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Oral history interview with Helen Williams Drutt English

Interviewee:
Drutt, Helen Williams  Search this
Interviewer:
Milosch, Jane  Search this
Extent:
21 Items (Sound recording: 21 sound files (6 hr., 47 min.), digital, wav)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2018 January 8-26
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Helen Williams Drutt English conducted 2018 January 8,9, and 26, by Jane Milosch, for the Archives of American Art, at Drutt's homes in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and New York, New York.
Biographical / Historical:
Helen Williams Drutt English (1930- ) is a curatorial consultant and educator in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and New York, New York. Jane Milosch (1964- ) is a former curator with the Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds the papers of Helen Williams Drutt English.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
For information on how to access this interview contact Reference Services.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia -- Interviews  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art dealers -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia -- Interviews  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Educators -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia -- Interviews  Search this
Jewelry  Search this
Pottery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.drutt18
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-drutt18

Sadakichi Hartmann papers, 1906

Creator:
Hartmann, Sadakichi, 1867-1944  Search this
Hartmann, Sadakichi, 1867-1944  Search this
Subject:
Inness, George  Search this
Ranger, Henry Ward  Search this
Rimmer, William  Search this
Stephens, Alice Barber  Search this
Vinton, Frederick Porter  Search this
Waterman, Marcus A.  Search this
Clarke, Walter Appleton  Search this
Darley, Felix Octavius Carr  Search this
Davis, Charles H. (Charles Harold)  Search this
Elliott, Elizabeth Shippen Green  Search this
Hunt, William Morris  Search this
Carnegie Institute, Museum of Art  Search this
Art Society of Pittsburgh  Search this
Topic:
Art, American -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh  Search this
Theme:
Art Market  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10072
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212942
AAA_collcode_hartsada
Theme:
Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_212942

Sadakichi Hartmann papers

Creator:
Hartmann, Sadakichi, 1867-1944  Search this
Names:
Art Society of Pittsburgh  Search this
Carnegie Institute, Museum of Art  Search this
Clarke, Walter Appleton, 1876-1906  Search this
Darley, Felix Octavius Carr, 1822-1888  Search this
Davis, Charles H. (Charles Harold), 1856-1933  Search this
Elliott, Elizabeth Shippen Green  Search this
Hunt, William Morris, 1824-1879  Search this
Inness, George, 1825-1894  Search this
Ranger, Henry Ward, 1858-1916  Search this
Rimmer, William, 1816-1879  Search this
Stephens, Alice Barber, 1858-1932  Search this
Vinton, Frederick Porter, 1846-1911  Search this
Waterman, Marcus A., 1834-1914  Search this
Extent:
30 Items ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1906
Scope and Contents:
Letters from artists, members of their families, and dealers, 1906, resulting from Hartmann's commission, apparently from the Art Society of Pittsburgh, to collect and exhibit American drawings for the benefit of the Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh. Writing about their work are Charles H. Davis, Elizabeth Shippen Green Elliott, Marcus Waterman, Walter A. Clarke, Frederick P. Vinton, and Alice B. Stephens. Offered in letters from dealers and family are works by Felix O.C. Darley, William Rimmer, George Inness, and William Morris Hunt. Hartmann writes to Henry W. Ranger. Price lists are included.
Biographical / Historical:
Art dealer; Pittsburgh, Pa.
Provenance:
Donated by Carnegie Institute, Museum of Art, 1971, who received the letters from Mildred Steinbach of the Frick Art Reference Library.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh  Search this
Topic:
Art, American -- Pennsylvania -- Pittsburgh  Search this
Function:
Arts organizations
Identifier:
AAA.hartsada
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hartsada

Henry Varnum Poor papers

Creator:
Poor, Henry Varnum, 1887-1970  Search this
Names:
Montross Gallery  Search this
Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture  Search this
Benton, William, 1900-1973  Search this
Biddle, George, 1885-1973  Search this
Billing, Jules  Search this
Burchfield, Charles Ephraim, 1893-1967  Search this
Caniff, Milton Arthur, 1907-1988  Search this
Ciardi, John, 1916-  Search this
Czebotar, Theodore  Search this
Deming, MacDonald  Search this
Dickson, Harold E., 1900-  Search this
Dorn, Marion, 1896-1964  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Esherick, Wharton  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Garrett, Alice Warder  Search this
Houseman, John, 1902-1988  Search this
Marston, Muktuk  Search this
Meredith, Burgess, 1907-1997  Search this
Mumford, Lewis, 1895-1990  Search this
Padro, Isabel  Search this
Poor, Anne, 1918-  Search this
Poor, Bessie Breuer  Search this
Poor, Eva  Search this
Poor, Josephine Graham  Search this
Poor, Josephine Lydia  Search this
Poor, Peter  Search this
Sargent, Elizabeth S.  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Steinbeck, John, 1902-1968  Search this
Watson, Ernest William, 1884-1969  Search this
Extent:
12.9 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketches
Motion pictures (visual works)
Diaries
Prints
Photographs
Illustrations
Drawings
Watercolors
Sketchbooks
Date:
1873-2001
bulk 1904-1970
Summary:
The papers of Henry Varnum Poor measure 12.9 linear feet and date from 1873-2001, with the bulk from the period 1904-1970. Correspondence, writings, artwork, printed material and photographs document Poor's work as a painter, muralist, ceramic artist and potter, architect, designer, writer, war artist, educator and a co-founder of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Also found is extensive information about the design and construction of Crow House, his home in New City, New York, commissions for other architectural projects, and his personal life.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Henry Varnum Poor measure 12.9 linear feet and date from 1873-2001, with the bulk from the period 1904-1970. Correspondence, writings, artwork, printed material and photographs document Poor's work as a painter, muralist, ceramic artist and potter, architect, designer, writer, war artist, educator and a co-founder of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Also found is extensive information about the design and construction of Crow House, his home in New City, New York, commissions for other architectural projects, and his personal life.

