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Oral history interview with Harry N. Abrams, 1972 March 14

Interviewee:
Abrams, Harry N. (Harry Nathan)  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul, 1933-1997  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Harry N. Abrams, 1972 March 14. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art publishing -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Publishers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13015
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211917
AAA_collcode_abrams72
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_211917
Online Media:

Oral history interview with John Coplans, 1975 April 4-1977 August 4

Interviewee:
Coplans, John Rivers, 1920-2003  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul, 1933-1997  Search this
Subject:
Alloway, Lawrence  Search this
Blum, Irving  Search this
Fried, Michael  Search this
Hopps, Walter  Search this
Leider, Philip  Search this
Rose, Barbara  Search this
Artforum  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with John Coplans, 1975 April 4-1977 August 4. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art publishing -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Museum curators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Gallery directors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12787
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212318
AAA_collcode_coplan75
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212318
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Harry N. Abrams

Interviewee:
Abrams, Harry N.  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recording, 5 in.)
29 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1972 March 14
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Harry N. Abrams conducted 1972 March 14, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art. Abrams speaks of his educational background including classes at the National Academy of Design, the Art Students League, and New York University. He recalls his book designs, advertising and mail orders for Schwab and Beatty (1928-1936) and the Book-of-the-Month Club (1936-1950) and his association with Illustrated Modern Library and Illustrated Junior Library.
He discusses the organization and early problems of the Abrams Publishing Company, paperback reprints, translations, foreign publications and successful titles. Abrams speaks of the Abradale Press, the Norman Rockwell series, the Contemporary Painters series; and the characteristics of book club and bookstore customers. The interview concludes with a description of his art collection.
Biographical / Historical:
Harry N. Abrams (1905-1979) was a publisher from New York, New York.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 1 digital wav file. Duration is 1 hr.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Art publishing -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Publishers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.abrams72
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw92e22a47b-c548-4a10-9744-e393d7f34cd0
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-abrams72
Online Media:

Oral history interview with John Coplans

Interviewee:
Coplans, John  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Names:
Artforum  Search this
Alloway, Lawrence, 1926-1990  Search this
Blum, Irving, 1930-  Search this
Fried, Michael  Search this
Hopps, Walter  Search this
Leider, Philip, 1929-  Search this
Rose, Barbara  Search this
Extent:
133 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1975 April 4-1977 August 4
Scope and Contents:
An interview of John Coplans conducted 1975 April. 4-1977 August 4, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art, in New York City.
Coplans speaks of his educational background; the founding and development of ARTFORUM magazine; ARTFORUM staff writers including Lawrence Alloway, Michael Fried, Philip Leider, and Barbara E. Rose; and the influence of Irving Blum and Walter Hopps on California artists and collectors. Coplans also discusses the art market in New York and in California, and talks about his career as a teacher, editor, gallery director, critic, and museum curator.
Biographical / Historical:
John Coplans (1920- 2003) was an art administrator, editor, photograph, and educator of New York, New York. Born in London, England; died in Manhattan, New York.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 8 hr., 6 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Editors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art publishing -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Museum curators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Gallery directors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.coplan75
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ade983e1-5d0e-470f-9cec-7583edf9c27e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-coplan75
Online Media:

Rosa Esman Gallery and Tanglewood Press Inc. records

Creator:
Rosa Esman Gallery  Search this
Names:
Tanglewood Press  Search this
Darger, Henry, 1892-1972  Search this
Esman, Rosa  Search this
Gray, Eileen, 1878-1976  Search this
Rodchenko, Aleksandr, 1891-1956  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-1987  Search this
Extent:
13.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1922-1998
bulk 1972-1994
Summary:
The Rosa Esman Gallery and Tanglewood Press Inc. records measure 13.4 linear feet and date from circa 1922 to 1998, with the bulk of the records dating from 1972 to 1994. The records shed light on two businesses operated by Rosa Esman through administrative files, artist files, exhibition and event files, sales and financial records, printed material, photographic materials, and several objects.
Scope and Contents:
The Rosa Esman Gallery and Tanglewood Press Inc. records measure 13.4 linear feet and date from circa 1922 to 1998, with the bulk of the records dating from 1972 to 1994. The records shed light on two businesses operated by Rosa Esman through administrative files, artist files, exhibition and event files, sales and financial records, printed material, photographic materials, and several objects.

Administrative files contain correspondence files, printed material, and inventories; photos of the gallery, Rosa Esman, and others; a few gallery blueprints; and pins and magnets from a collaboration between the Esman Gallery and artists Roy Lichtenstein, Gustav Klutsis, Lazar "El" Lissitzky, and Sol LeWitt. Artist files consist of resumes and biographical summaries, correspondence, pricelists, exhibition material, press packets, photographic materials depicting artwork and artists, and more. Artists include Eileen Gray, Lev Nussberg, Pascal Verbena, Helen Frankenthaler, Alexander Rodchenko, Sol LeWitt, Peter Boynton, and Jan Muller. Exhibition and event files contain price lists, loan agreements, correspondence, printed materials, and photographic materials. Included in this series is one file for an exhibition held at Knoedler Gallery that was in collaboration with Rosa Esman after she had closed her gallery. Financial records consist of sales books, consignment records, receipts and invoices, ledgers, and some appraisals. Tanglewood Press Inc. files contain correspondence files, financial records, order forms and receipts, photographic materials, press packets, mailers, a certificate, and some exhibition materials.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as five series.

Series 1: Administrative Files, 1973-1997 (Box 1-2; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Artist Files, 1920s, 1953-1998 (Box 2-8; 5.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Exhibition and Event Files, 1971-1994 (Box 8-12; 4.6 linear feet)

Series 4: Financial Records, 1977-1993 (Box 12-13; .8 linear feet)

Series 5: Tanglewood Press Inc. Records, 1964-1997 (Box 13-15; .9 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Rosa Esman Gallery was established in 1972 in New York, New York by Rosa Esman. The gallery exhibited mostly twentieth-century American and European art in various mediums and styles, including pop art, European outsider art, Dada, constructivism, architecture, interior design, and Russian artists from the early twentieth century. Tanglewood Press Inc. was an art publishing company founded by Esman, and published thirteen limited-edition portfolios by a number of artists from 1965 to 1991.

With encouragement from Doris Freedman and Hans Kleinschmidt, Esman established Tanglewood Press Inc. in 1965 as a publisher of artists' portfolios. The first publication, New York Ten (1965), included artwork by Tom Wesselmann, George Segal, Claes Oldenburg, Roy Lichtenstein, Mon Levinson, Robert Kulicke, Nicholas Krushenick, Helen Frankenthaler, Jim Dine, and Richard Anuszkiewicz. Later publications included artwork by Andy Warhol, Mary Bauermeister, Ad Reinhardt, Robert Motherwell, Sol LeWitt, Jim Dine, and many others. The portfolio, "Ten Landscapes-Roy Lichtenstein (1967), was published in collaboration with Abrams Original Editions. Esman was contracted to work at Abrams Original Editions for a short period of time in the late 1970s. Esman and her Tanglewood Press Inc. were featured in the exhibition, The Great American Pop Art Store: Multiples of the sixties (1997-2000), University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach, California.

Esman held a drawings exhibition of artwork borrowed from the Leo Castelli Gallery in 1972 in a space she rented for Tanglewood Press Inc.; she credited this as the beginning of Rosa Esman Gallery. Esman continued exhibiting in that location for the next several years, including a solo show of folded drawings by Sol LeWitt and Modern Master Drawings: Avery, Stuart Davis, De Kooning, Hoffman, Motherwell (1973). Esman moved her operation in 1975 to a building in midtown near the galleries of Tibor de Nagy and Virginia Zabriskie. Artists and printmakers shown at Esman Gallery during 1970s include Christo, Bill Fares, Tom Noskowski, Ursula Von Rydingsvard, Hannah Tierney, and Eileen Gray. In 1979, Esman began an exhibition series of Russian avant-garde art, The Russian Revolution in Art, 1-5 (1979-1983), featuring artwork by Kasmir Malevich, Alexander Rodchenko, Lyubov Popova, and many others of the Russian avant-garde. Esman moved the gallery to SoHo in 1980. In the 1980s, Esman began showing European outsider artists Pascal Verbena and Henry Darger and held a group exhibition of outsider artists in 1986, Outsiders: Art Beyond the Norm. Other exhibitions in the 1980s included Art by Architects (1980), Architecture by Artists (1981), Curator's Choice: A Tribute to Dorothy Miller (1982). Later exhibitions featured artists Joseph Zito, Sofia Dymshits-Tolstaya, Eric Snell, and Carl Goldhagen; and group shows of Dada art, twentieth-century photography, and constructivism. After closing Rosa Esman Gallery in 1992, Esman entered a partnership at Ubu Gallery with Adam Boxer and Alfred Jarry.

Rosa Mencher Esman was born in New York, New York in 1927. She studied government at Smith College in Northhampton, Massachusetts. She went abroad to Europe her junior year, visiting museums in Geneva, Florence, and Paris. After college, she worked several jobs including a position in the art book department of Harper and Brothers and as an office administrator for Rene d'Harnocourt at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. In 1957, she and a friend opened Tanglewood Gallery in Stockbridge, Massachusettes, showing artwork by artist-friends, utilizing the Museum of Modern Art lending service, and borrowing from the Downtown Gallery. The Tanglewood Gallery exhibited artists Milton Avery, Karl Schrag, Tom Wesselman, Alexander Calder, George Morrison, Robert Indiana, Richard Anuszkiewicz, Mervin Jules, and George L. K. Morris, among others. The gallery operated until circa 1960.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Rosa Esman conducted by James McElhinney, June 9-16, 2009.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Rosa Esman in 2003 and 2014.
Restrictions:
Two folders comprised of Rosa Esman Gallery legal files, 1989-1991, in Box 15 are access restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Women art dealers  Search this
Pop art  Search this
Art, Russian -- 20th century  Search this
Outsider art  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Citation:
Rosa Esman Gallery and Tanglewood Press Inc records, circa 1922-1998. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.rosaesmg
See more items in:
Rosa Esman Gallery and Tanglewood Press Inc. records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw90b5afc25-4ac5-4700-9d90-a03c3ac29007
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rosaesmg
Online Media:

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records

Creator:
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Names:
De Hauke & Co., Inc.  Search this
Eugene Glaenzer & Co.  Search this
Germain Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Gersel  Search this
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Glaenzer, Eugene  Search this
Haardt, Georges  Search this
Hauke, Cesar M. de (Cesar Mange), d. 1965  Search this
Parker, Theresa D.  Search this
Seligman, Germain  Search this
Seligmann, Arnold, 1870-1932  Search this
Seligmann, Jacques, 1858-1923  Search this
Seligmann, René  Search this
Trevor, Clyfford  Search this
Waegen, Rolf Hans  Search this
Extent:
203.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gallery records
Date:
1904-1978
bulk 1913-1974
Summary:
The records of Jacques Seligmann & Co. measure approximately 203.1 linear feet and date from 1904 to 1978, with bulk dates from 1913 to 1974. The collection includes extensive correspondence files, reference material on American and European collectors and their collections, inventory and stock records, financial records, exhibition files, auction files, and the records of subsidiary companies. The collection is an invaluable resource in tracing the provenance of particular works of art and provides a comprehensive view of the activities of collectors and art dealers in the years leading up to and following World War II.
Scope and Contents note:
The Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., records measure approximately 203.1 linear feet and date from between 1904 and 1978, with bulk dates of 1913-1974. The records include extensive correspondence files, reference material on American and European collectors and their collections, inventory and stock records, financial records, exhibition files, auction files, and the records of subsidiary companies, including de Hauke & Co., Inc., and Modern Paintings, Inc.

Historians and researchers will find the collection an invaluable resource in tracing the provenance of particular works of art. Although in the early 1940s many records in the Paris office were destroyed by Seligmann staff to keep them from falling into the hands of the occupying German military forces, many records survive, as much of the firm's business had previously come to center in the New York office. In all, the remaining records provide a comprehensive view of the activities and transactions of collectors and art dealers in the years leading up to and following World War II.

Correspondence (Series 1) is the largest series of the collection (80 linear feet) and is comprised of extensive correspondence files, primarily between Germain Seligman and his New York office staff with domestic and foreign private clients, collectors, dealers, individuals representing public museums and collections, and international scholars. The New York Office Correspondence (Series 1.1) concerns a wide variety of topics, including routine business matters, but focuses primarily on potential and realized sales and purchases and provenance documentation. Also found is detailed information on financial transactions, commissions, stock inventory, and the travel of Germain Seligman and other staff. Paris Office Correspondence (Series 1.2) is separated into a small subseries and contains correspondence written primarily by Jacques Seligmann from Paris. The subseries General Correspondence (Series 1.3) is the largest subsection of the Correspondence series and contains letters written to and received from clients and other business associates concerning business transactions and inquiries. The subseries Museum Correspondence (Series 1.4) contains letters between the firm and art institutions and museums. The subseries Germain Seligman's Correspondence (Series 1.5), contains not only personal letters but a wealth of information concerning the affairs of the firm. Much personal correspondence was marked "private."

Also of note in the Correspondence series are the Legal Correspondence Files (Series 1.6) and the Inter-Office Correspondence (Series 1.9) and Inter-Office Memoranda (Series 1.13). The Legal Correspondence Files subseries houses correspondence with both U.S. and Paris attorneys and concerns legal affairs and specific lawsuits. Of particular interest are Germain Seligman's attempts to recover Seligmann family and Paris gallery artwork and other assets stolen or confiscated by the Germans in World War II. This small subseries also contains limited information on the stock and inventory holdings of several of the firm's and Germain Seligman's subsidiary corporations, family legal affairs and lawsuits, and other related legal matters. The subseries Inter-Office Correspondence and Inter-Office Memoranda (called fiches by Seligmann staff) include memos between Germain Seligman and his staff about clients, collectors, sales, acquisitions, and other matters. These offer interesting commentary clearly intended to be read by staff only.

