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Josef Albers papers

Creator:
Albers, Josef  Search this
Names:
Baltimore Museum of Art  Search this
Maryland Institute, College of Art  Search this
Albers, Anni  Search this
Arp, Jean, 1887-1966  Search this
Leake, Eugene, 1911-  Search this
Tyler, Kenneth E.  Search this
Extent:
1.5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Poems
Interviews
Date:
1929-1970
Summary:
The papers of painter, printmaker, and art teacher Josef Albers date from 1929 to 1970 and measure 1.5 linear feet. Found within the papers are biographical materials, writings, a recorded lecture, and photographs. The bulk of the collection consists of printed materials.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter, printmaker, and art teacher Josef Albers date from 1929 to 1970 and measure 1.5 linear feet. Found within the papers are biographical materials, writings, a recorded lecture, and photographs. The bulk of the collection consists of printed materials.

Biographical material consists of a curriculum vitae, bibliographic lists, a transcript of a "Yale Reports" radio interview in which Albers discusses art as a port of general education, and a photocopy of a letter from Eugene W. Leake of the Maryland Institute discussing a work by Albers in the Baltimore Museum.

Writings and Lectures are primarily photocopies of poems and typescripts by Albers concerning his theories on art, as well as an sound tape reel recording of Albers delivering a lecture at Yale University. There are also photocopied typescripts about Albers written by others including a typescript "Josef Albers" by Hans Jean Arp.

Printed material primarily consists of clippings and exhibition announcements and catalogs, some of which are annotated by Albers. There are also two exhibition catalogs for Anni Albers, press releases, a copy of poetry publication Origin 8, 2 books by Albers, Embossed Linear Compositions and Josef Albers: Poems and Drawings, the book American Abstract Artists, 1936-1966, and miscellaneous brochures.

Photographs consist of two copies of the same image of Josef Albers pin registering one of his prints with Tamarind artisan Ken Tyler.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 4 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1957-1970 (3 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Writings and Lecture, 1936-1967 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 3: Printed Material, 1929-1969 (1.3 linear feet; Boxes 1-3)

Series 4: Photographs, circa 1968 (1 folder; Box 2)
Biographical / Historical:
Josef Albers (1888-1976) of Dessau, Germany, Black Mountain, North Carolina, and New Haven, Connecticut, was a painter, printmaker, and art teacher advocating a disciplined approach to composition, form, and color.

Josef Albers was born on March 19, 1888 in Bottrop, Westphalia, Germany, the only child of Lorenz Albers, a housepainter, and Magdelena (Schumacher) Albers. He attended the Präparanden-Schule in Langenhorst from 1902 to 1905 and then the teachers college in Büren, graduating in 1908. He became an instructor in several Westphalian primary schools.

Albers studied at the Royal Art School in Berlin, the Arts and Crafts School (Folkwang School) in Essen, and at the Art Academy in Munich under Franz Stuck before enrolling at the Bauhaus in Weimar in 1920. In 1923, he became an instructor and in 1925, when the school was transplanted to Dessau, he became a Bauhausmeister, teaching his fundamental design course. He remained in that position in Dessau and Berlin until 1933, when under pressure from National Socialism, the school was shut down. In that year, Albers emigrated to the United States, becoming a professor of painting at Black Mountain College in North Carolina.

In 1949, Albers moved to Yale University where he taught in the Department of Design and served as Chairman of the Art Department. Following his retirement in 1960, Albers continued to live in New Haven with his wife, textile artist Anni Albers.

Albers served as a guest teacher in Ulm, Germany, and in many colleges and art schools in the United States, Mexico, and South America. He was also an author of poems and books concerning art theory.

Josef Albers died on March 25, 1976 in New Haven, Connecticut.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives is an oral history interview with Albers conducted by Sevim Fesci in 1968, and a collection of letters from Albers to J. B. Naumann that was loaned to the Archives by the Brooklyn Museum for microfilming and is available on microfilm reel 911.
Provenance:
The Josef Albers papers were donated by the artist in 1969 and 1970. A small collection of additional Albers papers and an audio recording of a lecture with an unknown provenance were integrated.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art teachers  Search this
Painters  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Poems
Interviews
Citation:
Josef Albers papers, 1929-1970. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.albejose
See more items in:
Josef Albers papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ab065186-b199-4ce3-8502-db4febf6c189
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-albejose
Online Media:

Anni Albers papers

Creator:
Albers, Anni  Search this
Names:
Bauhaus  Search this
Black Mountain College (Black Mountain, N.C.)  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1924-1969
Summary:
The papers of artist and weaver Anni Albers measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1924-1969. They consist primarily of printed materials about Alber's exhibitions, Bauhaus training, and Black Mountain weaving classes.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of artist and weaver Anni Albers measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1924-1969. They consist primarily of printed materials about Alber's exhibitions, Bauhaus training, and Black Mountain weaving classes.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as one series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Printed Materials, 1929-1969 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Anni Albers (1899-1994) was a textile designer, weaver, writer, and printmaker who worked in Connecticut and at the Black Mountain College in North Carolina.

