which sought greater exhibition opportunities for printmakers. Bacon illustrated over sixty books, nineteen of which she also wrote, between 1919 and 1966, including many children's books and a successful mystery novel called The Inward Eye (1952). In 1933 she received a Guggenheim Fellowship and used it to complete a collection of caricatures of art world figures called Off With Their Heads (1934), the success of which prompted a spate of commissions for caricatures. Bacon stopped making caricatures in 1935, but they include some of her best-known work.

Bacon exhibited frequently, in New York and in major museum exhibitions nationally, showing her prints, drawings, pastels, and watercolors. She had over thirty solo exhibitions at such venues as Montross Gallery, Alfred Stieglitz's Intimate Gallery, and the Downtown Gallery, and was represented by Rehn Galleries and later Kraushaar Galleries. Bacon also taught extensively in the 1930s and 1940s, at the Fieldston School, Art Students League, Hunter College, Temple University, the Corcoran Gallery, and other places. In the 1950s, she returned to painting. She made her last prints in 1955. In the early 1970s, Bacon's eyesight failed, and she eventually went to live with her son in Cape Porpoise, Maine. She died in 1987.
Related Material:
Among the other resources relating to Peggy Bacon in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Bacon, May 8, 1973; and letters to Bernice and Harry Lurie from Peggy Bacon, 1969-1977. Additional Peggy Bacon papers are available at Syracuse University.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Peggy Bacon in 1973 and Kraushaar Galleries in 2008.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- Woodstock  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- Woodstock  Search this
Caricaturists -- New York (State) -- Woodstock  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- Woodstock  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Drawings
Citation:
Peggy Bacon papers, 1893-1972. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bacopegg
See more items in:
Peggy Bacon papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90c2a3bfc-4dd1-4ec7-8a53-a42044f90398
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bacopegg
Online Media:

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Bacon, Peggy, 1895-1987  Search this
Extent:
3 Linear feet (Boxes 1-3)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1893-1939, 1969-1972
Scope and Contents note:
Correspondence includes letters written by Peggy Bacon, her husband, Alexander Brook, her parents, and various other family members, friends, and associates. Peggy Bacon's letters from 1913 and earlier are mostly correspondence with schoolmates, parents, and other family. Beginning around 1914, Bacon wrote regular, detailed letters to her mother about her life as an art student and artist at Port Jefferson, Long Island (1914), at the Art Student's League in New York City (1915-1920), summers in Provincetown, Massachusetts (1915-1917), and the Woodstock artists' colony (1919-1927). Letters also describe her time living in England and France (1920-1921), and her early years in New York City (1920s-1930s). Letters received by Bacon include letters from the artist Lucia Fairbanks Fuller (1903-1909) her teacher Jonas Lie (circa 1915), and her friends and fellow artists Catherine Wiley, Dorothy Varian, Katherine Schmidt, Anne Rector, and others (circa 1914-1919). Letters are occasionally illustrated.

Alexander Brook's letters to his mother-in-law, Elizabeth Bacon, span the early years of his relationship with Peggy Bacon, recounting family and career matters during their Woodstock years, their travel abroad, and their early years in New York City.

Letters written to Bacon's father, Charles Roswell Bacon, include letters from the artists Jules Adler, Rudolph Bunner, Ira Remsen, and Charles Downing Lay. The rest of the correspondence series consists mainly of family correspondence and Elizabeth Bacon's personal and business correspondence.

This series is arranged by correspondent and/or recipient. Undated correspondence is filed either by approximate date derived from the content of the letters, or at the end of the folder series. Under folder headings with multiple correspondents, undated letters are alphabetized by their authors.

Additional correspondence can be found with Personal Business Records.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Peggy Bacon papers, 1893-1972. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bacopegg, Series 2
See more items in:
Peggy Bacon papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9bb1a1bfd-2fcf-43bc-a044-7483df11050a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-bacopegg-ref18

Francis Davis Millet

Artist:
George Willoughby Maynard, 1843 - 1923  Search this
Sitter:
Francis Davis Millet, 3 Nov 1846 - 15 Apr 1912  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
Frame: 165.1 x 113 x 5.7cm (65 x 44 1/2 x 2 1/4")
Type:
Painting
Date:
1878
Topic:
Symbols & Motifs\Medal  Search this
Costume\Headgear\Hat  Search this
Exterior  Search this
Personal Attribute\Facial Hair\Mustache  Search this
Equipment\Rope\Lariat  Search this
Equipment\Sports Equipment\Equestrian Gear\Riding Crop  Search this
Francis Davis Millet: Male  Search this
Francis Davis Millet: Visual Arts\Artist\Painter  Search this
Francis Davis Millet: Visual Arts\Artist\Illustrator  Search this
Francis Davis Millet: Journalism and Media\Journalist\Reporter\Newspaper  Search this
Francis Davis Millet: Visual Arts\Artist\Painter\Muralist  Search this
Francis Davis Millet: Literature\Publisher\Book  Search this
Francis Davis Millet: Journalism and Media\Journalist\Correspondent  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; bequest of Dr. John A. P. Millet
Object number:
NPG.78.205
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
2022 Rehang of Out of Many: Portraits from 1600 to 1900
On View:
NPG, East Gallery 140
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm495cdcb79-785d-4c88-a6be-76b9ab9110b5
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.78.205

Map of the Rockport, Massachusetts artist colony

Creator:
Rockport Art Association  Search this
Type:
Printed Materials
Place:
Rockport, Mass.
Date:
193-?
Citation:
Rockport Art Association. Map of the Rockport, Massachusetts artist colony, 193-?. Gabrielle de Veaux Clements papers, 1860-1948. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Artist colonies  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)15944
See more items in:
Gabrielle de Veaux Clements papers, 1860-1948
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_15944
Online Media:

Gabrielle de Veaux Clements papers

Creator:
Clements, Gabrielle de Veaux, 1858-1948  Search this
Names:
Cornell University -- Students  Search this
Hale, Ellen Day, 1855-1940  Search this
Extent:
1 Linear foot
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photographs
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Place:
Egypt -- description and travel
Date:
1860-1948
Summary:
The papers of painter, etcher, printer, muralist, and art teacher Gabrielle de Veaux Clements measure 1 linear foot and date from 1860 to 1948. Found within the papers are biographical material; personal and professional correspondence, including extensive correspondence from Clements to her mother; writings, including notes and essays on art history and etching techniques; printed material; artwork; eight sketchbooks; and photographs of Clements, her family and friends, and her work.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter, etcher, printer, muralist, and art teacher Gabrielle de Veaux Clements measure 1 linear foot and date from 1860 to 1948. Found within the papers are biographical material; personal and professional correspondence, including extensive correspondence from Clements to her mother; writings, including notes and essays on art history and etching techniques; printed material; artwork; 8 sketchbooks; and photographs of Clements, her family and friends, and her work.