Henry Varnum Poor's correspondence documents his personal, family, and professional life. Correspondents include family and friends, among them George Biddle, Charles Burchfield, John Ciardi, Marion V. Dorn (who became his second wife), Philip Evergood, Lewis Mumford, John Steinbeck, David Smith, and Mrs. John Work (Alice) Garrett. Among other correspondents are galleries, museums, schools, organizations, fans, former students, and acquaintances from his military service and travels. Family correspondence consists of Henry's letters to his parents, letters to his parents written by his wife, and letters among other family members.

Among the writings by Henry Varnum Poor are manuscripts of his two published books, An Artist Sees Alaska and A Book of Pottery: From Mud to Immortality. as well as the text of "Painting is Being Talked to Death," published in the first issue of Reality: A Journal of Artists' Opinions, April 1953, and manuscripts of other articles. There are also film scripts, two journals, notes and notebooks, lists, speeches, and writings by others, including M. R. ("Muktuk") Marston's account of Poor rescuing an Eskimo, and Bessie Breuer Poor's recollections of The Montross Gallery.

Subject files include those on the Advisory Committee on Art, American Designers' Gallery, Inc., William Benton, Harold Dickson, Reality: A Journal of Artists' Opinions Sales, and War Posters. There are numerous administrative files for the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture.

Artwork by Henry Varnum Poor consists mainly of loose drawings and sketches and 45 sketchbooks of studies for paintings, murals, and pottery. There is work done in France, 1918-1919, and while working as a war correspondent in Alaska in 1943. There are commissioned illustrations and some intended for his monograph, A Book of Pottery: From Mud to Immortality. Also found are a small number of watercolors and prints. Work by other artists consist of Anne Poor's drawings of her father's hands used for the Lincoln figure in The Land Grant Frescoes and interior views of Crow House by Ernest Watson.

Documentation of Poor's architectural projects consists of drawings and prints relating to houses designed and built for Jules Billing, MacDonald Deming, John Houseman, Burgess Meredith, Isabel Padro, and Elizabeth S. Sargent. Also found is similar material for the new studio Poor built in 1957 on the grounds of Crow House.

Miscellaneous records include family memorabilia and two motion picture films, Painting a True Fresco, and The Land Grant Murals at Pennsylvania State College.

Printed material includes articles about or mentioning Poor, some of his pottery reference books, family history, a catalog of kilns, and the program of a 1949 Pennsylvania State College theater production titled Poor Mr. Varnum. Exhibition catalogs and announcements survive for some of Poor's shows; catalogs of other artists' shows include one for Theodore Czebotar containing an introductory statement by Henry Varnum Poor. Also found is a copy of The Army at War: A Graphic Record by American Artists, for which Poor served as an advisor. There are reproductions of illustrations for An Artist Sees Alaska and Ethan Frome, and two Associated American Artists greeting cards reproducing work by Poor.

Photographs are of Henry Varnum Poor's architectural work, artwork, people, places, and miscellaneous subjects. This series also contains negatives, slides, and transparencies. Images of architectural work include exterior and interior views of many projects; Poor's home, Crow House, predominates. Photographs of artwork by Poor are of drawings, fresco and ceramic tile murals, paintings, pottery and ceramic art. People appearing in photographs include Henry Varnum Poor, family members, friends, clients, juries, students, and various groups. Among the individuals portrayed are Milton Caniff, Marcel Duchamp, Wharton Esherick, M. R. ("Muktuk") Marston, and Burgess Meredith. Among the family members are Bessie Breuer Poor, Marion Dorn Poor, Anne Poor, Eva Poor, Josephine Graham Poor, Josephine Lydia Poor, Peter Poor, and unidentified relatives. Photographs of places include many illustrating village life in Alaska that were taken by Poor during World War II. Other places recorded are French and California landscapes, and family homes in Kansas. Miscellaneous subjects are exhibition installation views, scenes of Kentucky farms, and a photograph of Poor's notes on glazes.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1919-1987 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1, OV 18)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1873-1985 (1.5 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1944-1974 (0.6 linear feet; Boxes 2-3)

Series 4: Subject Files, 1928-1975 (0.8 linear feet; Box 3, OV 23)

Series 5: Artwork, circa 1890s-circa 1961 (3.5 linear feet; Boxes 4-6, 9-10, OV 19-22)

Series 6: Architectural Projects, circa 1940-1966 (0.7 linear feet; Box 6, OV 24-26, RD 14-17)

Series 7: Miscellaneous Records, 1882-1967 (Boxes 6, 11, FC 30-31; 0.5 linear ft.)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1881-2001 (1.2 linear feet; Boxes 6-7, 11, OV 27-29)

Series 9: Photographs, 1893-1984 (2.3 linear feet; Boxes 7-8, 12-13)
Biographical Note:
Henry Varnum Poor (1888-1970), best known as a potter, ceramic artist, and a co-founder of the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, was also an architect, painter, muralist, designer, educator, and writer who lived and worked in New City, New York.