Also prominent is Collectors Files (Series 2), which contains numerous reference files documenting the collections of existing and potential clients with whom Seligmann & Co. maintained contacts. The files are arranged by either individual name or institution and reflect the wide scope of collector references maintained by the firm throughout its operating years. The files contain a variety of reference materials, such as photographs, provenance notes, and sales, purchase, and inventory information in cases where the collector purchased from the firm or the firm purchased from the collector. Researchers will find that many of the private and public names that appear in General Correspondence (Series 1.3) appear in the Collectors Files as well. Also found in this series are specific files relating to the Duc d'Arenberg Collection, the Clarence H. Mackay Collection, the Mortimer L. Schiff Collection, and the Prince of Liechtenstein Collection. The firm either handled substantial estate sales for these collections or purchased and sold important pieces from these collections.

Auction Files (Series 3) and Exhibition files (Series 4) trace the sales and exhibition activities undertaken by Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc. In the Auction files, researchers will find documentation of auctions of individual works of art owned by the firm and handled by Christie's, Parke-Bernet, and other auction houses. Of particular interest is the 1948-1949 Parke-Bernet auction of the C. S. Wadsworth Trust, a "dummy" trust set up by the firm to dispose of a portion of its unsold inventory. The Exhibition Files house a variety of documentation, such as catalogs and correspondence, concerning the firm's active exhibition history. Many of the exhibitions featured works of art recently acquired by the firm, such as the 1937 exhibition, Twenty Years in the Evolution of Picasso, which included a number of Picassos the firm acquired from Madame Jacques Doucet that year.

Reference Files (Series 5) includes a card catalog to books and catalogs in the library maintained by Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., and a photograph reference index of works of art. Inventory and Stock Files (Series 6) tracks the firm's inventory through a series of stock books and supporting documentation that include sales and provenance information.

Financial Files and Shipping Records (Series 7) consists primarily of records of the New York office, but some Paris office documents can be found scattered throughout. Found in this series is a wide variety of financial records including purchase receipt files, credit notes, invoices, consignment invoices and books, invoices, consular invoices, sales and purchase account books, ledgers, and tax records. The records appear to be quite complete and date from 1910 to 1977. Of particular interest are the purchase receipts and credit notes and memoranda that contain detailed documentation on acquisitions and sales. The consignment invoices provide information about works of art sold on behalf of other galleries and dealers, as well as which galleries and dealers were handling works of art for Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc. Although quite large and complex, the financial records offer a comprehensive overview of the firm's business and financial transactions.

The records of subsidiary companies that were part of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., such as Contemporary American Department, de Hauke & Co., Inc., Modern Paintings, Inc., and Gersel Corp. are arranged in their own series. In 1935, the firm established the Contemporary American Department to represent young American artists. Under the direction of Theresa D. Parker, a longtime gallery employee, the department initiated an exhibition and loan program. Contemporary American Department (Series 8) includes mostly correspondence files and exhibition files.

The largest subsidiary company to operate under Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., was de Hauke & Co., Inc. De Hauke & Co., Inc., Records (Series 9) dates from 1925 through 1949 and contains domestic and foreign correspondence with clients, collectors, and dealers; inter-office correspondence and memoranda with Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc.; administrative and legal files; and financial records. Modern Paintings, Inc., records (Series 10) contains the legal and financial files of this subsidiary company, which was established in 1930 to incorporate most of the stock of the liquidated de Hauke & Co., Inc. Gersel Corp. Records (Series 11) contains a small amount of material from this company.

Researchers should note that a scattering of records from most of the subsidiary companies may also be found throughout additional series, particularly Inventory and Stock Files (Series 6) and Financial Files and Shipping Records (Series 7). Records for the firms Tessa Corp. and Georges Haardt & Co., which were also owned by Germain Seligman, are not part of the Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., Records, although scattered references to these two firms may be encountered throughout the collection.

German Seligman's Personal papers (Series 12) includes scattered family and biographical materials, his research and writings files, and documentation of his personal art collection. Found in Family and Biographical Material (Series 12.1) are photographs of family members, including Jacques Seligmann, and of the Paris gallery. Also found is a limited amount of correspondence concerning Germain Seligman's residency status and his desire to obtain an army commission during World War II. Germain Seligman's research and writing files are found in this series and include material for his books: Roger de La Fresnaye, with a Catalogue Raisonné (1969); Merchants of Art, 1880-1960: Eighty Years of Professional Collecting (1961); The Drawings of Georges Seurat (1947); and Oh! Fickle Taste; or, Objectivity in Art (1952). Documentation of Germain Seligman's private art collection is arranged in this series and includes provenance and research files and correspondence concerning his art collection.

Overall, the historical records of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., offer researchers a comprehensive and detailed resource for studying one of the most active dealers in decorative arts, Renaissance, and European contemporary art. The records clearly document the firm's numerous acquisitions and sales of important works of art to well-known European and American collectors and museums as well as Germain Seligman's extensive client contacts and references. The collection offers an insightful, intriguing, and often fascinating view into the complex field of art sales, trading, and acquisition during the first half of the twentieth century, when many major collections in the United States were formed.

Researchers interested in tracing the provenance of individual works of art should carefully check each series of the collection for information to obtain a complete history for any work. Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., staff set up many different files to cross-reference works of art from various angles, such as artist or creator; collector or collection; most recent owner or repository location; stock inventory number, if owned by Seligmann & Co.; and photographic reference files. The task is made somewhat more difficult by the number of commission sales and joint ownership of works of art, often documented solely in the Inventory and Stock Files (Series 6) or the Financial Files and Shipping Records (Series 7). Only by tracing a name or date through the various series can one find all of the information relating to a particular work of art and its provenance.
Arrangement note:
Following is an outline of the arrangement of the collection by series and corresponding box numbers and extent. More detailed information for each series and subseries, along with a box and folder inventory, is found in the Series Descriptions/Container Listings, which can be found by following the series links below. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.

Missing Title

Series 1: Correspondence, 1913-1978 (1-174, 80 linear feet)

Series 2: Collectors Files, 1875, 1892-1977, undated (Boxes 175-252, 35 linear feet)

Series 3: Auction Files, 1948-1975, undated (Boxes 253-259, 2.75 linear feet)

Series 4: Exhibition Files, 1925-1977, undated (Boxes 260-272, 5.5 linear feet)

Series 5: Reference Files, 1877-1977, undated (Boxes 273-278, 2.25 linear feet)

Series 6: Inventory and Stock Files, 1923-1971, undated (Boxes 279-289, 4.5 linear feet)

Series 7: Financial Files and Shipping Records, 1910-1977 (Boxes 290-357, 30.5 linear feet)

Series 8: Contemporary American Department, 1932-1978 (Boxes 358-381, 10 linear feet)

Series 9: De Hauke & Co., Inc., Records, 1925-1949, undated (Boxes 382-416; 16 linear feet)

Series 10: Modern Paintings, Inc., Records, 1927-1950 (Boxes 417-420, 1.25 linear feet)

Series 11: Gersel Corp. Records, 1946-1969 (Box 421, 0.25 linear feet)

Series 12: Germain Seligman's Personal Papers, 1882, circa 1905-1984, undated (Boxes 422-459, OV 460, 17 linear feet)
Biographical/Historical note:
Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., was counted among the foremost French and American art dealers in antiquities and decorative arts and was among the first to foster and support the growth and appreciation for collecting in the field of contemporary European art. The company's clients included most of the major American and European art collectors of the era, and the art that passed through its galleries often ended up in the collections of prominent American and European museums through the donations of the wealthy benefactors who purchased them from the company. Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., took an active part in promoting such donations as well as providing its own donations and selling paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts directly to many museums.

The company was first established as Jacques Seligmann & Cie. in 1880 on the Rue des Mathurins in Paris by Jacques Seligmann (1858-1923), a German émigré who came to France in 1874 and soon thereafter became a French citizen. The company experienced so much success that in 1900 a new, larger Galerie Seligmann was opened on the Place Vendôme, and Jacques's two brothers, Simon and Arnold, joined the business as partners. Simon served as the company's accountant, and Arnold was in charge of correspondence with the firm's many clients. Jacques remained as the manager and was in charge of all purchases for the firm.

Prominent clients of the company included Baron Edmond de Rothschild of France, the Stroganoff family of Russia, Sir Philip Sassoon of England, and American collectors Benjamin Altman, William Randolph Hearst, J. P. Morgan, Henry Walters, and Joseph Widener. As American clients increasingly came to dominate the company's sales activities, a New York office at 7 West Thirty-sixth Street was opened in 1904. Five years later, Jacques purchased the Hôtel de Sagan (also called the Palais de Sagan by the Seligmann family) in Paris as a location where Jacques Seligmann & Cie. could stage larger exhibitions and receive its most distinguished clients.

In 1912 a family quarrel resulted in a lawsuit that split the company. Arnold remained at the Place Vendôme location, reorganized under the name Arnold Seligmann & Cie., while Jacques consolidated his operations and moved the headquarters for Jacques Seligmann & Cie. to the Hôtel de Sagan. Jacques also opened an additional gallery at 17 Place Vendôme to retain a presence near the company's original location, but this branch soon relocated to 9 Rue de la Paix. The New York office, which formerly had operated out of a single room, was upgraded to larger office space and a gallery at 705 Fifth Avenue.

Jacques's son, Germain Seligman (1893-1978), showed an interest in art connoisseurship from his early years and often accompanied his father to work in the galleries. (In 1943, when Germain Seligman became an American citizen, he dropped the second "n" from his surname, and for clarity his name appears with this spelling throughout this finding aid.) His father taught him how to deal with clients and often assigned him tasks to help in the completion of sales. Germain accompanied Jacques on many business trips and in 1910 was sent to St. Peterburg, Russia, to secure information about the selling price of the Swenigorodskoi enamels owned by the Russian collector M. P. Botkine.

Germain continued to work informally in the firm's galleries until the outbreak of World War I. Within hours of the mobilization order in 1914, Germain joined the French army as a second lieutenant in the 132nd Infantry Regiment of Rheims. By 1916 he was promoted to first lieutenant in the Twenty-fourth Infantry Brigade and in the following year achieved the rank of captain in the Fifty-sixth Infantry Division. Also in the same year, he was assigned as the first French liaison officer to the First Division of the American Expeditionary Force in France, serving as translator for Major George C. Marshall. Seligman was discharged from the French army in 1919 and was awarded the French Croix de Guerre with six citations. (In 1938 Seligman also was awarded the Office of the Legion of Honor from France, and in 1939 he was decorated by General John Joseph Pershing with the Distinguished Service Medal of the United States, in recognition for his service during World War I.)

After his discharge from military service, Germain Seligman actively joined his father's company as a partner in 1920. Jacques Seligmann & Cie. was changed to Jacques Seligmann et Fils, and Germain was placed in charge as the president of the New York office. The strong American art market necessitated Germain's making numerous cross-Atlantic trips each year. Upon the death of his father in 1923, Germain took over as president of both the Paris and New York offices, and the company was once again renamed Jacques Seligmann & Cie.

In the early years of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., the firm carried few paintings, as collectors focused their interest mostly on small objects, enamels, ivories, and other decorative pieces from the Byzantine to the Renaissance eras. Stone and bronze sculptures, medieval and Renaissance tapestries, and eighteenth-century French furniture were the most avidly collected pieces of the era. The galleries of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., reflected its clients' tastes, but soon after the turn of the century art trends began to change.

The 1913 Armory Show introduced many Americans to contemporary European art, and collectors in the United States began to show marked interest in it. The advent of World War I brought much of the art market to a standstill in Europe, but interest in the Impressionists continued in the United States, and it quickly resumed in Europe, as well, after the war. Both collectors and dealers began buying modern art, led by such progressive American collectors as Walter Arensberg, Albert C. Barnes, A. E. Gallatin, Mrs. Horace O. Havemeyer, Mrs. Potter Palmer, Duncan Phillips, and John Quinn, among others.

Under Germain's leadership, Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., began acquiring works by Pierre Bonnard, Paul Cézanne, Honoré Daumier, Edgar Degas, Pablo Picasso, Henri Rousseau, and Vincent van Gogh. While Germain promoted this trend for modern art in the New York gallery, other family partners did not approve as this was a new direction for the firm. For this reason Germain Seligman looked to establish a new, independent business venture in the evolving field of modern art. He selected as his partner César Mange de Hauke.

César Mange de Hauke was born on March 8, 1900, the son of a French engineer and a Polish mother. After completing academic and art studies in England and France in the years following World War I, de Hauke arrived in the United States in 1926. While in New York City, he was introduced to Germain Seligman by Germain's cousin, René Seligmann, and by 1927 de Hauke had joined Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., as a sales representative.

With their shared interest in modern French painting, Seligman and de Hauke decided to explore the feasibility of sales in this area by forming a subsidiary to Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., that would specialize in contemporary European artists. In 1926 Seligman personally financed the fledgling company, first called International Contemporary Art Company, Inc., and he appointed de Hauke its director, but even before the legal documents setting up the company were completed the name was changed to de Hauke & Co., Inc. Although the bulk of the new company's art purchases took place in Paris and London, the majority of its sales occurred in the United States.

Seligman and de Hauke worked out an agreement allowing de Hauke to purchase works of art that could then be sold as stock inventory of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., or privately under de Hauke's own name. Ownership of paintings was often shared among various art dealers, involving complicated commission transactions upon completion of sale. Seligman provided display space for de Hauke & Co., Inc., at the new, larger gallery of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., now located at 3 East Fifty-first Street. The two businesses were deeply intertwined, as evidenced by the facts that Seligman's financial records include a great deal of de Hauke material and many of de Hauke's records are written on the stationery of Jacques Seligmann Co., Inc.

During the second half of the 1920s, de Hauke showed the work of modern French School artists in New York City. He exhibited works by Pierre Bonnard, Amedeo Modigliani, Odilon Redon, Ker-Xavier Roussel, Edouard Vuillard, and many others. De Hauke was equally interested in French School drawings and watercolors, and the scope of his exhibitions also included works by nineteenth-century masters such as Paul Cézanne, Jacques-Louis David, Eugè00E8;ne Delacroix, Jean Ingres, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Georges Seurat.

Among the exhibitions held at the New York gallery were two highly successful shows featuring the works of Pablo Picasso. The first one, held in 1936, displayed paintings from the Blue and Rose Periods and was soon followed by the 1937 exhibition, Twenty Years in the Evolution of Picasso. The star of this exhibition was Les Demoiselles d'Avignon which Germain had recently acquired from the Jacques Doucet Estate sale.

