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Kathleen Blackshear and Ethel Spears papers

Creator:
Blackshear, Kathleen, 1897-1988  Search this
Spears, Ethel, 1903-1974  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Art Institute of Chicago. School  Search this
Abercrombie, Gertrude, 1909-1977  Search this
Archipenko, Alexander, 1887-1964  Search this
Arquin, Florence  Search this
Aubin, Barbara, 1928-2014  Search this
Biesel, Fred, 1893-1954  Search this
Foy, Frances M., 1890-1963  Search this
Gardner, Helen, d. 1946  Search this
Halstead, Whitney  Search this
Kapsalis, Thomas Harry, 1925-  Search this
Kent, Rockwell, 1882-1971  Search this
Yoshida, Ray  Search this
Extent:
8.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1920-1990
Scope and Contents:
Spears papers (ca. 0.5 ft.) include photographs of Spears and her work; writings about Spears; letters, 1935-1967; a file on the WPA; and travel notes. Blackshear's papers include: writings by and about Blackshear, including an unpublished manuscript by Blackshear, SURVEY OF ART, 1926, and an editor's proof of Helen Gardner's ART THROUGH THE AGES (3rd ed.); photographs of Blackshear and her work; travel diaries, 1920 and undated; ca. 80 sketches; a sketchbook; letters, 1925-1986; address books, 1947-1963 and undated; clippings, 1926-1967; exhibition announcements, 1929-1965; files on Gertrude Abercrombie, Alexander Archipenko, Florence Arquin, Helen Gardner, Whitney Halstead, Tom Kapsalis, Ray Yoshida, and others, containing letters, printed material, photographs of works of art, and personal photographs; and 2.0 ft. of notebooks on art.
Also included are 2.0 ft. of handmade Christmas cards to both Blackshear and Spears from Barbara Aubin, Fred Biesel, Frances Foy, Rockwell Kent, Ray Yoshida, and many others.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, lecturer, writer, educator; Chicago, Ill. As a graduate student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Blackshear worked as a teaching assistant under Helen Gardner and then continued to teach there for 35 years. She had a lifetime friendship with painter and instructor Ethel Spears.
Provenance:
Donated 1990 by William Terrell, Blackshears' nephew and executor.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Women painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.blackath
See more items in:
Kathleen Blackshear and Ethel Spears papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-blackath

Roberto Sifuentes papers

Creator:
Sifuentes, Roberto, 1967-  Search this
Extent:
4.3 Linear feet
0.054 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Interviews
Photographs
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
circa 1988-2006
bulk 1993-2000
Summary:
The papers of performance artist and educator Roberto Sifuentes measure 4.3 linear feet and date from circa 1988 to 2006. The collection documents Sifuentes' work as a professional artist and educator through biographical material and interviews; correspondence including emails; project files including project descriptions, documentation of individual productions, audio and video recordings, and components of works for multimedia projects; conference files documenting symposia and conference participation; articles, versions of performance scripts, and other writings; printed material including press clippings, promotional press packets, and source material; as well as photographic material documenting performances and social events.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of performance artist and educator Roberto Sifuentes measure 4.3 linear feet and date from circa 1988 to 2006. The collection documents Sifuentes' work as a professional artist and educator through biographical material and interviews; correspondence including emails; project files including project descriptions, documentation of individual productions, audio and video recordings, and components of works for multimedia projects; conference files documenting symposia and conference participation; articles, versions of performance scripts, and other writings; printed material including press clippings, promotional press packets, and source material; as well as photographic material documenting performances and social events.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1990-2000 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1, 0.003 Gigabytes; ER01)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1990-2000 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1, 0.004 Gigabytes; ER02-ER05)

Series 3: Project Files, circa 1986-2000 (1.9 linear feet; Boxes 1-3, 0.051 Gigabytes; ER06-ER15, ER18-ER19)

Series 4: Conference Files, circa 1995-2006 (0.2 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 5: Writings, circa 1993-2000 (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 3-4, 0.002 Gigabytes, ER16-ER17)

Series 6: Printed Material, circa 1993-2000 (0.9 linear feet; Boxes 4-5)

Series 7: Photographic Material, circa 1990s (0.1 linear feet; Box 4)
Biographical / Historical:
Roberto Sifuentes, (born Los Angeles, 1967) is a Chicano performance artist and arts instructor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He completed his BA from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut in 1989 and in 1993 founded La Pocha Nostra Performance Group with his career-long collaborator, Guillermo Gómez-Peña. La Pocha Nostra in its manifesto describes itself as a "trans-disciplinary arts organization...created out of our necessity to survive as Chicano artists in a racist Art World." Around 1992 Roberto began contributing as a collaborator and performer for performance works created by Gómez-Peña in collaboration with Coco Fusco, Couple in the Cage and New World (B)order. Sifuentes has continued his partnership with Gómez-Peña in creating new performance works and publications, as well touring widely to perform their works and deliver outreach programs including lectures and workshops.

Consistent with his work with La Pocha Nostra, Sifuentes has taken an activist sensibility and approach in incorporating stereotypical ritualistic and religious cultural imagery in his installations and performances, while engaging with emerging technologies. This juxtaposition between the futuristic and the traditional stereotype was reflected in his widely applied artistic persona Cybervato. Key works incorporating this persona include Borderscape 2000, Temple of Confessions, and Mexterminator. He has performed his works and contributed to symposia and conferences throughout the world at venues including National Review of Live Art, Glasgow; Center for Performance Research, Wales; Hemispheric Institute, New York University; Centro Cultural Recoleta, Buenos Aires; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington DC; De Young Museum, San Francisco; and El Museo del Barrio in New York City.
Provenance:
The Roberto Sifuentes papers were donated by Roberto Sifuentes to the Archives of American Art in 2018.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and born-digital records with no duplicate copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Performance artists--Illinois--Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Mexican American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Photographs
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Roberto Sifuentes papers, circa 1988-2006, bulk 1993-2000. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.sifurobe
See more items in:
Roberto Sifuentes papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sifurobe

Allen Philbrick papers

Creator:
Philbrick, Allen, 1879-1964  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Kellogg, Edith  Search this
Extent:
0.4 Linear feet ((on a partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1902-1990
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence consists primarily of letters, 1902-1987, from Philbrick to his future wife, concert pianist Edith Kellogg, in which he describes his travels to Naples, Capri, Spain, and his studies in Paris. Two receipts are from the Academie Colarossi, 1905, and the Adams Davidson Galleries, 1990. Printed material consists of clippings, 1918-1980, 5 exhibition announcements and catalogs, 1977-1989, a program for HANSEL AND GRETEL, a passenger list from the ship ALICE, 1909, and a booklet, 1966, about the Peoples Savings Bank of Cedar Rapids which contains murals by Philbrick. Photographs show life class students at the Art Institute of Chicago, ca. 1908, and works of art.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, art instructor; Chicago, Ill. Born in Utica, New York, Philbrick studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and in Paris at the Academie Colarossi and the Academie Julian with Jean Paul Laurens from 1904-1906. From 1906 to 1953, he taught at the Art Institute of Chicago.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1991 by Jane Kofler, the daughter of Allen Philbrick and Edith Kellogg.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Art schools -- Illinois -- Chicago -- Photographs  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- France -- Paris  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.philalle
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-philalle

Tony Hepburn papers

Creator:
Hepburn, Tony  Search this
Extent:
4.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1967-2007
Scope and Contents:
Biographical material, letters and copies of electronic mail, writings, artwork, photographs, audio visual material, printed material and miscellaneous material relating to Tony Hepburn's career as a sculptor and educator.
Biographical material includes school yearbooks and certificates. Letters and e-mails are from business associates, university colleagues, and friends. Writings include various notebooks, many of which include notes and sketches, typed transcripts of lectures and typed essays by Hepburn and daily notes. Photographs are of Hepburn and his artwork. Printed material includes journals and newspaper clippings of reviews, exhibition catalogs, and publications by the Cranbrook Academy of Art. Audio visual material includes three VHS tapes, one of a workshop in Tulane, La., 1989; another of a Symposium in San Jose, Calif., 1985, in which Hepburn participated; and one tape labeled "Tony Marsh Wall Project," undated. Miscellaneous material includes travel records, an address book, and pricing lists.
Biographical / Historical:
Sculptor, art teacher; Bloomfield Hills, Mich.; b. 1942
Provenance:
Donated in 2008 by Tony Hepburn.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Educators -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.hepbtony
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hepbtony