A native of Chapman, Kansas, Henry Varnum Poor moved with his family to Kansas City when his grain merchant father became a member of the Kansas Board of Trade. From a young age he showed artistic talent and spent as much time as possible - including school hours - drawing. When a school supervisor suggested that Henry leave school to study at the Art Institute of Chicago, the family disagreed. Instead, he enrolled in the Kansas City Manual Training High School where he delighted in learning skills such as carpentry, forge work, and mechanical drawing. In 1905, he moved with his older brother and sister to Palo Alto, California and completed high school there. Because Poor was expected to join the family business, he enrolled at Stanford University as an economics major, but much to his father's disappointment and displeasure, soon left the economics department and became an art major.

Immediately after graduation in 1910, Poor and his major professor at Stanford, Arthur B. Clark, took a summer bicycling tour to look at art in London, France, Italy, and Holland. As Poor had saved enough money to remain in London after the summer was over, he enrolled in the Slade School of Art and also studied under Walter Sickert at the London County Council Night School. After seeing an exhibition of Post-Impressionism at the Grafton Galleries in London, Poor was so impressed that he went to Paris and enrolled in the Académie Julian. While in Paris, Poor met Clifford Addams, a former apprentice of Whistler; soon he was working in Addams' studio learning Whistler's palette and techniques.

In the fall of 1911, Poor returned to Stanford University's art department on a one-year teaching assignment. During that academic year, his first one-man show was held at the university's Old Studio gallery. He married Lena Wiltz and moved back to Kansas to manage the family farm and prepare for another exhibition. Their daughter, Josephine Lydia Poor, was born the following year. Poor returned to Stanford in September 1913 as assistant professor of graphic arts, remaining until the department closed three years later. During this period, Poor began to exhibit more frequently in group shows in other areas of the country, and had his first solo exhibition at a commercial gallery (Helgesen Gallery, San Francisco). In 1916, Poor joined the faculty of the San Francisco Art Association. He and his wife separated in 1917 and were divorced the following year. Poor began sharing his San Francisco studio with Marion Dorn.

During World War I, Poor was drafted into the U. S. Army, and in 1918 went to France with the 115th Regiment of Engineers. He spent his spare time drawing; soon officers were commissioning portraits, and Poor was appointed the regimental artist. He also served as an interpreter for his company. Discharged from the Army in early 1919, Poor spent the spring painting in Paris. He then returned to San Francisco and married Marion Dorn.

Once Poor realized that earning a living as a painter would be extremely difficult in California, he and his new wife moved to New York in the autumn of 1919. They were looking for a place to live when influential book and art dealer Mary Mowbray-Clarke of the Sunwise Turn Bookshop in Manhattan suggested New City in Rockland County, New York as good place for artists. In January of 1920, the Poors purchased property on South Mountain Road in New City. The skills he acquired at the Kansas City Manual Training High School were of immediate use as Poor designed and constructed "Crow House" with the assistance of a local teenager. Influenced by the farmhouses he had seen in France, it was made of local sandstone and featured steep gables, rough plaster, chestnut beams and floors, and incorporated many hand-crafted details. Poor designed and built most of their furniture, too. Before the end of the year, he and Marion were able to move into the house, though it remained a work in progress for many years. Additions were constructed. Over time, gardens were designed and planted, and outbuildings - a kiln and pottery, work room, garage, and new studio - appeared on the property.

In 1925, two years after his divorce from Marion Dorn, Poor married Bessie Freedman Breuer (1893-1975), an editor, short story writer, and novelist. Soon after, he adopted her young daughter, Anne (1918-2002), an artist who served as his assistant on many important mural commissions. Their son, Peter (b. 1926) became a television producer. Crow House remained in the family until its sale in 2006. In order to prevent its demolition, Crow House was then purchased by the neighboring town of Ramapo, New York in 2007.

Between 1935 and 1966 Poor designed and oversaw construction of a number of houses, several of them situated not far from Crow House on South Mountain Road. Poor's designs, noted for their simplicity, featured modern materials and incorporated his ceramic tiles. Among his important commissions were houses for Maxwell Anderson, Jules Billig, Milton Caniff, MacDonald Deming, and John Houseman.

Poor's first exhibition of paintings in New York City was at Kevorkian Galleries in 1920, and sales were so disappointing that he turned his attention to ceramics. His first pottery show, held at Bel Maison Gallery in Wanamaker's department store in 1921, was very successful. He quickly developed a wide reputation, participated in shows throughout the country, and won awards. He was a founder of the short-lived American Designers' Gallery, and the tile bathroom he showed at the group's first exposition was critically acclaimed. Poor was represented by Montross Gallery as both a painter and potter. When Montross Gallery closed upon its owner's death in 1932, Poor moved to the Frank K. M. Rehn Gallery.

Even though Poor's pottery and ceramic work was in the forefront, he continued to paint. His work was acquired by a number of museums, and the Limited Editions Club commissioned him to illustrate their republications of Ethan Frome, The Scarlet Letter, and The Call of the Wild.