Despite the bleak economic conditions of the 1930s, the new business venture proved so successful that the other family members of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., withdrew their opposition to expanding into the field of modern art, and de Hauke & Co., Inc., was dissolved and re-formed under the new name, Modern Paintings, Inc. César M. de Hauke was appointed its director, but tensions had crept into the relationship between the former partners, and by 1931, de Hauke had resigned and returned to Paris.

The mid-1930s appear to have been a period of reorganization for the company. By 1934 Modern Paintings, Inc., was also dissolved, and it assets were assumed by Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., and by Tessa Corp., another subsidiary of the firm. In 1935, however, the firm established a new subsidiary, the Contemporary American Department, to represent young American artists. Theresa D. Parker, a longtime gallery employee, was selected to head the department, and she initiated an exhibition and loan program. Soon thereafter, the City of Paris offered to buy the company's building at the Hôtel de Sagan as part of a complicated negotiation for a site for the Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la vie Modern 1937. The Paris office of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., reestablished itself at 9 Rue de la Paix, but Germain selected the New York office as the headquarters for Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc. Subsequently he filed his legal residence as New York City. Germain's half-brother, François-Gerard, was left in charge of the Paris office operations, although Germain continued to commute between the two offices until the summer of 1939.

During the New York World's Fair of 1939, Germain served as a member of the Exhibition Committee, which coordinated the art section. When the fair was extended for an additional year, Seligman was asked to take responsibility for planning the French art section. World political events intruded, however, and rumors of impending war affected both the European and American economies as well as the international art world. Speculative sales, particularly in Europe, made for a chaotic and unpredictable market. In June 1940 German forces invaded France and occupied Paris. Business for Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., took a dramatic downturn. In the summer of 1940 the Seligmann galleries and family holdings were seized by the Vichy government, along with Germain's private art collection. The family house and its contents, along with almost the entire stock of the Paris firm, was sold at public auction. Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., staff burned the Paris office archives in an effort to keep the records relating to works of art from falling into the hands of the Nazi occupiers, who were looting and shipping art to Germany.

Family members also experienced the pains and changes brought on by the war. Jean Seligmann, a cousin of Germain and the head of Arnold Seligmann & Cie., was captured and shot in Vincennes, France. François-Gerard, a half-brother, was drafted into the army and subsequently joined the French Resistance. Another brother, André, fled France in September 1940 and arrived in New York City, where he opened his own gallery. (He would later return to Paris after the war, but died shortly thereafter from a heart attack.)

Germain applied for a commission in the United States Army in 1942, but his application was initially turned down due to his noncitizen status. Soon thereafter, however, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the second War Power Act, which stipulated that naturalization could be expedited if the individual served in the military during the war. This act prompted Germain to further press his application for a post overseas, citing his citizenship status as fairly inconsequential or at least no longer a grave hindrance. Despite numerous letters exchanged with the War Department, however, his application was eventually rejected due to changes in military personnel policy.

During the war years, the Seligmann company in New York moved from its 3 East Fifty-first Street location to smaller quarters at 5 East Fifty-seventh Street. The first exhibition in this space was held in the spring of 1944. By 1945 the Contemporary American Department was reactivated, with Theresa D. Parker as its head.

In the years following the war, a rapprochement occurred among the family members who had been split since the family quarrel between Jacques and Arnold Seligmann. With the death of Jean Seligmann during the war, Arnold Seligmann & Co. had been left without a director. Germain consolidated the two family businesses, but made separate financial and administrative entities of the Paris and New York offices. Henceforth they were affiliated "only by ties of affection."

During the early to mid-1950s, many of the activities involving Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., centered upon the recovery of looted artwork and property as well as resolving outstanding issues from the consolidation of the various family businesses. The firm was also involved in the sale of several significant collections.

In 1951 Germain was commissioned by the family of the Duc d'Arenberg to sell the family's collection of important illuminated manuscripts, engravings, and select paintings. Jan Vermeer's Portrait of a Young Girl was purchased for over a quarter million dollars.

Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., also handled the 1953 sale of works from the Prince of Liechtenstein's collection and negotiated the purchase of seven Italian marble sculptures that were eventually sold to the Samuel H. Kress Foundation in 1954. From the late 1950s up until the closing of the company in 1977-1978, the exhibitions mounted by the firm seem to indicate a gradual focus back toward drawings and more traditional art. Contemporary American artists continued to be shown as well, but the firm no longer maintained its leading edge in the art market.

Germain, who during the 1940s had written several works, among them a monograph on Roger de La Fresnaye in 1945 and The Drawings of Georges Seurat in 1947, devoted himself more and more to writing. In Oh! Fickle Taste; or, Objectivity in Art, published in 1952, Seligman addressed the importance of political and social climates in understanding the evolution of art collecting in the United States. He followed this book with the 1961 publication of Merchants of Art, 1880-1960: Eighty Years of Professional Collecting which memorialized his father and traced the history of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc. Germain's most significant work, Roger de La Fresnaye, with a Catalogue Raisonné (1969), was lauded by art critics and listed among the 1969 "Best Ten Books of the Year" by the New York Times.

With the death of Germain Seligman in 1978, the firm doors closed, leaving behind a legacy of collecting that helped to establish American collectors and museums in the forefront of the international art world. A survey of the major art museums and collections in the United States reveals the significant number of works that were acquired either by sales or through donation from Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc. The influence the company wielded is also demonstrated through the network of relationships it built with collectors, art museums and institutions, and other dealers, such as Dr. Albert C. Barnes, Bernheim-Jeune, George Blumenthal, Sen. William A. Clark, the Detroit Institute of Arts, M. Knoedler & Co., Inc., the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the National Gallery of Art, Marjorie Merriweather Post, Henry Walters, and Wildenstein & Co., among others.

Missing Title

1858, September 18 -- Jacques Seligmann born in Frankfurt, Germany.

1874 -- Jacques Seligmann leaves Germany to work in Paris, France, as an assistant at Maître Paul Chevallier, a leading Paris auctioneer. Soon after he leaves to work for Charles Mannheim, an expert in medieval art.

1880 -- Jacques Seligmann opens his own shop at the Rue des Mathurins. An early client is Baron Edmond de Rothschild.

1893, February 25 -- Germain Seligman is born in Paris, France. His mother's maiden name is Blanche Falkenberg (d. 1902).

1900 -- Jacques Seligmann & Cie. is formed when Jacques's brothers, Arnold and Simon, join him as partners and the business moves to the Place Vendôme.

1904 -- The New York City office of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., is established, with Eugene Glaenzer as the manager. Beginning in 1905, Seligmann begins yearly visits to the New York office.

1907 -- Jacques Seligmann is elected a Fellow for Life of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

1909 -- Jacques Seligmann & Cie. acquires the Hôtel de Sagan on the Rue Saint Dominique. Jacques moves the headquarters for the company to this location and reserves its use for the most exclusive and important clients, but his brother Arnold continues to oversee the general operations of the company at the Place Vendôme.

1912 -- A lawsuit between Jacques Seligmann and his brother, Arnold, results in a split in the family company. Arnold remains at Place Vendôme under the name Arnold Seligmann & Cie. Jacques consolidates his activities at the Hôtel de Sagan. He also opens another gallery at 17 Place Vendôme, but this is soon moved to 9 Rue de la Paix.

1914 -- As a result of the split in the family business, a new office and gallery are opened at 705 Fifth Avenue, and Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., is incorporated within the State of New York.

1914-1919 -- Germain Seligmann serves in the French army as a second lieutenant in the 132nd Infantry Regiment of Rheims. Later he is assigned as the first French liaison officer to the First Division of the American Expeditionary Force in France. He is discharged from active service in 1919.

1920 -- Germain Seligman becomes a partner with his father and formally joins Jacques Seligmann & Fils as the president of the New York office.

1923, October -- Jacques Seligman dies.

1924 -- Germain Seligman becomes the president of both the Paris and New York offices. Several of his brothers and sisters become partners in the firm. Theresa D. Parker joins the New York office.

1926 -- The New York office moves to 3 East Fifty-first Street. Germain Seligman, with César Mange de Hauke, sets up de Hauke & Co., Inc., to sell modern European paintings to American clients.

1930 -- De Hauke & Co., Inc., becomes Modern Paintings, Inc.

1931 -- De Hauke resigns as head of Modern Paintings, Inc., and returns to Paris.

1934 -- Modern Paintings, Inc., is dissolved, and its assets are assumed by Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., and by Tessa Corp., another subsidiary of the parent company.

1935 -- The Contemporary American Department is created as a part of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., and Theresa D. Parker directs its operations.

1936-1937 -- Jacques Seligmann et Fils moves out of its gallery space at the Hôtel de Sagan and briefly reestablishes its headquarters at 9 Rue de la Paix. By 1937, however, the company headquarters moves to New York City. Germain Seligman establishes his legal residence there.

1939 -- World War II begins.

1940 -- During the summer, the Seligmann family house and its contents (at Rue de Constantine) are seized and sold by order of the Vichy government, along with Germain's private art collection and the gallery's stock. The Paris archives of Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., is destroyed by the Seligmann staff in order to keep the records from falling into the hands of the Nazis. René Seligmann dies in a New York hospital in June; François-Gerard, Germain's half-brother, is called up to serve in the army and joins the French Resistance. Another brother, André, escapes to the United States and opens a gallery in New York. Jean Seligmann, a cousin of Germain and the head of Arnold Seligmann & Cie., is captured and shot at Vincennes, France.

1943 -- Germain Seligman becomes an American citizen (and drops the second "n" from his original surname).

1944, Spring -- The New York gallery holds its first exhibition in the new 5 East Fifty-seventh Street location in New York City. During the war years, the firm had moved from its Fifty-first Street location to smaller quarters.

1945 -- The Contemporary American Department is reactivated.

1946 -- After the war, Arnold Seligmann & Cie. is left without a director, although it remains at the Rue de la Paix location. Germain consolidates the two firms but organizes the Paris and New York offices as separate financial and administrative entities.

1969 -- Germain Seligman publishes Roger de La Fresnaye, with a Catalogue Raisonné. The book receives acclaim and is listed on the 1969 New York Times "Ten Best Books of the Year."

1978, March 27 -- Germain Seligman dies.
Provenance:
The records of the Paris and New York art dealer Jacques Seligmann & Co., Inc., were donated to the Archives of American Art in 1978 by Mrs. Ethlyne Seligman, widow of Germain Seligman. A small addition of 19 linear feet was donated in 1994.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- France -- Paris  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Mackay, Clarence Hungerford, 1874-1938 -- Art collections  Search this
Schiff, Mortimer L. -- Art collections  Search this
Arenberg, duc d' -- Art collections  Search this
Liechtenstein, House of -- Art collections  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- France -- Paris  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
La Fresnaye, Roger de, 1885-1925  Search this
Art, Renaissance  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Art treasures in war  Search this
Art, European  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Art galleries, Commercial -- France
Genre/Form:
Gallery records
Citation:
Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.jacqself
See more items in:
Jacques Seligmann & Co. records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9967799ef-d6d8-4390-819b-3d9300dcf1d3
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-jacqself
Online Media:

Correspondence Files

Collection Creator:
Cahill, Holger, 1887-1960  Search this
Extent:
1.5 Linear feet (Boxes 1-2)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1922-1979, 1993
Scope and Contents note:
This series consists of personal and work-related correspondence (primarily incoming correspondence) between Cahill and various friends and colleagues. While a large portion of the series documents Cahill's position as Director of the FAP, it also extends beyond those years and illuminates other aspects of Cahill's career including his interest in folk and Asian art, and his work as an art critic.

There is significant correspondence with the artist Stanton MacDonald Wright between 1936 and 1950, and with the artist Irene Pereira between 1950 and 1953. The series also documents research which Cahill conducted in the late 1940s on the development of the Index of American Design for his introduction to a book on the Index by the National Gallery of Art, published by the Macmillan Company. Correspondence from 1949 provides another angle on the historical details of the FAP through lengthy correspondence documenting Cahill's criticism of William Francis McDonald's book Federal Relief Administration and the Arts (Ohio State University Press, 1969).

There is a large amount of correspondence from July 1960 comprising sympathy letters to Dorothy C. Miller following Cahill's death. Correspondence from 1977 encloses a catalog of an exhibition organized by New York WPA Artists, Inc., at the Parsons School of Design in November 1977. The exhibition, New York City WPA Art, was dedicated to the memory of Holger Cahill.