Biographical material consists of an address book, artwork sales and price lists, and autobiographical notes.

Correspondence is primarily with Clements' family, friends, and business associates. The series includes significant correspondence from Clements to her mother during her college years at Cornell University.

Writings include notes and essays on art history and etching techniques, 2 notebooks of poetry, and a travel diary chronicling a trip to Egypt with Ellen Day Hale.

Printed material includes clippings, exhibition catalogs, a map of the artists' colony at Rockport, Folly Cove in Massachusetts, and a copy of the book Suggestions for Illuminating by W. Randle Harrison.

Artwork consists of sketches and original etchings by Clements and artwork by others.

There are 8 sketchbooks consisting primarily of cityscapes, landscapes, and figure and portrait studies.

Photographs are of Clements, her family and friends, artists models, and work by Clements and others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical materials, circa 1920-1944 (3 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1875-1945 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1885-1940 (8 folders; Box 1)

Series 4: Printed material, circa 1860-1948 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 5: Artwork, circa 1895-1940 (3 folders; Box 1)

Series 6: Sketchbooks, circa 1884-1940 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1875-1940 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, printer, and art teacher Gabrielle de Veaux Clements (1858-1948) lived and worked in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Baltimore, Maryland; and Folly Cove near Gloucester, Massachusetts. She was known for her etchings and her commissioned murals for the cities of Baltimore and Washington, D.C.

Clements was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to physician Richard Clements and his wife, Gabrielle De Vaux. Her interest in art was supported by her family and, at the age of seventeen, she began studying lithography with the designer Charles Page at the Philadelphia School of Design for Women. After graduating in 1880 from Cornell University, where she had produced a number of scientific drawings and lithographs, Clements studied with painter Thomas Eakins at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and won the school's Toppan Prize. In 1883, Clements was introduced to etching techniques by the artist Stephen Parrish and began exhibiting and printing her works professionally.

In 1884, Clements traveled abroad to Paris to study at the Academie Julian where she was joined in 1885 by fellow painter and future lifelong companion Ellen Day Hale. Upon returning to her Philadelphia studio in 1885, Clements taught other female artists, including Margaret Bush-Brown, and exhibited in numerous institutions, including the National Academy of Design and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. In 1895, Clements moved to Baltimore to teach art at the newly established Bryn Mawr School, where she remained until 1908. During her tenure in Baltimore, she was commissioned by the Bendann Galleries to etch nine views of Baltimore and also painted five church murals in Washington, D.C., which led to subsequent murals in Detroit, Philadelphia, and Chicago.

Clements and Hale frequently traveled abroad, visiting France, Italy, Egypt, Syria, and Palestine, and spent summers at "The Thickets," the house they purchased in the artists' colony at Folly Cove. During World War I, they wintered in Charleston, South Carolina where they opened their studios to young female artists and taught innovative etching, painting, and color printmaking techniques. After the war, they again opened their studios in Folly Cove to young artists and continued to teach and experiment with soft-ground etching and aquatints in color. This work was highlighted in special exhibitions at the J.B. Speed Art Museum and the Smithsonian Institution. Clements died in Rockport, Massachusetts in 1948.
Provenance:
The Gabrielle de Veaux Clements papers were donated by Mrs. Harlan Starr, Jr. in 1983.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Muralists -- Massachusetts  Search this
Printmakers -- Massachusetts  Search this
Etchers -- Massachusetts  Search this
Art teachers -- Massachusetts  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Etching -- Technique  Search this
Art -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Prints
Photographs
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Citation:
Gabrielle de Veaux Clements papers, 1860-1948. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.clemgabr
See more items in:
Gabrielle de Veaux Clements papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw953de79c7-7bd3-41f1-832a-e2e9b1c03b9f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-clemgabr
Online Media:

Glass plate negatives of the Provincetown Art Colony

Creator:
Provincetown Art Association  Search this
Names:
Browne, George Elmer, 1871-1946  Search this
Philpott, A. J.  Search this
Webster, E. Ambrose (Edwin Ambrose), 1869-1935  Search this
Extent:
0.44 Linear feet
0.116 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Date:
1916
circa 2006
Summary:
The glass plate negatives of the Provincetown Art Colony measure 0.44 linear feet and 0.116 GB and date from 1916 and include images believed to have been taken for A. J. Philpott's August 1916 Boston Globe article entitled "Biggest Art Colony in the World at Provincetown." In addition to the twelve glass plate images of artists at work in Provincetown, including George Elmer Browne and E. Ambrose Webster, the collection includes the original negative box, a circa 2006 photocopy of Philpott's article, and digital copies of the glass plates.
Scope and Contents:
The glass plate negatives of the Provincetown Art Colony measure 0.44 linear feet and 0.116 GB and date from 1916 and include images believed to have been taken for A. J. Philpott's August 1916 Boston Globe article entitled "Biggest Art Colony in the World at Provincetown. In addition to the twelve glass plate images of artists at work in Provincetown, including George Elmer and E. Ambrose Webster, the collection includes the original negative box, a circa 2006 photocopy of Philpott's article, and digital copies of the glass plates.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as one series.

Series 1: Glass Plate Negatives of the Provincetown Art Colony, 1916, circa 2006 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1, MGP 2, 0.116 GB; ER01)
Biographical / Historical:
The Provincetown Art Association was established by artists Gerrit Beneker, Oscar Gieberich, William Halsall, Charles Hawthorne, and E. Ambrose Webster, along with local business men and women, in 1914. By 1916, the town had become a refuge for artists and expatriates from post-World War I Paris and artists from New York, and the association held juried exhibitions, beginning in the summer of 1915. Boston Globe editor A. J. Philpott's article "The Biggest Art Colony in the World," published in August of 1916, cemented Provincetown's reputation.

