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William Anderson Coffin papers, 1886-1924

Creator:
Coffin, William A. (William Anderson), 1855-1925  Search this
Coffin, William A. (William Anderson), 1855-1925  Search this
Subject:
Stella, Joseph  Search this
Warren, Whitney  Search this
Mauer, Alfred  Search this
Benson, Frank Weston  Search this
Blashfield, Edwin Howland  Search this
Zorach, William  Search this
Gay, Walter  Search this
Gussow, Bernard  Search this
Bouché, Louis  Search this
Cortissoz, Royal  Search this
Pan-American Exposition  Search this
Société des artistes français  Search this
Exposition d'artistes de l'école Américaine  Search this
American Rights Committee  Search this
American Artists' Committee of One Hundred  Search this
Lotos Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Musée d'histoire et d'art (Luxembourg)  Search this
Committee for the Exhibition of American Painting and Sculpture (Paris, France)  Search this
Type:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Topic:
Harper's Weekly  Search this
New York Post  Search this
Art Exhibitions France Paris  Search this
Landscape painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, American  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- Civilian relief -- France  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7476
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209634
AAA_collcode_coffwill
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209634
Online Media:

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Richardson, Constance, 1905-  Search this
Extent:
4.6 Linear feet (Boxes 2-6)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1926-1988
Scope and Contents:
Correspondence is with art dealers, collectors, museum curators, museums, artists, art critics, art historians, publishers, editors, librarians, foreign scholars, organizations, friends, and family. Topics regard purchasing art for various collections, consultations about art and collecting including authentications and attributions, publishing, general art history, lectures, and personal matters, among other topics.
Arrangement:
Series is arranged as 4 subseries based on type of correspondent.

3.1: General, 1926-1988

3.2: With Artists, 1942-1985

3.3: With Foreign Scholars, 1945-1964

3.4: Personal, 1930-1986
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Edgar P. Richardson papers, 1814-1996, bulk 1921-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.richedga, Series 3
See more items in:
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-richedga-ref125

General

Collection Creator:
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Richardson, Constance, 1905-  Search this
Extent:
3.3 Linear feet (Boxes 2-5)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1926-1988
Scope and Contents:
General correspondence is with colleagues, professional acquaintances, art critics and historians, galleries and dealers, museums, and other organizations regarding purchasing art for collections, authentications and attributions, publishing, news about friends and acquaintances, and general consultations. There is correspondence with Wayne Andrews, Archives of American Art, Castano Galleries, Lawrence Fleischman, James Thomas Flexner, Alfred V. Frankenstein, George Croce, Walter Heil, Earl Krentzin, Wilmarth Lewis, Russel Lynes, John Francis McDermott, Philadelphia Museum of Art, J. Hall Pleasants, Anna Rutledge, Charles Sellers, Smithsonian Institution, Regina Soria, Victor Spark, William Stevens, Robert Vose, William Woolfenden, and many others.
Arrangement:
Arranged in alphabetical order.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Edgar P. Richardson papers, 1814-1996, bulk 1921-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.richedga, Subseries 3.1
See more items in:
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers / Series 3: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-richedga-ref127

Detroit Art Market, Standards of Art Criticism

Collection Creator:
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Richardson, Constance, 1905-  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 24
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1940-1941
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Edgar P. Richardson papers, 1814-1996, bulk 1921-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers / Series 4: Writings and Notes / 4.2: Lectures and Talks
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-richedga-ref373

Detroit Art Market, Standards of Art Criticism Second Series

Collection Creator:
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Richardson, Constance, 1905-  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 25
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1941-1942
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Edgar P. Richardson papers, 1814-1996, bulk 1921-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers / Series 4: Writings and Notes / 4.2: Lectures and Talks
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-richedga-ref374

Detroit Art Market, The Theory of Art Criticism

Collection Creator:
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Richardson, Constance, 1905-  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 26
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1941
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Edgar P. Richardson papers, 1814-1996, bulk 1921-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers / Series 4: Writings and Notes / 4.2: Lectures and Talks
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-richedga-ref375

Art Historians & Art Critics

Collection Creator:
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Richardson, Constance, 1905-  Search this
Container:
Box 18, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1963
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Edgar P. Richardson papers, 1814-1996, bulk 1921-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers / Series 6: Artist-Subject files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-richedga-ref655

