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Oral history interview with Nancy Holt, 1992 July 6

Interviewee:
Holt, Nancy, 1938-2014  Search this
Holt, Nancy, 1938-2014  Search this
Interviewer:
Gutterman, Scott  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Women sculptors -- Interviews  Search this
Filmmakers -- Interviews  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12482
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214837
AAA_collcode_holt92
Theme:
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_214837

Oral history interview with Nancy Holt

Interviewee:
Holt, Nancy, 1938-2014  Search this
Interviewer:
Gutterman, Scott  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound cassette (Sound recording)
25 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1992 July 6
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Nancy Holt conducted 1992 July 6, by Scott Gutterman, for the Archives of American Art. Interview of Nancy Holt conducted by Scott Gutterman for the Archives of American Art, at Nancy Holt's home or studio on July 6, 1992. Holt speaks of growing up and living in Massachusetts and New Jersey; attending school at Tufts and Jackson; spending time in New York; her early artist training and exposure to museums; the New jersey landscape; Dark Star Park; Sky Land; her first trip out West; Robert Smithson; her family life and relationship with her parents; studying biology; lectures at MIT; moving to New York; Richard Serra; perceptual art; becoming friends with Robert Smithson; peyote; quiet inner-transformation; locator pieces; creating artwork; Hampton Air; Rock Rings; focus on place; feminism; land art; Buried Poems; documenting work; working for Harper's Bazaar; Westbeth; living in New York; video art; Points of View; working in a gallery format; writing; Sky Mound; working with landfills and alternate energy; creating public art; working with space; plumbing systems; learning by doing; working with artisans; Sun Tunnels; resonance; catalogs; Holt also talks a bit about Alan Ginsberg, Fred Mcdarrah, Dan Flavin, Mark di Suvero, Joan Joas, Peter Campas, David Hammond, and Rupert Sheldrake.
Biographical / Historical:
Nancy Holt (1938- ) was a sculptor and filmmaker from N.M.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators. Funding for this interview was provided by the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.
Restrictions:
This interview is open for research. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Women sculptors -- Interviews  Search this
Filmmakers -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.holt92
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-holt92
Online Media:

Masters of the Building Arts

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
From the soaring skyscrapers of New York City to the adobe churches of New Mexico, from the sturdy stone walls of New England to the majestic monuments of the nation's capital, master craftworkers in the building arts have brought enduring beauty to our built environment. Working in wood, stone, brick, and metal, in plaster, paint, glass, and clay, they transform designs on paper into three-dimensional works of art. Much depends on their workmanship and skill: on their deep understanding of raw materials, their careful selection and use of tools, their mastery of technique. The final product is the result not only of their knowledge and abilities, but also their creativity and care - their will to excellence.

Artisans in the building trades share a deep appreciation for the aesthetic value and expressive power of technical perfection. They delight in skill and find meaning and pleasure in the poetic qualities of workmanship - in their ability to craft objects of beauty and strength through their special touch. Their great pride and creative spirit, their love for their work, and their commitment to excellence are manifested in a lasting legacy of architectural achievement left behind for generations to come.

The 2000 Festival program celebrated the extraordinary artistry of craftspeople in the building arts and explored the many challenges they face today as they work to preserve our nation's past and build for the future. The Festival brought together a selection of master artisans - stone carvers, masons, carpenters, terra cotta artisans, plasterers, blacksmiths, stained glass artisans, and adobe builders - who have enriched our world with the work of their hands, and who educated and informed Festival visitors not only with their skills but also with their knowledge and lore.

Marjorie Hunt was Curator and James Deutsch was Program Coordinator; Betty Belanus was Education Specialist and Family Activity Guide Coordinator. An Advisory Committee included: J. Bryan Blundell, Kurt Dewhurst, William Dupont, Cynthia Field, Henry Glassie, Norman Koonce, Betty Monkman, Peter Nabokov, Joanna Reagan, Rex Scouten, William Seale, Chris Sturbaum, John Michael Vlach, and Ed Worthy.

The program was produced in collaboration with the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers and the International Masonry Institute, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the National Building Museum, the American Institute of Architects, and the Preservation Trades Network. Major funding was provided by Homestore.com, the Marble Institute of America, Allied Stone Industries, the Building Stone Institute, the Indiana Limestone Institute, and the National Building Granite Quarries Association. Major contributors included Target Stores, the Associated General Contractors of America, the National Association of Realtors, and the Smithsonian Women's Committee. Additional donors included the School of the Building Arts, Duron, Inc., the Brick Industry Association, the Laborers' International Union of North America, the Smithsonian Educational Outreach Fund, and the Copper Development Association, Inc.
Researchers:
Jane Beck, Betty Belanus, Ray Brassieur, Amanda Dargan, James Deutsch, Kurt Dewhurst, Karen Duffy, Lynn Martin Graton, Dwight Pauahi Kauahikaua, Winnie Lambrecht, Tim Lloyd, Gregory Sharrow, Gary Stanton, David Taylor, Elaine Thatcher, John Michael Vlach
Presenters:
Betty Belanus, Barry Bergey, Ray Brassieur, Olivia Cadaval, Amanda Dargan, William Dupont, Brian Finnegan, Lynn Martin Graton, Tim Lloyd, Philip "Pete" Pederson, Clift Seferlis, Peter Seitel, Gregory Sharrow, Angelo Simone, Nick Spitzer, Gary Stanton, David Taylor, Elaine Thatcher, Cynthia Vidaurri, John Michael Vlach
Participants:
David Adams, historic preservation specialist, Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Robert Alger, stone carver, sculptor, Spencerville, Maryland

Joseph Alonso, stone mason, Vienna, Virginia

Onofre Anguiano, terra cotta hand presser, mold maker, Lincoln, Calif.

Walter S. Arnold, stone carver, Skokie, Illinois

Sam Baca, program director, Cornerstones Community Partnerships, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Earl A. Barthe, 1932-2010, plasterer, historian and consultant, New Orleans, Louisiana

Hurchail Barthe, plasterer, New Orleans, Louisiana

Terry Barthe, plasterer, historic housing specialist, New Orleans, Louisiana

Nick Benson, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Johan Bjurman, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Anna Bowen, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Dan Boyle, timber framer, Dover, New Hampshire

Rory Brennan, historic plaster specialist, Putney, Vermont

Ron Brooks, decorative painter, Rockville, Maryland

John Canning, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Jacqueline Canning-Riccio, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Jesus Cardenas, terra cotta modeler, mold maker, Lincoln, California

Charles Cardine, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Patrick Cardine, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Carson Christian, timber framer, Wooster, Ohio

Rudy Christian, timber framer, Burbank, Ohio

Peter "Billy" Cleland, 1921-2010, stone mason, Clinton, Maryland

William R. Cleland, Jr., stone mason, Dunkirk, Maryland

Rose Concha, -- enjarrodoro -- (adobe plasterer), Taos, New Mexico

Brian Cox, carpenter, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

John Drew, carpenter, St. Leonard, Maryland

William Dupont, Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D.C.