See Appendix for a list of correspondents (with the exception of those microfilmed on reel 1105) in Series 2
Appendix: Correspondents in Series 2:
Abbott, Berenice: 1944 (letter to the Editor)

Abbott, John: [1946]

Abell, Walter ( -- Canadian Art): -- 1943-1944 (2 letters)

Adams, Charles C.: 1940

Alcopley, Mr.: [1952] (including typescript "Pictures of Alcopley" by Saburo Hasegawa); 1953-1960 (4 letters)

Alsberg, Henry G. (Director, Federal Writers' Projects): 1936 (4 letters)

American Council of Learned Societies: 1949

American Federation of Arts: 1949-1952 (3 letters)

American Folk Art Gallery: 1941

American Heritage: 1954

American Swedish Historical Foundation: 1949

Andrews, Robert Armstrong and Eleanor: [1960], undated

Art in America: 1953

Artists For Victory: [1942]

Artists League of America: 1945

Artists Union of Massachusetts: 1936 (telegram to President Roosevelt)

Arts Council of Japanese Americans for Democracy: 1944

Ashton, Dore: [1960]

Bach, Richard F. (Metropolitan Museum): 1924 and 1950

Bailey, Herbert: 1972 (letter from Naomi Bliven)

Baker, Donald: [1936]

Baker, Jacob (WPA): 1935-1960, undated (10 letters)

Barach, Frederica (Writers' War Board): 1944

Barker, Virgil and Ida: 1945-1960 (4 letters)

Barnard College: 1951 (2 letters)

Barr, Alfred H., Jr. (Museum of Modern Art): 1935-1960 (16 letters)

Barr, Tony: 1960

Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc.: 1950

Baur, John (Brooklyn Museum): 1946-1960 (6 letters)

Baylinson, Ada: 1950

Bear, Donald J. (Denver Art Museum): 1939

Beckmann, Mrs. Max: 1960

Bennington College: 1950

Benson, Emanuel M. (FAP): 1936-1940 (7 letters)

Berlandina, Jane: 1960

Bessinger, Frederic (artist): 1933

Biddle, George: 1936-1940

Biesel, Fred and Frances: 1941-1955 (13 letters)

Bird, Elzy: [1949]

Bittermann, Eleanor: 1951

Black, Mary: [1960]

Bliven, Naomi: 1972 (letter to Herbert Bailey)

Block, Edgar S.: 1950

Block, Lou: 1949

Bluemner, Oscar: 1934-1937 (3 letters)

Blue Ribbon Books: 1935

Blume, Peter: 1944 and 1950

Blumenfeld, Willow (Cahill's granddaughter): [1960]

Blumenschein, Ernest L.: 1936

Blumenthal, Joseph: [1960]

Bolotowsky, Ilya: 1960

Borgenicht, Grace (art dealer): [1960]

Boston Marine Museum: 1949

Boston: Museum of Fine Arts: 1950

Boulton, Margaret: 1936

Bragozzi, Tony and Olive (curator of David Rockefeller's collection): 1960

Breck, George and Ruth: [1960]

Brennan, Francis: 1960

Brook, Alex: 1959 (2 letters)

Brook, Gina (wife of artist Alexander Brook): 1960

Brooks, James and Charlotte: [1960]

Brown, Clara D. (antiques dealer): [1935]

Brown, Yaeger: 1943 (2 letters)

Bruce, Edward: 1937

Bucks County Historical Society: 1950

Bufano, Beniamino: [1940-1942], undated (3 letters)

Bulau, Alwin E.: 1952

Burnham, Ralph Warren (antiques dealer): 1933

Byron, Evelyn S.: 1942 (memo from Wilda Sawyer)

Bywaters, Jerry: 1960

Calder, Alexander: 1956 (photocopy) and 1960

Calkins, K: 1936 (2 letters to Constance Rourke)

Campbell, Robert B.: 1960

Carolina Art Association: 1935-1950 (5 letters)

Carroll, Bob: 1960

Carroll, Eleanor: 1936

Castelli, Leo: 1960

Catlin, Tod: 1960

Cavanna, Elise: 1960

Chamberlain, Betty: 1960

Chanin, Abraham and Maralt (Museum of Modern Art): [1960]

Chapin, Lucy Stock: 1932-1933 (2 letters)

Chapman, Suzanne: 1946-1949 (2 letters)

Charm -- (Barbara Lee Johnson): 1929

Chermayeff, Serge (Institute of Design): 1948

Chichester, Jim Hinchman (college friend of Elizabeth Holt): 1960

Church, Elizabeth D. (antiques dealer): 1935 (including 10 photographs of folk art)

Citizens Committee for Support of WPA: 1937

Claflin, Agnes: 1960

Clark, Stephen C.: 1939

Cleveland Institute of Art: 1950 (letter from Alfred Barr)

Coffey, Katherine: 1960

Coggeshall, Calvert and Suzanne: 1956-1960 (2 letters)

Cole, Mrs. Charley Tidd (Friends of the FAP): 1940 (letter from Martha Davidson)

Colie, Annetta (Elizabeth Holt's sister): 1960

Colin, Georgia and Ralph: 1960

Collier, Nina (Index of American Design): 1936 (6 letters)

Collins, Lloyd and Lib: 1960

Colman, Anne (FAP, Michigan): 1937 (2 letters)

Colonial Williamsburg, Incorporated: 1935-1960 (13 letters)

Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center: 1939-1960 (3 letters)

Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc.: 1939 (contract for Cahill to broadcast "What's Art to Me" program)

Columbia University: [1939]

Conklin, Franklin (Newark Museum): 1944

Connolly, Elizabeth (FAP, Southern California): 1940

Cooper, Charlotte Gowing (FAP, Ohio): 1937-1937 (4 letters)

Cooper, Samuel C.: 1941 (including certificate of dissolution for the American Folk Art Gallery); 1951 (3 letters)

Corcoran Gallery of Art: 1950 (3 letters)

Cornelius, Charles: 1936 (2 memoranda from others)

Cosmopolitan Fire Insurance: 1931

Coussirat, Elizabeth (Index of American Design): 1936 (6 letters)

Crampton, Rollin: 1960

Craven, Thomas: 1944 (2 letters)

Crawford, Phyllis: 1945-1960 (4 letters)

Crofut, Edward F. (WPA and Museum of Modern Art): 1936-1938 (3 letters)

Cronin, Agnes S.: 1939-1944 (2 letters)

Crosby, Hildegard (FAP, Illinois): 1937-1949 (8 letters)

Culler, Julia Abbott: 1935

Cummin, Hazel (Index of American Design): 1937 (5 letters)

Curran, Mary (FAP, Pennsylvania): 1937 (2 letters)

Daly, Matthew A. (WPA): 1936 (2 letters)

Dana, John Cotton (Newark Museum): 1924-1925 (4 letters)

Daugherty, D. H. (American Council of Learned Societies): 1949 (11 letters)

Davidson, Jo: 1944 (letter to the Editor)

Davidson, Martha (Friends of the FAP): 1939-1940 (3 letters)

Davies, Terry: 1960 (2 letters)

Davis, Charles (artist): mentioned in invitation dated [1938]

Davis, D. and Phyllis: 1960

Davis, George Earl: 1952

Davis, Lew and Mathilde: 1960

Davis, Stuart: 1936-1960 (5 letters)

Dehner, Dorothy: [1960]

Delson, Sidney: 1958-1959 (2 letters)

de Nagy, Tibor: 1960

Dentsch, Hilda: [1941-1960] (2 letters)

DeVoto, Bernard: 1949 (4 letters)

De Young Memorial Museum: 1939

d'Harnoncourt, Rene: 1944-1960 (5 letters)

Dickinson, Edwin: 1960

Dienes, Sari (artist): 1960

Don, Michael: 1939-1940 (2 letters)

Donati, Enric: 1960

Douglas, Eric: 1949

Downtown Gallery: 1935

Dows, Olin (Treasury Relief Art Project): 1935-1960 (5 letters)

Dunbar, Anna: 1960

Duntley, Seibert Q.: 1941

du Pont, H. F.: 1950 (2 letters)

Durieux, Caroline: 1943

Durham, Mr.: 1936

Dutt, Alska: 1956

du Von, Jay: 1941

East Liverpool, Ohio, Chamber of Commerce: 1939

Eaton, Allen: 1938 and 1945

Edwards, Paul (WPA, Washington, D.C.): 1941

Eglington, Laurie (Index of American Design): 1936 (2 letters)

Eilshemius, Louis M.: 1931-1939 (2 letters)

Emery, Humphrey J. (American Handicraft Council): 1939

Emil, Allan and Kate (art collectors): 1960

Emmerich, Andre: 1960

Engineer Replacement Center, Fort Belvoir: 1941 (2 letters)

Essex Institute: 1950

Evans, Ernestine: 1947 (2 letters)

Evergood, Philip: 1944 (letter to the Editor)

Fairweather, Sally: [1960]

Feininger, Julia: 1960, undated

Feitelson, Lorser and Helen: 1943-1960 (3 letters)

Ferber, Herbert and Lisi: 1960 (2 letters)

Ferren, John: 1949 (2 letters)

Field, George H. (Federal Works Agency): 1943 (2 letters)

Flanagan, Hallie: 1949 (3 letters)

Fleming, Philip B.: [1943]

Fogel, Barbara: 1960

Follmer, Frank J.: 1942

Force, Juliana: 1946

'47 -- Magazine: 1946

Frankenberg, Lloyd: 1937 and 1960

French, Helen: [1960]

Frick Art Reference Library: 1946

Fried: Rose Fried Gallery: 1953

Friends of the FAP: 1939 (13 letters)

Fuller, Buckminster: 1942-1949 (including a brochure about the Dymaxion House)

Fultz, Harry T.: 1942 (memo from Fred Biesel)

Gaskin, William: 1940-1961 (12 letters)

Gates, Marguerite (Public Library of Newark, N.J.): 1929-1935 (3 letters)

Gavert, Olive Lyford (Alfred Barr's secretary): 1960

General Services Administration: 1950

Gershoy, Toni: [1960]

Gibbs, Peggy (widow of artist Howard Gibbs): [1960]

Giedion, Siegfried: mentioned in letter dated Oct 07, 1951

Glarner, Fritz: 1949 and 1960

Glassgold, Cook Adolph: 1936-1940 (43 letters)

Goldberg, Albert L. (Illinois Music Project): 1940

Goldberg, Mike: [1960]

Goldwater, Louise and Robert: 1960

Goodall, Donald B.: 1960

Goodchild, Donald: 1939

Goodrich, Lloyd (Whitney Museum of American Art): 1948-1960 (7 letters)

Goodyear, A. Conger: 1935-1960 (5 letters)

Gordon, Jack (Whitney Museum of American Art): [1960]

Gorsline, Douglas W.: 1950 (2 letters)

Gowing, Lawrence: 1960

Graham, Ralph (FAP, Illinois): 1941-1942 (3 letters)

Graves, Morris: 1946

Green, Wilder: 1960

Greenberg, Clement: 1960

Greenwell, Darrell J. ( -- Ogden Standard Examiner): -- 1949

Griffis, Toni (Mrs. Hughes Griffis): 1960

Griffith, E. J. (FAP, Oregon): 1938 and 1960

Grossman, Mrs. I. Donald: [1960]

Guerrero, Jose and Roxane: [1960]

Guggenheim, Olga: 1960

Gwathmey, Robert: 1944 (letter to the Editor)

Hale, Bob (Metropolitan Museum of Art): 1960

Hall, Edward T. (Universal School of Handicrafts): 1939

Halpert, Edith: 1930-1960, undated (20 letters)

Hardin, Shirley: [1960]

Hare, Michael M.: 1948

Harper's Magazine: 1943-1944 (2 letters)

Harrison, Preston: 1934

Hart, "Pop": 1930-1932 (2 letters)

Hartigan, Grace: 1960

Hasegawa, Saburo: 1952 (letter to Franz Kline, including typescript "Pictures of Alcopley")

Hatch, John Davis: 1960

Hatcher, Harry and Doris: 1960 (3 letters)

Haupers, Clement (FAP, Minnesota): 1937-1949 (5 letters)

Haydon, Hal: 1955

Henley, Helen B. (Wadsworth Atheneum): 1937 (2 letters)

Herbert, David: 1960

Hess, Thomas: 1960

Hinckley, Robert H. (American Broadcasting Co.): 1960

Hirsch, Joseph: 1960

Hofmann, Hans and Maria: 1960 (2 letters)

Holt, Elizabeth (art historian): 1960

Holzhauer, Mildred: 1937-1940 (4 letters)

Hope, Henry R. (Indiana Univ.): 1948-1949 (2 letters)

Hopkins, Harry L.: 1936-1943 (13 letters)

Horr, Axel (artist): mentioned in invitation dated [1938]

House Beautiful: 1950

Houston: Museum of Fine Arts of Houston: 1955

Hunter, Howard O.: 1941

Hunter, Virginia and Russell Vernon Hunter: 1951-1960, undated (4 letters)

Huxley, Julia S.: 1942

Illinois Art Project: 1941-1942 (6 letters)

Index of American Design: 1936 (form letter)

Interior: Department of the Interior: 1950 (3 letters)

Inverarity, Robert Bruce (FAP State Dir., Washington): 1937-1950 (5 letters)

Isaacs, Betty and Julius: 1960

Jackson, Martha: [1960]

Jerry, Sylvester (FAP, Michigan): 1939 (3 letters)

Johns, Jasper: 1960

Johnson, Anna: 1952

Johnson, Buffie: 1960

Johnson, Irene Edith: 1960

Johnson, Philip C.: 1960

Jones, Anne (Mrs. E. Powis Jones): 1960

Kallen, Horace (publisher): 1960

Karpel, Ray and Bernard (Museum of Modern Art): [1960]

Kavanaugh, George R. (Berea College): 1936

Kaye, Harold: 1958

Kayser, Dr.: 1954

Keck, Caroline and Sheldon (art conservators): 1960

Kellogg, Elizabeth R.: 1949 (2 letters)

Kent, Rockwell: 1944

Kerr, Florence (Work Projects Administration): 1940-1942 (4 letters)

Keyes, Homer Eaton ( -- Antiques -- Magazine): 1936

Kiesler, Frederick J.: 1960

Kiplinger, Walter M.: 1941 (4 letters)

Kipper, Katrina (antiques dealer): 1935 (3 letters)

Kirby, Mr. O. A.: 1941

Kleinholz, Frank: 1944 (letter to the Editor)

Kline, Franz: 1952 (letter from Saburo Hasegawa, including typescript "Pictures of Alcopley") and 1960

Knight, Frederic (Artists' Coordination Committee): Nov 1936 (5 letters)

Knight, Harry: 1960

Knittle, Rhea Mansfield: 1936-1937 (2 letters)

Kokoschka, Oskar: 1944

Kootz, Jane and Sam: 1960

Kroll, Eleanor: 1937 (2 letters)

Kuniyoshi, Yasuo: 1944 (2 letters)

Labaudt, Lucien: 1943 (4 letters)

Lane, Harry: [1960]

Laning, Clair: 1960

Leech, Nancy T.: 1949

Leeds, Harold Eliot (architect): 1960

Legg, Alicia (Museum of Modern Art curator): 1960

Leggett, Eugene S. (National Emergency Council): 1936 (letter from Harry Hopkins)

Leicester, Louise B. (American Handicraft Council): [1940]

Lekakis, Michael: 1960

Lemmon, Warren W.: mentioned in letter dated Mar 08, 1940

Levine, Jack: 1960

Levy, Julian: 1944 and [1960]

Lewis and Clark High School: 1939

Lewis, Elizabeth Ray: 1943

Life -- Magazine: 1944 (4 letters)

Lipman, Jean and Howard: [1960]

Lipscomb, Isabel (Work Projects Admin.): 1941 (3 letters)

Lipton, Seymour: [1960]

Litchfield, Elizabeth (Museum of Modern Art): 1941 - [1960] (3 letters)

Lowenthal, Edith and Milton: 1960

Lundy, Margaret: 1938

Lunsford, Bascom Lamar: 1936

Lyles, Mary E.: 1935

Mabry, Tom and Ethel: 1960 (2 letters)