Maryette Charlton papers

Creator:
Charlton, Maryette  Search this
Names:
American University of Beirut -- Faculty  Search this
Art Institute of Chicago -- Faculty  Search this
Chicago Public School Art Society  Search this
Container Corporation of America  Search this
University of Iowa, Museum of Art  Search this
Andres, Jo  Search this
Bishop, Elizabeth, 1911-1979  Search this
Cage, Xenia  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Court, Paula  Search this
Elliott, Leone  Search this
Elliott, Owen  Search this
Fujitomi, Yasuo, 1928-  Search this
Habachy, Nimet  Search this
Hadzi, Dimitri, 1921-2006  Search this
Haskins, Sylvia Shaw Judson, 1897-  Search this
Hoff, Margo  Search this
Kiesler, Frederick  Search this
Kiesler, Lillian, 1910?-2001  Search this
Lubar, Cindy  Search this
MacIver, Loren, 1909-  Search this
Matisse, Pierre, 1900-1989  Search this
Miller, Dorothy Canning, 1904-2003  Search this
Nevelson, Louise, 1899-1988  Search this
Purdy, James  Search this
Reynal, Jeanne, 1903-  Search this
Smith, Kiki, 1954-  Search this
Takaezu, Toshiko  Search this
Tawney, Lenore  Search this
Von Brockdorff, Louise Medbery  Search this
Extent:
80.6 Linear feet
0.34 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Scripts (documents)
Drawings
Mail art
Motion pictures (visual works)
Video recordings
Date:
circa 1890-2013
Summary:
The papers of filmmaker, photographer, painter, printmaker, teacher, and arts advocate Maryette Charlton measure 81 linear feet and date from circa 1890 to 2013. This particularly rich collection includes biographical materials, correspondence, writings, 30 diaries, teaching files, professional and project files, major film project files, artist research files, exhibition files, printed material, scrapbooks, artwork, 22 sketchbooks, extensive photographic materials, numerous sound and film recordings, a digitized sound recording, and an unintegrated later addition to the papers containing additional biographical materials, journals, correspondence, subject files, printed materials, and scattered photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of filmmaker, photographer, painter, printmaker, teacher, and arts advocate Maryette Charlton measure 81 linear feet and 0.34 gigabytes and date from circa 1890 to 2013. This particularly rich collection includes biographical materials, correspondence, writings, 30 diaries, teaching files, professional and project files, major film project files, artist research files, exhibition files, printed material, scrapbooks, artwork, 22 sketchbooks, extensive photographic materials, numerous sound and video recordings, motion picture film, a digitized sound recording, and an unintegrated later addition to the papers containing additional biographical materials, journals, correspondence, subject files, printed materials, and scattered photographs.

Biographical materials consist of material on Maryette Charlton and her family. The subseries on Maryette Charlton includes a biographical chronology, passports, records of her marriage to Hall Winslow, information on studio spaces, school transcripts, and other material. Family files include genealogical charts and files of family members containing correspondence, writings, printed material, sound and video recordings, and photographs. The bulk of the family files are for Charlton's parents, Etna and Shannon, and her husband and son, Hall and Kirk Winslow.

Extensive correspondence is with family, friends, artists, and colleagues. Family correspondence is with her husband and son, parents, and extended family. Personal correspondence is with friends and colleagues, many of whom were famous artists. Named correspondence files and chonological correspondence files contain exchanges with Jo Andres, Elizabeth Bishop, Xenia Cage, Paula Court, Yasuo Fujitomi, Dimitri Hadzi, Margo Hoff, Sylvia Shaw Judson, Lillian Kiesler, Cindy Lubar, Loren MacIver, Pierre Matisse, Nimet (Saba Habachy), Henri Seyrig, Robert Wilson, and many others. There is also correspondence with colleges, museums, and universities.

Writings include academic papers and college class notes, titled essays, a notebook with sketches, and miscellaneous notes. Thirty diaries cover the period 1943 - 2001 and document a wide variety of topics, from film projects to travels to the art world in New York City. Some diaries are illustrated, including one illustrated by Alexander Calder at a party with Maryette, Ellsworth Kelly, and actress Delphine Seyrig. Journals from 1978-1979 tell of Charlton's experiences while appearing in films made by avant-garde director Richard Foreman. There is also one diary of Maryette's mother Etna Barr Charlton.

Teaching files document Charlton's career as an instructor at the Art Institute of Chicago and as the founder of and instructor at the American University of Beirut's art department. Files include appointment calendars, schedules, notes, lectures, news releases, printed material, and photographs.

Professional and project files consist of material related to Maryette Charlton's professional work at the University of Iowa Museum of Art, as a lecturer at the Chicago Public School Art Society, color analyst at the Container Corporation of America, executor of the estate of artist Louise Medbery von Brockdorff, fellowships, conferences, organizations, and the filming industry in general. There are files for the screening of Zen in Ryoko-In. The University of Iowa Museum of Art subseries consists of correspondence with fellow co-founders Leone and Owen Elliott, files on art donations, museum administration, annual reports, printed material, photographs, and sound and video recordings.

Artist research files consist of books, articles, and clippings collected by Charlton for research. Notable artists chronicled include Alexander Calder, James Purdy, Louise Nevelson, Kiki Smith, and Toshiko Takaezu.

Major film project files document Maryette Charlton's films about or with artists Frederick Kiesler (Trienniale, The Universal Theater and Kiesler on Kieseler), Lenore Tawney, Dorothy Miller, Loren MacIver, and Jeanne Reynal. The files for Frederick Kiesler also contain materials about his wife Lillian Kiesler, with whom Charlton had a long relationship and collaborated with on film projects. Individual film project files contain a wide variety of research and production documentation, including correspondence, writings, printed material, research files, exhibition catalogs, photographic materials, sound recordings of interviews and lectures, and Charlton's documentation about the creation and producation of each film, such as contracts, scripts, and distribution information. The film project files for Kiesler and Dorothy Miller are particularly rich, containing substantial amounts of primary source materials not found elsewhere. Sound and video recordings are found throughout the series, as well as 4 film reels.

Files documenting Maryette Charlton's group and solo exhibitions include catalogs and announcements, publicity, printed material, mailing lists, art inventory, sales lists, correspondence, and other material.

Printed materials include other exhibition catalogs, books, posters, magazines, and clippings. There are many books on color theory from Maryette Charlton's job as a color analyst and substanial printed material on Frederick Kiesler. Scrapbooks document Maryette Charlton's personal life from high school, college, and summer camp, as well as exhibitions of her own work, and miscellaneous subjects.

Artwork includes sketches and drawings by Maryette Charlton, some drawings by Lillian Kiesler and others, and mail art created by various artists. There are also 22 sketchbooks filled with pencil, ink, and crayon drawings and sketches, with occasional annotations.

Photographic materials include photographs, slides, negatives, and photograph albums. There are photographs of Maryette Charlton, her travels, family, friends, and artists. Photographs are also found throughout other series.

Sound and video recordings which could not be merged with other series were arranged in an audiovisual series. There are recordings of radio programs and performances Maryette Charlton attended or participated in as well as miscellaneous recordings of artists and events.

The 2014 addition to the Maryette Charlton papers consists of biographical materials, journals, correspondence, subject files, printed materials, and a small number of photographs.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 16 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1896-2005 (3.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-4, 80)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1930-2010 (23.3 linear feet; Boxes 4-27, 80)

Series 3: Writings, 1942-1999 (1 linear feet; Boxes 27-28)

Series 4: Diaries, 1943-2001 (2.1 linear feet; Boxes 28-30)

Series 5: Teaching Files, 1946-1997 (3.6 linear feet; Boxes 30-33, 80)

Series 6: Professional and Project Files, 1923-1998 (7.6 linear feet; Boxes 34-41, 81, OV 87)

Series 7: Artist Research Files, 1949-circa 2000 (1.8 linear feet; Boxes 41-43, FCs 88-89)

Series 8: Major Film Projects, 1904-2007 (18.8 linear feet, 0.34 GB; Boxes 43-61, 81-82, OV 87, FC 90-91, ER01)

Series 9: Exhibition Files, 1950-2000 (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 61-62)

Series 10: Printed Material, 1924-2000 (3.2 linear feet; Boxes 62-65, 82, OV 87)

Series 11: Scrapbooks, 1939-2010 (0.8 linear feet; Box 65, 82-83)

Series 12: Artwork, 1950-1998 (0.9 linear feet; Boxes 65-66, 84)

Series 13: Sketchbooks, 1949-1996 (0.5 linear feet; Box 66)

Series 14: Photographic Materials, circa 1890-circa 2010 (7.8 linear feet; Boxes 67-74, 84-86)

Series 15: Sound and Video Recordings, circa 1953-2008 (1.2 linear feet; Boxes 74-75, 86)

Series 16: Addition to Maryette Charlton papers, 1951-2013 (3.7 linear feet; Boxes 75-79, 86)
Biographical / Historical:
Maryette Charlton (1924-2013) was a painter, printmaker, photographer, filmmaker and arts advocate based in Chicago, Illinois, and New York, New York.

Maryette Charlton was born in Manchester, Iowa on May 18, 1924. Her parents were Shannon and Etna Charlton and she had 2 siblings. Charlton pursued her undergraduate studies at Monticello College and Northwestern University in Illinois, Antioch College in Ohio, and the University of Colorado before receiving a B.F.A. from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York in 1947. She continued her studies in Chicago, Illinois with Laszlo Moholy-Nagy and Hugo Weber at the Institute of Design and Art Institute of Chicago. From 1948 to 1952, she was a Department of Education lecturer at the Art Institute of Chicago museum galleries and also gave talks at schools for the Chicago Public School Art Society.

Between 1942-1951, Maryette Charlton worked as a color analyst for the Container Corporation of America. In 1952, Charlton founded the Art Department of the American University of Beirut and taught there as an assistant professor until 1956. While in Beirut, Charlton married photographer Hall Winslow in 1953 and their only child Kirk Winslow was born in 1955. Winslow and Charlton later divorced in 1973.