Cane Fields, Hawaiian dry stack mason, Kailua-Kana, Hawaii

Billy Fields, Hawaiian dry stack mason, Kailua-Kana, Hawaii

David Flaharty, ornamental plasterer, sculptor, Green Lane, Pennsylvania

lsidoro Flaim, stone mason, Camp Springs, Maryland

Tom Glynn, timber framer, South Berwick, Maine

Dieter Goldkuhle, 1938-2011, stained glass artisan, Reston, Virginia

Giles Harper, preservation carpenter, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

Adam Heller, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Randy Herald, sheet metal craftsperson, Bethesda, Maryland

Randy Herald, Jr., sheet metal craftsperson, Bethesda, Maryland

Hans Herr, coppersmith, Holtwood, Pennsylvania

John Paul Huguley, president, School of the Building Arts, Charleston, South Carolina

Judy Jacob, architectural conservator, National Park Service, New York, New York

Raymond Johnson, terra cotta modeler, draftsman, Lincoln, California

Dean Kalomas, decorative painter, Washington, D.C.

Vikki Keys, deputy superintendent, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.

Rick King, dry stone wall mason, Holderness, New Hampshire

Scott King, dry stone wall mason, Holderness, New Hampshire

Naomi Kroll, architectural conservator, National Park Service, New York, New York

Wade Lawrence, assistant director, Drayton Hall, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Charleston, South Carolina

Elmo Leonardelli, scaffold erector, Baltimore, Maryland

Stephen Lorenzetti, chief of resource management, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.

Amber Lucero, -- enjarrodoro -- (adobe plasterer), Taos, New Mexico

Rick Lykins, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

George McDaniel, director, Drayton Hall, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Charleston, South Carolina

Richard Marks, architectural conservator, Charleston, South Carolina

Antonio Martinez, community leader, Upper Rociada, New Mexico

David Martinez, terra cotta draftsman, Roseville, California

David Mason, dry stone wall mason, Starksboro, Vermont

Rick Mason, dry stone wall mason, Hinesburg, Vermont

John O'Connor, engineer, Universal Builders Supply, Cheverly, Maryland

David Overholt, restoration project manager, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

Albert D. Parra, adobe builder, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Theodore Pierre, Jr., brick mason, New Orleans, Louisiana

Konstantinos Pilarinos, Byzantine-style woodcarver, Astoria, New York

Panagiota Pylarinos, architect, Astoria, New York

Dennis Playdon, program manager, Cornerstones Community Partnerships, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Patrick Plunkett, stone carver, Takoma Park, Maryland

Joseph Pringle, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Nol Putnam, artist blacksmith, The Plains, Virginia

Clay Raley, restoration carpenter, Norman, Indiana

Brad Robinson, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Steve Roy, historic preservation specialist, Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Brett Rugo, president, Rugo & Carosi, Woodbridge, Virginia

Laura Saeger, timber framer, Burbank, Ohio

George Salvador, restoration crew leader, Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico

Eduardo Seara, vice-president, Lorton Contracting Company, Lorton, Virginia

Manuel Seara, president, Lorton Contracting Company, Lorton, Virginia

Tony Segreti, architect, Bethesda, Maryland

Carlton Simmons, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Philip Simmons, 1912-2009, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Louis Soublet, plasterer, New Orleans, Louisiana

Larry E. Stearns, coppersmith, Westford, Vermont

Ben Sturbaum, restoration carpenter, Owensburg, Indiana

Chris Sturbaum, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

Arran Sturgis, timber framer, Eliot, Maine

Daniel Szwed, construction manager, Waldorf, Maryland

Mark Tamara, structural engineer, James Madison Cutts, Washington, D.C.

Lonn Taylor, historian, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Lloyd Tortalita, Adult, Higher Education director, former governor, Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico

Roman Troyer, timber framer, Wooster, Ohio

Dexter Trujillo, adobe builder, mud preserver, Abiquiu, New Mexico

Mark Tsirigos, president, Universal Builders Supply, Cheverly, Maryland

George Void, masonry crew, Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.

Chuck Wagner, owner, Wagner Roofing Company, Hyattsville, Maryland

Sheila Wagner, owner, Wagner Roofing Company, Hyattsville, Maryland

Tom Weddle, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

Bob Wooldridge, slater, Mercersburg, Pennsylvania

Jeff Wooldridge, slater, project manager, Bethesda, Maryland

Bill Yeingst, curator, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Pauli Zmolek, decorative painter, Takoma Park, Maryland

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF BRICKLAYERS AND ALLIED CRAFTWORKERS (BAC), INTERNATIONAL MASONRY INSTITUTE (IMI)

Frank Baiocchi, marble mason, Mt. Airy, Maryland

Ed Bellucci, IMI deputy director of Apprenticeship and Training, Jefferson, Maryland

Robert Bernardon, marble mason, Suitland, Maryland

Lewis Carrara, mosaic worker, Fortville, Indiana

Raoul Cervantes, bricklayer, Claremont, California

Kurt Colo, bricklayer, New Baltimore, Michigan

Laird Donaldson, IMI regional director, Auburn, Washington

James Farris, stone mason, Stafford, Virginia

Richard Francescon, marble mason, South Easton, Massachusetts

Greg Hartseil, IMI Job Corps regional director, Lorida, Florida

Dennis Holloway, IMI Scola Training Center director, West Babylon, New York

Mike Kassman, IMI pointing, cleaning, and caulking instructor, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania

Tony Kassman, IMI National Safety, pointing, cleaning, and caulking coordinator, Tonawanda, New York

John Kitchen, bricklayer apprentice, Dryden, New York

Frank Koletar, refractory bricklayer, Orchard Park, New York

Annette Ludwig, tile layer, Bellevue, Washington

Nelson McMath, BAC Local 9 Michigan field representative, Saline, Michigan

Tom McQuaid, BAC Local 1 DC, MONA secretary, treasurer, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Steve Martini, IMI Strategic Programs director, Cascade, Maryland

Steve Mason, terrazzo apprentice, Washington, D.C.