Robert Rosenblum Papers

Creator:
Rosenblum, Robert  Search this
Names:
Columbia University -- Faculty  Search this
Harry N. Abrams, Inc.  Search this
Los Angeles County Museum of Art  Search this
Musée d'Orsay  Search this
National Museum of American Art (U.S.)  Search this
New York University -- Faculty  Search this
Princeton University -- Faculty  Search this
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum  Search this
University of Michigan -- Faculty  Search this
Yale University -- Faculty  Search this
Becraft, Melvin E.  Search this
Ingres, Jean-Auguste-Dominique, 1780-1867  Search this
Kramer, Hilton  Search this
Rockwell, Norman, 1894-1978  Search this
Rosenquist, James, 1933-  Search this
Extent:
38.3 Linear feet
1.17 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Video recordings
Collages
Sound recordings
Sketches
Interviews
Transcripts
Date:
circa 1927-2009
bulk 1950-2006
Summary:
The papers of art historian, curator, and professor Robert Rosenblum measure 38.3 linear feet and 1.17 GB and date from circa 1927 to 2009, with the bulk dating from 1950 to 2006. They include biographical material, extensive personal and professional correspondence; lectures, writings, and writing project files by Rosenblum and others; exhibition files; research reference files; teaching files; personal business records; printed and digital material; photographs; and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art historian, curator, and professor Robert Rosenblum measure 38.3 linear feet and 1.17 GB and date from circa 1927 to 2009, with the bulk dating from 1950 to 2006. They include biographical material, extensive personal and professional correspondence; lectures, writings, and writing project files by Rosenblum and others; exhibition files; research reference files; teaching files; personal business records; printed and digital material; photographs; and artwork.

Biographical materials include Rosenblum's bibliography and resume materials, various school related ephemera and diplomas, a transcript of an interview with Amy Newman for Artforum, and a digital video recording of a Josef Levi interview. Extensive personal and professional correspondence is with friends, family, colleagues, publishers, museums, and others. Some of the correspondents include Melvin Becraft, the Guggenheim, Harry Abrams, Inc., Hilton Kramer, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the National Museum of American Art. Also found are numerous postcards.

Lectures, writings, and writing project files document Rosenblum's prolific writing and speaking career, and include notes, copies, and manuscript drafts of lectures, articles, catalog essays, and books, as well as additional materials related to the writings and the publication of books, such as as correspondence, editing feedback, photographs, and lists of photographs. There are manuscript, notes, and other materials related to many of Rosenblum's notable books, including Transformations in Late Eighteenth-Century Art, Paintings in the Musee D'Orsay, 19th-Century Art, The Dog in Art, Ingres, Modern Painting and the Northern Tradition, and others. Also found are Rosenblum's dissertation and other student writings. There is also a series containing writings by or about others, such as students and colleagues.

Rosenblum planned and facilitated numerous exhibitions that are well-documented within the exhibition files, including French Painting, 1774-1830: The Age of Revolution (1974), 1900: Art at the Crossroads (2000), Norman Rockwell: Pictures for the American People (2001), Best in Show: Dogs in Art from the Renaissance to the Present (2006), and Citizens and Kings: Portraits in the Age of Revolution, 1760-1830 (2007), among many others. Contents of each exhibition file vary considerably but often include correspondence, lists of artwork, proposals, notes, catalog drafts and outlines (see also series 3), and printed materials. There are a few sound cassettes, including a recorded interview with James Rosenquist with transcripts. Also included are digital photographs of Norman and Irma Braman Collection exhibition.

Research reference files cover a wide variety of art related topics, but are arranged within a separate series because they are not related to specific named projects as are the files in Series 3. These files contain research notes, bibliographies, and syllabi kept by Rosenblum presumably for a variety of publications, research interests, and teaching references.

Teaching files and class notes document Rosenblum's professorial career at Columbia University, New York University, Princeton University, University of Michigan, Yale College, and Yale University, and include a variety of course materials.

Personal business records consist of various financial and legal documents, expense and income records, publishing and speaking contracts, and royalties received.

The papers also include a variety of printed materials, photographs, student sketches by Rosenblum, and an unidentified collage.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1927-2006 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1, 1.00 GB; ER02)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1927-2006 (4.5 linear feet; Boxes 1-5)

Series 3: Lectures, Writings, and Writing Project Files, 1940-2006 (13.5 linear feet; Boxes 5-16, OV 39-41, 0.063 GB; ER01)

Series 4: Writings by Others, circa 1954-2006 (2.9 linear feet; Boxes 16-19)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, circa 1965-circa 2006 (5.2 linear feet; Boxes 19-24, 0.109 GB; ER03)

Series 6: Research Files, circa 1927-2006 (2.9 linear feet; Boxes 24-27)

Series 7: Teaching Files and Class Notes, 1955-2006 (4.3 linear feet; Boxes 27-31)

Series 8: Personal Business Records, 1951-2009 (4.4 linear feet; Boxes 31-36)

Series 9: Printed Material, 1927-2009 (2.4 linear feet; Boxes 36-38)

Series 10: Photographs, circa 1950s-circa 2000 (0.3 linear feet; Box 38, OV 41)

Series 11: Artwork, circa 1940s-circa 1980s (0.1 linear feet; Box 38)
Biographical / Historical:
Robert Rosenblum (1927-2006) was an art historian, curator, and professor who worked primarily in New York City.