Poor's first work in true fresco was shown in a 1932 mural exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art. Between 1935 and 1949 he was commissioned to produce several murals in fresco for Section of Fine Arts projects at the Department of Justice and the Department of the Interior, The Land Grant Frescoes at Pennsylvania State College, and a mural for the Louisville Courier-Journal. Ceramic tile mural commissions included: the Klingenstein Pavilion, Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York City; Travelers Insurance Co., Boston; the Fresno Post Office, California; and Hillson Memorial Gallery, Deerfield Academy, Deerfield, Mass.

As a member of the War Artists' Unit, Poor was a "war correspondent" with the rank of major in World War II, and for several months in 1943 was stationed in Alaska. An Artist Sees Alaska, drawing on Poor's observations and experiences, was published in 1945. A Book of Pottery: From Mud to Immortality, his second book, was published in 1958. It remains a standard text on the subject. While on the faculty of Columbia University in the 1950s, Poor and other artists opposed to the growing influence of Abstract Expressionism formed the Reality Group with Poor the head of its editorial committee. Their magazine, Reality: A Journal of Artists' Opinions, first appeared in 1953 featuring "Painting is Being Talked to Death" by Poor as its lead article. Two more issues were published in 1954 and 1955.

Along with Willard Cummings, Sidney Simon, and Charles Cuttler, in 1946 Henry Varnum Poor helped to establish the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Skowhegan, Maine. He served as its first president. Poor and his daughter, Anne, were active members of the Board of Trustees and were instructors for many years. The summer of 1961 was Henry Varnum Poor's last as a full-time teacher, though he continued to spend summers at Skowhegan.

Henry Varnum Poor exhibited widely and received many awards, among them prizes at the Carnegie Institute, Syracuse Museum of Fine Arts, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and the Architectural League of New York. Poor was appointed to the United States Commission of Fine Arts by President Roosevelt in 1941 and served a five year term. He was elected a member of the National Institute of Arts and Letters in 1943. The National Academy of Design named him an Associate Artist in 1954 and an Academician in 1963. He became a trustee of the American Craftsman's Council in 1956. The work of Henry Vernum Poor is represented in the permanent collections of many American museums including the Cleveland Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum, Addison Gallery of American Art, and Syracuse Museum of Fine Arts.

Henry Varnum Poor died at home in New City, New York, December 8, 1970.
Related Material:
An oral history interview with Henry Varnum Poor was conducted by Harlan Phillips for the Archives of American Art in 1964.
Provenance:
Gift of Henry Varnum Poor's son, Peter V. Poor, in 2007. A smaller portion was loaned to the Archives in 1973 by Anne Poor for microfilming and returned to the lender; this material was included in the 2007 gift.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
War artists  Search this
Topic:
Architects -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
War posters  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Pottery -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Designers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Ceramicists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' studios  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Motion pictures (visual works)
Diaries
Prints
Photographs
Illustrations
Drawings
Watercolors
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Henry Varnum Poor papers, 1873-2001, bulk 1904-1970. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.poorhenr
See more items in:
Henry Varnum Poor papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-poorhenr
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Ruth Snyderman, 1990 June 22

Interviewee:
Snyderman, Ruth, 1937-  Search this
Snyderman, Ruth, 1937-  Search this
Interviewer:
Polsky, Richard  Search this
Subject:
Works Gallery  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Women art dealers  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11730
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213631
AAA_collcode_snyderr90
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213631

Oral history interview with Ruth Snyderman

Interviewee:
Snyderman, Ruth, 1937-  Search this
Interviewer:
Polsky, Richard  Search this
Names:
Works Gallery  Search this
Extent:
76 Pages (Transcript)
76 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1990 June 22
1990 June 22
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Ruth Snyderman conducted 1990 June 22, by Richard Polsky, for the Archives of American Art Philadelphia Project.
Snyderman speaks of her family, her education, the Works Gallery in Philadelphia, the changes in the crafts field over her 25 years in business, and the development of the South Street - Society Hill section of Philadelphia.
Biographical / Historical:
Ruth Snyderman (1937- ) is an art gallery owner and art dealer from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Founded and owns Works Gallery.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 3 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 45 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Women art dealers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.snyderr90
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-snyderr90

Oral History interview with Hope Makler, 1989 November 28

Interviewee:
Makler, Hope Welsh, 1924-2013  Search this
Makler, Hope Welsh, 1924-2013  Search this
Interviewer:
Pacini, Marina  Search this
Subject:
Barnes Foundation  Search this
Makler Gallery  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13329
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213405
AAA_collcode_makler89
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213405

Oral history interview with John Ollman, 1990 Mar. 15

Interviewee:
Ollman, John E., 1942-  Search this
Ollman, John E., 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
Kirwin, Liza, 1957-  Search this
Subject:
Hemphill, Herbert Waide  Search this
Cavin Morris Gallery  Search this
Janet Fleisher Gallery (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Phyllis Kind Gallery  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Self-taught artists -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12595
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213410
AAA_collcode_ollman90
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213410

Oral history interview with Helen Williams Drutt (English), 1991 July 5-October 20