The Provincetown Art Association continued to expand throughout the twentieth century, and now operates a museum and a school. Provincetown celebrated it's 100th anniversary as an art colony in 1999.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds the microfilm for the Provincetown Art Association records and photographs, 1914-circa 1975.
Provenance:
Eight negatives were donated 2006 by Stephen Borkowski, chair of the Provincetown Art Commission. Borkowski purchased the negatives at a flea market in Boston in 1996 or 1997. He was told they were from the estate of a Boston Globe photographer. Borkowski made the donation in honor of Vivian Bullaudy, friend and colleague who curated an exhibition on Provincetown artists. The additional four negatives were donated in 2008 jointly by Stephen Borkowski, chairman of the Provincetown Art Commission, and the Provincetown Art Association and Museum.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of born-digital records with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Function:
Artist colonies -- Massachusetts
Citation:
Glass plate negatives of the Provincetown Art Colony, 1916, circa 2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.philanth
See more items in:
Glass plate negatives of the Provincetown Art Colony
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw99f1b2840-8c68-4bed-9a5f-002dcff143f6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-philanth
Online Media:

Blanche Lazzell papers

Creator:
Lazzell, Blanche, 1878-1956  Search this
Names:
Chaffee, Oliver Newberry, 1881-1944  Search this
Dasburg, Andrew, 1887-1979  Search this
Gleizes, Albert, 1881-1953  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
O'Connor, John  Search this
Pearson, Ralph M., 1883-1958  Search this
Extent:
4.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketches
Photographs
Visitors' books
Drawings
Diaries
Date:
1893-1986
bulk 1901-1940
Summary:
The papers of printmaker, etcher, and painter Blanche Lazzell (1878-1956) measure 4.6 linear feet and date from 1893 to 1986, with the bulk of the material dating from 1901 to 1940. Found within the papers are biographical materials; correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues; writings; five diaries; scattered personal business records; printed material; artwork; photographs; and artifacts.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of printmaker, etcher, and painter Blanche Lazzell (1878-1956) measure 4.6 linear feet and date from 1893 to 1986, with the bulk of the material dating from 1901 to 1940. Found within the papers are biographical materials; correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues; writings; five diaries; scattered personal business records; printed material; artwork; photographs; and artifacts.

Biographical material includes school report cards, address books, obituaries, membership certificates, and travel documents from Blanche Lazzell's travels abroad in Europe.

Correspondence is with family, friends, and colleagues. Family correspondence is predominately with Lazzell's sisters, and a lesser amount with her brother Rufus and other relatives. Well over one-half of the correspondence is with friends and colleagues, including Arthur Lee Post and John O' Connor, and one or more letters from Oliver Chaffee, Andrew Dasburg, Robert Henri, and Ralph M. Pearson, among others.

Writings include notebooks, essays, and notes. Notebooks are primarily class notes, including one from Lazzells's studies in France during her second trip to Europe, and another maintained as a record of artwork. Also found are essays,including one about Provincetown; notes; biographical sketches; and lists of exhibitions and artwork. Five diaries document the late 1890s and Lazzell's trips to Europe in 1912-1913 and 1923-1924.

Scattered personal business records consist of 3 expense account ledgers and one sales ledger. Printed Material includes guest books, news clippings, exhibition catalogs, exhibition announcements, magazines, brochures, and newsletters. Artwork includes pencil drawings and sketches, mostly from studies with the artist Albert Gleizes in Paris. Photographic material consists of photographs, slides, and one lantern slide. The photographs are of Blanche Lazzell with artists and friends, her studio and the harbor in Provincetown, artwork, and travels in Italy.

Artifacts include 2 metal signs and 1 paint palette in a metal case.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 9 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1894-1970 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1897-1965 (1.2 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 3: Writings, 1893-1969 (1.2 linear feet; Box 2-3)

Series 4: Diaries, 1896-1924 (0.1 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1894-1916 (0.1 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1899-1986 (1 linear feet; Box 3-4)

Series 7: Artwork, 1924-circa 1940 (0.1 linear feet; Box 4)

Series 8: Photographic Material, 1897-1956 (0.5 linear feet; Box 5-6)

Series 9: Artifacts, circa 1910-1956 (0.1 linear feet; Box 6)
Biographical / Historical:
Blanche Lazzell (1878-1956) was a printmaker, etcher, painter, and rug designer who worked primarily in Provincetown, Massachusetts and Morgantwon, West Virginia.

Nettie Blanche Lazzell was born in Maidsville, West Virginia, in 1878, the daughter of Mary Prudence Pope and Cornelius Carhart Lazzell. At some point during her childhood, Lazzell became partially deaf. When Lazzell was fifteen, she enrolled in the West Virginia Conference Seminary, now West Virginia Wesleyan College and graduated in 1898.

In 1899, Lazzell continued her studies at the South Carolina Co-educational Institute and graduated that same year. She later matriculated into the West Virginia University (1901-1905) where she took drawing and art history classes with William J. Leonard and earned a degree in fine arts. After graduation, Lazzell periodically studied at the university until 1909. Lazzell moved to New York City in 1907 and enrolled in the Art Students League of New York in 1908 where she studied under William Merritt Chase.

Lazzell travelled to Europe during the summer of 1912. After visiting several cities, Lazzell went to Paris and stayed beyond the tour to attend classes at the Académie Julian and the Académie Moderne where she studied with painter Charles Guérin. Lazzell returned to the United States in the fall of 1913 and stayed in West Virginia with her sister Bessie. She held a solo exhibition of her sketches and paintings in 1914. Lazzell moved to the thriving art colony at Provincetown, Massachusetts in 1915. There, she studied with Charles Webster Hawthorne, who founded the Cape Cod School of Art, and Oliver Chaffee, who taught her the technique for white-line woodcuts. Lazzell quickly adopted and excelled at making white-line woodblock prints, joined the Provincetown Printers, an art collective, and regularly exhibited with them.

n 1918, Lazzell converted an "old fish house" overlooking the Provincetown harbor into her studio and summer home. She planted a lush garden that became a tourist attraction where she often hosted teas and taught classes on painting and woodblock printing. The studio became her primary summer residence, though she often returned to Morgantown, West Virginia. Lazzell also visited other artist colonies during this time, including one in Woodstock, New York where she studied with Andrew Dasburg.

In 1919 Lazzell was featured in an exhibition at Touchstone Gallery in New York City. Later that year, the Provincetown Printers were featured at the Detroit Institute of Arts exhibition "Wood Block Prints in Color by American Artists". That show included Lazzell's depiction of the Monongahela River in Morgantown.

From 1923 to 1924, Lazzell travelled again to Europe and studied with Fernand Legér, André Lhote, and Albert Gleizes in Paris. Lazzell studied Cubism and took a class with Gleizes and her work became more abstract. When she returned to Provincetown, she had her studio rebuilt so it was more comfortable during the winter. She continued to teach art at her studio and participate in exhibitions.