Rosenblum received his B.A. from Queens College, his M.A. from Yale, and his Ph.D. from the Institute of Fine Art at New York University in 1956. He spent a year teaching art at the University of Michigan before becoming an associate professor at Princeton, ultimately accepting a Professor of Fine Arts position at NYU in 1966, where he spent the rest of his professorial career interspersed with visiting professorships at Oxford University and Yale University. Rosenblum was named Henry Ittleson, Jr. Professor of Modern European Art at NYU in 1976, and received the Frank Jewett Mather Award for Distinction in Art Criticism in 1981. After being appointed Stephen and Nan Swid Curator of 20th-Century Art at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 1996, Rosenblum went on to curate such exhibitions as 1900: Art at the Crossroads (2000) and Norman Rockwell: Pictures for the American People (2001). Prior to this appointment, he was one of the organizers of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's French Painting, 1774-1830: The Age of Revolution (1974). He received a Distinguished Teaching Award from NYU in 2005, and continued to curate, lecture, teach, and write.

Rosenblum was a prolific author, and his seminal works include: Cubism and Twentieth-Century Art (1959), Transformations in Late Eighteenth-Century Art (1967), Modern Painting and the Northern Romantic Tradition: Friedrich to Rothko (1975), and 19th-Century Art (co-authored with H.W. Janson, 1984).

Rosenblum married Jane Kaplowitz in 1978. He died in New York City in 2006.
Provenance:
The papers were donated in multiple accessions by Robert Rosenblum between 1986 and 2003, and by his widow, Jane Kaplowitz between 2010 and 2013.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and electronic media with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art museum curators  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- 19th century  Search this
Art -- 18th century  Search this
Painting, Modern  Search this
Portraits  Search this
Dogs in art  Search this
Painting, French  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Collages
Sound recordings
Sketches
Interviews
Transcripts
Citation:
Robert Rosenblum Papers, circa 1927-2009, bulk 1950-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.roserobe
See more items in:
Robert Rosenblum Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-roserobe
Online Media:

Millard Sheets papers

Creator:
Sheets, Millard, 1907-1989  Search this
Names:
Dalzell Hatfield Galleries  Search this
Millard Sheets & Associates Designs  Search this
Sheets, Mary Baskerville  Search this
Extent:
27.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Photographs
Date:
circa 1907-2000
Summary:
The Millard Sheets papers comprise 27.6 linear feet of material dating from circa 1907 to 2000 with bulk dates spanning 1956 to 1981. The collection documents Sheets's career as a designer, painter, and muralist, and his personal and professional interests through correspondence, writings, lectures, printed material, drawings, slides, photographs, and ephemera. A small addition donated 2018 by Carolyn Owen-Toole, Sheet's daughter. There is a 4.6 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated 2018 that includes writings; sketchbooks and sketches; photographs and negatives of works of art, images of Millard Sheets and others; printed material, including two scrapbooks; and scattered correspondence regarding Sheet's projects.
Scope and Content Note:
The personal papers of Millard Sheets (1907-1990) measure 27.6 linear feet and date from circa 1907-2000, with bulk dates of 1956-1981. The collection reflects Sheets's career as a designer, painter, and muralist, as well as his other personal and professional interests, through correspondence, writings, lectures, clippings, blueprints, drawings, slides, photographs, and ephemera.

The Project Files comprise the largest group of materials in the collection and document design work undertaken by Sheets through his company Millard Sheets & Associates Designs. Sheets and his associates produced concept drawings and blueprints and supervised the construction for a wide range of design projects that ranged in scale from architectural plans for private residences to bid proposals for shopping malls and financial institutions located in California and the Southwest.

Sheets designed interior and exterior plans for over forty Home Savings and Loan bank branches in California. The distinctive modular design which Sheets created and then customized by integrating interior and exterior art elements that highlighted local historical events or natural features became synonymous with the image of Home Savings and Loan. Sheets also teamed up with the architect Edward Durrell Stone to produce a proposal for the Capitol Mall Project, an urban renewal project for the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Sacramento. Researchers will find correspondence, job costs and billing statements, and notes that trace the development of these and other building construction projects. In some instances the documents are supplemented by blueprints, photographs, and/or drawings of the project, but in many cases, visual documentation is missing.