Interviewee:
Drutt, Helen Williams, 1930-  Search this
Drutt, Helen Williams, 1930-  Search this
Interviewer:
Pacini, Marina  Search this
Subject:
Helen Drutt Gallery  Search this
Philadelphia Museum of Art  Search this
Philadelphia Council of Professional Craftsmen  Search this
Moore College of Art  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Handicraft -- Exhibitions  Search this
Handicraft -- Collectors and collecting -- Pennsylvania -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12221
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)215077
AAA_collcode_drutt91
Theme:
Craft
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_215077

Interview with John Ollman, 1989 Aug. 10

Creator:
Ollman, John E., 1942-  Search this
Hartigan, Lynda Roscoe  Search this
Ollman, John E., 1942-  Search this
Subject:
Hemphill, Herbert Waide  Search this
Lenox, Kathy  Search this
Ramirez, Martin  Search this
Traylor, Bill  Search this
Janet Fleisher Gallery (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Phyllis Kind Gallery  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10262
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213404
AAA_collcode_ollmjohn
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_213404

Leonid and Ethel Gechtoff papers, 1918-1958

Creator:
Gechtoff, Leonid, 1883-1941  Search this
Gechtoff, Ethel  Search this
Gechtoff, Leonid, 1883-1941  Search this
Subject:
Hoover, J. Edgar (John Edgar)  Search this
East & West Gallery (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Type:
Scrapbooks
Topic:
Expatriate painters -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Women art dealers -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8200
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210371
AAA_collcode_gechleon
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210371

Gallery 1015 records, 1958-1972

Creator:
Gallery 1015  Search this
Gallery 1015  Search this
Subject:
Day, Larry  Search this
Keene, Paul F., Jr.  Search this
Lueders, Jimmy C.  Search this
Maitin, Sam  Search this
Staffel, Rudolf  Search this
Myers, Gladys  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Exhibitions -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Women art dealers -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Theme:
Art Market  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9805
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212243
AAA_collcode_gall1015
Theme:
Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_212243

Leonid and Ethel Gechtoff papers

Creator:
Gechtoff, Leonid, 1883-1941  Search this
Gechtoff, Ethel  Search this
Names:
East & West Gallery (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Hoover, J. Edgar (John Edgar), 1895-1972  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Items (linear ft. (on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Date:
1918-1958
Scope and Contents:
Letters recieved, including several from J. Edgar Hoover concerning a painting by Leonid Gechtoff, 1935-1938; two autographed photographs of Hoover; photographs of Leonid Gechtoff and his work; a scrapbook, ca. 1918-1929, containing letters, photographs, exhibition catalogs, clippings and printed miscellany; naturalization papers for Ethel Gechtoff; and material concerning her East & West Gallery in San Francisco, 1956-1958, including leases, exhibition announcements, clippings, and a price list for works of art.
Biographical / Historical:
Leonid Gechtoff was a Russian landscape painter who emigrated to this country in 1922; settling in Philadelphia, Pa. in 1923, where he remained until his death in 1941. His wife Ethel Gechtoff ran a Gallery in San Francisco 1956-1958.
Provenance:
The donor, Sonia Gechtoff, is the daughter of Leonid and Ethel Gechtoff, and also a painter.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Soviet Union  Search this
Painters -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Gallery directors -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Landscape painters -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Expatriate painters -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Women art dealers -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.gechleon
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gechleon

Oral History interview with Hope Makler

Interviewee:
Makler, Hope Welsh, 1924-2013  Search this
Interviewer:
Pacini, Marina  Search this
Names:
Barnes Foundation  Search this
Makler Gallery  Search this
Extent:
38 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1989 November 28
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Hope Makler conducted 1989 November 28, by Marina Pacini for the Archives of American Art Philadelphia Project. Makler speaks of her art education at the Barnes Foundation and at the University of Pennsylvania; opening the Makler Gallery in Philadelphia in 1960; working with New York City galleries such as Andre Emmerich and Frank Perls to bring the work of such artists as Milton Avery, Jacques Lipchitz and Alexander Calder to Philadelphia; and the Philadelphia gallery scene.
Biographical / Historical:
Hope Welsh Makler (1924-2013) was an art dealer from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound cassette. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 13 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.makler89
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-makler89

Oral history interview with John Ollman

Interviewee:
Ollman, John E., 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
Kirwin, Liza  Search this
Names:
Cavin Morris Gallery  Search this
Janet Fleisher Gallery (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Phyllis Kind Gallery  Search this
Hemphill, Herbert Waide  Search this
Extent:
90 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1990 Mar. 15
Scope and Contents:
An interview of John Ollman conducted 1990 Mar. 15, by Liza Kirwin for the Archives of American Art Philadelphia Project.
Ollman speaks of his studies at the Philadelphia College of Art and at Indiana University before becoming director of the Janet Fleisher Gallery; the gallery's change of focus towards American Art, specifically the work of folk and self-taught artists, and visionary artists. He discusses the changes in collecting over the past twenty years; collectors, such as Bert Hemphill; trends in collecting; artists whose work he has sold; other galleries with which he has worked, including the Phyllis Kind and Cavin Morris Galleries.
Biographical / Historical:
John E. Ollman (1942- ) is an art dealer from Philadelphia, Pa.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 2 hrs., 34 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Self-taught artists -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.ollman90
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ollman90