Charlton moved to New York City in 1955. She began a master's program at Columbia University and graduated with a M.F.A in film and printmaking in 1958.

Charlton made numerous documentary films, mostly about American artists including Alexander Calder, e. e. cummings, Jeanne Reynal, Dorothy Miller, Pierre Matisse, Lenore Tawney, and Loren MacIver. She also worked tirelessly to promote the work of sculptor, architect, and set designer Frederick Kiesler. She was the camera woman for Kiesler's Kiesler's Universal Theater which aired on CBS in 1962. She became close friends with Kiesler's widow, Lillian, and they collaborated on the film Kiesler on Kiesler and numerous other film and art projects, supporting the work of young artists. Charlton also worked on commissioned films, including The Mosaics of Jeanne Reynal and Zen in Ryoko-in. Charlton befriended many artists in the visual, literary, and film worlds, including Elizabeth Bishop, Dimitri Hadzi, Margo Hoff, James Purdy, and Delphine Seyrig.

A performer in her own right, Charlton appeared in the works of Richard Foreman, Jo Andres, and others. She also played the part of Helen Keller in the film Ghostlight (2003).

An Iowa native, Charlton founded the University of Iowa Museum of Art together with Leone and Owen Elliott. She maintained a close relationship with the Iowa Museum over many years as a donor and chronicler.

Charlton died in New York City on November 25, 2013.
Related Materials:
The Houghton Library at Harvard University and the University of Iowa Museum of Art also hold papers and artwork by Maryette Charlton. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, houses the film Kiesler on Kiesler, created by Maryette Charlton.

The Archives of American Art also has the papers of Frederick and Lillian Kiesler, a portion of which was donated by Charlton.
Provenance:
The Maryette Charlton papers were donated in multiple accretions from 1998-2011 by Maryette Charlton, and in 2013-2014 by the Maryette Charlton estate via Jo Andres, executor.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.

Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Filmmakers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Photographers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art teachers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art teachers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Filmmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Printmakers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Color  Search this
Art -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Sound recordings
Scripts (documents)
Drawings
Mail art
Motion pictures (visual works)
Video recordings
Citation:
Maryette Charlton papers, circa 1890-2013. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.charmary
See more items in:
Maryette Charlton papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-charmary
Online Media:

James Brooks and Charlotte Park papers

Creator:
Brooks, James, 1906-1992  Search this
Names:
Kootz Gallery (N.Y.)  Search this
New York University -- Students  Search this
Southern Methodist University -- Students  Search this
United States. Army  Search this
Bolotowsky, Ilya, 1907-1981  Search this
Gottlieb, Adolph, 1903-1974  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
King, William, 1925-2015  Search this
Park, Charlotte  Search this
Extent:
20.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Interviews
Drawings
Photographs
Diaries
Date:
1909-2010
bulk 1930-2010
Summary:
The papers of Abstract Expressionist painters James Brooks and Charlotte Park measure 18.7 linear feet and are dated 1909-2010, bulk 1930-2010. Correspondence, subject files, personal business records, printed material, and a sound recording document his painting career, interests, professional and personal activities. Also found are biographical materials, interviews, writings, and art work. The collection also includes papers of his wife, Abstract Expressionist painter Charlotte Park, regarding her painting career, personal life, activities as executor of James Brooks' estate, and some material concerning the James Brooks and Charlotte Park Brooks Foundation. There is a 1.4 linear foot addition to this collection donated in 2017 that includes 58 "week-at-a-glance" appointment books, three journals and one address/ telephone book of Charlotte Park; a hand written chronology with significant dates and notes; postcards and exhibition announcements sent to Charlotte and James; doodles; and a sketch, possibly by Don Kingman.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Abstract Expressionist painters James Brooks and Charlotte Park measure 18.7 linear feet and are dated 1909-2010, bulk 1930-2010. Correspondence, subject files, personal business records, printed material, and a sound recording document his painting career, interests, professional and personal activities. Also found are biographical materials, interviews, writings, and art work. The collection also includes papers of his wife, Abstract Expressionist painter Charlotte Park, regarding her painting career, personal life, activities as executor of James Brooks' estate, and some material concerning the James Brooks and Charlotte Park Brooks Foundation. There is a 1.4 linear foot addition to this collection donated in 2017 that includes 58 "week-at-a-glance" appointment books, three journals and one address/ telephone book of Charlotte Park; a hand written chronology with significant dates and notes; postcards and exhibition announcements sent to Charlotte and James; doodles; and a sketch, possibly by Don Kingman.

Biographical materials include biographical notes and documents such as copies of birth and death certificates, curricula vitae, family history. Educational records are from Southern Methodist University and documentation of flight training courses at New York University. Brooks' military service in World War II is well documented by United States Army records with related correspondence. Also found is extensive documentation of his death and funeral.

Professional and personal correspondence is addressed to Brooks, the couple, and to Charlotte Park during the later years of Brooks' life when she managed his affairs. A significant amount of correspondence is categorized as art, autograph requests, personal, and teaching; also include is general correspondence that overlaps all categories. Art correspondence with museums, galleries, collectors, artists, and friends concerns exhibitions, Brooks' work, and invitations to exhibit, speak, or serve as a juror. Of note is the correspondence with Samuel M. Kootz Gallery. The personal correspondence is mainly social, and teaching correspondence consists largely of requests that he teach in summer programs, serve as a visiting artist/critic.

Six interviews with James Brooks are in the form of published and unpublished transcripts; a seventh is a sound recording with no known transcript. Charlotte Park participates in one interview.

Writings by Brooks are statements about his work and a tribute to Ilya Bolotowsky. Among the writings by others about Brooks are a catalog essay, academic papers, and lecture; also found are a few short pieces on miscellaneous topics. Three diaries include brief entries regarding his work, exhibitions, and activities.

Subject files maintained by Brooks concerning organizations, exhibitions, mural projects, a commission and teaching document his professional activities, relationships and interests. Personal business records concern appraisals, conservation, gifts, insurance, loans, sales, shipping, and storage of artwork. Gallery records include agreements, consignments, lists, and receipts. Also, there are accounts for lettering work and personal income tax returns.

Printed material is mostly exhibition announcements, invitations, catalogs, and checklists, as well as articles and reviews. The majority are about/mention Brooks or include reproductions of his work; some concern artist friends, former students, and others.

Artwork by Brooks consists of pencil and ink drawings, two sketchbooks, and "telephone doodles." Other artists include Adolph Gottlieb (ink drawing of sculpture), Philip Guston (three pencil drawings of Brooks), and William King (two silhouettes of Brooks).

Photographic materials (photographs, digital prints, negatives, slides, and color transparencies) provide extensive documentation of Brooks' artwork and, to a lesser extent, exhibitions.There are pictures of Brooks as a very young boy, though the most views of him date from the 1930s through 1980s, and with friends. Places include Brooks' homes and studios in Montauk, New York and the Springs, East Hampton, New York; travel to Maine, Oregon and California. Views of the Middle East from World War II show Brooks with colleagues, local people engaged in daily activities, and scenery. Also of note are a copy print of "The Irascibles" by Nina Leen, and attendees at the dedication of Flight dining in view of Brook's LaGuardia Ariport mural.

Charlotte Park papers document the professional career and personal life of the Abstract Expressionist painter, art teacher, and wife of James Brooks through correspondence, personal business records, exhibition records, printed material, and photographs. In addition, this series documents artwork in the estate of James Brooks and posthumous exhibitions. Twelve years younger than her husband, Park began handling business matters for him as he aged and developed Alzheimer's disease. She also served as his executor. In the 1990s, a curator assumed management of the artwork and loans for exhibitions. After the James Brooks and Charlotte Park Brooks Foundation was established in 2000, its director handled most business activities. Some copies of Foundation minutes and correspondence are found among Park's papers.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 11 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1924-1995 (Box 1, OV 19; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1928-1995 (Boxes 1-3; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Interviews, 1965-1990 (Box 3; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1952-1999 (Box 3; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 5: Diaries, 1975-1984 (Box 3; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 6: Subject Files, 1926-2001 (Boxes 3-5, OV 20; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 7: Personal Business Records, 1932-1992 (Boxes 5-6; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1928-1992 (Boxes 6-11, OV 21-OV 22; 4.8 linear feet)

Series 9: Artwork, 1930s-1992 (Box 11; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographic Materials, 1909-2000s (Boxes 11-15; 4.1 linear feet)

Series 11: Charlotte Park papers, 1930s-2010 (Boxes 15-18, OV 23; 3.6 linear feet)

Series 12: Unprocessed Additition, circa 1930-2010 (Boxes 25-26; 1.4 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
James Brooks (1906-1992) and Charlotte Park (1919-2010) were Abstract Expressionist painters in East Hampton, N.Y. A native of St. Louis, Missouri, Brooks spent his childhood in Colorado, Oklahoma, Illinois, and Texas. He begn drawing as a young boy, finding inspiration in magazine illustrations and comic strips. Before moving to New York City in 1926, he studied at Southern Methodist University (1923-1924) and at the Dallas Art Institute.