In addition to her woodblock prints, Lazzell also worked with batik, rug design, and hand-painted china. She was a member of numerous arts organizations such as the Société Anonyme, New York Society of Women Artists, Provincetown Art Association, the Sail Loft Club (a Provincetown women's art club), and the Society of Independent Artists. In 1934, Lazzell received a Federal Art Project grant through the Works Progress Administration and created a mural titled Justice for the Morgantown courthouse.

Lazzell died in Morgantown, West Virginia in 1956.
Separated Materials:
The papers were originally loaned for microfilming on reels 2988-2991 and most of them, but not all, were included in a later donation. The papers not included in the later donation are only available on microfilm.
Portions of the microfilmed material were retained by the donor.
Provenance:
The Blanche Lazzell papers were anonymously donated to the Archives of American Art in 1987, including most of the materials that had been earlier loaned for microfilming in 1983.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Printmakers -- Massachusetts  Search this
Etchers -- Massachusetts  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts  Search this
Textile designers -- Massachusetts  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Women designers  Search this
Women textile designers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Photographs
Visitors' books
Drawings
Diaries
Citation:
Blanche Lazzell papers, 1893-1986, bulk 1901-1940. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lazzblan
See more items in:
Blanche Lazzell papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9fb2eed0b-d11d-4799-a9f3-e141835ba917
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lazzblan
Online Media:

Nancy Douglas Bowditch and Brush family papers

Creator:
Bowditch, Nancy Douglas  Search this
Names:
Brush, George de Forest, 1855-1941  Search this
Clemens, Jane Lampton, 1880-1909  Search this
Faulkner, Barry, 1881-1966  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Parrish, Stephen, 1846-1938  Search this
Pearmain, William Robert, 1888-1912  Search this
Thayer, Abbott Handerson, 1849-1921  Search this
White, Nelson C.  Search this
Extent:
6.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Biographies
Paintings
Diaries
Sound recordings
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Notes
Photographs
Date:
circa 1860-1985
Summary:
The papers of painter, author, and designer Nancy Douglas Bowditch and the George de Forest Brush family measure 6.2 linear feet and date from circa 1860 to 1985. The majority of the collection consists of Bowditch's correspondence with family and friends and her notes and writings, particularly concerning her biography of her father George de Forest Brush The Joyous Painter, and her unpublished biography of her husband painter William Robert Pearmain. Brush family material includes scattered correspondence of George de Forest Brush and other family members, notes, sketches, clippings, and the family home building files, five scrapbooks, including two on William Robert Pearmain, and numerous photographs of the Brush family, Bowditch, and William Robert Pearmain. There is also correspondence between William Robert Pearmain and his family and artwork by Pearmin.
Scope and Contents note:
The papers of painter, author, and designer Nancy Douglas Bowditch and the George de Forest Brush family measure 6.2 linear feet and date from circa 1860 to 1985. The majority of the collection consists of Bowditch's correspondence with family and friends and her notes and writings, particularly concerning her biography of her father George de Forest Brush The Joyous Painter, and her unpublished biography of her husband painter William Robert Pearmain. Brush family material includes scattered correspondence of George de Forest Brush and other family members, notes, sketches, clippings, and the family home building files, five scrapbooks, including two on William Robert Pearmain, and numerous photographs of the Brush family, Bowditch, and William Robert Pearmain. There is also correspondence between William Robert Pearmain and his family and artwork by Pearmin.

Scattered family biographical materials include invitations, biographical sketches of George de Forest Brush, a ship's register, certificates, an obituary, and a sound recording of Nancy Bowditch.

Scattered personal business records include deeds of gift from various institutions and agreements from the publishing of The Joyous Painter.

One-third of the collection is correspondence with Nancy Douglas Bowditch, William Robert Pearmain, George de Forest Brush, and other members of the Brush, Pearmain, and Bowditch families. The majority of Nancy Douglas Bowditch's correspondence is from family and friends, although professional correspondence is also found. Nancy's notable correspondents include Jane Clemens, Barry Faulkner, Rockwell Kent, members of the Abbot Handerson Thayer family, and Nelson C. White. Also found are Nancy's letters to her first husband, William Robert Pearmain. Pearmain's correspondence includes letters from his parents, siblings, and his father-in-law, and a few letters from Pearmain to his family. George de Forest Brush's correspondence includes letters from friends and a few copies of letters written by Brush.

Writings and notes are primarily by Nancy Douglas Bowditch, the majority of which pertain to her biography of George de Forest Brush, The Joyous Painter, and her unpublished biography of William Robert Pearmain. Other writings are by George de Forest Brush, Tribbie Brush, Barry Faulkner, and William Robert Pearmain.

Artwork consists of approximately 78 drawings and sketches by William Robert Pearmain, 5 drawings and paintings by Nancy Bowditch, and one drawing by George de Forest Brush.

Brush family home and building files contain materials relating to a log cabin in New Hampshire, and the family home Brushwood which was built by William Robert Pearmain in 1911.

Five scrapbooks were compiled by members of the Brush, Pearmain, and Bowditch families. Two are about Pearmain, two are about George de Forest Brush, and one was organized by Harold Bowditch that contains family photographs.

Within printed materials are exhibition announcements and catalogs for George de Forest Brush, Barry Faulkner, Stephen Parrish, and Abbot Handerson Thayer.

Extensive photographs are of members of the Brush family, the Pearmain family, the Bowditch family, friends, and works of art by Bowditch, Brush, Pearmain and Douglas Volk. Included are portraits, snapshots, travel photos, wedding photos, and photos of the Brush family homes.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged as 9 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1909-1965 (Box 1; 7 folders)

Series 2: Personal Business and Financial Records, 1908-1974 (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 3: Correspondence, 1895-1979 (Boxes 1-3; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings and Notes, circa 1900-1975 (Boxes 3-4; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 5: Artwork, 1898-1950 (Boxes 4, 9-10; 4 folders)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1889-1974 (Box 4; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 7: Brush Family Home Building Files, 1910-1971 (Boxes 4, 8, 10; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 8: Scrapbooks, circa 1907-circa 1985 (Boxes 5, 8; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographs, circa 1860-1979 (Boxes 5-7, 11; 1.0 linear feet)
Biographical/Historical note:
Nancy Douglas Bowditch (1890-1979) worked primarily in the New Hampshire area as a painter, author, and costume and set designer. Bowditch's father was painter George de Forest Brush and she was first married to painter William Robert Pearmain, who died at an early age.