Macdonald-Wright, Stanton: 1936-1955, undated (60 letters)

Macdowell Colony: 1960

MacLeish, Archibald: [1943] (letter from Philip B. Fleming)

Macmillan Company: 1946-1959 (24 letters)

Magazine of Art: 1948-1951 (10 letters)

Mapes, Col. Milton C. (Civilian Camouflage): 1941

March, Frank A. (Project Control Division): 1941

Marcus, Marcia: 1960

Marg -- Magazine: 1956 (6 letters)

Marx, Ione F.: 1942

Maryland Historical Society: 1950 (2 letters)

Matisse, Patricia (Pierre Matisse Gallery Corp.): [1960]

Mattis, Astria: 1960

Maverick Maury (Congressman, Texas): 1936 (3 letters)

Mayor, A. Hyatt (Metropolitan Museum): 1960

Mazo, Sara (widow of Yasuo Kuniyoshi): 1960

McAndrew, Betty and John: 1960

McCormick, M. R.: 1938

McCrady, John: 1943

McCray, Porter (Museum of Modern Art): 1960

McDonald, W. F. (American Council of Learned Societies): 1944-1949 (3 letters)

McKeague, Robert I. (Community Service Projects Section): 1937-1940 (8 letters)

McMahon, Audrey (WPA): 1936-1941 (7 letters)

McPharlin, Paul (Michigan WPA): 1937 (7 letters)

Metropolitan Museum of Art: 1953

Miller, Dorothy C. (Museum of Modern Art): 1936-1956 (27 letters)

Miller, Emma Guffey: 1938

Minnesota Historical Society: 1952

Morgan, Anne: 1938-1939 (5 letters)

Morley, Grace: 1960

Morris, Lawrence: 1937-1939 (2 letters)

Morris, Suzy (Mrs. George L. K. Morris): 1960

Morrison, Richard: 1936-1949 (6 letters)

Morsell, Miss: 1938

Motherwell, Robert: 1960

Museum of Modern Art: 1936-[1960] (4 letters)

Myers, Bernard: 1948

Myers, John (art dealer): 1960

Nakian, Reuben: 1960

Nash, Susan Higginson: 1934 (2 letters)

Nathan, Reuben S.: 1949 (3 letters)

National Gallery of Art: 1943-1993 (27 letters)

National Institute on Education and the War: 1943

Navy: Department of the Navy: 1941

Neuberger, Roy: 1960

Neumeyer, Alfred (Mills College): 1944

Nevelson, Louise: 1960

Newhall, Beaumont: 1941

New Hampshire: University of New Hampshire: 1939

Newman, Barnett: 1960

Newmeyer, S.: [1936]

New Republic: 1949 (letter from Lloyd Goodrich)

New York WPA Artists, Inc.: 1977 (including exhibition catalog "Then and Now")

New Yorker: 1948 and 1952

New York Herald Tribune: 1948-1952 (3 letters)

New York Public Library: 1949 (including copies of Index of American Design correspondence dated 1935-1936)

New York State Historical Association: 1949-1951 (4 letters)

[New York Times]: 1944

Neyland, Harry: 1935 (letter to Mrs. Rockefeller with 13 photographs of folk art)

Norman, Charles: 1960

Norman, Dorothy (Stieglitz protegee): 1960

Norman, Geoffrey (Works Projects Administration): 1941 (3 letters)

North Texas Agricultural College: 1939

Northrop, F. S. C.: 1947

Northwest Missouri State Teachers College: 1939

Norton, Ann: [1960]

Norwegian Folk Art Museum: 1949 (2 letters)

Odegaard, Charles E. (American Council of Learned Societies): 1949 (3 letters)

O'Hara, Frank (poet and art critic): 1960

Okada, Kimi and Keryo: 1960

Olmsted, Harold S.: 1954

Olsen, Catharine M.: 1941, undated (3 letters)

O'Neill, John P. (Historic American Buildings Survey, Department of the Interior): 1936 (5 letters)

Organ, Violet: 1949

Ormsbee, Thomas H. (editor, -- American Collector): -- 1936 (letter to Ruth Reeves)

Osborn, Elodie: 1960

O'Steen, Alton (Alabama Dept. of Education): 1943

Pach, Walter: 1939 (photograph of letter to Friends of the FAP)

Parker, Margaret: [1960]

Parker, Thomas C. (Federal Art Proj.): 1936-1940 (14 letters)

Parkinson, Eliza (Museum of Modern Art trustee): 1960

Parr, Russell C.: 1936

Parsons, Betty: 1960

Pedlar, Sylvia: 1960

Pedro, Luis Martinez: 1947

Peixotto, Ernest: 1936

P.E.N. Club, The: 1948

People's Art Center Association, St. Louis: 1952 (5 letters)

Pereira, Irene Rice and George Reavey: 1950-1953 (21 letters)

Perry, Beatrice (Gres Gallery): 1960

Philadelphia Museum of Art: 1950

Pickens, Alton: 1955

Pietan, Norman: 1948 and [1949]

Pilgrim Society: 1949 (2 letters)

Pollack, Peter: 1960

Pollak, Frances M. (WPA): 1936-1949 (7 letters)

Pollet, Elizabeth (widow of artist Joseph Pollet): [1960]

Pollock, Jackson: 1952 (photocopy)

Price, R. Moore: 1945

Public Use of Arts Committee: 1939

Purcell, Ralph: 1949 (4 letters)

Pyle, Edward Frederick: 1939

Ramsay, John: mentioned in memo dated Mar 31, 1936

Reeves, Ruth: 1936-1949 (55 letters including field reports)letters)

Reines, Harriet: 1938

Reinhart, Ad: 1952-1959 (3 letters)

Reynal and Hitchcock, Inc.: 1937

Richardson, E. P. (Detroit Institute of Arts; Archives of American Art): 1951-1960 (7 letters)

Riefstahl, Elizabeth: 1936

Ritchie, Andrew C.: 1944 (2 letters)

Rivers, Larry: 1960

Robinson, Boardman: 1936 and 1960

Rockefeller Center, Inc.: 1934 (contract for the First Municipal Art Exhibition)

Rockefeller Foundation: 1949

Rockefeller, David: 1960

Rockefeller, John D., Jr., and Abby A.: 1934-1940 (4 letters)

Rockefeller, John III, and Blanchette: 1951-1960 (3 letters)

Rockefeller, Nelson A.: 1934-1960 (6 letters)

Rockefeller, Peggy: 1960

Roesen, Severin: mentioned in letter dated Mar 02, 1938

Roosevelt, Franklin D.: 1936-1940 (3 letters)

Rosenbaum, Belle ( -- New York Herald Tribune): -- 1949-1960 (4 letters)

Rosenwald, Janet: 1937 and 1960

Rothko, Mark: 1960

Rourke, Constance: 1935-1938 (57 letters)

Rowan, Edward B. (Treasury Department, Section of Painting and Sculpture): 1936-1943 (5 letters)

Rubenstein, Erica B.: 1945 (3 letters)

Rubenstein, Sarah (Museum of Modern Art): 1960

Russell, Morgan: 1950-1951 (2 letters)

St. Petersburg Federal Galleries: 1939

Sandoz, Mari (writer): 1960

Sawitzky, William (painting researcher): 1935 (2 letters)

Sawyer, Wilda A.: 1942

Saxon, Lyle: 1943

Schaefer, Bertha: [1960]

Scharf, Bill: [1960]

Scheidt, Melvin E. (War Relocation Authority): 1943

Schmidt, Katherine: 1944 and 1960

Schnitzer, Robert C.: 1949

Schwabacher, Ethel: 1960 (2 letters)

Scott, Cecil: 1960 (2 letters)

Scott, Phyllis C.: 1936-1937 (2 letters)

Scull, Ethel and Bob (art collectors): [1960]

Seckar, Alvena V.: 1946

Seeger, Charles: 1936

Selz, Peter and Thalia: 1960

Shaw, Charles: 1960

Simms, Agnes (artist): 1960

Siporin, Mitchell: 1943-1960 (4 letters)

Sloan, Helen (Mrs. John Sloan): 1951 and 1960

Sloane, William: 1945

Smedley, Agnes: 1947 (letter from Ernestine Evans)

Smith College: 1944-1950 (6 letters)

Smith, Ferdinand: 1952

Smith, Geneva: 1942 (memo from Frank J. Follmer)

Smith, Gordon M. (Index of American Design): 1936-1937 (8 letters)

Smith, Holly and Sam: [1960]

Smith, Joseph Lindon: mentioned in letter dated Mar 28, 1950

Smith, Laura: 1938-1939 (5 letters)

Smith, Louise: 1960

Smith, Margery Hoffman (FAP, Oregon): 1938

Soby, James Thrall: 1948-1960 (5 letters)

Soderblom, Nathan: 1922 (in Swedish)

Solomon, Saul (Cahill's doctor): 1960

Soyer, Moses: 1944 (letter to the Editor)

Spark, Mrs. Victor: 1960

Speck, Walter: 1939 (2 letters)

Spencer, Betty (Niles Spencer's first wife): 1960

Spencer, Catherine (Mrs. Niles Spencer): 1952-1960 (8 letters)

Stamos, Theodoros: 1960

Standards: National Bureau of Standards: 1941

State: Department of State: 1939 (3 letters)

Stavenitz, Alexander: 1937

Steegmuller, Francis: 1960

Stella, Joseph: 1936 (2 letters)

Sterner, Albert: 1935

Stieglitz, Alfred: 1932 and 1934

Stier, W. (Project Review Section): 1941

Still, Clyfford: 1953-1956 (4 letters)

Stix, Hugh: 1960

Stock, Joseph (artist): mentioned in letters dated 1932 and 1933

Stout, Rex: 1944

Strickland, Sidney: 1949 (2 letters)

Studio Publications, Inc.: 1951

Sunami, Soichi: 1960

Swasey, Jeannette: [1935]

Sweeney, Jim: [1960]

Tabak, Maynatalie (colleague of Jackson Pollock): [1960]

Taub, Alex: 1942 (memo from Buckminster Fuller)

Taylor, Francis Henry: 1939 and 1952

Taylor, Miss: 1936

Thomas, Yvonne (artist): 1960

Thomley, John: 1949

Thoms, Mr.: 1936 (letter from Matthew Daly)

Thorgurson, Nina: [1960]

Tobey, Mark: 1954 and 1960

Tobey, Judith (Resettlement Administration): 1936

Townsend, Gertrude: [1937]

Townsend, Mr.: 1938

Tranum, Carl K.: 1949 (2 letters)

Triggs, Clayton E.: 1940 (4 letters)

Turner, Katherine: [1935]

Tworkov, Jack and Wally: 1960

Uht, Charles (photographer of Nelson Rockefeller's collection): 1960

United American Artists: 1940

Valentin, Curt: 1954

Valentine, Chapin: 1932

Valentiner, W. R. (Detroit Institute of Arts): 1933

Varian, Dorothy: 1960

Viviano, Catherine (art dealer): [1960]

Volkmer, Jean (Museum of Modern Art conservator): [1960]

von Wiegand, Charmion (artist): 1960

Walker, Hudson D.: 1960

Walley, Jano and John: 1949 and 1960

Ward: 1925 and 1960 (3 letters)

War Department: 1938-1941 (5 letters)

Warren, William (FAP, Connecticut): 1937

Wasey, Jane: 1960

Washburn College: 1939

Washburn, Gordon (Albright Art Gallery): 1960

Washington: The State College of Washington: 1939

Watrous, Harry W.: 1936

Watson, Forbes: 1949

Webb, Aileen (American Handicraft Council): 1938 (4 letters)

Weber, Max: 1922-1960 (6 letters)

Weisenborn, Fritzi (Mrs. Rudolph Weisenborn): 1950

Wendt, Gerald (Time, Inc.): 1944 (2 letters)

Weston, Edward: 1936

Wharton, Frances L.: 1935 (2 letters)

Wheeler, Monroe (Museum of Modern Art): 1960

White, Francis Robert: 1944

White, Jim: 1960

Whitelaw, Robert N. S.: 1960

Whitney Museum of American Art: 1949 and 1979

Whyte, James C.: 1942

Wilfred, Thomas: 1960

Williams, Aubrey (WPA): 1936

Williamsburg Restoration, Incorporated: 1935 (4 letters)

Winchester, Alice ( -- Antiques -- Magazine): 1950-1951 (6 letters)

Winser, Beatrice: 1924-1944 (6 letters)

Winter, Anna K. (antiques dealer): 1935

Wisconsin: State Historical Society of Wisconsin: 1939

Woodstock Artists Association: 1960

Woodward, Ellen S.: 1936-1938 (3 letters)

Worcester, Wakefield (architect): 1936

Wright, Russell (industrial designer): [1960]

Wyn: A. A. Wyn, Inc.: 1951

Youngerman, Jack: 1960

Zegri, Armando (Galeria Sudamericana): 1960

Zimmerman, Fred and Dorothy: [1960]

Zorach, William: 1936-1960 (3 letters)
Collection Restrictions:
The microfilm of this collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Holger Cahill papers, 1910-1993, bulk 1910-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.cahiholg, Series 2
See more items in:
Holger Cahill papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9bfd0f186-dabc-4de0-b3c7-0556a4b4fab6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-cahiholg-ref23

Adirondack Experience the Museum on Blue Mountain Lake Adirondack Experience in association with Scala Arts Publishers, Inc

Author:
Adirondack Experience  Search this
Editor:
Bell, Eugenia  Search this
Subject:
Adirondack Experience  Search this
Physical description:
60 pages illustrations (chiefly color), color maps 23 cm
Type:
Books
Catalogs
History
Place:
Adirondack Park (N.Y.)
Adirondack Mountains (N.Y.)
Adirondack, Monts (N.Y.)
New York (State)
Adirondack Mountains
Adirondack Park
Date:
2019
Topic:
History  Search this
Histoire  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1153606