In New York, Brooks studied illustration at the Grand Central Art School. After exposure to museums led him to differentiate between illustration and fine art, Brooks enrolled at Art Students League. During this period he supported himself by doing lettering for magazine advertisements. From 1936-1942 he participated in the WPA Federal Art Project, executing murals at Woodside Library, Queens, New York (destroyed); the Post Office, Little Falls, New Jersey; and his famous Flight at LaGuardia Airport's Marine Air Terminal (painted over in the 1950s and restored in 1980).

During World War II Brooks served in the United States Army as an art correspondent in Cairo. When at the Office of Special Services, Washington, DC, he met Charlotte Park who worked there as a graphic artist and later became his wife. The couple moved to New York City in 1945 and married in 1947. Brooks resumed friendships with artists he knew from the WPA including Philip Guston, Bradley Walker Tomlin, and Jackson Pollock. Brooks and Park were especially close with Pollock and Lee Krasner; after they moved to Long Island, Brooks and Park, soon followed, first to Montauk and later to the Springs, East Hampton, New York.

By the late 1940s, Brooks had turned away from figural painting in the social realist style and moved toward abstraction. In the early 1950s, he was experimenting with enamel, gouache, and diluted oil paints, staining various grounds in ways that produced interesting shapes, adding spontaneous splashes of color over which he painted more deliberately. In the 1960s he switched to acrylics, leading to wider use of color and broader strokes.

Peridot Gallery presented Brooks' first solo exhibition in 1949. He helped organize and participated in the famous Ninth Street Show of 1951, earning critical acclaim. This assured him a place in two of the Museum of Modern Art's most important exhibitions of the period, Twelve Americans (1956) and New American Painting (1958). He showed at the Stable Gallery, Kootz Gallery, Martha Jackson Gallery and others. During his lifetime Brooks enjoyed five traveling retrospective exhibitions.

Prizes and awards included Carnegie Institute's Pittsburgh International Exhibition 5th prize for painting (1952), The Art Institue of Chicago's 62nd American Exhibition Logan Medal and Prize for Painting (1957) and 64th American Exhibition Harris Prize (1961), The National Arts Club Medal (1985), and a citation of appreciation for Flight from The North Beach Club Marine Air Terminal, LaGuardia Airport (1986).

Brooks taught for nearly three decades: drawing at Columbia University (1947-1948) and lettering at Pratt Institute (1948-1955); was a visiting critic, Yale University (1955-1960), University of Pennsylvania (1971-1972), and Cooper Union (1975); and served on the Queens College faculty (1966-1969). In addition, he was an artist-in-residence at The American Academy in Rome (1963), the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship (1969), and a National Endowment for the Humanities Grant (1973).

Brooks developed Alzheimer's disease around 1985 and died in East Hampton, New York in 1992.

Charlotte Park graduated from the Yale School of Fine Art (1939) and during World War II, when working in Washington, D.C., she met James Brooks. They moved to New York City in 1945, where she studied with Australian artist Wallace Harrison. Park taught children's art classes at several private schools in the early 1950s and at the Museum of Modern Art, 1955-1967.

Park's approach to Abstract Expressionism featured curved or linear shapes with vibrant colors and dynamic brushstrokes. Tanager Gallery presented her first solo show in 1957 and her work was included in numerous group exhibitions from the 1950s through 2000s, mainly in New York City and Long Island. After Park's second solo exhibition, held in 1973 at Elaine Benson Gallery, Bridgehampton, New York, interest in her work revived; other one-person shows followed at Guild Hall (1979), Ingber Gallery (1980), and paired with James Brooks at Louise Himelfarb Gallery. The National Institute of Arts and Letters honored Park with its Art Award in 1974. Her work is in the permanent collections of the Parrish Art Museum, Guild Hall Museum, Telfair Museum of Art, and in many private collections.

Charlotte Park died in 2010.
Related Materials:
Also among the Archives of American Art's holdings are letters from James Brooks and Sean Scully, 1980-1989 addressed to Theodora ["Teddy"] S. Greenbaum, and an oral history interview with James Brooks conducted by Dorothy Seckler, 1965 June 10 and June 12.
Separated Materials:
Correspondence, interview transcripts, photographs, and printed material were loaned by James Brooks for microfilming in 1969 (reel N69-132). With the exception of an address book, a scrapbook, and a few photographs, Brooks donated almost all of the loan in 1979.
Provenance:
The majority of the collection was donated in 2013 by the James Brooks and Charlotte Brooks Foundation and an additional 1.4 linear feet donated 2017 by the Foundation. In 1979 James Brooks donated most of the material lent for microfilming in 1969.
Restrictions:
ACCESS RESTRICTED: Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Access requires written permission from The James Brooks and Charlotte Park Brooks Foundation. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Interviews
Drawings
Photographs
Diaries
Citation:
James Brooks and Charlotte Park papers, 1909-2010, bulk 1930-2010. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.broojame
See more items in:
James Brooks and Charlotte Park papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-broojame

Harriet Blackstone papers

Creator:
Blackstone, Harriet, 1864-1939  Search this
Names:
Anderson, Stell  Search this
Chase, Joseph Cummings, 1878-1965  Search this
Chase, William Merritt, 1849-1916  Search this
Dewing, M. O. (Maria Oakey), 1855-1927  Search this
Dewing, Thomas Wilmer, 1851-1938  Search this
Hobart, Alice Tisdale, 1882-1967  Search this
Holbrook, Florence  Search this
Landis, Mary  Search this
Laurens, Jean-Paul, 1838-1921  Search this
McCullough, Esther Morgan  Search this
Sargent, John Singer, 1856-1925  Search this
Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915  Search this
Wunder, Richard P.  Search this
Extent:
5.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Date:
1870-1984
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter Harriet Blackstone date from 1870-1984 and measure 5.4 linear feet. The collection provides documentation of Harriet Blackstone's career through scattered biographical material; personal and professional correspondence, including letters from Maria Oakey Dewing, Thomas Wilmer Dewing, Alice Tisdale Hobart, Joseph Cummings Chase, Stell Anderson, Mary Landis, Esther Morgan McCullough, and Booker T. Washington; writings by Blackstone, Esther Morgan McCullough, Richard P. Wunder, and Florence Holbrook; personal business records; clippings, exhbition material, and other printed material; one scrapbook; photographs of Blackstone, family, friends, and notable artists William Merrit Chase, Jean Paul Laurens, and John Singer Sargent; artwork; and four sketchbooks. Also found are a few artifacts found on Blackstone's easel.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1930-1973 (Box 1, 6; 7 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1883-1984 (Box 1; 0.4 Linear Feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1861-1979 (Boxes 1-2; 1.0 Linear Feet)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, circa 1906-late 1930s (Box 2; 0.2 Linear Feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1901-1984 (Boxes 2-3, 6; 0.8 Linear Feet)

Series 6: Scrapbook, circa early 1900s (Boxes 3, 6; 0.2 Linear Feet)

Series 7: Photographs, 1870-early 1900s (Boxes 3-4, 6, BV 7, 8-9; 1.7 Linear Feet)

Series 8: Artwork, 1870-1929 (Boxes 4-5; 0.2 Linear Feet)

Series 9: Artifacts, circa early 1900s-1939 (Box 5, Artifact; 0.4 Linear Feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Harriet Blackstone (1864-1939) was a painter in New York, New York. Blackstone was born on November 13th, 1864 in New Hartford, New York. In 1883, she moved to Illinois where she became a high school elocution teacher. She did not start her studies to be an artist until 1903 when she enrolled at the Pratt Institute of Art in Brooklyn, New York. While there her art teacher was William Merritt Chase. Later, Blackstone went to the Academie Julian in Paris, France to gain more experience with Jean Paul Laurens as her instructor. Blackstone started to gain attention as a renowned artist in 1907 when her painting, Soldat de Crimée, was exhibited in The Salon, Paris. She moved back to Glencoe, Illinois and focused more on her artwork by painting commissions and joining different art organizations, such as the Chicago Society of Artists and the Arts Club. Blackstone travelled to different locations, including Taos, New Mexico and Bruges, Belgium, to help inspire her creativity. In 1920, Blackstone moved back to New York City where she would spend the remainder of her life; she never married or had children. She died on March 16, 1939 and was survived by her brother and friends. During her art career, Blackstone often painted portraits of well-known people and over time she developed her own style of work. Her artwork was displayed in several prominent cities in the United States: Washington, D.C., Chicago, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and New York City. Some of Blackstone's artwork became part of permanent collections, such as Soldat de Crimée, which was acquired by the National Gallery of Art in 1921, now known as the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
Related Materials:
Also at the Archives of American Art is the Richard Wunder research material on Harriet Blackstone.
Provenance:
Microfilmed material transferred in 1978 from the National Collection of Fine Arts, who had acquired it in 1967 along with Harriet Blackstone's paintings from Stell Anderson, Blackstone's friend and a collector of her work. Anderson had received the papers from Blackstone's brother, Edward, in 1939. Upon Anderson's death, additional material was turned over to her niece Pat Rauchenstein, who donated them in 1989. Prior to the donation, the papers were in possession of Esther McCullough, who annotated some items and added research material in preparation for her unpublished manuscript "Harriet Blackstone, 1864-1939."
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Harriet Blackstone papers, 1870-1984. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.blacharr
See more items in:
Harriet Blackstone papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-blacharr
Online Media:

Vera Berdich papers

Creator:
Berdich, Vera, 1915-2003  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Art Institute of Chicago. School  Search this
Aubin, Barbara, 1928-2014  Search this
Blackshear, Kathleen, 1897-1988  Search this
Halstead, Whitney  Search this
Kucera, Kathryn  Search this
Spears, Ethel, 1903-1974  Search this
Webster, Lynn  Search this
Extent:
3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Date:
1947-1989
Scope and Contents:
Biographical material; letters received, many from people associated with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago; writings; sketchbooks; printed material; and a photograph album.
Included are biographical writings and resumes; letters (some illustrated) from friends, colleagues, and family, including Barbara Aubin, Kathleen Blackshear, Whitney Halstead, Thomas Kapsalis, Kathryn Kucera, Denis Loy, Ethel Spears, Lynn Webster and Berdich's sisters and cousins; letters from galleries and museums including the George Binet Gallery (N.Y.C.), the Yamada Gallery (Japan), the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Illinois Arts Council; subject files on the Art Institute of Chicago and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago; writings regarding printmaking techniques, an index of Berdich's art works; notes kept during Berdich's sabbatical in San Francisco; 4 sketchbooks; clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs; and photographs, slides and photo albums of Berdich, her friends, family and works of art.
Biographical / Historical:
Printmaker, educator; Chicago, Illinois.
Provenance:
Donated 1992 by Vera Berdich.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Printmakers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Women artists -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Identifier:
AAA.berdvera
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-berdvera

Oral history interview with Nelli Bar Wieghardt

Interviewee:
Wieghardt, Nelli Bar, 1904-2001  Search this
Interviewer:
Pacini, Marina  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Illinois Institute of Technology  Search this
Barnes, Albert C. (Albert Coombs), 1872-1951  Search this
Extent:
105 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1987 July 9-1989 April 29
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Nelli Bar Wieghardt conducted 1987 July 9-1989 April 29, by Marina Pacini, for the Archives of American Art.
Wieghardt discusses her and her husband Paul Wieghardt's art training in Germany; their move to Paris in 1931; their emigration to the United States in 1940 and their involvement with Quaker refugee programs; their move to a hostel in Cummington, Massachusetts and subsequent employment at the Cummington School in the Hills and the Berkshire Museum; their move in 1943 to Philadelphia to set up and run an art department for the Friends Neighborhood Guild; exhibitions at the Carlen Galleries and their relationship with Albert Barnes; the move in 1946 to Chicago and their teaching careers and methods at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois Institute of Technology; the University of Chicago, and the Evanston Art Center; their exhibition history; and the Wieghardt galleries at the State Museum, Ludensheid.
Biographical / Historical:
Nelli Bar Wieghardt (1904-2001) was a sculptor and instructor of Gwynedd, Pennsylvania and Chicago, Illinois.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 2 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Pennsylvania -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Sculptors -- Pennsylvania -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.wiegha87
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-wiegha87

Douglas Volk and Leonard Wells Volk papers

Creator:
Volk, Leonard Wells, 1828-1895  Search this
Volk, Douglas , 1856-1935  Search this
Names:
Chicago Academy of Design  Search this
Ecole nationale supérieure des beaux-arts (France)  Search this
Sabatos Industries  Search this
Adler, Felix, 1851-1933  Search this
Albert, King of the Belgians, I, 1875-1934 -- Photographs  Search this
Benson, Eugene, 1837-1908  Search this
Bridge, Marion Volk  Search this
Brush, George de Forest, 1855-1941  Search this
Chase, William Merritt, 1849-1916 -- Photographs  Search this
Chubb, Percival, 1860-1960  Search this
Daingerfield, Elliott, 1859-1932  Search this
Douglas, Stephen Arnold, 1813-1861  Search this
Gilbert, Cass, 1859-1934  Search this
Gérôme, Jean Léon, 1824-1904  Search this
Hale, Philip Leslie, 1865-1931 -- Photographs  Search this
Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865  Search this
Lloyd George, David, 1863-1945  Search this
Pershing, John J. (John Joseph), 1860-1948 -- Photographs  Search this
Volk, Gerome  Search this
Volk, Marion Larrabee, 1859-1925  Search this
Volk, Wendell  Search this
Weir, Julian Alden, 1852-1919  Search this
von Rydingsvaard, Karl  Search this
Extent:
12.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Paintings
Photographs
Sketches
Place:
Sculptors -- Maine
Date:
circa 1858-1965
2008
bulk 1870-1935
Summary:
The papers of painter and teacher Douglas Volk (1856-1935) and his father, sculptor Leonard Wells Volk (1828-1895), measure 12.4 linear feet and date from circa 1858-1965, 2008, with the bulk of the material dating from circa 1870-1935. Douglas Volk's papers document his life and career through biographical material, family and professional correspondence, writings and notes, diaries and journals, financial records, printed material, scrapbooks, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographs of the artist, his family, friends, and artwork. The papers also provide documentation of the formation and operations of the Sabatos Handicraft Society established with Marion Volk from the Volk's summer home, Hewnoaks, in Center Lovell, Maine. Scattered documentation of the life and work of Leonard Wells Volk, is found in biographical material, land records, letters, memoirs, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and teacher Douglas Volk (1856-1935) and his father, sculptor Leonard Wells Volk (1828-1895), measure 12.4 linear feet and date from circa 1858-1965, 2008, with the bulk of the material dating from circa 1870-1935. Douglas Volk's papers document his life and career through biographical material, family and professional correspondence, writings and notes, diaries and journals, financial records, printed material, scrapbooks, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographs of the artist, his family, friends, and artwork. The papers also provide documentation of the formation and operations of the Sabatos Handicraft Society established with Marion Volk from the Volk's summer home, Hewnoaks, in Center Lovell, Maine. Scattered documentation of the life and work of Leonard Wells Volk, is found in biographical material, land records, letters, memoirs, and photographs.

Douglas Volk's papers form the bulk of the collection and document all stages of his life from his first visits to Europe during his teenage years, until his death. Biographical material includes address books, biographical notes, genealogical records of Volk's family, and a warranty deed for land purchased by Marion Volk in Center Lovell, Maine, in 1904.

Family correspondence is primarily between Douglas and Marion throughout their courtship and marriage, but also includes letters from other family members including daughter Marion Volk Bridge and sons Wendell and Gerome Volk. General correspondence is with colleagues, art galleries, societies, institutions and museums, schools and colleges, government agencies, and others. Also found are letters from artists including George de Forest Brush, Elliott Daingerfield, Cass Gilbert, Philip Leslie Hale, Swedish woodcarver Karl von Rydingsvard, and J. Alden Weir; and friends Felix Adler and Percival Chubb.

Douglas Volk's writings and notes are on art, art instruction for children, and the significance and influence of his father's work, particularly Leonard Volk's Lincoln life mask, and include drafts of his monograph "Art Instruction in Public Schools."

Diaries and journals record details of Volk's early art education in Europe, including his friendships with Eugene Benson and George de Forest Brush and others, his time spent studying under Jean-Léon Gérôme at the École des Beaux Arts, his appointment by the National Art Committee to paint portraits of World War I era politicians and military figures, and his Lincoln portrait painted just prior to Volk's death.

Financial records document day-to-day routine expense, as well as sales of artwork and other art-related transactions.

Printed material and a scrapbook of clippings and letters include press coverage of Douglas Volk's career from the early 1900s to 1918. An additional scrapbook provides documentation of the Sabatos Handicraft Society, including a copy of one of only three known editions of the society's publication The Fire Fly. Artwork includes sketches, two small oil paintings, and fifteen sketchbooks of Douglas Volk.

Photographs include portraits taken at various stages of Volk's career, family photographs, photographs of the main house at Hewnoaks and additional buildings, photographs of several artists including William Merritt Chase and Karl von Rydinsgsvard, photographs of world leaders including David Lloyd George, King Albert of Belgium, and General John J. Pershing, and photographs of artwork.

The papers of Leonard Wells Volk include seven volumes of his hand-written memoirs which document his relationship with Stephen A. Douglas, his first meeting with Lincoln, and his involvement with the Chicago Academy of Design. Also found are three letters including one written to Douglas Volk in 1887, and a memorandum related to the value of Leonard Wells Volk's Lincoln and Douglas statues at the Illinois State House. Photographs include three of Leonard Wells Volk, photographs of other family members including his wife Emily, photos of houses and woodland scenes, and photos of artwork.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 2 series.

Series 1: Douglas Volk Papers, circa 1870-1965, 2008 (11.85 linear feet; Boxes 1-12, 15-16, OVs 13-14)

Series 2: Leonard Wells Volk Papers, circa 1858-circa 1930 (0.45 linear feet; Boxes 11-12)
Biographical / Historical:
Chicago sculptor Leonard Wells Volk (1828-1895) created one of only two life masks of Abraham Lincoln. His son, painter and teacher Douglas Volk (1856-1935), was known for his figure and portrait paintings. Douglas Volk and his wife Marion Larrabee Volk established the Sabatos Handicraft Society, producing homespun woolen rugs and textiles from their summer home in Center Lovell, Maine.