The Project Files also document work done by Millard Sheets on public projects such as the Family of Man mural in the Los Angeles City Hall Annex, a mosaic dome in the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, Washington, D.C., and the Word of Life mural at the University of Notre Dame, Ind., along with numerous other murals and mosaics created for private individuals and corporations.

The Correspondence Series primarily reflects the interaction between Sheets and his clients, colleagues, and personal acquaintances. These files will prove valuable to researchers who are interested in the way that Sheets's beliefs about the role of art in everyday life impacted the way he conducted business and managed both large and small design projects. The correspondence also reflects Sheets's interest in popular American culture, travel, political issues of the day, and art collecting.

The Membership Files document the wide variety of interests that Sheets maintained through active membership in associations and organizations. The material in this series consists primarily of correspondence, minutes of meetings, and notes which Sheets created or used as he served as a board member or trustee on a number of organizational boards, such as the California Institute of the Arts, the Claremont Colleges, Virginia Steele Scott Foundation, Webb School of California, and Goodwill Industries of Southern California.

Also found in this series is material that documents his interest and participation in various recreational and professional organizations. Sheets maintained a long association with the Economic Roundtable, a group of businessmen who met regularly to give presentations and share discussion on contemporary political and social issues. Sheets was a frequent speaker and his talks given at the Economic Roundtables can be found in Lectures and Speeches, a subseries of the Writings Series.

Included in the Millard Sheets & Associates Designs, Inc. series are records that reflect the day-to-day operations of Sheets's design firm. Found here are chronological copies of correspondence that were sent out, files Sheets maintained on various independent contractors that the design firm frequently used, resumes and letters of recommendation that Sheets received regarding potential employees, as well as records relating to the cost and maintenance of Sheets's office building.

The Teaching and Workshop Files document the instructional activities undertaken by Sheets throughout his career in the arts. Although Sheets became pivotal in establishing a regionally recognized art department at Scripps College in Claremont, California, the files that reflect his academic position there are limited in scope and depth. Researchers will find more substantive the files that he maintained on the numerous art demonstrations and paintings workshops that he conducted privately throughout his career. Sheets traveled extensively around the world through his teaching activities and the files in this series track his path.

Closely related to the Teaching and Workshop Files is the Painting Trips series. The material in these files document Sheets's service as an American Specialist in the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the USIS, Department of State. Sheets served two times as a cultural arts representative in Turkey in 1960 and in the former USSR in 1961. Sheets also made numerous trips to South East Asia, which had proved an area of fascination for him since his experiences as a war correspondent in Burma and India in World War II. The files in this series document his painting trips to Tahiti, the Pacific Ocean Rim, and Hawaii. Also found are files that detail his painting activities in Mexico.

The Exhibition Files reflect the records that Sheets maintained regarding his participation in art exhibitions, as well as his files on art shows that he personally directed or organized for public or private groups or organizations. Although Sheets exhibited his work predominantly in the West and Southwest, the files in this series demonstrate that he exhibited both nationally and internationally as well.

Also found within the records for this series are files relating to Sheets's representation of his artwork through established galleries and art agents. The Dalziel Hatfield Galleries of Los Angeles, California, served as his primary agent for most of his painting career. Correspondence between Sheets and the Hatfields provide insight into Sheets's development into a regionally and nationally significant watercolorist and painter. The files relating to the Kennedy Galleries in New York and the Circle Gallery in Chicago reflect Sheets's efforts to maintain a national presence in the arts community.

The Jury Files document Sheets's involvement as a juror in regional, as well, as national shows. The files reveal the great variety of professional watercolor and painting exhibitions in which Sheets participated as either a jury panelist or solo judge.

The Writings Files provide an excellent source for researchers interested in Sheets's philosophical beliefs about the relationship between art and everyday life. His articles, lectures, and speeches predominantly address the role of the artist, the relationships that exist between artists and the community, and the role that art can play in making a fuller, more productive life. Also found in the files of this series are articles written by others about Sheets.

The Biographical Material series provides a short introduction to Millard Sheets. The files consist of the calendars maintained by Sheets and his wife and staff, which were used to coordinate his many commitments and appointments. Also found in the files of this series are family chronologies that were created by Mary Baskerville Sheets. Medical records and resumes provide personal information about Sheets's background and health. A small file of military memorabilia provides information about Sheets's contributions to the war effort in World War II.

The Printed Matter series documents family activities and personalities through publicity clippings. Also found are exhibition catalogs and announcements that Sheets saved regarding other artists. Miscellaneous interests and activities of Sheets are found through magazine articles, brochures, and flyers.