Nancy Douglas Bowditch was born to Mary and George de Forest Brush on July 4, 1890 in Paris, France. Along with her siblings Mary, Jane, Thea, Gerome, Tribbie, and Georgia, she often served as a subject of her father's paintings. The family lived in the artist colony of Dublin, New Hampshire where Nancy became close friends with their neighbor Samuel Clemens' (Mark Twain) daughter Jean Clemens.

Nancy met and became close to one of her father's pupils, William Robert Pearmain while traveling through Europe in 1907. Two years later, Nancy married Robert at the Brush family farm in Dublin, New Hampshire. Together, they had one daughter, Mary Alice whom they called Polly. Robert developed a strong political interest in growing anarchist movements, gave up painting and went to Pittsburgh to work in a factory. Shortly after, he became seriously ill and, upon the advice of a doctor, moved back to New Hampshire with Nancy. He soon died from leukemia in September 1912. In 1918, Nancy married her second husband Dr. Harold Bowditch from Boston, Massachusetts. With her second husband, Nancy had three more children, Martha, Henry, and George de Forest Bowditch.

Professionally, Nancy worked as a painter, wrote plays, and designed theatrical sets and costumes. In 1971, Bowditch published a biography of George de Forest Brush entitled The Joyous Painter. Nancy Douglas Bowditch died in 1979.
Related Archival Materials note:
Also among the collections at the Archives of American Art are the William Robert Pearmain and Pearmain family papers, 1888-1955, and an oral history with Nancy Douglas Bowditch conducted on January 30, 1974 by Robert F. Brown.
Provenance:
The Nancy Douglas Bowditch papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in several installments by Nancy Douglas Bowditch between 1968 and 1979. Bowditch's daughter, Mary A. Marlowe donated additional materials in 1982. In 2008, Joan Morgan, biographer of George de Forest Brush, donated additional papers she had acquired during her research.
Restrictions:
Use of originals requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New Hampshire  Search this
Set designers -- New Hampshire  Search this
Costume designers -- New Hampshire  Search this
Authors -- New Hampshire  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women designers  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Biographies
Paintings
Diaries
Sound recordings
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Notes
Photographs
Citation:
Nancy Douglas Bowditch and Brush family papers, circa 1860-1985. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bowdnanc
See more items in:
Nancy Douglas Bowditch and Brush family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a9a08d45-4271-4656-ab7b-5272d47f5465
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bowdnanc
Online Media:

Artists and Writers

Collection Creator:
Blaine, Nell, 1922-1996  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 12
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1980-1982
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Nell Blaine papers, 1942-1985. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Nell Blaine papers
Nell Blaine papers / Series 2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97430796a-c937-414d-b642-ada00db4bc03
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-blainell-ref57
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Douglas Volk and Leonard Wells Volk papers

Creator:
Volk, Leonard Wells, 1828-1895  Search this
Volk, Douglas , 1856-1935  Search this
Names:
Chicago Academy of Design  Search this
Ecole nationale supérieure des beaux-arts (France)  Search this
Sabatos Industries  Search this
Adler, Felix, 1851-1933  Search this
Albert I, King of the Belgians, 1875-1934 -- Photographs  Search this
Benson, Eugene, 1837-1908  Search this
Bridge, Marion Volk  Search this
Brush, George de Forest, 1855-1941  Search this
Chase, William Merritt, 1849-1916 -- Photographs  Search this
Chubb, Percival, 1860-1960  Search this
Daingerfield, Elliott, 1859-1932  Search this
Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861  Search this
Gilbert, Cass, 1859-1934  Search this
Gérôme, Jean Léon, 1824-1904  Search this
Hale, Philip Leslie, 1865-1931 -- Photographs  Search this
Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865  Search this
Lloyd George, David, 1863-1945  Search this
Pershing, John J. (John Joseph), 1860-1948 -- Photographs  Search this
Volk, Gerome  Search this
Volk, Marion Larrabee, 1859-1925  Search this
Volk, Wendell  Search this
Weir, Julian Alden, 1852-1919  Search this
von Rydingsvaard, Karl  Search this
Extent:
12.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Paintings
Photographs
Sketches
Place:
Sculptors -- Maine
Date:
circa 1858-1965
2008
bulk 1870-1935
Summary:
The papers of painter and teacher Douglas Volk (1856-1935) and his father, sculptor Leonard Wells Volk (1828-1895), measure 12.4 linear feet and date from circa 1858-1965, 2008, with the bulk of the material dating from circa 1870-1935. Douglas Volk's papers document his life and career through biographical material, family and professional correspondence, writings and notes, diaries and journals, financial records, printed material, scrapbooks, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographs of the artist, his family, friends, and artwork. The papers also provide documentation of the formation and operations of the Sabatos Handicraft Society established with Marion Volk from the Volk's summer home, Hewnoaks, in Center Lovell, Maine. Scattered documentation of the life and work of Leonard Wells Volk, is found in biographical material, land records, letters, memoirs, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and teacher Douglas Volk (1856-1935) and his father, sculptor Leonard Wells Volk (1828-1895), measure 12.4 linear feet and date from circa 1858-1965, 2008, with the bulk of the material dating from circa 1870-1935. Douglas Volk's papers document his life and career through biographical material, family and professional correspondence, writings and notes, diaries and journals, financial records, printed material, scrapbooks, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographs of the artist, his family, friends, and artwork. The papers also provide documentation of the formation and operations of the Sabatos Handicraft Society established with Marion Volk from the Volk's summer home, Hewnoaks, in Center Lovell, Maine. Scattered documentation of the life and work of Leonard Wells Volk, is found in biographical material, land records, letters, memoirs, and photographs.

Douglas Volk's papers form the bulk of the collection and document all stages of his life from his first visits to Europe during his teenage years, until his death. Biographical material includes address books, biographical notes, genealogical records of Volk's family, and a warranty deed for land purchased by Marion Volk in Center Lovell, Maine, in 1904.

Family correspondence is primarily between Douglas and Marion throughout their courtship and marriage, but also includes letters from other family members including daughter Marion Volk Bridge and sons Wendell and Gerome Volk. General correspondence is with colleagues, art galleries, societies, institutions and museums, schools and colleges, government agencies, and others. Also found are letters from artists including George de Forest Brush, Elliott Daingerfield, Cass Gilbert, Philip Leslie Hale, Swedish woodcarver Karl von Rydingsvard, and J. Alden Weir; and friends Felix Adler and Percival Chubb.