Anni Albers was born in Germany in 1899 and attended the Bauhaus where she met her husband designer Josef Albers in 1922; they married in 1925. At the Bauhaus. she experimented with new materials for weaving and executed richly colored designs on paper for wall hangings and textiles in silk, cotton, and linen yarns.

When the Bauhaus moved to Dessau, the Albers lived alongside the families of artist teachers Lyonel Feininger, Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Oscar Schlemmer, and others in one of the masters' houses designed by Gropius. In 1933, the Albers emigrated to the U.S. to work at the experimental Black Mountain College in North Carolina. Both taught at Black Mountain until 1949. During these years Anni Albers' weavings were shown throughout the US and she published many articles on textiles and design, culminating in a 1949 show at the Museum of Modern Art, the first of its kind for a textile artist.

In 1950, Josef accepted the position of chair of the design department at Yale and the Albers moved to Connecticut. During the 1950s and 1960s, Anni worked productively from a home studio, producing fabric patterns, creating "pictorial" weavings, and writing articles and books about weaving, including On Designing in 1952 and On Weaving in 1965. During the 1960s she also started printmaking and devoted much of her later career to this artform.

Anni Albers died in Connecticut in 1994.
Related Material:
Also found among the holdings of the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Anni Albers by Sevim Fesci on July 5, 1968.
Provenance:
Anni Albers donated the papers in 1969.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Connecticut -- New Haven  Search this
Authors -- Connecticut -- New Haven  Search this
Printmakers -- Connecticut -- New Haven  Search this
Weavers -- Connecticut -- New Haven  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Citation:
Anni Albers papers, 1924-1969. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.albeanni
See more items in:
Anni Albers papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw900c2d513-2fee-4b6f-b954-bed462a88926
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-albeanni

Oral history interview with Josef Albers, 1968 June 22-July 5

Interviewee:
Albers, Josef, 1888-1976  Search this
Albers, Josef, 1888-1976  Search this
Interviewer:
Fesci, Sevim  Search this
Subject:
Heckel, Erich  Search this
Itten, Johannes  Search this
Kirchner, Ernst Ludwig  Search this
Schmidt-Rottluff, Karl  Search this
Stuck, Franz, Ritter von  Search this
Bauhaus  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Die Brücke (Dresden)  Search this
Painters -- Connecticut -- New Haven -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11847
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214202
AAA_collcode_albersj68
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_214202
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Bernard Chaet, 1997 June 18-August 15

Interviewee:
Chaet, Bernard, 1924-2012  Search this
Chaet, Bernard, 1924-2012  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F  Search this
Subject:
Albers, Josef  Search this
Zerbe, Karl  Search this
Boris Mirski Gallery (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Yale University. School of Art  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13280
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216431
AAA_collcode_chaet97
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_216431
Online Media:

Josef Albers papers, 1929-1970

Creator:
Albers, Josef, 1888-1976  Search this
Albers, Josef, 1888-1976  Search this
Subject:
Leake, Eugene  Search this
Tyler, Kenneth E.  Search this
Arp, Jean  Search this
Albers, Anni  Search this
Baltimore Museum of Art  Search this
Maryland Institute, College of Art  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Poems
Interviews
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Theme:
Art Movements and Schools  Search this
American Art and Artists in a Global Context  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)5803
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)208643
AAA_collcode_albejose
Theme:
Art Movements and Schools
American Art and Artists in a Global Context
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_208643
Online Media:

Josef Albers letters to J. B. Neumann, 1934-1947

Creator:
Albers, Josef, 1888-1976  Search this
Albers, Josef, 1888-1976  Search this
Subject:
Neumann, J. B. (Jsrael Ber)  Search this
Theme:
Art Movements and Schools  Search this
American Art and Artists in a Global Context  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)5952
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)208795
AAA_collcode_albejose2
Theme:
Art Movements and Schools
American Art and Artists in a Global Context
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_208795

Oral history interview with Anni Albers

Interviewee:
Albers, Anni  Search this
Interviewer:
Fesci, Sevim  Search this
Names:
Bauhaus  Search this
Klee, Paul, 1879-1940  Search this
Extent:
20 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1968 July 5
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Anni Albers conducted 1968 July 5, by Sevim Fesci, for the Archives of American Art, in New Haven, Connecticut.
Albers speaks of her educational background; Paul Klee as a teacher; color in weaving; techniques and materials; Peruvian and European textiles; her "sound-absorbing" textile designed for the Bauhaus auditorium; and her weaving workshop at Black Mountain College. She reminisces about the Bauhaus in the 1920s.
Biographical / Historical:
Anni Albers (1899-1994) was a weaver from New Haven, Connecticut.
General:
Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 40 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Connecticut -- New Haven  Search this
Authors -- Connecticut -- New Haven  Search this
Printmakers -- Connecticut -- New Haven  Search this
Weavers -- Connecticut -- New Haven  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Women printmakers  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Textile fabrics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.albersa68
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw91499ea5d-a113-4db4-901d-d969049c126e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-albersa68
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Bernard Chaet