The Photographs series includes photographic documentation for Sheets's artwork, horses, and major projects. A small group of photographs of Sheets are also in this series.

The files in the Artwork series include original drawings by Mary Baskerville Sheets and Millard Sheets.

There is a 4.6 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated 2018 that includes writings; sketchbooks and sketches; photographs and negatives of works of art, images of Millard Sheets and others; printed material, including two scrapbooks; and scattered correspondence regarding Sheet's projects.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into fifteen series. Small series, such as Biographical Material are generally based on type of document. Larger series, such as Correspondence or Project Files, are arranged alphabetically by name of correspondent or project. General correspondence has been made into its own series, but other series or subseries may also contain some correspondence. Within particular series, materials have been further divided into subseries which represent particular aspects of the project or event. For example, the Writings Series is further divided into subseries of books and articles, eulogies, and lectures and speeches. An outline listing series and subseries titles and dates follows.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1907-1982, undated (boxes 1-2; 1.25 linear ft.)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1929-1990, undated (boxes 2-4; 2.75 linear ft.)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1933-1980, undated (boxes 5-6; 1.25 linear ft.)

Series 4: Membership Files, 1946-1982, undated (boxes 6-8; 2.5 linear ft.)

Series 5: Millard Sheets & Associates Designs, 1934-1982, undated (boxes 8-9; 1.0 linear ft.)

Series 6: Project Files, 1956-1981, undated (boxes 9-18; 8.25 linear ft.)

Series 7: Teaching and Workshop Files, 1932-1982 (box 18; 0.5 linear ft.)

Series 8: Painting Trips, 1959-1980, undated (box 18; 16 folders)

Series 9: Exhibition Files, 1932-1937, 1951-1988, undated (box 19; 0.75 linear ft.)

Series 10: Jury Files, 1941-1982 (boxes 19-20; 42 folders)

Series 11: Writings, 1936-1988, undated (boxes 20-22; 2.5 linear ft.)

Series 12: Printed Matter, 1936-1922, undated (boxes 22-23; 20 folders)

Series 13: Photographs, 1934-1983, undated (box 23; 17 folders)

Series 14: Artwork, circa 1929, undated (box 23; 2 folders)

Series 15: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1930-2000 (boxes 24, 26-30, OV25: 4.6 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
"Your painting is a measure of your mind"-Millard Sheets

Millard Sheets, as one of the founding members of the "California Scene Painters," exerted a lasting influence upon subsequent generations of Western painters. He and the small group of painters who worked in California during the 1930s and 1940s, developed a new style of watercolor painting that was at the forefront of the American watercolor movement of the time, and that later gave rise to a subsequent generation of painters who became known as the California Regionalist school.

Sheets was born in Pomona, California on June 24, 1907. His mother died in childbirth, and his father, John Sheets, unprepared to raise a baby alone, sent Millard to Pomona, California to be raised by his maternal grandparents, Lewis and Emma Owen. Sheets's grandfather proved to be a guiding force in his life, and when Sheets's father remarried and offered Millard the opportunity to return to the Sheets household, Millard chose instead to remain with his grandparents.

Sheets's love of horses can be directly traced back to his childhood years spent living at his grandfather's horse ranch. Millard rode his first horse when he was three years old. Throughout his life, Sheets returned to the theme of horses in his paintings, as well as maintaining a private stable of horses, and raising and breeding racehorses.

His interest in art also began in childhood. When he was still a young boy, his two maternal aunts encouraged him to play with crayons and pencils. Sheets took his first painting lesson from a neighbor at the age of seven, and by 1919 he had already submitted artwork to the copy division of the Los Angeles County Fair fine arts show competition. He submitted a drawing he had copied of a tinted photograph of Lake KIlarney, California. Sheets won first prize in his division.

It was through this competition that Millard met Theodore B. Modra, a Polish artist who had retired to the Pomona area. After giving Sheets a lecture on the evils of copying art, Modra offered to give him art lessons.

Sheets continued to pursue his interest in art and enrolled in the Choinard School of Art in Los Angeles, California. By the time that he graduated in 1929, Sheets had also managed to come to the attention of Dalzell and Ruth Hatfield of the Dalzell Hatfield Galleries in Los Angeles, California. The Hatfields were one of the most influential art dealers in Southern California, and that same year, they sponsored Sheets in his first one-man exhibition in 1929. The exhibition brought Sheets to the attention of Western Coast art critics and launched Sheets on his painting career.

In 1929 Sheets also learned that he had won second place in the annual Edgar B. Davis art competition held in San Antonio, Texas. The award came with a cash prize and Sheets made plans to travel to Europe to study and paint. Shortly before his departure, however, he met an art student, Mary Baskerville, and they began a whirlwind romance. With Baskerville's enthusiastic support for European plans, and with her promise that she would wait for him, Sheets departed for New York and then Europe.