Antoine Matthews, bricklayer, Baltimore, Maryland

Michael Menegazzi, IMI terrazzo instructor, South Gate, California

Bob Mion, IMI tile, marble, and terrazzo instructor, Binghamton, New York

Guillermo Moreno, stone mason, Hyattsville, Maryland

Colleen Muldoon, coordinator of Education Programs, bricklayer, Baltimore, Maryland

Clarence Nichols, IMI deputy director of Apprenticeship and Training, Cumberland, Maryland

Angela Olszewski, tile layer, Jersey City, New Jersey

Lester Parnell, bricklayer, Detroit, Michigan

Bob Perry, IMI regional director, Culver City, California

Darren Raines, tile layer, Chicago, Illinois

Matthew Redabaugh, IMI coordinator of Special Projects, Cascade, Maryland

Butch Rovder, BAC stone craft director, South Riding, Virginia

Joe Stewart, BAC pointing, cleaning, and caulking craft director, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Gene Stinner, IMI director of Apprenticeship and Training, Cascade, Maryland

Dennis Studley, IMI Job Corps regional director, Yucaipa, California

Harold Sugg, refractory bricklayer, West Seneca, New York

Jimmy Ternent, marble mason, Westminster, Maryland

John Totten, IMI plaster instructor, Clintondale, New York

Drew Vecchione, IMI stone instructor, Flourtown, Pennsylvania

Battista Yon, bricklayer, Hyattsville, Maryland
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref26

Oral history interview with Michael Bernard

Interviewee:
Bernard, Michael (1926-)  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Extent:
2 Items (sound file, digital, wav file)
23 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1976 December 20
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Michael Bernard conducted 1976 December 20, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Biographical / Historical:
Michael Bernard (1926-) is a city planner and craftsman from Newton, Massachusetts.
General:
Originally recorded 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 43 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Artisans -- Massachusetts -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.bernar76
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bernar76
Online Media:

American Folklore Society Centennial

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
It seemed especially appropriate to the Smithsonian Institution's Office of Folklife Programs to help celebrate the American Folklore Society's Centennial. For twenty years the Smithsonian's Festival of American Folklife had embodied many of the perspectives of the Society's founders: to observe and collect traditional performances and practices of the American peoples; to study this expressive life scientifically; to celebrate the diversity of American culture through presenting publicly the accomplishments of master performers and artisans. Both the Smithsonian and the Society had worked for a century with this common approach.

In celebrating the folklore collector as a cultural mediator, bringing together traditional performers and craftspeople with the public, the Smithsonian dramatized what folklorists actually do in their chosen tasks. Folklorists observe the life of groups at human scale; they interact with those working and playing in their everyday environments, places in which traditions live; they seek out new ways of informing and delighting each other. In short, folklorists face traditions newly invented and quickly traditionalized. Guardians of "authentic" traditions, folklorists today also pursue fresh, emergent ones. During the Festival, visitors could see and sense, in a tent on the National Mall, the living traditions of folklorists themselves - values and practices forged a century ago by pioneers, and now conserved, traditionalized, and elaborated by a new generation of their cultural descendants.

Rayna Green, Diana Parker, Nicholas R. Spitzer, and John Michael Vlach served as Curators, and Ronna Lee Widner as Program Coordinator.

The American Folklore Society Centennial Program was made possible in part by the L.J. Skaggs and Mary C. Skaggs Foundation through the American Folklore Society.
Research assistance:
Barry Jean Ancelet, Erika Brady, Andrew Connors, Frank Proschan, Olga Najera Ramirez, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Patricia Turner, John Michael Vlach, D.K. Wilgus
Presenters:
Charles Camp, Timothy Lloyd
Participants:
Roger D. Abrahams, folklorist, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Barry Jean Ancelet, folklorist, Lafayette, Louisiana

Dewey Balfa, Cajun fiddle player, Basile, Louisiana

Louis Bashell, Slovenian accordion player, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Barry Bergey, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Horace Boyer, 1935-, ethnomusicologist, Amherst, Massachusetts

C. Ray Brassieur, folklorist, St. Martinville, Louisiana

Olivia Cadaval, 1943-, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Norma Elia Cantú, 1947-, folklorist, Laredo, Texas

Nora Dauenhauer, Tlingit narrative specialist, Juneau, Alaska

Richard Dauenhauer, anthropologist, Juneau, Alaska

Carl Fleischhauer, media folklife specialist, Washington, D.C.

Gladys-Marie Fry, 1931-, folklorist, College Park, Maryland

Henry Glassie, folklorist, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Kenny Goldstein, folklorist, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Teresa Maria Gonzalez, Matachines dancer, Laredo, Texas

Rayna Green, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Clifford Hardesty, 1921-, Anglo fiddle player and maker, West Lafayette, Ohio

Bess Lomax Hawes, 1921-, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Joseph C. Hickerson, 1935-, archivist, Washington, D.C.

Marjorie Hunt, 1954-, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Alan Jabbour, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Mary Jackson, 1945-, Afro-American basket maker, Charleston, South Carolina

Geraldine Johnson, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Suzi Jones, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Susan Kalcik, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Richard Kurin, 1950-, anthropologist, Washington, D.C.

Michael S. Licht, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Alan Lomax, 1915-2002, folklorist, New York, New York

Worth Long, folklorist, Atlanta, Georgia

Richard March, 1946-, folklorist, Madison, Wisconsin

Lynn Martin, folklorist, Honolulu, Hawaii

Margarita Mazo, ethnomusicologist, Washington, D. C.

Robert McCarl, folklorist, Boise, Idaho

Clydia Nahwooksy, Native American cultural specialist, Rochester, New York

Barry Lee Pearson, folklorist, College Park, Maryland

Lonnie Pitchford, blues guitar player, Lexington, Mississippi

Frank Proschan, 1953-, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Bernice Johnson Reagon, 1942-, cultural historian, Washington, D.C.

Ralph Rinzler, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Howard Sacks, sociologist, Gambier, Ohio

Raymond Sedotal, 1924-2006, Cajun boat builder, Pierre Part, Louisiana

Anthony Seeger, ethnomusicologist, Washington, D.C.