Oral history interview with Marian Locks

Interviewee:
Locks, Marian  Search this
Interviewer:
Pacini, Marina  Search this
Names:
Marian Locks Gallery  Search this
Andrade, Edna, 1917-2008  Search this
Brady, Luther W., 1925-  Search this
Chimes, Thomas, 1921-2009  Search this
Formicola, John Joseph, 1941-  Search this
Havard, James Pinkney, 1937-  Search this
Kahn, Louis I., 1901-1974  Search this
Osborne, Elizabeth, 1936-  Search this
Rohrer, Warren  Search this
Extent:
133 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1989 Sept. 20-29
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Marian Locks conducted, 1989 Sept, 20-29, by Marina Pacini, for the Archives of American Art Philadelphia Project. Locks discusses her early life, education, and the evolution of the Marian Locks Gallery, founded in 1968, which represented Philadelphia artists. Locks discusses the artists represented by the gallery including Edna Andrade, Liz Osborne, John Formicola, James Havard, Tom Chimes, and Warren Rohrer. Along with a discussion of how she met each artist and his/her stylistic development over the years, Locks discusses the sale of the artists' works, who their collectors were and how successful they were over the years. Among the collectors discussed are Dr. Luther Brady and various Philadelphia corporations. She discusses exhibitions at the gallery such as a group show of women artists, and an exhibit of Louis Kahn drawings. She discusses the gallery scene in Philadelphia; efforts to get recognition for Philadelphia artists through the press; the Philadelphia press coverage of the art scene; the relationship between the city's museums and artists; and recent changes in the Marian Locks Gallery.
Biographical / Historical:
Marian Locks (1915-2010) was an art dealer from Philadelphia, Pa.
General:
Originally recorded on 3 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 5 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hrs., 15 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives' Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.locks89
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-locks89

Oral history interview with Helen Williams Drutt (English)

Interviewee:
Drutt, Helen Williams  Search this
Interviewer:
Pacini, Marina  Search this
Sewell, Darrel, 1939-  Search this
Names:
Helen Drutt Gallery  Search this
Moore College of Art  Search this
Philadelphia Council of Professional Craftsmen  Search this
Philadelphia Museum of Art  Search this
Extent:
264 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1991 July 5-October 20
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Helen Williams Drutt English conducted 1991 July 5-1991 October 20, by Darrel Sewell and Marina Pacini, for the Archives of American Art Philadelphia Project.
Drutt English speaks of early childhood in Winthrop, Massachusetts and growing up in Philadelphia; memories of her parents and grandparents and connection to the decorative arts and style; attending Birney Elementary School and returning to Winthrop in the summers; art lessons as a child; attending Tyler School of Art; early training as an artist and interest in art history; first jobs and working at the Smith Memorial Recreation Center and the Psychological Research Institute and teaching; travel in Europe after college; marriage to Lawry Weiss and divorce; attending classes at the Barnes Foundation; teaching school children; second marriage to William Drutt; starting an interior design firm; moving to her current home; attempting to build a craft center in Philadelphia; joining the Arts Council of the YM/YWHA and significant exhibitions; marriage to Maurice English; serving as Founding Director of Philadelphia Council of Professional Craftsmen and organizing exhibitions; advising Calvin Hathaway on collecting for the Philadelphia Museum of Art; starting the Inter-Society on Twentieth Century Decorative Arts and Design; attending the World Crafts Council in Dublin; teaching at the Philadelphia College of Art, and creating an original course on contemporary craft; opening Helen Drutt Gallery; relationships to artists and to collectors; collecting philosophy concentrating on ceramics and jewelry; developing her archive; developing relationships with European goldsmiths; changing locations of gallery (Old Town, Walnut Street); teaching at Moore College of Art and becoming Director of the Moore College of Art Gallery; relationship of the gallery to the Philadelphia Craft Show and the Fabric Workshop; developing relationships with collectors beyond Philadelphia; working with the National Endowment for the Arts; various European scholars; travel to Hawaii and relationships there; interest in poetry; Relationship and marriage to Maurice English; Opening a branch of her gallery in New York; discussion of the changing perception of craft as art. Close friendship with Stella Kramrisch; relationship to George Nakashima; development of the gallery system for crafts; detailed discussion of her relationship to Calvin Hathaway; the development of COLLAB; Difference between work with non-profits and the commercial sector; developing the Robert Arneson exhibition at the Gallery of the Moore College of Art; the financials of running a gallery; work in Australia; ongoing network of international contacts. Also reminiscences of Rudolf Staffel, Dr. Hermann Gundesheimer, O. Spurgeon English, Gladys Myers and Gallery 1015, Ms. De Mazia, William Daley, T.H. Robsjohn-Gibbings, Ted Hallman, Dick Jones, Daniel Jackson, Stanley Lechtzin, Olaf Skoogfors, Bill Daley, Dick Reinhardt, Dick Koga, Calvin Hathaway, Paula Winokur, Richard Kagan, Albert Paley, Ronald Pearson, Claus Bury, Robert Pfannebecker, Howard Kottler, Patti Warashina, Karen Karnes, Peter Voulkos, Society of North American Goldsmiths, Tom Rippon, Emmy Van Leersum, Gijs Bakker, Breon O'Casey, Mark Burns, Emily Reinsel, Evan Turner, Edna Beron, Lois Boardman, Peter Dormer, Evert Von Straatten, Lila and Twigg Smith, Jim Jenson, Stephen Berg, Robert Arneson, Stella Kramrisch, Claire Zeisler, Ruth Duckworth, Joke van Ommen, Dale Chihuly, James Surls, Peter Chang.
Biographical / Historical:
Helen Williams Drutt (1930- ) is an art dealer and gallery director of the Helen Drutt gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Known as Helen Drutt or Helen Williams Drutt and later Helen Williams Drutt English.
General:
Originally recorded on 7 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 13 digital wav files. Duration is 8 hr., 28 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Gallery directors -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Handicraft -- Exhibitions  Search this
Handicraft -- Collectors and collecting -- Pennsylvania -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.drutt91
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-drutt91