Frederic Fairchild and Julia Munson Sherman papers, 1874-1970

Creator:
Sherman, Frederic Fairchild, 1874-1940  Search this
Sherman, Julia Munson  Search this
Subject:
Boardman, David Sherman  Search this
Bolton, Theodore  Search this
Cleland, T. M. (Thomas Maitland)  Search this
Earl, Ralph, 1751-1801  Search this
Groll, Albert Lorey  Search this
Orr, Elliot  Search this
Peale, James  Search this
Ryder, Albert Pinkham  Search this
Lipman, Jean  Search this
Clark, Eliot Candee  Search this
Gutman, Walter  Search this
Waldo & Jewett (Firm: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Citation:
Frederic Fairchild and Julia Munson Sherman papers, 1874-1970. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Literary miscellany  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art publishing -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Theme:
Art Market  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8469
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210645
AAA_collcode_sherfref
Theme:
Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210645

Watson-Guptill Publications letters, 1948-1955

Creator:
Watson-Guptill Publications (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Subject:
Guptill, Arthur Leighton  Search this
American Amateur Artists Association  Search this
Citation:
Watson-Guptill Publications letters, 1948-1955. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
American Artist  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art publishing -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Theme:
Art Materials, Techniques, and Studio Art Education  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8771
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210954
AAA_collcode_watspubl
Theme:
Art Materials, Techniques, and Studio Art Education
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210954

Forbes Watson papers, 1840-1967, bulk 1900-1960

Creator:
Watson, Forbes, 1879-1960  Search this
Subject:
Sheeler, Charles  Search this
Saint-Gaudens, Homer  Search this
Marsh, Reginald  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo  Search this
Kroll, Leon  Search this
Barr, Alfred H., Jr.  Search this
Zorach, William  Search this
Gallatin, A. E. (Albert Eugene)  Search this
Adams, Ansel  Search this
Citron, Minna Wright  Search this
Bruce, Edward  Search this
Brancusi, Constantin  Search this
Glackens, Ira  Search this
Genthe, Arnold  Search this
Klonis, Stewart  Search this
Dows, Olin  Search this
Coleman, Glenn O.  Search this
Pène Du Bois, Guy  Search this
Matisse, Henri  Search this
Morgenthau, Henry  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo  Search this
Manship, Paul  Search this
Mangravite, Peppino  Search this
Shimin, Symeon  Search this
Beal, Gifford  Search this
Sterne, Maurice  Search this
Ray, Man  Search this
Rowan, Edward Beatty  Search this
Watson, Nan  Search this
Weber, Max  Search this
Tucker, Allen  Search this
United States. Dept. of the Treasury. Section of Painting and Sculpture  Search this
United States. Dept. of the Treasury. Section of Fine Arts  Search this
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Pepsi-Cola Company  Search this
Public Works of Art Project  Search this
Red Cross  Search this
United States. Public Buildings Administration. Section of Fine Arts  Search this
Type:
Notes
Photographs
Drafts (documents)
Scrapbooks
Place:
United States -- Social conditions -- 1933-1945
New York N.Y. -- Buildings, structures, etc., Photographs
Citation:
Forbes Watson papers, 1840-1967, bulk 1900-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Arts (Magazine)  Search this
Art and state  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art publishing  Search this
Architecture, New York State, New York -- Photographs  Search this
Architecture -- New York, N.Y. -- Photographs  Search this
New Deal, 1933-1939  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Theme:
Government Sponsorship of the Arts  Search this
Architecture & Design  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11027
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)211525
AAA_collcode_watsforb
Theme:
Government Sponsorship of the Arts
Architecture & Design
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_211525
Online Media:

John D. Graham papers

Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Names:
Burliuk, David, 1882-1967  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
Gilot, Francoise, 1921-  Search this
Gorchov, Ron  Search this
Gorky, Arshile, 1904-1948 -- Photographs  Search this
Kitaj, R. B.  Search this
Mayer, Jack  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973 -- Photographs  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Ultra Violet  Search this
Extent:
11.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Date:
1799-1988
bulk 1890-1961
Summary:
The papers of painter, collector, and writer John Graham measure 11.2 linear feet and date from 1799 to 1988, with the bulk of materials dating from 1890 to 1961. Papers document the life of John Graham, born Ivan Dombrowsky, through personal documents related to military service and family history, passports, artifacts, correspondence, appointment books, financial records, inventories, wills, extensive writings and notes, books, clippings, exhibition catalogs, photographs of Graham and his family and friends, and artwork created and collected by Graham.
Scope and Contents note:
The papers of painter, collector, and writer John Graham measure 11.2 linear feet and date from 1799 to 1988, with the bulk of materials dating from 1890 to 1961. Papers document the life of John Graham, born Ivan Dombrowsky, through personal documents related to military service and family history, passports, artifacts, correspondence, appointment books, financial records, inventories, wills, extensive writings and notes, books, clippings, exhibition catalogs, photographs of Graham and his family and friends, and artwork created and collected by Graham.

Biographical Materials and Artifacts include passports and other official documents, as well as records related to Graham's family, military service, and medical history. Among the artifacts are paint pots and a palette. Correspondence is with art and antique dealers and collectors, and includes significant correspondence and related documents of Jack Mayer, Graham's agent from the late 1950s. Several artists and famous friends are represented in Graham's correspondence including David Burliuk, Stuart Davis, Ultra Violet, Francoise Gilot, R.B. Kitaj, Marc Tobey, and Ron Gorchov.

Personal Business Records contain appointment books spanning 1931 to 1961 which record appointments but were also used as notebooks and sketchbooks. Other Business Records include inventories of Graham's books and antiques made by Graham, records of antique-related transactions, wills of Graham and his last wife, Marianne Strate, and extensive personal financial records from the last few years of his life.

Graham's writings are found scattered throughout the collection, as is his artwork. The Writings series is dominated by Graham's lengthy book projects, found in multiple drafts. The author's annotated published works are also found, as well as typescripts of several published essays by and about Graham. Lists, notes, and writings on a wide range of subjects are found on loose pages and in notebooks dated from 1931 to 1961. Among the Printed Materials are many annotated books from Graham's library, some of which contain drawings, and clippings and exhibition catalogs related to Graham's career going back to the 1920s. Reference files of printed ephemera and clippings collected by Graham are found on a variety of subjects, some of which contain pictorial subjects used in Graham's paintings.

Photographs depict Graham from childhood through his last years in cabinet card portraits, passport photographs, and snapshots. Photographs are also found of his parents, his five wives and four children, and a number of famous friends including Pablo Picasso, Françoise Gilot, their children, and Arshile Gorky. Artwork includes Graham's sketchbooks of 1934, 1960, and 1961, loose sketches, and a collection of file folders with many symbols and illustrations. Also found among the artwork are antique and contemporary prints and drawings collected by Graham.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged into 7 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials and Artifacts, 1799, 1822, 1891-1961 (Boxes 1, 11-12, 17; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1932-1988 (Box 1; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, circa 1931-1962 (Boxes 1-3; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1839, circa 1923-1986 (Boxes 3-5, OV 13; 2.9 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Materials, circa 1885-1961 (Boxes 6-9, OV 14; 3.7 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1860-1985 (Box 9-10, 17, OV 15; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1852-1961 (Box 10, OV 16; 1 linear foot)
Biographical/Historical note:
The Russian émigré painter and writer John Graham, born Ivan Dombrowsky, was born in Kiev in 1886, 1887, or 1888. All three conflicting dates are found on various legal papers, licences, and passports. His parents were of minor nobility but with little means. He attended law school and served in the Circassian Regiment of the Russian army, earned the Saint George's Cross during World War I, and was imprisoned as a counterrevolutionary by the Bolsheviks after the assassination of Czar Nicholas II and his family in 1918. He fled for a time to his mother's native Poland, and finally in 1920, he emigrated with his second wife Vera and their son Nicholas to the United States. He began calling himself John in the US, and had his name officially changed to John Graham upon becoming a United States citizen in 1927. The name Graham may have been a transliteration of his father's name, Gratian. Graham is often described as a quixotic figure who cultivated a larger-than-life persona in the artistic circles of New York in the first half of the twentieth century through his authoritative philosophical and aesthetic arguments on the one hand, and his often fabulous tales of his early life on the other, including a story he wrote of his origins in which he was dropped as an infant onto a rock in the Caspian Sea by an enormous eagle.

In New York, Graham studied at the Art Students League, taking classes with John Sloan, William von Schlegell, and Allen Tucker. Among his fellow students were Dorothy Dehner and David Smith, Adolph Gottlieb, Alexander Calder, and Elinor Gibson, who married Graham in 1924. The couple lived briefly in Elinor's native Baltimore, Maryland, where he met Etta and Claribel Cone, collectors of modern European paintings. It may have been the Cone sisters who introduced Graham to their circle of avant-garde artists and art collectors in Paris in the late 1920s. Whatever its origin, Graham's early style has been compared to Cezanne, Braque, Derain, and Chirico, and his frequent trips to Europe made him a conduit for current art ideas and trends for the American artists who knew him.

Graham exhibited his paintings steadily in the late 1920s and early 1930s, including shows at the Society of Independent Arists (New York) in 1925, the Modernist Galleries (Baltimore) in 1926, Galerie Zaborowski (Paris) in 1928 and 1929, at Dudensing Galleries (New York) and Phillips Memorial Gallery (Washington) in 1929, the First Biennial at the Whitney Museum in 1932, and at 8th Street Gallery (New York) in 1933. During this period Graham and his wife Elinor lived in Paris, New York City, New Jersey, and upstate New York. He spent a year teaching at Wells College in Aurora, New York, where he also executed a series of wall panels in 1932. Graham's friendships with other artists during this period included Arshile Gorky, Stuart Davis, and Willem de Kooning. De Kooning is said to have called Davis, Gorky, and Graham the "three smartest guys on the scene."

Graham's European travels also enabled him to earn a living by buying primitive sculpture and antiques for collectors and dealers. In the 1930s he bought African Art for Vanity Fair editor and art collector Frank Crowninshield, and in 1936, Graham arranged an exhibition of Crowninshield's collection at Jacques Seligmann gallery. Graham and Elinor Gibson divorced in 1934 and he married Constance Wellman in Paris in 1936. They lived in Brooklyn Heights near Adolph Gottlieb, David Smith, and Dorothy Dehner, and worked for Hilla Rebay in her formation of the Museum of Non-Objective Painting, which became the Guggenheim Museum. Suffering financial hardship in the late years of the Depression, Constance and Graham lived in Mexico for several stretches of time, and Graham published several articles on Mexico and Mexican Art, and an essay entitled "Primitive Art and Picasso" in Magazine of Art.

Graham was a prolific writer, but only a few of his written works found their way into print. Aside from his essays, published works include a small book of poetry, Have It!, published in 1923, and a book which presented Graham's personal theories of art entitled System and Dialectics of Art, published in 1937 by Delphic Studios, an eclectic New York gallery and small press run by Alma Reed. The book was influential for a younger generation of American artists; Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner in particular both expressed appreciation for Graham's ideas. For decades, Graham worked on several other major written works which were not published, including a highly stylized, symbolist work about his childhood and an encyclopedic collection of short, didactic essays on a wide range Grahamiam themes, a work which Graham usually referred to as Orifizio Mundi.

In 1942, Graham organized the exhibition "French and American Painters" at McMillen Gallery (New York) which showed Modigliani, Picasso, Braque, Rouault, and Matisse, alongside the Americans Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Stuart Davis, David Burliuk, and Walt Kuhn, among others. The show was well-received critically and, as it was Jackson Pollock's first public exhibition and Willem de Kooning's second, and the occasion of Pollock and Lee Krasner's meeting, could be considered a watershed event in contemporary American art.

Graham's own style made a pronounced shift away from abstraction in the 1940s. He began referencing renaissance art in his paintings, incorporating occult symbols, and signing them "Ioannus Magus," or "Ioannus San Germanus." His marriage to Constance ended acrimoniously around this time. He met Marianne Strate, a bookbinder, through her daughter Ileana Sonnabend and son-in-law Leo Castelli. They lived in Southampton, New York, where Graham was close to the Castellis, Paul Brach, Miriam Schapiro, and where he renewed his friendship with Willem de Kooning, who had a studio in Castelli's East Hampton home in the early 1950s. Marianne died in 1955.

Graham exhibited at the Stable Gallery in 1954, and at the newly-opened, uptown Whitney Museum of American Art in 1955. Jack Mayer became Graham's dealer in the late 1950s, held exhibitions at his Madison Avenue gallery, Gallery Mayer, in 1960, and arranged for an exhibition at the Tennessee Fine Arts Center in 1961, shortly before Graham's death. Graham left the United States for the last time in 1959, lived in Paris for two years, and died in June 1961 in a hospital in London. Gallery Mayer held a memorial exhibition at the end of 1961. Retrospective exhibitions of Graham's work have been held at the Art Institute of Chicago (1963), the Museum of Modern Art (1968), the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (1969), and the Phillips Collection (1987).
Separated Materials note:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reel 5049) including six volumes of notebooks and several loose sketches. Loaned materials were returned to MoMA and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The papers of John Graham were given to the Archives of American Art in five separate accessions between 1985 and 1988. The bulk of papers were donated by Graham's son, John David Graham, in 1985, with later additions from Patricia Graham, the widow of John David Graham, in 1986, 1987, and 1988, via the Andre Emmerich Gallery, Inc. The Department of Prints and Drawings of the Museum of Modern Art donated more papers and loaned additional materials for microfilming in 1986.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Rights:
Reel 5049: Museum of Modern Art, NY: John Graham Notebooks: Authorization to publish, quote or reproduce requires written permission from the Museum of Modern Art. Contact Reference Services for more information.
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists as authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Antiques  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.grahjohn
See more items in:
John D. Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw945d28f67-7253-4b77-ad5a-148643181754
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-grahjohn
Online Media:

Valentine Gallery records

Creator:
Valentine Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Names:
F. Valentine Dudensing (Firm)  Search this
Brook, Alexander, 1898-1980  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
De Chirico, Giorgio, 1888-  Search this
Dudensing, F. Valentine, 1892-1967  Search this
Eilshemius, Louis M. (Louis Michel), 1864-1941  Search this
Kane, John, 1860-1934  Search this
Matisse, Henri, 1869-1954  Search this
Mérida, Carlos, 1891-1984  Search this
Price, C. S. (Clayton S.), 1874-1950  Search this
Stella, Joseph, 1877-1946  Search this
Van Vechten, Carl, 1880-1964  Search this
Extent:
1.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
circa 1890-circa 1960
Summary:
The records of the New York City based Valentine Gallery measure 1.8 linear feet and date from circa 1890 to 1960. The bulk of the material documents the gallery's dealings with artists Louis Eilshemius, John Kane, Henri Matisse, and C.S. Price. Additionally, there is one scrapbook which contains printed materials regarding Valentine Gallery exhibitions from 1925-1936.
Scope and Contents:
The records of the New York City based Valentine Gallery measure 1.8 linear feet and date from circa 1890 to 1960. The bulk of the material documents the gallery's dealings with artists Louis Eilshemius, John Kane, Henri Matisse, and C.S. Price. Additionally, there is one scrapbook which contains printed materials regarding Valentine Gallery exhibitions from 1925-1936.