While overseas during 1929 and 1930, Sheets studied under Dorfinant, a master printer in Paris. Through his work at this studio workshop, he met Henri Matisse.

Five months after Millard returned to the California in 1930, Sheets and Mary Baskerville married. Sheets worked as the director of the Fine Arts Exhibition of the Los Angeles County Fair. In 1932 Sheets returned to school to study art and humanities at Scripps College in Claremont, California. After graduating from Scripps, school officials approached Sheets with an offer to set up a separate fine arts program and asked him to chair the new department. This was the beginning of a twenty year association with the school. In 1938, he also became the Director of Art at Claremont Graduate School.

Sheets left the school during the years of World War II to serve as a war-time artist and journalist for Life magazine, and from 1943-1944 was stationed on the Burma-India Front. His experiences in Asia appeared to affect him deeply. In contrast to his earlier works which featured backgrounds with neutral tones and brilliant shades that highlighted and punctuated the compositions, the paintings from the wartime featured somber tones. Sheets remarked of this time:

During the fighting and the time I spent in the C-B-1 theater, I was too shaken and intellectually stunned to do any complete paintings. I made many, many sketches, though, as well as a real effort to remember each scene that particularly affected me. Then, once I returned to America, I painted frantically, for months, exorcising demons. [Lovoos, Janice and Edmund F. Penney, Millard Sheets: One-Man Renaissance, Northland Press, Flagstaff, AZ, 1984]

Sheets returned from the war in 1944 and resumed his position at Scripps College until 1955 when he was approached by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and asked to overhaul the fledgling Los Angeles County Art Institute. Sheets accepted the position and spent the next five years reshaping the mission and format of the school, renaming it the Otis Art Institute. In the years after Sheets left the directorship, the school eventually became part of the Parson's School of Design on the West Coast.

In 1953 Sheets founded the Millard Sheets Designs company. He hired between twenty-five and thirty artisans for large projects, with Susan Hertel, a former student of his, serving as his assistant in all the operations of the design studio. The working staff included engineers, registered architects, draftsmen, and artists, and the projects that the firm produced included murals, mosaics, stained glass, and sculpture for private homes and public and commercial businesses.

The design studio completed several major architectural projects throughout the late 1950s through the mid 1970s, including the design and construction of Cal Aero, a flight training school for the US Air Force, the National American Insurance Company offices for the California financier, Howard Ahmanson, Ahmanson Bank and Trust Company in Beverly Hills, many Home Savings and Loan Association Buildings, private residences, and the Scottish Rite Memorial Temples in Los Angeles and San Francisco, among many other projects.

Sheets also designed and completed mural and mosiac work for numerous public buildings in the Los Angeles area, as well as across the nation. Many of the murals and mosiacs were for those buildings designed by his firm while others were done as independent commissions.

In 1968 Sheets first proposed the murals he designed for the Los Angeles City Hall. His design was approved and he was awarded a commission to complete The Family of Man murals over the two main entrances to the Los Angeles City Hall. The murals were completed in 1971 and installed in 1972. Sheets also designed mosiacs and murals for the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, the Library at Notre Dame University, the Scottish Rite Masonic Temple in Los Angeles, several Home Savings and Loan Association buildings in the Los Angeles area, the Detroit Public Library, and the Dome of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, DC.

During the early 1960s Sheets participated in the American Specialist Program of the US Department of State. His first assignment was to Turkey in 1960, where he served as a visiting artist. The following year he went to the USSR in the same capacity.

During the early to mid 1950s Sheets became involved with Columbia Pictures and was technical advisor and production designer for a few years.

Millard Sheets was a member of the National Watercolor Society, the American Watercolor Society, the National Academy of Design, the Society of Motion Picture Art Directors, and the Century Association. Sheets actively promoted his own work and was a businessman, an active and prolific artist, instructor, and designer. Millard Sheets died on March 31, 1989 in Gualala, California.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reels LA 10) including a biographical sketch, career resume, and a list of sheets' work prepared in 1964. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Millard Sheets lent material for microfilming in 1965. Mary B. Sheets, Millard's widow, donated the papers to the Archives of American Art in 1992. Carolyn Owen-Toole, Sheet's daughter, gave a small addition of material in 2018.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- California  Search this
Art and society  Search this
Horses -- Breeding  Search this
Watercolorists -- California  Search this
Muralists -- California  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Designers -- California  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Photographs
Citation:
Millard Sheets papers, circa 1907-2000. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.sheemill
See more items in:
Millard Sheets papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sheemill
Online Media:

Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers

Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Names:
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Bess, Forrest, 1911-1977  Search this
Congdon, William, 1912-1998  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Extent:
61.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Video recordings
Drawings
Date:
1916-1991
bulk 1946-1983
Summary:
The Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers measure 61.1 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1991, with the bulk of the material dating from 1946-1983. Records provide extensive documentation of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1946 to its closing in 1983 and of the activities of Betty Parsons as one the leading art dealers of contemporary American Art in the latter half of the twentieth century, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists. Over one third of the of the collection is comprised of artists files containing correspondence, price lists, and printed materials. Additional correspondence is with galleries, dealers, art institutions, private collectors, and the media. Also found are exhibition files, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales records, stock inventories, personal financial records, and photographs. Betty Parsons's personal papers consist of early curatorial files, pocket diaries, personal correspondence, and evidence of her own artwork, including sketchbooks, and files documenting her personal art collection.
Scope and Content Note:
The Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers measure 61.1 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1991, with the bulk of the material dating from 1946-1983. Records provide extensive documentation of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1946 to its closing in 1983 and of the activities of Betty Parsons as one the leading art dealers of contemporary American Art in the latter half of the twentieth century, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists. Over one third of the of the collection is comprised of artists files containing correspondence, price lists, and printed materials. Additional correspondence is with galleries, dealers, art institutions, private collectors, and the media. Also found are exhibition files, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales records, stock inventories, personal financial records, and photographs. Betty Parsons's personal papers consist of early curatorial files, pocket diaries, personal correspondence, and evidence of her own artwork, including sketchbooks, and files documenting her personal art collection. Personal papers also include personal photographs.

Artists files, the largest and most extensive series, consist of a wide variety of documents, including biographical materials, correspondence with or related to the artist, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales and expense invoices, clippings, price lists, and photographs of the artist, exhibitions, and artwork. The files reflect Parsons's close personal relationships with certain artists, particularly Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, and Barnett Newman. Extensive documentation is also found for Forrest Bess, William Congdon, Paul Feeley, Thomas George, Alexander Liberman, Seymour Lipton, Richard Pousette-Dart, Jesse Reichek, and Jack Youngerman. Historians and researchers will find these files to be an invaluable resource both in tracing Betty Parsons's role in promoting Abstract Expressionism and researching individual artists.

Exhibition files primarily document the gallery's infrequent group or themed exhibitions. Of particular note are the files on The Ideographic Picture, which was organized by Barnett Newman and included his work, as well as that of Pietro Lazzari, Boris Margo, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Theodoros Stamos, and Clyfford Still. Price lists, artist biographies and exhibition schedules are housed in the general exhibition files. Loan exhibition files provide documentation of artwork borrowed by other galleries or institutions for exhibitions, as well as shows outside of the gallery that were organized by Betty Parsons. Also found are gallery exhibition guest books, and announcements and catalogs.

Gallery correspondence is primarily with galleries and dealers, museums, arts organizations, and collectors. Scattered letters from artists are also found, although the bulk of the artists' correspondence is filed in the Artists Files. Also found here are memoranda and letters between Betty Parsons and her staff that contain detailed information concerning Parsons's schedule and gallery activities. Similar correspondence is found amongst the correspondence files within the series Betty Parsons papers.

Appraisal and conservation files include correspondence, appraisal invoices, forms, and appraisal requests and other information from the Art Dealers Association of America, and conservation invoices and reports. The majority of the appraisal records contain information about the specific works of art, including artist, title, date, current owner and the estimated value at the time of the request. Conservation records document conservation treatments undertaken by outside conservators to gallery stock.

Sales, purchases, stock and inventory are well documented in the sales and inventory records. The records provide detailed information about individual sales, prices of individual pieces of artwork, consignments, and loans. Most sales records also include detailed information about the buyer and are a valuable resource for provenance research. Files documenting the general administration, routine business operations, and financial transactions (not individual sales) of the gallery are housed in the general business and financial records. These records include ledgers, receipts, tax records, and banking records. There is some limited information about works of art scattered amongst the receipts and in the "in/out slips" files. Legal records house general legal documents and those concerning specific lawsuits. Of particular note is the file detailing the lawsuit between Betty Parsons and Sidney Janis over the fifth floor of 24 West 57th Street.

The remainder of the collection consists of Betty Parsons's personal papers which document her career prior to opening her own gallery, her work as an artist, and her personal art collection.

Some information about Parsons's work prior to opening her own gallery is found in the early curatorial files she retained from her curatorial and administrative work at the Wakefield Gallery and the Mortimer Brandt Gallery. Clippings, correspondence, announcements, exhibition lists and exhibition files are found. For both positions, she kept only the exhibition files for a small group of exhibitions organized around a specific theme, the most notable being the exhibition of Pre-Columbian Sculpture at the Wakefield Gallery.