Leonard Wells Volk was raised in New York State and Massachusetts, before moving to St. Louis to learn modeling and drawing. Around 1852 he married Emily Clarissa King Barlow, a cousin of Senator Stephen A. Douglas. Douglas took an interest in Volk's career and helped finance his trip to Rome and Florence between 1855 and 1857, where Volk studied art. On returning from Europe Volk settled in Chicago, opening a studio there and establishing himself as a leader in art circles and a founder of the Chicago Academy of Design. He served as president of the Academy (later the School of the Art Institute of Chicago) for eight years. Volk recorded his first meeting with Lincoln during the 1858 Lincoln-Douglas debates, and the subsequent 1860 sittings with Lincoln for the life mask, hands, and bust, in his memoirs. The mask served as a model for many sculptors who made later portraits of Lincoln. Volk's other important works include the Rock Island County Soldier's Monument in Rochester, New York (1869), statues of Lincoln and Douglas for the Illinois Statehouse (1876), a bust of Douglas, and the Douglas Tomb monument (1881) in Chicago.

Douglas Volk was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts in 1856. His artistic education began in his teens when he traveled to Europe with his family. In the early 1870s he lived in Rome and Venice, spending time with his friends George de Forest Brush and J. Alden Weir. He moved to Paris in 1873 where he studied at the École des Beaux Arts with Jean-Léon Gérôme, and exhibited his first picture, In Brittany, at the 1875 Paris Salon.

In 1879 Volk returned to the United States and accepted a teaching position at Cooper Union. He was elected to the Society of American Artists in 1880 and married Marion Larrabee in 1881. In 1883 Volk became a founder of the Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts and was appointed the first president of the subsequent Minneapolis School of Fine Arts in 1886, a position he held until 1893. During his time in Minneapolis, Volk purchased a summer studio and retreat in Osceola, Wisconsin, and he and Marion had four children: Leonard (1882-1891), Wendell (1884-1953), Marion (1888-1973) and Gerome (1890-1959). In 1893 Volk returned to New York and accepted a position at the Art Students League, where he taught from 1893-1898, and also resumed his post at Cooper Union. He became interested in innovative ways to teach art and art history to children, and in 1895 the National Academy of Design printed his essay "A Plea for Art in the Public Schools," in its annual exhibition catalog. He was elected an associate of the Academy in 1898, becoming a full academician in 1899.

In 1898, looking to provide the family with a summer retreat, Marion Volk purchased property with a friend in Center Lovell, Maine, an area already enjoyed by the couple's friends, George de Forest Brush and Percival Chubb. The property was divided in 1901 and Marion added to her half creating a lot of approximately twenty-five acres. The Volks renovated the house, which they named Hewnoaks, and eventually built four more cottages and a studio for Douglas Volk on the property. During this period Marion Volk was working with handwoven wool on traditional area looms using fruit and vegetable hand-dyes and designs based on motifs from Native American art. In 1902 the Volks held the founding meeting of the Sabatos Handicraft Society at Hewnoaks, and the property became the hub of a Center Lovell community effort to produce rugs, textiles, and other handicrafts using traditional methods. Daughter Marion worked with her mother, and son Wendell, a printmaker and woodcaver, operated the Hewn Beam Press, printing pamphlets and a newsletter entitled the Fire Fly: A Periodical of Fearless Endeavour. Swedish-born wood carver Karl von Rydingsvard offered classes on wood carving at Hewnoaks, assisted by Wendell Volk.

Douglas Volk worked to make the Hewnoaks handicraft movement a success, but focused primarily on his own painting. The Maine woods provided endless inspiration and the setting for many of his paintings and murals, which primarily depicted romanticized historical subjects in Colonial America and reflected his traditional academic training. One of his best known works, The Boy with the Arrow (1903), a portrait of his son Leonard "Leo" Volk who died at the age of eight, is now in the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Volk taught at the National Academy of Design from 1910-1917. He served as recording secretary and then on the council for the organization from 1910-1919. His acclaimed intimate portraits of friends and acquaintances, including Felix Adler (1914) and William Macbeth (1917), were painted during this period. In 1919 Volk was one of a group of artists commissioned by the National Art Committee to paint major figures from World War I. He subsequently painted portraits of King Albert of Belgium, British Prime Minister David Lloyd George, and General John J. Pershing, and recorded his meetings and sittings with the three men in his journals.

For the last fifteen years of his life Volk, using his father's life mask, painted a series of portraits of Abraham Lincoln, one of which hangs in the Lincoln Bedroom at The White House.

At least fifteen years prior to her death in 1925, Marion Volk's involvement in handicrafts at Hewnoaks declined, while Douglas Volk continued to focus on his own work. Wendell Volk's career in civil engineering took precedence over his interest in weaving and woodcarving and both he and his brother Gerome moved West in 1909. Following Douglas Volk's death in Fryeburg, Maine in 1935, Wendell Volk and his wife Jessie, also an artist, ultimately took possession of Hewnoaks. Wendell died in 1953, but the property was eventually bequeathed by Jessie Volk to the University of Maine and now operates as an artist colony.
Separated Materials:
Volumes 1, 3, 6-7, 9, and 10 of Leonard Volk's memoirs form part of the Alfred Whital Stern Collection of Lincolniana in the Library of Congress.

The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel 4280) including correspondence of Leonard Volk and photographs of his artwork. Lent materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The George Arents Research Library, Syracuse University in Syracuse, New York first lent material for microfilming in 1989. Most of the material was then donated in 2004–2005 by Jessie J. Volk, the daughter-in-law of Douglas Volk, who also bequeathed the Volk estate including additional Volk papers to the University of Maine. In 2006, University officials arranged for an auction of much of the property of the estate including the remaining family papers. The Volk Family estate auction was conducted by Cyr Auction Co., in Gray, Maine, on July 19, 2006. Several individuals purchased parts of the papers at that auction and subsequently donated them to the Archives. Those donors are: David Wright, who acquired the 1875 journal and Brush letters and donated them to the Archives in 2006; Dr. Christine Isabelle Oaklander, who purchased the account book, 1873–1875, and donated it to the Archives in honor of Judith Ellen Throm in 2007, and also donated additional letters and a photograph in 2008; and Mary K. and John F. McGuigan Jr., who purchased correspondence (1120 letters), speeches, lectures, articles, checks, check stubs and miscellaneous items and donated them to the Archives in 2015. In 2007, the University of Maine Foundation via Amos Orcutt donated the 1934 journal and 60 photographs.

John F. McGuigan Jr. and Mary K. McGuigan have purchased and donated additional archival materials to the Archives, including the Mary K. McGuigan and John F. McGuigan Jr. artists' letters collection, and 69 letters now among the Sylvester Rosa Koehler papers.

In 2007, the University of Maine Foundation via Amos Orcutt donated the 1934 journal and 60 photographs that were part of the Volk Family estate, but not included in the June 19, 2006 auction.

In 2019 Dr. Christine Isabelle Oaklander donated additional material purchased at auction, primarily photographs and some printed material.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Maine  Search this
Art teachers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Paintings
Photographs
Sketches
Citation:
Douglas Volk and Leonard Wells Volk papers, circa 1858-1965, 2008, bulk circa 1870-1935. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.volkleon
See more items in:
Douglas Volk and Leonard Wells Volk papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-volkleon
Online Media:

Seymour Rosofsky papers

Creator:
Rosofsky, Seymour, 1924-  Search this
Names:
Stipe, William S., 1916-  Search this
Extent:
4.5 Linear feet ((on 7 microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Sketchbooks
Date:
1945-1982
Scope and Contents:
Sketchbooks, prints, drawings, correspondence, and business and printed materials relating to the activities of Seymour Rosofsky.
Reels 4183-4187: Sixty sketchbooks (circa 1945-1980) range in size from 5" x 8" to 18" x 24" and are accompanied by 2 linocuts and 42 drawings and watercolors.
Reels 4187-4189: Biographical materials include resumes (1959-1981), a transcript (1970) from the Art Institute of Chicago and medical records (1966-1967, 1980). Correspondence (1947-1981) concerns art-related activities and includes 12 letters (1978-1981) from William Stipe, letters of condolence (1981) to Carol Rosofsky after her husband's death, and a file (1981-1982) on the Rosofsky Memorial Fund. Business records consist of an accounts notebook of works sent out (1978-1981), income tax returns (1969-1976), invoices (1966-1981) for art supplies, receipts (1963-1982) and 5 leases (1969-1981) for Rosofsky's apartment.
A file (1968-1973) contains letters and printed material concerning the Chicago City College art program. Printed materials consist of clippings (1954-1981), press releases (1961-1981), exhibition announcements and catalogs (1966-1981), and publications containing illustrations by Rosofsky. Other materials include a proposal (1967) for a center for craftsmen and artists, lists of exhibitions and PAC members, a linocut portrait of a man, 30 ink sketches and a card file of addresses.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, printmaker and art instructor, Chicago, Illinois. Studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago with Boris Anisfeld, a student of Chagall, and at the Universities of Biarritz and Chicago. Rosofsky was part of the group of Chicago artists known as the "Monster Roster" in the early 1950s. His surrealistic works were usually set in Chicago. He taught at Loop Junior College (Chicago City Colleges) from 1964 until his death in 1981.
Provenance:
Loaned and donated by Rosofsky's widow, Carol Rosofsky.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Printmakers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Surrealism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Sketchbooks
Identifier:
AAA.rososeym
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rososeym