Daniel Sheehy, ethnomusicologist, Washington, D.C.

Nicholas R. Spitzer, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Richard K Spottswood, discographer, Washington, D.C.

William C. Sturtevant, anthropologist, Washington, D.C.

Thomas Vennum, Jr., ethnomusicologist, Washington, D.C.

John Michael Vlach, 1948-, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Stephen Wade, musician, Washington, D.C.

Joseph T. Wilson, 1938-2015, folklorist, Washington, D.C.

Margaret R. Yocom, folklorist, Fairfax, Virginia
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1988, Series 2
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1988 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1988-ref18

Olin Levi Warner papers

Creator:
Warner, Olin Levi, 1844-1896  Search this
Names:
Fine Arts Federation of New York  Search this
France. Armée. Légion étrangère  Search this
Jno. Williams, Inc.  Search this
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
World's Columbian Exposition (1893 : Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
Cook, Clarence, 1828-1900  Search this
Devens, Charles, 1820-1891  Search this
Eaton, Wyatt, 1849-1896  Search this
Ryder, Albert Pinkham, 1847-1917  Search this
Warner, Sylvia Martinache  Search this
Weir, Julian Alden, 1852-1919  Search this
Extent:
1.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Paris (France) -- History -- Commune, 1871
Date:
1857-1962
bulk 1857-1899
Summary:
The papers of sculptor Olin Levi Warner measure 1.9 linear feet and date from 1857 to 1962 with the bulk of the materials dating from 1857 to 1899. The collection documents Warner's art student days in Paris and his career as a sculptor, primarily in New York City. Found are scattered biographical materials and writings, including a speech by Warner about the Paris Commune of 1871; personal and professional correspondence; clippings, catalogs, and other printed material; sculpture project files; and photographs of Warner, his studio, his family, and notable figures who sat for him, including artist J. Alden Weir, and his artwork.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of sculptor Olin Levi Warner measure 1.9 linear feet and date from 1857 to 1962 with the bulk of the materials dating from 1857 to 1899. The collection documents Warner's art student days in Paris and his career as a sculptor, primarily in New York City. Found are scattered biographical materials and writings, including a speech by Warner about the Paris Commune of 1871; personal and professional correspondence; clippings, catalogs, and other printed material; sculpture project files; and photographs of Warner, his studio, his family, and notable figures who sat for him, including artist J. Alden Weir, and his artwork.

Found are biographical materials, including a speech written by Warner about the Paris Commune of 1871, awards, and membership records for several art organizations, including the Fine Arts Federation of New York.

Personal and business correspondence written by Warner, his wife, and his daughter is with family and friends. Warner's correspondents include artists Albert Pinkham Ryder, Clarence Cook, and Wyatt Eaton, among others. Of note are letters written from Warner to his family during the time he spent in Paris from 1869 to 1872 studying art and serving in the Foreign Legion.

Also found are scattered project files for a few of his notable sculptural projects, including his statue of Massachusetts governor Charles Devens, the Hodgkins Medal designed as the Smithsonian Institution's seal, work for the Chicago World's Fair, and bronze work produced by the Jno. Williams Foundry.

Printed materials include clippings and exhibition catalogs for the Society of American Artists, the National Sculpture Society, and the World's Columbian Exposition.

Photographs in the papers are of Warner, his family, home, and studio, works of art, and a few notable sitters, including the artist J. Alden Weir.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into five series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1863-1896 (Box 1, OV 4; 5 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1857-1962 (Box 1; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Project Files, 1871-1936 (Box 1, OV 4; 6 folders)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1862-1950 (Boxes 1-2, OV 4; 6 folders)

Series 5: Photographs, 1870s-1890s (Box 2-3, OV 4; 0.7 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Olin Levi Warner was born in 1844 in Suffield, Connecticut and worked as an artisan and a telegraph operator before pursuing his art education and career. In 1869, Warner traveled to Paris to study under Francois Jouffroy at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. He was in Paris when the Republic was declared and served in the French Foreign Legion for a short while before resuming his studies. In 1872 he returned to the United States and set up a studio in New York.

An early proponent of the French Beaux-Arts style, Warner was a founding member of the Society of American Artists in 1877 and joined the National Academy of Design in 1888. By the end of Warner's lifetime, he had become a well-known sculptor, helping to popularize bas-relief in the United States. A few of Warner's notable works include a series of medallions depicting Native American Indian Chiefs, an 1876 bust of President Rutherford B. Hayes, the 1883 nude Diana, a statue of judge and former U.S. Attorney General Charles Devens in Boston, and the design of the bronze doors of the Library of Congress. This last project was uncompleted at the time of Warner's death on August 14, 1896, as the result of a bicycle injury in Central Park.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming on reel 270. All of the material was later donated, except for one sketchbook which was returned to the lender, and is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
A portion of the Olin Levi Warner papers were originally loaned to the Archives of American Art for microfilming in 1972 by Rosalie Warner Jones, Warner's daughter. Rosalie Warner Jones and her sister, Frances O. Warner, and Rosalie's daughter Frances Follin Jones, donated the collection in several accretions between 1972 and 1977. This gift included the majority of the loaned materials, excluding one sketchbook. Additional materials were transferred to the Archives in 2005 from the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- France -- Paris  Search this
Sculpture, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Olin Levi Warner papers, 1857-1962 (bulk 1857-1899). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.warnolin
See more items in:
Olin Levi Warner papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-warnolin
Online Media:

Fritz Bultman papers

Creator:
Bultman, Fritz, 1919-1985  Search this
Names:
Boghosian, Varujan  Search this
Bultman, Jeanne  Search this
Cicero, Carmen, 1926-  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Drexler, Sherman  Search this
Fromboluti, Sideo, 1921-  Search this
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Hofmann, Maria, 1885-1963  Search this
Kees, Weldon, 1914-1955  Search this
Krasner, Lee, 1908-1984  Search this
Manso, Leo  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Newman, Annette  Search this
Newman, Barnett, 1905-1970  Search this
Ossorio, Alfonso, 1916-1990  Search this
Ponsold, Renate  Search this
Reynal, Jeanne, 1903-  Search this
Rothschild, Judith  Search this
Sills, Thomas, 1914-  Search this
Simon, Sidney, 1917-1997  Search this
Smith, Tony, 1912-1980  Search this
Speyer, Nora  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Vevers, Tony  Search this
Windham, Donald  Search this
Extent:
11.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Interviews
Paintings
Drawings
Sketches
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Date:
1928-2010, bulk 1940s-1990s
Summary:
The papers of New York School painter and sculptor Fritz Bultman, 1928-2010, bulk 1940s-1990s, measure 11.9 linear feet. They document Bultman's professional activities, ties to the Abstract Expressionist movement, and his personal life. Letters from friends and family include many from Hans and Maria Hofmann. Letters by Bultman are mostly to family; also found are a few drafts and copies of business and personal letters. Writings and notes are by and about Bultman. Notebooks/sketchbooks (39 volumes) include autobiographical writings, notes on dreams and thoughts while in psychoanalysis, many sketches and some completed drawings. Subject files reflect Bultman's professional activities, interests, and relationships; Hans Hofmann is the most thoroughly documented subject. Extensive printed material concerns Bultman's activities and exhibitions; also included are his published writings. Most photographs are of artwork, Bultman, his family and friends. Also found are biographical materials, 4 diaries, 6 interviews with Fritz Bultman and Jeanne Bultman, and a small amount of artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York School painter and sculptor Fritz Bultlman, 1928-2010, bulk 1940s-1990s, measure 11.9 linear feet. They document Bultman's professional activities, ties to the Abstract Expressionist movement, and his personal life. Letters from friends and family include many from Hans and Maria Hofmann. Letters by Bultman are mostly to family; also found are a few drafts and copies of business and personal letters. Writings and notes are by and about Bultman. Notebooks/sketchbooks (39 volumes) include autobiographical writings, notes on dreams and thoughts while in psychoanalysis, many sketches and some completed drawings. Subject files reflect Bultman's professional activities, interests, and relationships. Extensive printed material concerns Bultman's activities and exhibitions; also included are his published writings. Most photographs are of artwork, Bultman, his family and friends. Also found are biographical materials, 4 diaries, 6 interviews with Fritz Bultman and Jeanne Bultman, and a small amount of artwork.

Biographical materials include school records and notice of Bultman's army classification.

Most letters are addressed to Fritz Bultman and his parents. Fritz's education in Munich and studying with Hans Hofmann is well-documented. Many letters are from Miz Hofmann and Hans Hofmann. Also found are a smaller number of letters from museums, galleries, universities, and arts organizations. The surviving letters by Bultman are mainly to his family. Most were written when he was a student in Munich or traveling in Europe. There are some drafts and copies of letters concerning professional activities, arrangements for lectures, exhibitions, and Cynthia Goodman's editing "Form and Color in the Creative Process: The Painter's Primer" by Hans Hofmann.

Most interviews focus on Bultman's career. An interview with Jeanne and Fritz Bultman is about John Graham, and one of the interviews with Jeanne Bultman concerns Hans Hofmann.

Bultman's writings and notes include articles, lectures and talks about Hans Hofman, lectures about his own work, and a book review. Among the writings about Bultman are articles, a catalog essay and exhibition review.

Notebooks/sketchbooks (39 volumes) contain a variety of writings and notes, including some that are autobiographical, along with sketches and several finished drawings. Some volumes consist of writings and notes with a few sketches and doodles while others are mainly sketchbooks containing a few stray notes and brief writings; many contain approximately the same amount of text and drawings.

Diaries (4 volumes) contain entries about his work, professional and personal activities. One volume is a record of his October 1978 trip to Istanbul.

Subject files contain varying combinations of correspondence, photographs, printed material, and manuscripts. The most extensive file relates to Hans Hofmann and includes copies of writings by him. Other files of note concern Joseph Cornell, the exhibitions "Forum '49" and "Forum '49 Revisited," Weldon Kees, Tony Smith, and Donald Windham.

The largest series, printed material, consists of exhibition catalogs, announcements, reviews, articles and clippings about or mentioning Bultman.

Noteworthy among the small amount of artwork by Bultman is an early print; also found are loose drawings and paintings on paper.

Photographs of artwork document the full range of Bultman's production --paintings, sculpture, drawings, collage, stained glass, interior design and decoration. Also found are a few photographs of works by other artists. Photographs of Fritz Bultman include many by Renate Ponsold. Other indentified individuals include parents Fred and Pauline Bultman, sister Muriel Bultman, childhood nurse Katie Belle, son Johann Bultman, Sherman Drexler, Hans Hofmann, Miz Hofmann, Miss Katsura, Lee Krasner, Annalee Newman, Barnett Newman, Alfonso Ossorio, Jeanne Reynal, Thomas Sills, Jack Tworkov, and Wally Tworkov. A group portrait of the artists of Long Point Gallery includes: Varujan Boghosian, Fritz Bultman, Carmen Cicero, Sideo Fromboluti, Budd Hopkins, Rick Klauber, Lee Manso, Sidney Simon, Robert Motherwell, Judith Rothschild, Nora Speyer, and Tony Vevers. Also found in this series are photographs of Bultman exhibition installations and views of miscellaneous places.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 10 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials,1928-2003 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 2: Letters, 1930-1995 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 3: Interviews, 1968-1998 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings and Notes, 1935-circa 1980s (Boxes 1-2; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 5: Notebooks/Sketchbooks, 1937-circa 1979 (Boxes 2-3, 11; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 6: Diaries, 1977-1979 (Box 3; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Subject Files, 1942-2010 (Boxes 3-5, 11; 2.3 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1941-2006 (Boxes 5-9, OV 12; 3.5 linear feet)

Series 9: Artwork, circa 1930s-1956 (Boxes 9, 11; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographs, 1935-1997 (Boxes 9-10; 0.6 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Fritz Bultman (1919-1985), a New York School painter and sculptor who lived and worked in Provincetown, Massachusetts and New York City, was also a collagist, stained glass artist, and educator.

Anthony Fred Bultman, III --always known as Fritz --was from a prominent and cultured New Orleans family. He began studying art as a boy and one of his teachers was Morris Graves, a family friend. His last 2 years of high school were spent at the Munich Preparatory School, boarding with Mrs. Hans Hofmann whose husband was working in New York for an extended period. Bultman attended the New Bauhaus in Chicago before studying for three years with Hans Hofmann in New York City and Provincetown, Massachusetts. As well as being a major influence on Bultman's development as a painter, Hofmann became a life-long friend.