The artist's file for Eilshemius contains biographical information; correspondence between Valentine Dudensing and the artist, as well scattered letters from Carl Van Vecten, Alfred H. Barr, and museums and institutions; writings and notes; price lists and other financial and legal documents; printed material from Eilshemius's varied career and from his affiliation with the Valentine Gallery; photographs including portraits of the artist, and photos of installations and of works of art; and a scrapbook containing clippings and scattered other printed materials covering Eilshemius's shows at the Valentine Gallery.

Artists' files for John Kane, Henri Matisse, and C.S. Price contain scattered documentation. The file for John Kane includes correspondence between Valentine Dudensing and Kane's estate managers as well as museums and institutions, price lists, legal records, and printed materials. There are two letters from Henri Matisse to Valentine Dudensing regarding travel plans and a thank you message. The C.S. Price file consists of letters from Price regarding specific works of art, and scattered financial records.

A scrapbook dates from 1925-1936 and includes newspaper and magazine clippings about exhibitions and artists represented by the Valentine Gallery. Artists and exhibitions mentioned in the clippings include Alexander Brook, Giorgio de Chirico, Stuart Davis, Jean Lucrat, Carlos Merida, and Joseph Stella. Also, there is a poster created by Valentine Dudensing to fundraise for ambulances for France.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 2 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Artists Files, circa 1890-1960 (Box 1, 3; 1.3 linear feet)

Series 2: Scrapbook, 1925-1936 (Box 2, 4; 0.5 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
The Valentine Gallery was founded by F. Valentine Dudensing in 1926 and operated in New York City until 1947. The gallery hosted many exhibitions of Modern European art and specialized in School of Paris paintings.

F. Valentine Dudensing was born in 1892 in New York City. His father, Richard Dudensing was a well known art publisher and gallerist who owned Dudensing Galleries. Valentine served in World War I in the United States Aviation Corps and in 1920, married Margaret van der Gros. During a trip to Europe in the early 1920s, Dudensing became acquainted with the son of artist Henri Matisse, Pierre. Together, they conceived a gallery managed by Dudensing in New York while Matisse organized and curated art from Europe.

Dudensing opened his gallery in 1926 at 43 East 57th Street as the F. Valentine Dudensing Gallery. At this time, his father's gallery, the Dudensing Galleries, was located at 45 West 44th Street. Valentine Dudensing changed his gallery's name in 1927 to the Valentine Gallery to distinguish it from his father's gallery. The gallery was one of the first to bring Modern European works to New York City and hosted exhibitions of Giorgio de Chirico, Jean Lurçat, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, and André Dunoyer de Segonzac. Additionally, Valentine Gallery represented American artists including Louis Eilshemius, John Kane, and C.S. Price. Pierre Matisse left the partnership with Valentine Dudensing to open his own gallery in 1931.

In 1947, Valentine Dudensing closed his gallery and moved to France with his wife. He died in 1967.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel NY59-5) including gallery index cards. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The Valentine Gallery records were donated by gallery founder, Valentine Dudensing in 1958. Dudensing also lent the Archives of American Art gallery index cards for microfilming in 1959. Roy R. Neuberger donated materials regarding Louis Eilshemius in 1959 who received the material from Valentine Dudensing.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Painting, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Valentine Gallery records, circa 1890-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.valegall
See more items in:
Valentine Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9d0dc67aa-56b9-4a68-bd94-030fdcded480
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-valegall
Online Media:

Forbes Watson papers

Topic:
Arts (Magazine)
Creator:
Watson, Forbes, 1880-1960  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Pepsi-Cola Company  Search this
Public Works of Art Project  Search this
Red Cross  Search this
United States. Dept. of the Treasury. Section of Fine Arts  Search this
United States. Dept. of the Treasury. Section of Painting and Sculpture  Search this
United States. Public Buildings Administration. Section of Fine Arts  Search this
Adams, Ansel, 1902-1984  Search this
Barr, Alfred H., Jr., 1902-1981  Search this
Beal, Gifford, 1879-1956 -- Photographs  Search this
Brancusi, Constantin, 1876-1957  Search this
Bruce, Edward, 1879-1943  Search this
Citron, Minna Wright, 1896-1991  Search this
Coleman, Glenn O., 1887-1932  Search this
Dows, Olin, 1904-1981  Search this
Genthe, Arnold, 1869-1942  Search this
Glackens, Ira, 1907-1990  Search this
Klonis, Stewart, 1901-1989  Search this
Kroll, Leon, 1884-1974 -- Photographs  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo, 1889-1953  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo, 1889-1953 -- Photographs  Search this
Mangravite, Peppino, 1896-  Search this
Manship, Paul, 1885-1966  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954 -- Photographs  Search this
Matisse, Henri, 1869-1954  Search this
Morgenthau, Henry, 1891-1967  Search this
Pène Du Bois, Guy, 1884-1958  Search this
Ray, Man, 1890-1976  Search this
Rowan, Edward Beatty, 1898-1946  Search this
Saint-Gaudens, Homer, b. 1880 -- Photographs  Search this
Shimin, Symeon, 1902-  Search this
Sterne, Maurice, 1878-1957  Search this
Tucker, Allen, 1866-1939  Search this
Watson, Nan, 1876-1966  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966  Search this
Photographer:
Gallatin, A. E. (Albert Eugene), 1881-1952  Search this
Sheeler, Charles, 1883-1965  Search this
Extent:
13.92 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Notes
Photographs
Drafts (documents)
Scrapbooks
Place:
United States -- Social conditions -- 1933-1945
New York N.Y. -- Buildings, structures, etc., Photographs
Date:
1840-1967
bulk 1900-1960
Summary:
The papers of New York City art critic, writer, and lecturer Forbes Watson date from 1840-1967 with the bulk of materials dating from 1900-1960 and measure 13.92 linear feet. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, business records relating to the Arts Publishing Corporation, records documenting Watson's work for the Public Works of Art Project and the Section of Painting and Sculpture, reference files, an exhibition file from the Pepsi-Cola Company's Third Annual Exhibition, writings and notes, ten scrapbooks and loose pages, printed materials, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of New York City art critic, writer, and lecturer Forbes Watson date from 1840-1967 with the bulk of materials dating from 1900-1960 and measure 13.92 linear feet. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, business records relating to the Arts Publishing Corporation, records documenting Watson's work for the Public Works of Art Project and the Section of Painting and Sculpture, reference files, an exhibition file from the Pepsi-Cola Company's Third Annual Exhibition, writings and notes, ten scrapbooks and loose pages, printed materials, and photographs.

Biographical material includes Watson's Harvard diploma, documents concerning his service with the Red Cross in World War II, biographical accounts, and obituaries.

Correspondence is primarily with colleagues and includes scattered letters from Alfred H. Barr, Jr., Ira Glackens, Allen Tucker, and Max Weber. Other letters are from artists, art historians, and museum curators. A notebook contains shorthand drafts of letters from Watson.

Business records include personal business records consisting of various tax and stock records. The Arts Publishing Corporation records concern Watson's tenure as editor of The Arts magazine and contains a contract, correspondence, financial records, stockholders reports, press releases, a scrapbook, and issues of The Arts. Also included are business records pertaining to the Art in Federal Buildings, Inc..

The U.S. Treasury Department file is the largest series and documents Watson's federal employment as technical director, chief advisor, and consultant for Treasury Department's public art programs - the Public Works of Art Project and the Section of Painting and Sculpture. The files contain correspondence, financial reports, prospectuses, exhibition files, typescripts, clippings, exhibition catalogs, miscellaneous printed material, and photographs, and a scrapbook. The files contain a record of Watson's and other federal administrators' interactions with many artists during the Depression Era. Correspondence is primarily between Watson and Edward Bruce, Olin Dows, Henry and Elinor Morgenthau, and Edward B. Rowan. Found are scattered letters from artists including Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Paul Manship, and William Zorach, among many others. There are exhibition files for "Art for Bonds," "Army at War," and "War Against Japan." There are also photographs of U. S. Treasury Department events including a radio broadcast by John Dewey, Robert La Follette, Jr., and Sumner Welles.

Documents from the Pepsi-Cola Company's Third Annual Exhibition at the National Academy of Design contains a prospectus, an exhibition catalog and artists' statements.

Artist/Patron files contain reference material concerning painters, sculptors, photographers, dancers, composers, authors, art collectors, art dealers, and museum administrators. Files may include writings, notes, artworks, exhibition catalogs and other printed materials. Of particular note are photographs, which include portrait photographs of artists and of artists in their studios. Notable photographers include Ansel Adams, Arnold Genthe, Man Ray, photographs of New York City by Charles Sheeler and a photo of Henri Matisse by A. E. Gallatin. Files for Nan Watson, Symeon Shimin, and Glenn O. Coleman contain artworks. A file for Constantin Brancusi contains legal documents concerning U. S. Customs vs. Brancusi.

Art and Architecture files consist of reference material including photographs and notes concerning miscellaneous unattributed art works, American architecture, and furnishings.

Notes and writings consist of miscellaneous notes and typescripts of lectures and published articles, and notebooks.

Nine scrapbooks and loose scrapbook pages contain clippings of articles written by Watson, lists, and exhibition announcements and catalogs. Additional printed material includes clippings, copies of the Hue and Cry newspaper, exhibition announcements and catalogs, press releases, calendars of events, brochures for the Art Students League, book catalogs, published books, and miscellaneous printed material.

Photographs are of Forbes Watson; family members including his wife, painter Nan Watson; and members of the Art Students League including Peggy Bacon, Minna Citron, Stewart Klonis, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, and Reginald Marsh. There are also photographs of juries for the Carnegie Institute International Exhibitions that include colleagues Alfred H. Barr, Jr., Gifford Beal, Guy Pene DuBois, Leon Kroll, Henri Matisse, Homer Saint-Gaudens, and Maurice Sterne.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1902-1960 (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1913-1960 (Box 1; 33 folders)

Series 3: Business Records, 1920-1944 (Box 1-3, 14, 22; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 4: U. S. Treasury Department File, 1926-1945 (Box 3-6, 14, 17, 22, OV 21; 3.4 linear feet)

Series 5: File for Pepsi-Cola Company's Third Annual Exhibition "Paintings of the Year," 1946 (Box 6; 5 folders)

Series 6: Artist/Patron Files, 1840-1967 (Box 6-9, 15, OV 21; 2.8 linear feet)

Series 7: Art and Architecture File, 1929-1930 (Box 9; 35 folders)

Series 8: Notes and Writings, 1875-1950 (Box 9-10, 22; 1.3 linear feet)

Series 9: Scrapbooks, 1904-1951 (Box 9, 11, 14, BV 18, BV 19, BV 20; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 10: Printed Material, 1900-1961 (Box 10, 12-13, 16-17, 22; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 11: Photographs, 1900-1950 (Box 13, 22; .4 linear feet)

All material is arranged chronologically, with the exception of the Artist/Patron Files which are arranged alphabetically.
Biographical Note:
Forbes Watson (1879-1960) worked primarily in New York City and Washington, D.C. as an art critic, writer, lecturer, and consultant to the U. S. Treasury Department's Public Works of Art Project and Section of Painting and Sculpture (Section of Fine Arts).

Forbes Watson was born on November 27, 1879 in Boston, the son of stockbroker John Watson and his wife Mary. Watson grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, attending the Phillips Academy in Andover, and graduating from Harvard University in 1902. After a brief period of freelance writing, he was hired by The New York Evening Post as an art critic in 1911 and worked there until 1917. In 1910, he married Agnes, professionally known as painter Nan Watson.

During World War I, Watson served with an American volunteer ambulance unit with the French army, later working with the American Red Cross in Paris. After the war, he moved back to New York City and worked as art critic for The World, from the early 1920s until 1931 and as editor of The Arts magazine from 1923-1933. Watson also lectured at the Art Students League, and at various universities and arts organizations.

In 1933, Watson moved to Washington, D.C. to serve as technical director of the U. S. Treasury Department's short-lived Public Works of Art Project. In October 1934, Watson was employed as Chief Adviser to the Treasury Department's Section of Painting and Sculpture (later renamed the Section of Fine Arts) and later as Consultant to the Secretary's Office of the Treasury. During World War II, he organized various traveling exhibitions including "Art for Bonds" that promoted the sale of war bonds. Watson retired in 1946 and lived in Gaylordsville, Connecticut.

Watson was the author of numerous essays and reviews, and several books including American Painting Today and Winslow Homer, a biography of the noted American artist. With Edward Bruce, he produced a pictorial volume Art in Federal Buildings, Vol. I: Mural Designs. At his death he was working on his autobiography.

Forbes Watson died on May 31, 1960 in New Milford, Connecticut.
Provenance:
The Forbes Watson papers were donated by Watson's widow, Nan Watson, in 1961. An additional folder of material was donated in 2018 by the Museum of Modern Art via Michelle Elligott, Chief of Archives, Library and Research.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art and state  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art publishing  Search this
Architecture, New York State, New York -- Photographs  Search this
Architecture -- New York, N.Y. -- Photographs  Search this
New Deal, 1933-1939  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Photographs
Drafts (documents)
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Forbes Watson papers, 1840-1967, bulk 1900-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.watsforb
See more items in:
Forbes Watson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9b62b4c1c-aa40-4979-bbf3-d90fa4e127b6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-watsforb
Online Media:

Eldzier Cortor Papers

Creator:
Cortor, Eldzier, 1916-  Search this
Names:
Anderson Gallery  Search this
Art Institute of Chicago -- Students  Search this
Kenkeleba House  Search this
Sylvan Cole Gallery  Search this
Anderson, Carol  Search this
Carracio, K.  Search this
Collier, Leontine L.  Search this
Driskell, David C.  Search this
Harrigan, Violetta C., 1941-  Search this
Lynch, Acklyn  Search this
Saar, Betye  Search this
Taha, Halima  Search this
Extent:
3.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Sketches
Collages
Diaries
Watercolors
Place:
Haiti -- description and travel
Date:
circa 1930s-2015
bulk 1972-2015
Summary:
The papers of painter and printmaker Eldzier Cortor measure 3.1 linear feet and date from circa 1930s to 2015, with the bulk of the papers dating from 1972 to 2015. The papers contain biographical material, correspondence, professional files, exhibition and gallery files, writings, printed material, artwork, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of painter and printmaker Eldzier Cortor measure 3.1 linear feet and date from circa 1930s to 2015, with the bulk of the papers dating from 1972 to 2015. The papers contain biographical material, correspondence, professional files, exhibition and gallery files, writings, printed material, artwork, and photographs.