Douglas Volk's writings and notes are on art, art instruction for children, and the significance and influence of his father's work, particularly Leonard Volk's Lincoln life mask, and include drafts of his monograph "Art Instruction in Public Schools."

Diaries and journals record details of Volk's early art education in Europe, including his friendships with Eugene Benson and George de Forest Brush and others, his time spent studying under Jean-Léon Gérôme at the École des Beaux Arts, his appointment by the National Art Committee to paint portraits of World War I era politicians and military figures, and his Lincoln portrait painted just prior to Volk's death.

Financial records document day-to-day routine expense, as well as sales of artwork and other art-related transactions.

Printed material and a scrapbook of clippings and letters include press coverage of Douglas Volk's career from the early 1900s to 1918. An additional scrapbook provides documentation of the Sabatos Handicraft Society, including a copy of one of only three known editions of the society's publication The Fire Fly. Artwork includes sketches, two small oil paintings, and fifteen sketchbooks of Douglas Volk.

Photographs include portraits taken at various stages of Volk's career, family photographs, photographs of the main house at Hewnoaks and additional buildings, photographs of several artists including William Merritt Chase and Karl von Rydinsgsvard, photographs of world leaders including David Lloyd George, King Albert of Belgium, and General John J. Pershing, and photographs of artwork.

The papers of Leonard Wells Volk include seven volumes of his hand-written memoirs which document his relationship with Stephen A. Douglas, his first meeting with Lincoln, and his involvement with the Chicago Academy of Design. Also found are three letters including one written to Douglas Volk in 1887, and a memorandum related to the value of Leonard Wells Volk's Lincoln and Douglas statues at the Illinois State House. Photographs include three of Leonard Wells Volk, photographs of other family members including his wife Emily, photos of houses and woodland scenes, and photos of artwork.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 2 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Douglas Volk Papers, circa 1870-1965, 2008 (11.85 linear feet; Boxes 1-12, 15-16, OVs 13-14)

Series 2: Leonard Wells Volk Papers, circa 1858-circa 1930 (0.45 linear feet; Boxes 11-12)
Biographical / Historical:
Chicago sculptor Leonard Wells Volk (1828-1895) created one of only two life masks of Abraham Lincoln. His son, painter and teacher Douglas Volk (1856-1935), was known for his figure and portrait paintings. Douglas Volk and his wife Marion Larrabee Volk established the Sabatos Handicraft Society, producing homespun woolen rugs and textiles from their summer home in Center Lovell, Maine.

Leonard Wells Volk was raised in New York State and Massachusetts, before moving to St. Louis to learn modeling and drawing. Around 1852 he married Emily Clarissa King Barlow, a cousin of Senator Stephen A. Douglas. Douglas took an interest in Volk's career and helped finance his trip to Rome and Florence between 1855 and 1857, where Volk studied art. On returning from Europe Volk settled in Chicago, opening a studio there and establishing himself as a leader in art circles and a founder of the Chicago Academy of Design. He served as president of the Academy (later the School of the Art Institute of Chicago) for eight years. Volk recorded his first meeting with Lincoln during the 1858 Lincoln-Douglas debates, and the subsequent 1860 sittings with Lincoln for the life mask, hands, and bust, in his memoirs. The mask served as a model for many sculptors who made later portraits of Lincoln. Volk's other important works include the Rock Island County Soldier's Monument in Rochester, New York (1869), statues of Lincoln and Douglas for the Illinois Statehouse (1876), a bust of Douglas, and the Douglas Tomb monument (1881) in Chicago.

Douglas Volk was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts in 1856. His artistic education began in his teens when he traveled to Europe with his family. In the early 1870s he lived in Rome and Venice, spending time with his friends George de Forest Brush and J. Alden Weir. He moved to Paris in 1873 where he studied at the École des Beaux Arts with Jean-Léon Gérôme, and exhibited his first picture, In Brittany, at the 1875 Paris Salon.

In 1879 Volk returned to the United States and accepted a teaching position at Cooper Union. He was elected to the Society of American Artists in 1880 and married Marion Larrabee in 1881. In 1883 Volk became a founder of the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts and was appointed the first president of the subsequent Minneapolis School of Fine Arts in 1886, a position he held until 1893. During his time in Minneapolis, Volk purchased a summer studio and retreat in Osceola, Wisconsin, and he and Marion had four children: Leonard (1882-1891), Wendell (1884-1953), Marion (1888-1973) and Gerome (1890-1959). In 1893 Volk returned to New York and accepted a position at the Art Students League, where he taught from 1893-1898, and also resumed his post at Cooper Union. He became interested in innovative ways to teach art and art history to children, and in 1895 the National Academy of Design printed his essay "A Plea for Art in the Public Schools," in its annual exhibition catalog. He was elected an associate of the Academy in 1898, becoming a full academician in 1899.

In 1898, looking to provide the family with a summer retreat, Marion Volk purchased property with a friend in Center Lovell, Maine, an area already enjoyed by the couple's friends, George de Forest Brush and Percival Chubb. The property was divided in 1901 and Marion added to her half creating a lot of approximately twenty-five acres. The Volks renovated the house, which they named Hewnoaks, and eventually built four more cottages and a studio for Douglas Volk on the property. During this period Marion Volk was working with handwoven wool on traditional area looms using fruit and vegetable hand-dyes and designs based on motifs from Native American art. In 1902 the Volks held the founding meeting of the Sabatos Handicraft Society at Hewnoaks, and the property became the hub of a Center Lovell community effort to produce rugs, textiles, and other handicrafts using traditional methods. Daughter Marion worked with her mother, and son Wendell, a printmaker and woodcaver, operated the Hewn Beam Press, printing pamphlets and a newsletter entitled the Fire Fly: A Periodical of Fearless Endeavour. Swedish-born wood carver Karl von Rydingsvard offered classes on wood carving at Hewnoaks, assisted by Wendell Volk.

Douglas Volk worked to make the Hewnoaks handicraft movement a success, but focused primarily on his own painting. The Maine woods provided endless inspiration and the setting for many of his paintings and murals, which primarily depicted romanticized historical subjects in Colonial America and reflected his traditional academic training. One of his best known works, The Boy with the Arrow (1903), a portrait of his son Leonard "Leo" Volk who died at the age of eight, is now in the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Volk taught at the National Academy of Design from 1910-1917. He served as recording secretary and then on the council for the organization from 1910-1919. His acclaimed intimate portraits of friends and acquaintances, including Felix Adler (1914) and William Macbeth (1917), were painted during this period. In 1919 Volk was one of a group of artists commissioned by the National Art Committee to paint major figures from World War I. He subsequently painted portraits of King Albert of Belgium, British Prime Minister David Lloyd George, and General John J. Pershing, and recorded his meetings and sittings with the three men in his journals.