Oral history interview with Hubert Leckie and Alexander Giampietro

Interviewee:
Leckie, Hubert W., 1913-1993  Search this
Creator:
Giampietro, Alexander (1912-2010)  Search this
Interviewer:
Kirwin, Liza  Search this
Names:
Institute of Contemporary Arts (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Institute of Design (Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
New Bauhaus (Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
Extent:
37 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1992 Feb. 13
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Hubert Leckie and Alexander Giampietro conducted 1992 Feb. 13, by Liza Kirwin, for the Archives of American Art.
Leckie and Giampietro recall their student days at the New Bauhaus in Chicago (fall 1937- summer 1938) and the teaching methods of Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Alexander Archipenko, Hin Bredendieck, Gyorgy Kepes, David Dushkin, and others there; the New Bauhaus approach to design; the closing of the school in 1938 and its reincarnation in the Institute of Design; Leckie's application of New Bauhaus principles in his teaching at American University and the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) in Washington, D.C.; ICA exhibitions and programs; both teaching at the ICA from 1948 to 1951; their impressions of ICA director Robert Richman; the impact of the ICA on the Washington, D.C. art scene; and the exchange between the ICA, American University, the Washington Workshop Center for the Arts, Catholic University, and other schools. Leckie also discusses his role as the designer of the Archives of American Art Journal.
Biographical / Historical:
Hubert Leckie (1913-1993) was an art instructor and designer in Washington, D.C. Leckie is a former art instructor and was the designer of the Archives of American Art Journal. Alexander Giampietro (1912-2010) was a professor of art at Catholic University.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 34 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Training of -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art teachers -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Designers -- Interviews  Search this
Function:
Art Schools -- Washington (D.C.)
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.leckie92
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-leckie92

Paul Kelpe papers

Creator:
Kelpe, Paul, 1902-1985  Search this
Extent:
2 Microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Date:
1927-1980
Scope and Contents:
A list of exhibitions, 1980; printed material, including clippings, exhibition catalogs, a book cover reproduction of a painting by Kelpe, and a book AMERICAN ABSTRACT ARTISTS 1936-1966, which mentions Kelpe.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, instructor, art historian; Chicago, Ill. and Austin, Texas.
Provenance:
Microfilmed as part of the Archives of American Art's Texas project.
Lent for microfilming 1983 by Paul Kelpe.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Texas -- Austin  Search this
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Painters -- Texas -- Austin  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art, Abstract  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.kelppaul
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kelppaul

Clara MacGowan papers

Creator:
MacGowan, Clara, 1895-1983  Search this
Names:
Illinois Historical Art Project  Search this
MacGowan, Clara, 1895-1983  Search this
Extent:
0.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1929-1978
Scope and Contents:
Biographical data; photographs of MacGowan; and a scrapbook containing letters, newspaper clippings and other printed material, 1929-1932, documenting her work. Also included is an album of photographs of seventy-four paintings by MacGowan compiled in 1977, to facilitate the distribution of her estate.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, educator; Chicago, Ill. MacGowan was Assistant and later Associate Professor of Art at Northwestern University from 1927-1947, and a frequent lecturer at local women's clubs and exhibitor at the Arts Club of Chicago and the Chicago Society of Artists.
Provenance:
Donated 1996 by the Illinois Historical Art Project through Joel Dryer.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Women art teachers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Women artists -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.macgclar
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-macgclar

Ed Colker papers

Creator:
Colker, Ed, 1927-  Search this
Names:
Atelier Desjobert  Search this
Haybarn Press  Search this
United States. Army  Search this
Barnet, Will, 1911-2012  Search this
Johnson, J. Curtis  Search this
Konner, Melvin  Search this
Norris, Kathleen, 1947-  Search this
Pease, Deborah  Search this
Takaezu, Toshiko  Search this
Walker, Jeanne Murray  Search this
Extent:
3.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
1944-2020
Summary:
The papers of painter, printmaker, educator and administrator Ed Colker are dated 1944-2020 and measure 3.4 linear feet. Colker's painting, printmaking, and Haybarn Press, as well as his career as an art teacher and university administrator, are documented through biographical materials, correspondence, interviews, writings, subject files, printed material, and photographs. There is a 0.2 linear ft. addition to the collection donated in 2020 that includes lists of works of art, exhibition information, letters to Colker, talks and lecutres by Colker, printed material and miscellany.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter, printmaker, educator and administrator Ed Colker are dated 1944-2020 and measure 3.4 linear feet. Colker's painting, printmaking, and Haybarn Press, as well as his career as an art teacher and university administrator, are documented through biographical materials, correspondence, interviews, writings, subject files, printed material, and photographs. There is a 0.2 linear ft. addition to the collection donated in 2020 that includes lists of works of art, exhibition information, letters to Colker, talks and lecutres by Colker, printed material and miscellany.

Biographical materials include official letters regarding Colker's performance in the Army, caricatures of him, diplomas, resume, awards, and certificates.

Correspondence, mainly professional in nature with a few scattered personal letters, concerns Colker's academic and artistic work, Haybarn Editions, exhibitions, projects, and various interests. Poet correspondents are J. Curtis Johnson, Kathleen Norris, Deborah Pease, and Jeanne Walker; translators include Melvin Konner and others.

Interviews with Ed Colker, conducted between 1982 and 2008 for various purposes, are preserved as 1 sound cassette and published transcripts. Also found are 1 sound cassette, 1 videocassette, and a published transcript of interviews Colker conducted with Will Barnet and Toshiko Takaezu in 1981 and 1994 respectively.

Among Colker's writings are the published versions of several articles and the manuscript of an unpublished one; two proposed books for students of design and typography; lectures delivered to students (3 videocassettes), miscellaneous writings, notes, and 1 videocassete of readings by artists from one of Colker's Haybarn Press poetry portfolios.

Subject files document many of Colker's professional interests, activities, projects, and relationships. Also of note are files about Haybarn Press.

The bulk of the printed material consists of exhibition catalogs, announcements, and school catalogs. Almost all is about or mentions Colker, or features reproductions of his work. Of note is the first and only issue of Re-Art: A Reflection of Current Ideas on the Arts (1954), published by Colker and Gene Feldman.

Photographs are of Colker and his family; Colker at events related to his artistic, academic, and publishing activities; artwork by Colker, and his work as reproduced in Haybarn Editions. Also found are an exterior view of the barn studio and one of printers working at Desjobert Press.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1946-circa 2011 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 2: Correspondence,1954-2011 (Box 1; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 3: Interviews, 1981-2008 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1961-1990s (Box 1; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 5: Subject files, 1952-2013 (Boxes 2-3; 1.3 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material,1944-2011 (Box 3; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1960s-2010 (Box 4; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 8: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1963-2020 (Box 5; 0.2 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Ed Colker (b. 1927) is a painter, printmaker, educator, and administrator who has worked in Chicago, Philadelphia, and New York City. Colker founded the not-for-profit fine art publisher Haybarn Press. He is married to artist Elaine Galen and resides in Mt. Kisco, NY.

After high school, Colker was awarded a scholarship and began his art education at the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Arts. He interrupted his studies to serve in the U.S. Army (1944-1946). He graduated in 1949, by which time the school had become the Philadelphia Museum School of Art; today it is the University of the Arts. He taught art in the Philadelphia area before moving to New York City in 1956. Later, Colker earned degrees from New York University (B.S. Ed, 1964; M.A., 1985).

Colker taught art and design courses at the University of Pennsylvania, University of Illinois at Chicago Circle, Cornell University, Pratt Institute, and Philadelphia College of Art. By the 1980s, he had become an administrator as well as a professor. Throughout his academic career, Colker published and lectured widely, served as a visiting artist, acted as a consultant, and participated in professional organizations. He occasionally organized exhibitions and served on exhibition juries.

Since 1960, under the imprints Editions du Grenier, Haybarn Editions, and Haybarn Press, Colker has published limited edition books, portfolios, broadsides, individual pages, and folders of poetry. Most are accompanied by Colker's etchings and lithographs inspired by the texts. Haybarn Press, under the Ambor Edition imprint, also produced four portfolios with text and drawings by Elaine Galen, 1996-2008. From its inception, the work of Haybarn Press has been featured in many exhibitions of book arts. Colker also participated in group shows throughout the United States and enjoyed solo exhibitions of his paintings and prints. Haybarn Press productions and Colker's prints and paintings are in the permanent collections of Brown University, Cornell University, Harvard University, Library of Congress, Museum of Modern Art, New York Public Library, University of Arizona Museum of Art, and others.