Fritz Bultman met dancer and model Jeanne Lawson (1918-2008), when she was posing in Hofmann's studio during the summer of 1941. They married in 1943 and the following year bought a house in Provincetown. In 1945, Bultman built a studio designed by a friend from the New Bauhaus, sculptor and architectural designer Tony Smith, who also helped with its construction.

His first solo exhibition was held in 1947 at the Hugo Gallery, New York; others followed in 1950, again at Hugo Gallery and at Kootz Gallery, New York. After receiving an Italian Government Grant for Exchange Fellowship, Bultman spent 1950-1951 in Florence, Italy, where he learned the process of casting and began making metal sculpture. In 1952 the Bultmans moved to New York City. Depressed and beset by anxiety, Bultman began Freudian psychoanalysis, and between 1952 and 1956 produced very little artwork.

In 1958 Bultman resumed exhibiting and continued to show regularly for the remainder of his life. He enjoyed solo exhibitions in New York City, Paris, New Orleans, North Carolina, Provincetown, and other venues. Between 1958 and 1963 Bultman taught painting at Hunter College and was an instructor in design and painting at Pratt Institute. Bultman spent 1964-1965 in Paris on a Fulbright Grant painting and sculpting, studying European methods of bronze casting, and meeting French artists. Bultman maintained his reputation as a highly regarded art instructor and in later years was a sought after guest lecturer at a various colleges. While artist-in-residence at Kalamazoo College, Michigan in 1981, he designed and produced a stained glass mural with technical assistance from his wife, Jeanne Bultman, a skilled artisan.

Fritz Bultman died of cancer in Provincetown, Massachusetts, in 1985.
Related Materials:
An oral history interview with Fritz Bultman, 1986 January 6, was conducted by Irving Sandler for the Archives of American Art (available on microfilm reel 3196).
Provenance:
Gift of Fritz Bultman in 1984, which included material lent for microfilming in 1970 and 1971. Additions donated by Jeanne Bultman, his widow, in 1988 and 2000, and by his sons, Anthony F. Bultman, IV and Ellis Johann Bultman, in 2013.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
New York school of art  Search this
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Interviews
Paintings
Drawings
Sketches
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Citation:
Fritz Bultman papers, 1928-2010, bulk 1940s-1990s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bultfrit
See more items in:
Fritz Bultman papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bultfrit

Korea

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
This program celebrated the centenary of diplomatic relations between the United States and Korea, and the equally-long relations between the Smithsonian and Korean scholars. Many of the kinds of traditions the first Smithsonian researchers encountered a century earlier were represented at the 1982 Festival, including musical instrument making, musical performance, pottery making and rituals from the indigenous shamanic religion of Korea. Visitors could also enjoy other venerable traditions including masked dance drama, hemp-cloth and hat making, and the occupational songs of farmers and women divers. Korean Americans presented traditions brought from Korea that have taken root in the American land.

The crafts represented at the Festival were typical of those produced during Korea's late feudal period, which ended with the termination of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). Before the eighteenth century, most of the handcraft industries, such as pottery-making, metal smithing, and stone-working, were strictly regulated by the royal court, which controlled much of the country's commerce. During the declining years of the dynasty, however, small cottage industries thrived, as court artisans entered private life and peasant farmers sought to improve their precarious economic situation by producing textiles, baskets, and other crafts for market. On appointed market days in the villages, peddlers, local vendors, and farmers would spread their wares on the ground or in booths, where they could be viewed by passersby. This traditional open-air market remains a feature of modern Korean life, even though many of the older handcrafts were supplanted over the last few decades with machine-manufactured goods.

The great influx of technology to the Republic of Korea in the 1960s and 1970s tended to leave all traditional arts in its wake - both elite and folk traditions. As a result, folk survivals in the 1980s tended to be grouped together with the high arts because they were considered to be old, traditional, venerable. Together with the tendency towards professionalization, this led to the current state of such folk traditions as the Farmer's Dance (nongak), taught by professional musicians in conservatories. Farmers may still know how to do it, but most people would say that one has to go to the cities to hear it done well, done precisely. If someone in a village turns out to have performing talent, he or she studies with the best masters; then, if really good, it is on to the big city to try to make a career in the performance and recording-studio world.

In choosing and presenting Korean and Korean American participants at the 1982 Festival, Smithsonian organizers sought to explore the range of vernacular styles in music, dance, crafts, foodways, games, and so forth, as expressed through the skills of the best available practitioners. The intention was to provide a glimpse of the country, its cultures, and its peoples.
Participants:
Note: In Korea, it is customary to list the family name followed by the first names. We have listed our Korean National participants in that manner while Korean-Americans are listed according to their preference.

Korean

Yangju Pyol Sandae Mask Dance Drama -- Yangju Pyol Sandae Mask Dance DramaHwang Kyung-hee, Kyonggi Province, KoreaKim Chung-sun, Kyonggi Province, KoreaKim Soon-hong, Kyonggi Province, KoreaKo Myung-dal, Kyonggi Province, KoreaSuk Chong-kwan, Kyonggi Province, KoreaYoo Kyung-sung, Kyonggi Province, Korea

Shinawi-Folk Instrumental Ensemble -- Shinawi-Folk Instrumental EnsembleKim Chung-mahn, Seoul, KoreaKim Moo-kyung, Seoul, KoreaKim Moo-kil, Seoul, KoreaKim Tong-jin, Seoul, KoreaPahk Duk-yong, Seoul, Korea

Instrument Maker

Choi Tae-soon, Seoul, Korea

Hwanghae Province, Folk Ritual

Choi Enm-jun, Inch'on City, Kyonggi Province, Korea

Kim Keum-hwa, Seoul, Korea

Lee Ok-ja, Inch'on City, Kyonggi Province, Korea

Yoon Chung-hwa, Seoul, Korea

Chindu Island Farmers Songs

Cho Kong-ryeh, South Cholla Province, Korea

Kim Hahng-kyu, South Cholla Province, Korea

Cheju Island Women Divers Songs

Kim Ju-san, Cheju City, Korea

Kim Joo-ok, Cheju City, Korea

Hempcloth Maker

Kim Jum-soon, South Cholla Province, Korea

Earthenware Pottery Maker

Shim Sang-oon, Kyonggi Province, Korea

Horse Hair flat Maker

Chung Choon-mo, South Kyongsang Province, Korea

Korean American

Children's Area

Mark Chang, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Hein Kim, Bloomfield, Michigan