Gallery 1015 records

Creator:
Gallery 1015  Search this
Names:
Day, Larry, 1921-  Search this
Keene, Paul F., Jr., 1920-2009  Search this
Lueders, Jimmy C., 1927-1994  Search this
Maitin, Sam  Search this
Myers, Gladys, 1921-  Search this
Staffel, Rudolf, 1911-2002  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet ((on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1958-1972
Scope and Contents:
In addition to five checklists for one-person and group exhibitions; printed matter includes announcements, posters designed by the artists, catalogs and clippings; and photographs of the gallery, artworks and some of the artists represented by the gallery such as Larry Day, Jimmy Lueders, Paul Keene, Rudy Staffel and Sam Maitin.
Arrangement:
I. Letters, 1968-1972. II. Award, 1962. III. Exhibition Catalogs and Announcements, 1958-1966. IV. Posters, 1960-1965. V. Clippings, 1959-1965. VI. Miscellaneous Printed Materials. VII. Photographs.
Biographical / Historical:
Gladys Myers was founder and director of the gallery, which was located in her home in Wyncotte, Pennsylvania, 1958-1967.
Provenance:
Collection includes all surviving records of the gallery.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Art -- Exhibitions -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Women art dealers -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- Pennsylvania
Identifier:
AAA.gall1015
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gall1015

Interview with John Ollman

Creator:
Ollman, John E., 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
Hartigan, Lynda Roscoe  Search this
Names:
Janet Fleisher Gallery (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Phyllis Kind Gallery  Search this
Hemphill, Herbert Waide  Search this
Lenox, Kathy  Search this
Ramirez, Martin, 1885-1960  Search this
Traylor, Bill, 1854-1947  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound cassettes (Sound recording)
79 Pages (Transcript: (on partial microfilm reel))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1989 Aug. 10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of John Ollman conducted by Lynda Hartigan for the Archives of American Art Philadelphia Project. Ollman discusses his studies at Indiana University and his connections with the Folklore Department, before moving to Philadelphia. He speaks of his tenure as director of the Janet Fleisher Gallery, including the gallery's early history as the Little Gallery, and the changes he instituted including the name and focus;
the exhibitions mounted of African, Oceanic, pre-Columbian, folk art, and the art of 20th century self-taught artists; the growing interest in the work of self-taught artists; an exhibit at the Philadelphia College of Art entitled "Transmitters: The Isolate Artist in America"; the market in Philadelphia and nationally for the work of self-taught artists; his work with Kathy Lenox of the Phyllis Kind Gallery; Bert Hemphill's collection and Hemphill's effect on the folk art field in the United States; the work of Bill Traylor, Martin Ramirez, and other self-taught artists; dealers and collectors he has been associated with.
Biographical / Historical:
Art dealer; Philadelphia, Pa.
Provenance:
Donated 1990 by John Ollman.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Occupation:
Art dealers -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.ollmjohn
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ollmjohn

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1838-1968
Scope and Contents note:
This series contains the gallery's general correspondence with artists, clients, curators, galleries, and art organizations and institutions. Outgoing letters are generally copies on highly-acidic fragile paper and are written by a combination of the gallery's proprietors and employees including William Macbeth, Robert Macbeth, Robert G. McIntyre, Hazel Lewis, Henry Miller, and Marguerite Onderdonk. The correspondence is fairly complete although there is very little outgoing correspondence before 1913 and very little correspondence, both outgoing and incoming, between 1928 and 1931 and 1933 and 1936. Although the gallery closed in 1953 correspondence in this series extends to 1968 documenting Robert G. McIntyre's continued activity as an art dealer operating from his home. Some records, generally from 1915, 1916 and 1923, are damaged by mold. For preservation reasons these have been placed in a separate box at the end of the collection and appear in the container listing at the end of 1.1: Correspondence.

Of particular interest is the substantial body of correspondence with artists. From the late 19th to the early 20th-century period there is significant correspondence with artists such as Cecilia Beaux, Emil Carlsen, John F. Carlson, Charlotte Buell Coman, Arthur B. Davies, Charles Harold Davis, Charles W. Hawthorne, Charles Hazeltine, Robert Henri, Winslow Homer, Jonas Lie, J. Francis Murphy, Henry Rankin Poore, Chaucey F. Ryder, William Sartain and Abbot Handerson Thayer. From the early to mid-20th-century period correspondents include Jay Connaway, Carl Gaertner, Rockwell Kent, James Lechay, Herman Maril, Ivan G. Olinsky, Ogden M. Pleissner, Constance Richardson and Andrew Wyeth.