Now retired from university administration and teaching, Colker continues to operate Haybarn Press and occasionally serves as an exhibition juror and visiting artist.
Provenance:
Donated by Ed Colker in 1991, 2013 and 2020.
Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- United States  Search this
Painters -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Printmakers -- United States  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Printing  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Transcripts  Search this
Design  Search this
Educators -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.colked
See more items in:
Ed Colker papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-colked

Francis Chapin papers

Creator:
Chapin, Francis, 1899-1965  Search this
Names:
Albright, Ivan, 1897-1983  Search this
Chapin, Vivian  Search this
Hopper, Edward, 1882-1967  Search this
Kurtz, Edmund  Search this
Mangravite, Peppino, 1896-  Search this
Pattison, Abbott L. (Abbott Lawrence), 1916-1999  Search this
Wilson, Douglas  Search this
Wines, James, 1932-  Search this
Extent:
0.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Date:
1917-1984
Scope and Contents:
Biographical documents; correspondence; art works; scrapbooks; photographs; and printed material.
A passport, 1928; 7 biographical sketches; correspondence, primarily to Chapin's wife and to friend, David McCosh; lists of paintings; a list of guests; 2 illustrated notebooks; price lists; receipts for works of art, 1948-1974; a proof of a lithograph; 2 drawings; 2 sketchbooks, one by Vivian Chapin, 1960; a scrapbook, 1950-1966, containing clippings and an exhibition catalog, 1958; a scrapbook containing clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, 4 letters, and photographs; printed materials; and photographs of Chapin, his associates, and his work.
Biographical / Historical:
Painter, lithographer, teacher; Chicago, Illinois. Studied at Art Institute of Chicago 1922-1929, travelled in Europe with David McCosh 1929, returning to study lithography with Bolton Brown. Chapin taught at the Art Institute of Chicago, 1929-1945, Grant Wood's school, 1932, and was director of the Institute's Summer School at Saugatuck, 1932-1940. He was artist-in-residence at University of Georgia, 1952.
Related Materials:
REEL 875: Also in the Archives on microfilm only are papers lent for microfilming in 1974 (reel 875), comprising biographical data; business and personal correspondence, 1930-1964, including one or more letters each from Ivan Albright, Edward Hopper, Edmund Kurtz, Abbott Pattison, Peppino Mangravite, and James Wines; three sketchbooks; loose sketches and two Christmas card designs; writings and talks by Chapin; a scrapbook of clippings, sketches, photographs, and memorabilia, 1917-1921; photos of his family and his works; exhibition catalogs and announcements, 1933-1974; clippings, 1928-1968; bills and receipts; a typescript of a conversation between Vivian Chapin and artist Douglas Wilson, 1956; and miscellany.
Francis Chapin sketchbooks also located at: Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson Library.
Provenance:
Material on reel 875 lent for microfilming 1974 by Chapin's wife. Chapin's son Todd donated additional material 1986.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art teachers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Lithographers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.chapfran
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-chapfran

Oral history interview with Aaron Bohrod

Interviewee:
Bohrod, Aaron  Search this
Interviewer:
Prince, Sue Ann  Search this
Extent:
3 Items (Sound recording: 3 sound files, digital, wav file)
28 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1984 Aug. 23
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Aaron Bohrod conducted 1984 Aug. 23, by Sue Ann Kendall, at the artist's home in Chicago, Ill., for the Archives of American Art.
Bohrod discusses his life and art, focusing on the nature of the trompe-l'oeil still lifes he has been painting since the early 1950s.
Biographical / Historical:
Aaron Bohrod (1907-1992) was a painter and teacher from Chicago, Ill. Studied with John Sloan in New York. Worked for Life magazine during WWII painting scenes at the front, and later was artist-in-residence at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago -- Interviews  Search this
Art teachers -- Wisconsin -- Madison  Search this
Topic:
Trompe l'oeil painting  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.bohrod84
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bohrod84

Barbara Aubin papers

Creator:
Aubin, Barbara, 1928-2014  Search this
Extent:
8.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Video recordings
Date:
circa 1950-2006
Scope and Contents:
Personal and professional correspondence; writings; personal business records; photographs of Aubin, her works of art and family; scrapbooks; two VHS videos and printed material relating to painter, teacher, and curator Barbara Aubin.
Also included is a miniature portrait of a man "Joshua" (presumably a relative of Aubin's) painted on ivory in a medallion, possibly dated 1867.
Biographical / Historical:
Barbara Aubin (1928-2014) was a painter, teacher, and curator in Chicago, Illinois.
Provenance:
Donated 2016 by the Barbara Aubin estate via Amie Hyman, executor.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Curators -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Women artists -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Video recordings
Identifier:
AAA.aubibarb
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-aubibarb

Mary Andersen Clark papers

Creator:
Clark, Mary Andersen, 1910-1994  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (Ill.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Reel (ca. 250 items (on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reels
Date:
[ca.1933]-1988
Scope and Contents:
Papers chiefly relating to Clark's career during the 1930s. Biographical data, including a letter in which Clark describes her work for the Federal Art Project in Illinois; personal photographs; photographs of work, including "Peace" and "Harvest," with photographs of the dedication and rededication ceremonies of these two heroic-size sculptures; and clippings.
Biographical / Historical:
Sculptor, instructor in sculpture and ceramics at Syracuse University, N.Y. Clark worked for the WPA-FAP in Illinois in the 1930s. Two heroic-size sculptures, "Peace" and "Harvest," commissioned by the FAP are currently located at the County Courthouse Plaza, Peoria, Illinois. They have been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Clark studied at Carnegie Tech, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the British Academy, Rome, Italy. She also took a life class with her uncle, sculptor John Storrs.
Provenance:
Lent for microfilming 1988 by Mary A. Clark.
Restrictions:
The Archives of American art does not own the original papers. Use is limited to the microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art teachers  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Topic:
Women sculptors -- Illinois  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.clarmary
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-clarmary

Buehr family papers

Creator:
Buehr family  Search this
Names:
Buehr, George Frederick, 1905-1983  Search this
Buehr, Karl Albert, 1866-1952  Search this
Buehr, Mary Guion Hess, 1871-1962  Search this
Granger, Kathleen Buehr  Search this
Hess, William, 1838-1964  Search this
Extent:
0.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Photographs
Date:
1880-1984
Summary:
The Buehr family papers date from 1880-1984 and measure 0.7 linear feet. The collection documents the lives and careers of a prominent Chicago family of artists, which included Karl Albert Buehr, his wife Mary Hess Buehr, their children Kathleen Buehr Granger and George F. Buehr, and Karl Buehr's brother-in-law, Will Hess. Found among the papers are biographical accounts, family histories, Karl Buehr's personal and professional correspondence, love letters between Karl and Mary Hess, writing by various family members, printed materials, artwork in the form of drawings by Kathleen Buehr Granger, and family and travel photographs, including two photo albums.
Scope and Content Note:
The Buehr family papers date from 1880-1984 and measure 0.7 linear feet. The collection documents the lives and careers of a prominent Chicago family of artists, which included Karl Albert Buehr, his wife Mary Hess Buehr, their children Kathleen Buehr Granger and George F. Buehr, and Karl Buehr's brother-in-law, Will Hess. Found among the papers are biographical accounts, family histories, Karl Buehr's personal and professional correspondence, love letters between Karl and Mary Hess, writing by various family members, printed materials, artwork in the form of drawings by Kathleen Buehr Granger, and family and travel photographs, including two photo albums.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as six series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1880-1976 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1898-1980 (8 folders; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1915-1970 (4 folders; Box 1)

Series 4: Printed Material, circa 1899-1984 (12 folders; Box 1-2, OV 3)

Series 5: Artwork, circa 1940-circa 1975 (6 folders; Box 2)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1886-1947 (0.2 linear feet; Box 2)
Biographical Note:
The Buehr family was a prominent Chicago family of artists, which included Karl Albert Buehr, his wife Mary Hess Buehr, their children Kathleen Buehr Granger and George F. Buehr, and Karl Buehr's brother-in-law, Will Hess.

Born in 1866 in Germany, Karl Albert Buehr was a painter of genre scenes, portraits, and Impressionist landscapes. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Julian Academy in France and the London School of Art. From 1899 to 1902 he lived in Holland, and then spent the first decade of the twentieth century at Giverny, France. A member of the Giverny artists, Buehr exhibited widely in Europe. Buehr became a U.S. citizen and served in the U.S. Cavalry during the Spanish-American War. In Chicago he became a highly respected teacher at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and one of the city's most popular painters. Buehr died in Chicago in 1952.

Karl's wife, Mary Hess Buehr, was born in Chicago in 1871. She was a painter who studied in Holland and France, and held three exhibitions at the Paris Salon. Mary specialized in miniatures and decorative paintings. She was also a lithographer, lecturer, and teacher active in Chicago. She died in Orwell, Vermont, in 1962.

Their children, Kathleen and George F. Buehr, were both artists as well. George, known for his watercolors and collages, was director of museum education and a lecturer at the Art Institute of Chicago. He died in Chicago in 1983 at age 78. Kathleen was born in Chicago in 1902. A graduate of the Art Institute of Chicago, Kathleen was painter and author. Several of her articles are found in the papers, including "My Most Unforgettable Character," published in 1969 in The Reader's Digest.
Provenance:
George Buehr's wife, Margo Hoff, donated the family papers in April, 1986, as part of the Archives' Chicago survey project. George Granger, son of Kathleen Buehr Granger, donated the remaining material in June, 1986.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Landscape painters  Search this
Art teachers  Search this
Portrait painters  Search this
Topic:
Expatriate painters -- France -- Giverny  Search this
Impressionism (Art)  Search this
Art, American -- French influences  Search this
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Miniature painters  Search this
Watercolorists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Photographs
Citation:
Buehr family papers, 1880-1984. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.buehfami
See more items in:
Buehr family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-buehfami
Online Media:

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