Sue Ann Lee, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan

Wook Lee, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Music

Au Myung-ja, 1953-, -- kayagum -- , Honolulu, Hawaii

Choi Kyung-man, 1947-, -- p'iri -- & -- taep'yongso -- player, Glendale, California

Choi Sung-ja, 1950-, -- kayagum -- player, Glendale, California

Lee Byung Sang, 1946-, -- taegum -- & -- tangso -- player, Ontario, California

Lee Yun-ja, 1952-, dancer, Ontario, California

Park Hi-all, dancer, Leucadia, California

Sung Kum-you, 1923-1986, dancer, Honolulu, Hawaii

Un Bang-cho, dance artist, Chicago, Illinois

Yim Hwa-yon, dancer, Chicago, Illinois

Seamstresses

Park Hea Sun, 1916-1980, Rockville, Maryland

Kim Sung Duk, Silver Spring, Maryland

Shin Bok Soon, College Park, Maryland

Oriental Screen Maker

Yoon Sam Kyun, Arlington, Virginia

Noodle and Kimchi Maker

Lee Young Sil, Fairfax, Virginia

Embroiderer

Kim Jung Ja, Arlington, Virginia
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives; please submit this form. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1982 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1982, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1982 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1982-ref25

Margaret Merwin Patch papers

Creator:
Patch, Margaret Merwin, 1894-1987  Search this
Names:
American Craftsmen's Council  Search this
World Crafts Council  Search this
Ayers, Hester Merwin, 1902-1975  Search this
Webb, Aileen O., 1892-1979  Search this
Extent:
10.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Sound recordings
Date:
1885-1986
Summary:
The papers of arts administrator Margaret Merwin Patch measure 10.9 linear feet and date from 1885 to 1986. The bulk of the collection consists of material from Patch's involvement with the American Craftsmen's Council and the formation and administration of the World Crafts Council. Also found are scattered biographical materials from Patch and the Merwin and Patch families; correspondence; three diaries; writings and notes by Patch and by others; subject files regarding various other organizations and activities with which Patch was involved; printed material, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of arts administrator Margaret Merwin Patch measure 10.9 linear feet and date from 1885 to 1986. The bulk of the collection consists of material from Patch's involvement with the American Craftsmen's Council and the formation and administration of the World Crafts Council. Also found are scattered biographical materials from Patch and the Merwin and Patch families; correspondence; three diaries; writings and notes by Patch and by others; subject files regarding various other organizations and activities with which Patch was involved; printed material; and photographs.

Biographical material includes documents from Margaret Merwin Patch as well as items from Rachel Merwin-Coggeshall, George Patch, Hester Merwin, and Ruth Merwin. One scrapbook contains clippings and photographs from the Patch's time at Cranbrook Academy of Art. Correspondents include Dorothy Johnson, Luba Kruja, Mary and Frances Schimpff, Olga Valkova, and Aileen Webb. Writings by others include unpublished works by Aileen Webb and Beatrice Wood. Family photographs depict the Patch and Merwin families.

The bulk of Patch's papers relate to her involvement with numerous arts organizations including the American Craftsmen's Council, Atlantic Center for the Arts, Shelburne Falls Art Center, and the World Crafts Council. These files may include founding documents, financial material, administrative records, correspondence, notes, printed material, and photographs. Found is material from the planning, goals, and accomplishments of twenty-five international meetings of various committees and groups of the World Crafts Council.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1903-1976 (0.9 linear feet; Box 1, 12, OV13-14)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1928-1986 (0.6 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Diaries, 1912-1926 (0.2 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 4: Writings and Notes, circa 1919-circa 1980s (0.4 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 5: Subject Files, 1927-1986 (1.4 linear feet; Box 2-3)

Series 6: American Craftsmen's Council Records, 1953-1987 (1.0 linear feet; Box 4)

Series 7: World Crafts Council Records, circa 1960-1986 (5.2 linear feet; Box 5-10)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1930s-1986 (0.4 linear feet; Box 10)

Series 9: Photographs, 1880s-1980s (0.8 linear feet; Box 10-11)
Biographical / Historical:
Margaret Merwin Patch (1894-1987) was an arts administrator in Massachusetts and Florida.

Born in Bloomington, Illinois in 1894, Margaret Stone Merwin graduated from Illinois Wesleyan University in 1915. She attended the University of Chicago Graduate School of Commerce and Administration from 1916 to 1917.

While living in London, Margaret enrolled at the London School of Economics and worked for the American Section of the Allied Maritime Transport Council, attending the Paris Peace Conference. Upon returning to the United States, she was a member of the National Industrial Conference Board and attended Columbia University in the early 1920s. She started a statistical graphic design company, Merwin-Davis Statistical Reports and Charts, which produced illustrated and varied graphs to display statistical information in the mid-1920s.

Margaret Merwin married George Patch in 1930. She and George moved between their summer home in Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, New York City, where Margaret was a special consultant to the National Broadcasting Company, and Bloomfield Hills, Michigan where she studied painting under Zoltan Sepeshy and Wallace Mitchell at Cranbrook Academy of Art. During World War II, Patch worked for the Office of Price Administration. Upon her husband's death in the 1950s, Patch spent winters in New Smyrna Beach, Florida.

From the 1940s until her death in 1988, Margaret Merwin Patch devoted her time to arts administration in the United States and around the world. Her passion began when she became the art chairman of the Women's Club of Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts. With that role, she helped lead the exhibition, class instruction, and retail support of local crafts. Eventually, her activity led to the formation of the Shelburne Falls Craft Center. Among the many organizations with which she was involved were the Aid to Artisans, American Craftsmen's Council, Atlantic Center for the Arts, Deerfield Valley Art Association, Michigan League of Women Voters, and the Shelburne Falls Art Center. Through her affiliation with the American Craftsmen's Council, Patch embarked on a year-long trip around the world in 1960. This trip helped lay the foundation for the World Crafts Council, which was formally established in 1964, with the aid of her colleague, Aileen Osborn Patch. A UNESCO group, the World Crafts Council sponsored international crafts conferences and cultural assemblies.

Margaret Merwin Patch died in 1988.
Related Materials:
Also in the Archives of American Art is an interview of Margaret Merwin Patch, conducted 1980 October 16-1984 September 25, by Robert F. Brown.