There are letters from Arthur B. Davies in which he writes of his travels in Europe during the 1890s, letters from Robert Henri from Ireland in the 1920s, and a letter from John Sloan to William Macbeth (one of only two in the collection) dated March 4, 1908, thanking Macbeth in the name of the "noble eight" for "all of the innumerable courtesies and kindnesses you have shown us in the long to be remembered exhibition of Feb. 3-18 1908." There are lengthy, detailed epistles from William Sartain written prior to, and during, the outbreak of World War I in Paris, and eighteen letters from Winslow Homer (although the two dated 1861 and 1876 respectively are copies) including an illustrated letter, an undated price list and notes on Homer paintings. There are also details regarding the settling of the Homer estate, which designated the Macbeth Gallery as sole selling agents of Homer's pictures in 1937, found in correspondence with members of the Homer family.

Although there is no correspondence with Homer D. Martin in the collection there are letters from his widow, Elizabeth, which reveal something of the painter's relationship with the gallery and chart the rise in popularity of Martin's work after his death. Elizabeth Martin's letters also discuss the appreciation of her husband written by her after his death and published by William Macbeth.

Correspondence with Andrew Wyeth reveals Wyeth's original agreement with the Macbeth Gallery and charts the launching of his career and apparently effortless rise to fame. Wyeth's correspondence includes illustrated letters and the original manuscript of the foreword to the catalog for his first exhibition at Macbeth Gallery, written by his father, N. C. Wyeth.

This series also documents the gallery's hand in the development of some of the country's major public and private art collections including those established by the Addison Gallery of American Art, the Albright Art Gallery, Butler Art Institute, Carnegie Institute, the City Art Museum of St. Louis, Dallas Art Association, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and the Rhode Island School of Design.

Obviously, letters from the gallery's proprietors are found throughout the series, but there are also several named files for William Macbeth, Robert Macbeth and Robert G. McIntyre. William Macbeth's correspondence includes a copy of his opening announcement of 1892. A pencil sketch of two cows on the back of the announcement reminds us of his other love - the Macbeth Farm in Suffolk County, New York. Also found here are some letters of recommendation that William acquired prior to his emigrating to the United States from Ireland, and several letters regarding the sale of an Arthur B. Davies picture in which he refers to the need to let Davies know about the sale of the picture as quickly as possible. "You would understand why," writes Macbeth to James Quinlan on 1 February 1898, "if you knew this nervous impatient artist as well as I do."

Robert Macbeth's correspondence deals primarily with gallery business up to 1920 but from that point on relates primarily to personal and family business. His correspondence includes one folder of twenty-seven letters from artists written in response to an invitation to a dinner honoring William Macbeth in 1909. Most are addressed to Augustus Vincent Tack and include letters from Chester Beach, Charles H. Davis, Robert Henri, John La Farge, Jerome Myers, Chauncey F. Ryder and Carleton Wiggins. There is also a copy of a poem written by Albert Pinkham Ryder.

Correspondence with Jessie L. Macbeth and Phoebe K. Maccbeth deals with Robert Macbeth's estate and includes correspondence between Phoebe and Robert G. McIntyre discussing the gallery's finanical difficulties during the 1940s.

Robert G. McIntyre's correspondence generally relates directly to gallery business. Three of his letters (found in the files of correspondents to which the letters were addressed) are of particular note as they display his lucid and engaging style and reveal details of his friendships with some of the gallery's most important artists: a 1948 letter to Joseph J. Kwiat describes his memories of "The Eight" and recounts in particular his impressions of William J. Glackens, Robert Henri and George Luks; a 1956 letter to Bennard B. Perlman recalls "Tuesday evenings" at Robert Henri's studio; and a 1945 letter to Lloyd Goodrich of the Whitney Museum describes watching Childe Hassam paint and date a picture as if he were "writing a letter." "He was so emphatic that this was the proper procedure" writes McIntyre, "that one may take it for granted that a date on a Hassam is the date it was begun, not finished."

Records relating to McIntyre's research for, and writing of, his book on Martin Johnson Heade, published in 1948, can be found in his correspondence with Maxim Karolik.

Although it is not always possible to determine which gallery member is responsible for an outgoing letter as they are generally unsigned copies, each of the proprietors appeared to enjoy letter writing and discussing their views on art with gallery clients. A good example of this can be found in letters to William Winter Drew in January and May of 1925 which provide a lengthy and detailed discussion of whom the letter writer (probably Robert Macbeth) believes should be included in a representative collection of American art.

The dating and arrangement of undated incoming letters, particularly those written before 1913 which do not have an accompanying response from the gallery, is often based on pencil notations made by Robert G. McIntyre which, while assumed to be reliable, are not necessarily accurate.

While the series is primarily comprised of folders arranged alphabetically by name of correspondent, there are a few folders arranged by subject including several which relate to exhibitions at the gallery. These are interfiled alphabetically by folder title with the exhibition files, for example, being filed under "E."

Although the gallery's financial records are generally found in Series 2: Financial and Shipping records, Series 1: Correspondence does include substantial financial information in the form of correspondence with banks, insurance agents and accountants. Correspondence with Frederic B. Thomason, Inc., for example, consists of over two linear feet of records containing insurance information from 1895 to 1952.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Fragile original scrapbooks are closed to researchers.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Macbeth Gallery records, 1838-1968, bulk 1892 to 1953. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.macbgall, Subseries 1.1
See more items in:
Macbeth Gallery records
Macbeth Gallery records / Series 1: Correspondence Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-macbgall-ref6340

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