For the last fifteen years of his life Volk, using his father's life mask, painted a series of portraits of Abraham Lincoln, one of which hangs in the Lincoln Bedroom at The White House.

At least fifteen years prior to her death in 1925, Marion Volk's involvement in handicrafts at Hewnoaks declined, while Douglas Volk continued to focus on his own work. Wendell Volk's career in civil engineering took precedence over his interest in weaving and woodcarving and both he and his brother Gerome moved West in 1909. Following Douglas Volk's death in Fryeburg, Maine in 1935, Wendell Volk and his wife Jessie, also an artist, ultimately took possession of Hewnoaks. Wendell died in 1953, but the property was eventually bequeathed by Jessie Volk to the University of Maine and now operates as an artist colony.
Separated Materials:
Volumes 1, 3, 6-7, 9, and 10 of Leonard Volk's memoirs form part of the Alfred Whital Stern Collection of Lincolniana in the Library of Congress.

The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel 4280) including correspondence of Leonard Volk and photographs of his artwork. Lent materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The George Arents Research Library, Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York first lent material for microfilming in 1989. Most of the material was then donated in 2004–2005 by Jessie J. Volk, the daughter-in-law of Douglas Volk, who also bequeathed the Volk estate including additional Volk papers to the University of Maine. In 2006, University officials arranged for an auction of much of the property of the estate including the remaining family papers. The Volk Family estate auction was conducted by Cyr Auction Co., in Gray, Maine, on July 19, 2006. Several individuals purchased parts of the papers at that auction and subsequently donated them to the Archives. Those donors are: David Wright, who acquired the 1875 journal and Brush letters and donated them to the Archives in 2006; Dr. Christine Isabelle Oaklander, who purchased the account book, 1873–1875, and donated it to the Archives in honor of Judith Ellen Throm in 2007, and also donated additional letters and a photograph in 2008; and Mary K. and John F. McGuigan Jr., who purchased correspondence (1120 letters), speeches, lectures, articles, checks, check stubs and miscellaneous items and donated them to the Archives in 2015. In 2007, the University of Maine Foundation via Amos Orcutt donated the 1934 journal and 60 photographs.

John F. McGuigan Jr. and Mary K. McGuigan have purchased and donated additional archival materials to the Archives, including the Mary K. McGuigan and John F. McGuigan Jr. artists' letters collection, and 69 letters now among the Sylvester Rosa Koehler papers.

In 2007, the University of Maine Foundation via Amos Orcutt donated the 1934 journal and 60 photographs that were part of the Volk Family estate, but not included in the June 19, 2006 auction.

In 2019 Dr. Christine Isabelle Oaklander donated additional material purchased at auction, primarily photographs and some printed material.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Maine  Search this
Art teachers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Paintings
Photographs
Sketches
Citation:
Douglas Volk and Leonard Wells Volk papers, circa 1858-1965, 2008, bulk circa 1870-1935. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.volkleon
See more items in:
Douglas Volk and Leonard Wells Volk papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90e52e701-7c1c-4c0f-9ae4-c5d298350d94
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-volkleon
Online Media:

Ellen Hale and Hale Family papers

Creator:
Hale, Ellen Day, 1855-1940  Search this
Names:
Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909  Search this
Hale, Emily P.  Search this
Hale, Herbert Dudley, 1866-1909  Search this
Hale, Lilian Westcott, 1880-1963  Search this
Hale, Robert Beverly, 1901-1985  Search this
Hale, Susan, 1833-1910  Search this
Extent:
3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Sketches
Date:
circa 1860-1952
Summary:
The Ellen Hale and Hale family papers measure 3 linear feet and date from circa 1860 to 1952. Found within the papers are biographical material for Ellen Day and Edward Everett Hale; personal correspondence from Ellen Day and Lillian Westcott Hale; diaries by Ellen Day and Susan Hale; an appraisal of the Hale estate and personal business records for Ellen Day and Edward Everett Hale; printed material; sketchbooks and sketches by Ellen Day and Herbert Dudley Hale; and travel photographs of the Hale family.
Scope and Contents:
The Ellen Hale and Hale family papers measure 3 linear feet and date from circa 1860 to 1952. Found within the papers are biographical material for Ellen Day and Edward Everett Hale; personal correspondence from Ellen Day and Lillian Westcott Hale; diaries by Ellen Day and Susan Hale; an appraisal of the Hale estate and personal business records for Ellen Day and Edward Everett Hale; printed material; sketchbooks and sketches by Ellen Day and Herbert Dudley Hale; and travel photographs of the Hale family.

Biographical materials consist of publications related to Edward Everett Hale's 80th birthday celebration; Ellen Day Hale's calling cards, calendar, and engagement books; and Robert Beverly Hale's calendar.

Correspondence is primarily Ellen Day Hale's and Lillian Westcott Hale's personal and business correspondence, and a letter from Margaret C. Hale to Arthur Hale.

Writings include 9 diaries by Ellen Day Hale, 1 diary by Emily P. Hale, and 19 diaries by Susan Hale; an essay by Arthur Hale; Herbert Dudley Hale's word game book; Susan Hale's travel instructions to a niece; and a notebook listing the likes and dislikes of various Hale family members.

Personal business records consist of Edward Everett and Emily P. Hale's account and tax records; Ellen Day Hale's art supply receipts, royalty statements, tax records, and a check register; Lillian Westcott Hale's receipts; and Susan Hale's notes on an appraisal of the Hale estate.

Printed material includes various clippings, invitations, and programs kept by the Hale family, and Ellen Day Hale's travel postcards.

Artwork includes 22 sketchbooks by Ellen Day Hale, 5 sketchbooks by Herbert Dudley Hale; and 7 sketchbooks by other artists.