Biographical material consists of awards certificates; Cortor's artist biography; an obituary and prayer cards for his father in law; an address book; and a Christmas list.

Correspondence includes letters from Cortor's family; correspondence with or about individuals or organizations; and general correspondence. Individuals included in the general correspondence are Acklyn Lynch, Leontine Collier, Violetta Harrigan, Halima Taha, David C. Driskell, Carol Anderson, and Betye Saar. Art institutions represented in this series include Sylvan Cole Gallery, Anderson Gallery, and Kenkeleba House.

Professional files include materials related to the Cosby Collection of Fine Arts; publishing; materials related to fake Cortor works; the Public School Mural Project; teaching files; lists of possible titles for paintings; financial documents; materials related to painting and etching plates for storage; and notes of museum and gallery contacts.

Exhibition and gallery files include correspondence; contracts and agreements; exhibition announcements; inventories; other exhibition materials; clippings; press releases; photographs and photocopied images of artwork; and photographs of exhibitions.

Writings consist primarily of essays and articles about Eldzier Cortor. Also included are his answers to a questionnaire about art, a diary, and notes, as well as hand-copied excerpts of reviews.

Printed material includes exhibition announcements, exhibition catalogs, newsletters, clippings, research and source material, and books.

Artwork includes ink and watercolor sketches from Cortor's time as a student at the Art Institute of Chicago. This series also includes additional sketches, sketchbooks, and a collage by K. Carracio.

Photographs depict Cortor, other individuals, his artwork, and exhibitions. There are also photographs from his time in Cuba and Haiti (circa 1950s).
Arrangement:
The Eldzier Cortor papers are organized into 8 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1947-2012 (Box 1; 5 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1970-2015 (Box 1; 8 folders)

Series 3: Professional Files, 1960, 1972-2015 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet, OV 4)

Series 4: Exhibition and Gallery Files, 1972-2015 (Boxes 1-2; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 5: Writings, circa 1970s-2006 (Box 2; 8 folders)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1940-1976, 1996-2015 (Boxes 2-3; 0.8 linear feet, OV 4)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1930s, circa 1970s-circa 1990s (Box 3; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, 1939-2002, 2014 (Box 3; 0.5 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Eldzier Cortor (1916-2015) spent his professional career as a painter and printmaker in Chicago and New York. He was born in Richmond Virginia to John and Ophelia Cortor. In 1917, the family moved to Chicago along with countless other African Americans as part of the Great Migration.

In 1936, Cortor began taking evening classes at the Art Institute of Chicago prior to enrolling full time. Kathleen Blackshear, an instructor at the Institute, recommended Cortor for employment at the Works Projects Administration in 1940. It was under Blackshear's guidance that Cortor was introduced to African Art. The depiction of African Americans became the defining subject of Cortor's career, specifically the portrayal of the African American woman, which he commonly represented nude in paintings and prints.

In 1941, with funding by the Works Projects Administration, Cortor helped found the South Side Community Arts Center in Chicago. Over the next few years he would receive two Rosenwald Fellowships, which allowed him to travel to the Sea Islands of Georgia. Afterward, Cortor moved to New York, and in 1946 Life magazine published his work Southern Gate. In 1949 he received a Guggenheim fellowship, which provided the opportunity to travel to Cuba, Jamaica, and Haiti. He settled in Port-au-Prince, where he taught for two years.

Cortor married Sophia Schmidt on August 20, 1951, and they subsequently had four children: Michael, Mercedes, Stephen, and Miriam. His work has been exhibited at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Studio Museum of Harlem, and the National Center of Afro-American Artists in Boston. Notable exhibitions include Three Masters: Eldzier Cortor, Hughie Lee-Smith, and Archibald John Motley, Jr. at Kenkeleba House in 1988; Southern Gate: African American Paintings from the National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution at Duke University Museum of Art, 1999; Eldzier Cortor: Master Printmaker at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, 2002; and Black Spirit: Works on Paper by Eldzier Cortor at the Indiana Art Museum, 2006.

Eldzier Cortor died in November of 2015, at the age of 99.
Related Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of materials lent for microfilming on reel N70-47, including biographical material, correspondence, printed material, papers related to exhibitions, photographs, and sketchbooks. Except for three photographs that appear in this collection (Box 3, Folder 19), loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Eldzier Cortor loaned materials to the Archives of American Art for microfilming in 1970 and donated papers in 2009. His son, Michael Cortor, gave additional materials in 2016.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Printmakers -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Art -- Forgeries  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Cuba -- Description and Travel  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketches
Collages
Diaries
Watercolors
Citation:
Eldzier Cortor papers, circa 1930s-2015, bulk 1972-2015. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.corteldz
See more items in:
Eldzier Cortor Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e30a2a29-7e5a-4147-afb3-7af49ea2a333
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-corteldz

Russell Lynes papers

Creator:
Lynes, Russell, 1910-1991  Search this
Names:
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Miller, Dorothy Canning, 1904-2003  Search this
Extent:
2.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1930-1986
Summary:
The papers of author, art critic, and art historian Russell Lynes, measure 2.9 linear feet and date from 1930-1986. The bulk of the material is related to Lynes's research for his 1973 book, The Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. Also included are some personal papers and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of author, art critic, and art historian Russell Lynes, measure 2.9 linear feet and date from 1930-1986. The bulk of the material is related to Lynes's research for his 1973 book, The Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. Also included are some personal papers and photographs.

Personal papers consist of typescript lectures and speeches on Eric Larrabee, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Dorothy Miller, and an illustrated letter from Gregorio Prestopino. Research material related to Lynes's book on the Museum of Modern Art, includes correspondence, ephemera, biographical sketches, clippings, sound recordings of interviews, and reports. Photographs are of artists in their studios, at their homes, and at exhibitions.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 3 series.

Series 1: Personal Papers, 1969-1986 (4 folders, Box 1)

Series 2: Research Material for -- Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art -- (1973), 1930-1984 (2.6 linear feet, Boxes 1-4)

Series 3: Photographs, 1935-1977 (14 folders, box 2; OV 5)
Biographical / Historical:
Russell Lynes (1910-1991) was an author, art critic, and art historian in New York City. He was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, and graduated from Yale University in 1932. Lynes worked as director of publications at Vassar College from 1936-1937, and served as assistant head principal and then head principal at the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, from 1938-1944. From 1944-1967 Lynes was an editor of Harper's Magazine. He authored many books and articles on art, architecture, and culture, and served on the boards of numerous organizations. Lynes was the brother of photographer George Platt Lynes.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent by Russell Lynes and microfilmed on reels N70-40, D310, 1859, 494, 153, and 3967. This material includes papers concerning California painter and muralist Howard Warshaw, consisting of correspondence about his work and exhibitions, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sketches, photographs of works of art, published writings, material sent to Lynes for his editorial opinion, and Lynes's essay for the catalog, "Howard Warshaw: A Decade of Murals." It also includes correspondence, clippings, and estate records related to Olana, Frederick Church's estate on the Hudson River in Greenport, New York; reports, press releases, articles, clippings, and other printed material related to government sponsorship of the arts; and material related to Eugene Berman including photographs, correspondence, and exhibition catalogs and announcements.

Some of the loaned materials were returned to the donor and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Portions of the collection were lent for microfilming from 1968-1978, and the bulk of the collection, including some of the loaned material, was donated by Russell Lynes from 1968-1989.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
Authorization to publish, quote, or reproduce the typescript of Russell Lynes's lecture, "Saint-Gaudens-His Time, His Place" (1986), requires permission from George P. Lynes Platt II, College of Saint Elizabeth.

The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Russell Lynes papers, 1930-1986. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lyneruss
See more items in:
Russell Lynes papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9b99283d5-2994-4937-af03-0a6fad86b26a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lyneruss

Oral history interview with Alice Winchester

Topic:
Magazine antiques (New York, N.Y. :1928)
Antiques (New York, N.Y. : 1952)
Interviewee:
Winchester, Alice  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Du Pont, Henry Francis, 1880-1969  Search this
Keyes, Homer Eaton, 1875-1938  Search this
Webb, Electra Havemeyer  Search this
Extent:
3 Sound cassettes (Sound recording (3 hrs., 46 min.), analog)
72 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1993 September 17-1995 June 29
Scope and Contents:
Interview of Alice Winchester, conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution at Winchester's home in Danbury, CT, September 17, 1993-June 29, 1995.
Winchester speaks of her childhood in the family of a Congregational minister in New England; attending Smith College (BA 1929) as had her mother and sisters; her junior year abroad in France; her clerical employment in New York City; her position as office secretary and then associate editor of "The Magazine Antiques"; working with Homer Eaton Keyes, its founding editor; learning about antiques; meeting many dealers, curators, and collectors (1930-38); her early years as editor of "The Magazine Antiques"; expanding the scope of the magazine, particularly to include articles on folk art and regular features on outstanding public and private collections; her highly specialized, though small, staff, including Helen Comstock; her close associations with important New York dealers, such as Israel Sack and his sons, Harold and Albert, and members of the Ginsburg and Levy firm; her role in establishing the annual Antiques Forum at Colonial Williamsburg; the importance of steady travel to view collections and meet collectors and curators; her several books on antiques; and the wealthy collectors she met, including Electra Havemeyer Webb, of Shelburne, VT. Winchester also recalls Henry Francis Du Pont, Mr. and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Flynt, Marshall and "Petey" Davidson, and Joseph Downs.
Biographical / Historical:
Alice Winchester (1907-1996) was an art editor and author of Danbury, Connecticut. Winchester was editor of the magazine, "Antiques," 1938-1951 and its successor "Antiques," 1951-1972; and curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art, 1972-1974.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 5 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 46 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Editors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Antique dealers  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Antiques -- Periodicals  Search this
Antiques  Search this
Art publishing  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.winche93
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97c204e5d-0f3f-461b-a264-dc50352ba014
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-winche93
Online Media:

Watson-Guptill Publications letters

Topic:
American Artist
Creator:
Watson-Guptill Publications (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Names:
American Amateur Artists Association  Search this
Guptill, Arthur Leighton, 1891-1956  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Items (linear f. (on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1948-1955
Scope and Contents:
Mostly letters to Arthur L. Guptill, director of publications, from authors seeking a publisher for various types of art books, as well as letters from business associates and persons requesting information or commenting about art books, techniques, schools, AMERICAN ARTIST magazine, the American Amateur Artists Association, and other topics.
Biographical / Historical:
Publishing house; New York, N.Y. Specialized in art related books, as well as the journal AMERICAN ARTIST.
Provenance:
Donated 1956 by Leighton Guptill, Arthur L. Guptill's son. Much of the firm's files were discarded after Guptill's death.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Publishers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art publishing -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.watspubl
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw96c6acf80-d4e6-49fa-b74a-0d684029c0ce
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-watspubl

Frederic Fairchild and Julia Munson Sherman papers

Topic:
Literary miscellany
Creator:
Sherman, Frederic Fairchild, 1874-1940  Search this
Sherman, Julia Munson, d. 1972  Search this
Photographer:
Waldo & Jewett (Firm: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Names:
Boardman, David Sherman  Search this
Bolton, Theodore, b. 1889  Search this
Clark, Eliot Candee, 1883-  Search this
Cleland, T. M. (Thomas Maitland), 1880-1964  Search this
Earl, Ralph, 1751-1801  Search this
Groll, Albert Lorey, 1866-1952  Search this
Gutman, Walter, 1903-1986  Search this
Lipman, Jean, 1909-1998  Search this
Orr, Elliot, 1904-1997  Search this
Peale, James, 1749-1831  Search this
Ryder, Albert Pinkham, 1847-1917  Search this
Extent:
5 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1874-1970
Scope and Contents:
Personal and business correspondence; biographical material; photographs of Elliot Orr and others, a daguerreotype of a drawing of Judge David Sherman Boardman of the Superior Court of Connecticut, 1853 by Waldo and Jewett; art work by Albert Lorey Groll, Elliot Orr, Thomas Maitland Cleland, Theodore Bolton, and others; notes; clippings and printed material; business records; correspondence regarding the Sherman's art collection; files containing writings, photographs, letters, and printed material regarding Ralph Earl, James Peale, Albert Pinkham Ryder, and other subjects of F.F. Sherman's writings and publications; manuscripts of articles written by Jean Lipman, Walter Gutman, Eliot Clark, and others; and ca. 100 books, pamphlets, catalogs and articles written, edited or published by the Shermans.
Included in the printed material are v.1-3, v.4 (nos.1 and 3) and v. 5 (no.1) of Sherman's "The Literary Miscellany," 1908-1912; "Art in America: An Illustrated Quarterly," v.1 (no.1), Jan. 1913; "Fine Art Publications" catalog, 1919-1922, 1925-1926, and 1932.
Biographical / Historical:
Art collectors, art critics, art historians, and private publishers; New York, N.Y.
Provenance:
Donated 1956-1972 by Julia Munson Sherman and the Munson Estate.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art publishing -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.sherfref
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw958e5c500-2b76-4382-9ff3-c369bad2957e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sherfref

Artists' books : Visual Studies Workshop Press, 1971-2008 / edited by Joan Lyons

Author:
Lyons, Joan 1937-  Search this
Subject:
Visual Studies Workshop Press  Search this
Physical description:
173 p. : ill. ; 26 cm
Type:
Bibliography
Place:
New York (State)
Rochester
Date:
2009
Topic:
Artists' books--Publishing  Search this
Art publishing  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1043581

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