Researchers interested in accessing the audiovisual recording in this collection must use an access copy. Contact References Services for more information.
Provenance:
The Margaret Merwin Patch papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Linda M. Walker, a personal representative of Patch's estate in 1987.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing the audiovisual recording in this collection must use an access copy. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators  Search this
Topic:
handicrafts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Sound recordings
Citation:
Margaret Merwin Patch papers, 1885-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.patcmarg
See more items in:
Margaret Merwin Patch papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-patcmarg
Online Media:

Jane England Chandler papers relating to Miye Matsukata necklace

Creator:
Chandler, Jane England  Search this
Names:
Matsukata, Miye, 1922-1981  Search this
Extent:
2 Items ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1980 June 2
Scope and Contents:
A photocopied statement for insurers document, describing the "Kathmandu" necklace created by Miye Matsukata and owned by Chandler; and a photocopy of a letter, from Matsukata to Chandler, conveying the intended design, and the travels that provided the inspiration for the design of the necklace.
Biographical / Historical:
Jane England Chandler was a collector in Alexandria, Virginia.

Miye Matsukata was a Japanese born American jewelry designer based in Boxton, Massachusettes.
Provenance:
Photocopies donated by Jane England Chandler, 1984. Photocopies subsequently discarded after microfilming, 1994.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Designers -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Jewelers -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Jewelry -- Private collections  Search this
Jewelry -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Jewelry making  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artisans  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.chanjane
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-chanjane

Oral history interview with Edward Wiener, 1962 September 5

Interviewee:
Wiener, Edward, 1911-1991  Search this
Wiener, Edward, 1911-1991  Search this
Interviewer:
Seckler, Dorothy Gees, 1910-1994  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Artisans -- Massachusetts -- Provincetown -- Interviews  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12031
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214138
AAA_collcode_wiener62
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_214138

Oral history interview with Michael Bernard, 1976 December 20

Interviewee:
Bernard, Michael, 1926-  Search this
Bernard, Michael, 1926-  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Artisans -- Massachusetts -- Interviews  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12073
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212538
AAA_collcode_bernar76
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212538
Online Media:

George Nakashima papers, 1950-1991

Creator:
Nakashima, George K., 1905-1990  Search this
Nakashima, George K., 1905-1990  Search this
Subject:
Caldwell, Alfred  Search this
Topic:
Architect-designed furniture  Search this
Artisans  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Asian American architects  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Furniture making  Search this
Handicrafts  Search this
Woodworkers  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Asian American woodworkers  Search this
Asian American furniture designers  Search this
Furniture designers--Pennsylvania--New Hope  Search this
Theme:
Asian American  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Craft  Search this
Architecture & Design  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10793
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214474
AAA_collcode_nakageor
Theme:
Asian American
Lives of American Artists
Craft
Architecture & Design
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_214474
Online Media:

Stearns-Ames collection, [ca. 1838-1894]

Creator:
Ames Manufacturing Company. Bronze Foundry  Search this
Ames Manufacturing Company. Bronze Foundry  Search this
Subject:
Franklin, Benjamin  Search this
Washington, George  Search this
Ball, Thomas  Search this
Greenough, Horatio  Search this
Rogers, Randolph  Search this
Walter, Thomas Ustick  Search this
Ames, James Tyler  Search this
Ames, Nathan Peabody  Search this
Brown, Henry Kirke  Search this
United States Capitol (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Bronze founding -- Massachusetts -- Chicopee  Search this
Bronze sculpture, American  Search this
Metal-workers  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Theme:
Art Materials, Techniques, and Studio Art Education  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9691
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211910
AAA_collcode_amesmanu
Theme:
Art Materials, Techniques, and Studio Art Education
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211910

Dedham Pottery platter

Maker:
Dedham Pottery  Search this
Physical Description:
ceramic (overall material)
blue (overall color)
monochrome, blue (overall surface decoration color name)
Measurements:
overall: 8 3/4 in x 12 1/2 in; x 22.225 cm x 31.75 cm
overall: 1 3/4 in x 12 5/8 in; 4.445 cm x 32.0675 cm
Object Name:
Platter
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Dedham
Date made:
1896-1928
Credit Line:
Gift of Clara Berwick
ID Number:
CE.63.229
Catalog number:
63.229
Accession number:
248370
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746aa-39d7-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_575737

Marblehead Pottery dish

Physical Description:
monochrome, blue (overall surface decoration color name)
ceramic (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 1/4 in x 11 1/4 in x 12 1/2 in; 5.715 cm x 28.575 cm x 31.75 cm
Object Name:
platter
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Marblehead
Credit Line:
Helen Augusta Mosher in memory of her parents Ellen and Richard Rothwell
ID Number:
CE.62.848
Accession number:
240968
Catalog number:
62.848
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a3-dd28-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_575774

Marblehead Pottery vase

Physical Description:
monochrome, gray (overall surface decoration color name)
ceramic (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 12 5/8 in x 5 7/8 in; 32.0675 cm x 14.9225 cm
Object Name:
Vase
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Marblehead
Credit Line:
Page Kirk
ID Number:
CE.393675
Catalog number:
393675
Accession number:
208838
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a3-dc0e-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_575763
Online Media:

Hampshire Pottery vase

Physical Description:
monochrome, blue (overall surface decoration color name)
ceramic (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 5 in x 5 7/8 in; 12.7 cm x 14.9225 cm
Object Name:
Vase
Place made:
United States: New Hampshire, Keene
Credit Line:
Mrs. Marcus Benjamin
ID Number:
CE.379665
Catalog number:
379665
Accession number:
150313
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a3-db43-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_575647

Grueby Faience Company vase

Maker:
Christian Register  Search this
Grueby Faience Company  Search this
Physical Description:
monochrome, green (overall surface decoration color name)
ceramic (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 8 1/2 in x 5 in; 21.59 cm x 12.7 cm
overall: 8 5/8 in x 5 5/16 in; 21.9075 cm x 13.5255 cm
Object Name:
Vase
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Boston
Credit Line:
Mrs. Marcus Benjamin
ID Number:
CE.379643
Catalog number:
379643
Accession number:
150313
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a3-de57-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_575791

Saturday Evening Girls vase

Physical Description:
black (overall color)
polychrome (overall surface decoration color name)
ceramic (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 9 in x 8 in; 22.86 cm x 20.32 cm
Object Name:
Vase
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts
Date made:
c. 1908-1915
Credit Line:
Chas. Frank Sugeren
ID Number:
CE.290227
Catalog number:
290227
Accession number:
59606
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Exhibition:
Art in Industry
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a3-d8ba-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_575628

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