Photographs are travel snapshots taken during travels in Mexico.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical materials, circa 1875-1925 (6 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1861-1951 (4 folders; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, 1878-1933 (0.9 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 4: Personal business records, 1909-1952 (8 folders; Box 2)

Series 5: Printed material, 1862-1933 (5 folders; Box 2)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 1860-1925 (1.5 linear feet; Box 2-3)

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1890-1901 (1 folder; Box 3)
Biographical / Historical:
Writer, publisher, and clergyman Edward Everett Hale (1822-1909) and his wife, Emily Perkins Hale, were well regarded members of Boston society. After graduating from Boston Latin School at age 13, Hale enrolled directly into Harvard University and graduated second in his class in 1839. He became a licensed Unitarian minister in 1842 and was a church pastor from 1846 to 1899. In the 1860s, Hale began publishing short stories in the Atlantic Monthly, Harper's New Monthly Magazine, and other periodicals. In 1869, he co-founded the Christian Examiner, which later merged with Scribner's Magazine in 1875, and founded Lend a Hand in 1886. He and his wife had one daughter and eight sons. Three of those sons died in childhood, and a fourth, Robert Beverly Hale, died as a young adult.

Writer and artist Susan Hale (1833-1910) was schooled at home by tutors before enrolling in George B. Emerson's school. She was a self-taught artist who learned to paint and draw early in life. In 1872, she traveled to Europe to pursue formal art instruction and, upon her return to Boston, began giving lessons in watercolors. From 1873 to 1885, she maintained a studio at the Boston Art Club, wrote articles for Boston papers, edited literary collections for fundraisers, lectured on popular fiction, and eventually became a literary celebrity. Beginning in the mid-1880s, Hale began traveling the country and abroad giving lectures in the winter and visiting Edward Everett's family in Matunuck, Rhode Island in the summer. In between her travels, she continued to publish books, including a traveling series for young readers, and an instruction book on painting techniques.

Artist and teacher Ellen Day Hale (1854-1939) was the eldest of the Hale children. She received her early art training from her aunt, Susan Hale, and received formal art training from Boston artists William Rimmer, William Morris Hunt, and Helen Knowlton. Hale continued her education at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and in 1877, opened a portrait studio where she taught private students. In the early 1880s, Hale traveled through Europe before settling in Paris to study at the Académie Julian for three years. In 1883, she met fellow artist and lifelong companion Gabrielle de Veaux Clements. In 1893, they purchased a home near Gloucester, Massachusetts named "The Thickets," where they opened their studio to women artists and taught various painting, printing, and etching techniques. After the death of her mother, from 1904 to 1909, Hale moved to Washington, D.C. to act as hostess for her father, who had been appointed Chaplain of the U.S. Senate. After her father's death, Hale continued to produce paintings, and together with Clements, summered at the artists' colony at Folly Cove on Cape Ann, Massachusetts, and frequently traveled abroad in the winters.

Arthur Hale (1859-1939) was a general agent for the American Railway Association and an employee of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. In 1899, he married Camilla Conner, with whom he had one daughter.

Architect Herbert Dudley Hale (1866-1908) graduated from Harvard in 1888 and studied architecture abroad at the École des Beaux Art in Paris, where he graduated among the first in his class. After his return to Boston around the turn of the century, Hale married Margaret Marquand, with whom he had five children, and established the architecture firm Hale and Rogers with James Gamble Rogers.

Writer Robert Beverly Hale (1869-1895) graduated from Harvard in 1892 and published numerous stories and articles in the Atlantic Monthly, Harper's Weekly, and Youth's Companion. Elsie and Other Poems was published in 1894, and Six Stories and Some Verses was published posthumously after Hale's death in 1895.

Artist Lillian Westcott Hale (1881-1963) was the wife of fellow artist Philip Leslie Hale, the third eldest of the Hale children. Hale received a scholarship to attend the Boston Museum School of Fine Arts, where she met Philip and married him halfway through her studies. Hale held her first solo show in 1908, the same year her daughter was born, and continued to produce work for exhibitions through the 1920s. She was the recipient of the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition gold medal, the National Academy's Shaw Memorial Prize (1915), and the National Academy of Design's Altman Prize (1927). She continued producing works until her death in 1963.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds two collections related to the Hale family, including the Philip Leslie Hale papers and the Edward Everett Hale letter to an unidentified person. Smith College's Sophia Smith Collection also holds papers of the Hale family, including Nathan, Sr., and Sarah Preston Everett Hale; Edward Everett and Emily Perkins Hale; Ellen Day Hale; and Philip and Lilian Westcott Hale. .
Separated Materials:
Printed books and monographs in the collection were transferred to the National Portrait Gallery Library in 1978.
Provenance:
The Ellen Hale and Hale family papers were donated in 1978 and 1984 by Nancy Hale Bowers, the niece of Ellen Day Hale, and the grand-daughter of Edward Everett and Emily P. Hale.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Artists -- Massachusetts  Search this
Watercolorists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Sketches
Citation:
Ellen Hale and Hale family papers, circa 1860-1952. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.halefami
See more items in:
Ellen Hale and Hale Family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw957bc3fd0-b038-4cbe-96fc-5f9d53af084b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-halefami

Printed Material

Collection Creator:
Clements, Gabrielle de Veaux, 1858-1948  Search this
Extent:
5 Folders (Box 1)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1860-1948
Scope and Contents:
Printed material consists of clippings; exhibition catalogs; a map of the artists' colony at Rockport, Folly Cove in Massachusetts; a copy of the book Suggestions for Illuminating by W. Randle Harrison; and a postcard of St. Philip's Church.
Arrangement:
Materials are arranged by document type.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Gabrielle de Veaux Clements papers, 1860-1948. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.clemgabr, Series 4
See more items in:
Gabrielle de Veaux Clements papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e937ed6d-4c86-453a-8446-fe105e28e58c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-clemgabr-ref15

Map, Rockport, Massachusetts Artist Colony

Collection Creator:
Clements, Gabrielle de Veaux, 1858-1948  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 33
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1930-1940
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Gabrielle de Veaux Clements papers, 1860-1948. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Gabrielle de Veaux Clements papers
Gabrielle de Veaux Clements papers / Series 4: Printed Material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9bc1fe983-c4ed-43c0-9e10-2399604625a3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-clemgabr-ref46

William Morris Hunt and the summer art colony at Magnolia, Massachusetts, 1876-1879 / Frederic A. Sharf and John H. Wright

Author:
Sharf, Frederic A. 1934-  Search this
Wright, John Hardy  Search this
Essex Institute  Search this
Subject:
Hunt, William Morris 1824-1879  Search this
Physical description:
27 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Massachusetts
Magnolia
Date:
1981
Topic:
Artist colonies  Search this
Call number:
N40.1.H935 S7 1981
N40.1.H935S7 1981
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_388462

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