Interviewee:
Chaet, Bernard  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Boris Mirski Gallery (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Yale University. School of Art  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Zerbe, Karl, 1903-1972  Search this
Extent:
5 Items (sound files (3 hrs., 30 min.), digital, wav file)
92 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1997 June 18-August 15
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Bernard Chaet conducted 1997 June 18-August 15, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art, at Chaet's home in Rockport, Massachusetts.
Chaet briefly speaks of his life growing up in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston and his family, in particular his father, before segueing into his early beginnings as an artist and his acceptance into the School of the Museum of Fine Arts; he discusses his training there, as well as the three-year interim after he quit and before he completed his education at Tufts University when he worked alone; he refers to his teacher and the head of the Department of Painting at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Karl Zerbe, often, including his falling out with Zerbe, citing this as the reason his quit the school; he recalls his relationship with Boston art gallery owner Boris Mirski, who supported him from an early stage and sent him to Europe when he was young, the evolution of his relationship with Mirski, and the reason for their eventual falling out; Chaet describes his trip to Europe, where he traveled for several months with friends, at length, including the art museums and the suffering he witnessed in Italy and Spain, as well as accidentally meeting Picasso in Antibes, and the influence the trip had on his work; he recalls how he became an art teacher, how he was hired by Josef Albers at Yale, his tenure at Yale, some of the students there, including Chuck Close, Nancy Graves, and Richard Serra, as well as the internal politics and his accomplishments; he discusses his own evolution as an artist, including his use of watercolors, as well as his return to certain themes, such as his painting of cows (and how, more generally, artists do return to themes throughout their lives), and the balance between teaching and being an artist; Chaet mentions the beginnings of Artists Equity and Cold War politics. Chaet also recalls his wife, the artist Ninon Lacey, his former roommate, the artist David Aronson, and art world figures: Hyman Swetzoff, Edith Halpert, Dorothy Adlow, Charles Sawyer, Jackson Pollock, Pablo Picasso, Hyman Bloom, Willem de Kooning, Rico Lebrun, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Bernard Chaet (1924-2012) was a painter and teacher from New Haven, Connecticut and Rockport, Massachusetts.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 5 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 29 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. Access to the entire audio recording is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Connecticut -- Interviews  Search this
Art teachers -- Connecticut -- New Haven -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.chaet97
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ece6734d-fae8-47b2-b7af-301c64a1ccdd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-chaet97
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Josef Albers

Interviewee:
Albers, Josef  Search this
Interviewer:
Fesci, Sevim  Search this
Names:
Bauhaus  Search this
Heckel, Erich, 1883-1970  Search this
Itten, Johannes, 1888-1967  Search this
Kirchner, Ernst Ludwig, 1880-1938  Search this
Schmidt-Rottluff, Karl, 1884-1976  Search this
Stuck, Franz, Ritter von, 1863-1928  Search this
Extent:
24 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1968 June 22-July 5
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Josef Albers conducted 1968 June 22-July 5, by Sevim Fesci, for the Archives of American Art.
This interview was conducted in New Haven, Connecticut. Albers speaks of his childhood in the industrial area of Westphalia, Germany; his father's influence as a house painter and set designer; his young interest in technical toys; his educational history, beginning at the Royal Art School, an art teacher prep school; his education in art history in conjunction with fine arts; his brief experience teaching in public schools; his time studying at the Applied Art School in Essen while living and teaching in Berlin; and the beginning of professional career after having passed his exam in Berlin in 1915.
He discusses the influence of the European movements/artists, Die Brucke; Schmidt-Rottluff, Heckel, and Kirchner; his move to Munich and time spent working with Stuck (the teacher of Kandinsky and Klee); his eventual shift to the Bauhaus working in collage and stained glass under Itten; his refusal to do the traditional apprenticeship at the Bauhaus and surprising success with stained glass while striking out on his own; his initial experiments while working in the new studio for stained glass at the Bauhaus with frosting (a.k.a. thermometer style); his move from collage to montage; his disbelief in the use of past art as a source for current art; his distaste for the concept of art as self-expression; his use of repetitive forms in his painting as a method of "solving the problem;" his belief that the spectator makes the vision of the artist more lively; his belief that he teaches philosophy (how to see) not technique (how to paint); the fine line between influencing students and creating disciples; color as the most relative medium in art and a study of ourselves; his use of squares (the most man-made form), beginning in 1949; the role of art in society to reveal visually the attitude of our mentality; and his belief as to the future of art as being a further consideration of order.
Biographical / Historical:
Josef Albers (1888-1976) was a painter and educator in New Haven, Connecticut.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hrs., 11 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Connecticut -- New Haven -- Interviews  Search this
Collagists  Search this
Stained glass artists  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Die Brücke (Dresden)  Search this
Painters -- Connecticut -- New Haven -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.albersj68
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9df07b806-7f25-4144-b4d2-8d490d11428b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-albersj68
Online Media:

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