Biographical materials include copies of her biography, family genealogies, photographs of Parsons, interviews with Colette Roberts and WYNC radio, memberships, photographs, and ephemera, including a collection of programs and invitations from events that she attended. Throughout her life Parsons gave generously of her time to various cultural and charitable institutions and was awarded for her contributions. There are also a number of files that document her speaking engagements, her participation as a juror in numerous juried exhibitions, charitable work, and awards that she received.

Parsons's personal correspondence files reflect how deeply Parsons's life was intertwined with the gallery. There are letters from museum directors, dealers, artists seeking representation, and personal letters from artists with whom she had close personal relationships, most notably Larry Bigelow, Alexander Calder, William Condon, and Ad Reinhardt. There are also letters from the English artist Adge Baker, with whom Parsons was romantically involved. Correspondence also includes several files of postcards and Christmas cards.

Pocket diaries and engagement calendars, spanning from 1933-1981, record social engagements, meetings, vacations, and telephone numbers. Also found are circa two linear feet of notebooks and sketchbooks, many of which are annotated with addresses, poetry, journal entries, and other observations of people, places, and travels. Writings by others include writings about Betty Parsons or the Betty Parsons Gallery, such as Lawrence Alloway's unpublished typescript titled "An American Gallery" and other topics.

Printed material consists of exhibition announcements and catalogs, art magazines, and newspaper and magazine clippings about Betty Parsons, her family and acquaintances, artists, and other art related topics, coupled with a miscellaneous selection of clippings, and a video recording, on topics that presumably captured Parsons's attention.

Personal art work records document Betty Parsons's career as an artist through inventories, group and solo exhibitions files, price lists, appraisals, sales and consignment invoices. Photographs are primarily reproductions of her works of art, although there are scattered photographs of exhibition installations.

Betty Parsons's private art collection files document her extensive personal collection of art that included works by Jackson Pollock, Agnes Martin, Romare Bearden, Barnett Newman, and Mark Rothko, in addition to Amlash sculpture from ancient Persia and primitive sculpture from New Hebrides. These files include inventories, lists, exhibition records, sales and purchase invoices, and photographs. There are also files for donations and loans from Parsons's personal collection to museums and fund raising auctions for several non-profit institutions.

Finally, the personal financial records provide information about the Parsons's family finances and her personal financial success as an art dealer. In addition to her own investments, Parsons inherited shares in family investments through the estates of her parents, J. Fred Pierson, Jr. and Suzanne Miles Pierson, and younger sister, Emily Rayner. Real estate files include correspondence, utility bills, receipts, area maps, and land plots for houses in Sheepscot, Maine and St. Maartens, Netherlands Antilles. Tax returns, ledger worksheets, receipts, banking statements, deposit slips, and cancelled checks are among the other financial records.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as seven series. Many of the series are further divided into subseries.

Series 1: Artists Files, 1935-1983 (19.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-18, 51, 55-56, OVs 53, 65)

Series 2: Exhibition Files, 1941-1983 (2.9 linear feet; Boxes 18-21, 51, 55, OVs 54, 66)

Series 3: Correspondence Files, 1941-1983 (3.9 linear feet; Boxes 21-24, 52, 56)

Series 4: Appraisal Files, 1954-1983 (0.7 linear feet; Box 24)

Series 5: Sales and Inventory Records, 1946-1983 (3.9 linear feet; Boxes 25-28, 51)

Series 6: General Business and Financial Records, 1946-1983 (9.3 linear feet; Boxes 28-38, 51, 56)

Series 7: Betty Parsons Personal Papers, 1916-1991 (21 linear feet; Boxes 38-51, 55-64, OVs 65-67)
Historical Note:
Betty Parsons (1900-1982) was one of the leading art dealers in New York City specializing in modern art, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists, and an abstract painter and sculptor in her own right. She opened Betty Parsons Gallery in 1946 at 15 E. 57th St., later moving to 24 W. 57th St.

The history of the Betty Parsons Gallery is inextricably bound to the life and experiences of its founder. Betty Parsons was born Betty Bierne Pierson on January 31, 1900 in New York City. She enjoyed a privileged childhood, which included vacation homes in Newport and Palm Beach. Her only formal education was a five-year stint at the prestigious Chapin School from 1910-1915, where she met many of the women who would become life-long friends and supporters. In the spring of 1920, she married Schuyler Livingston Parsons from one of New York's oldest families. The marriage ended after only three years and the couple traveled to Paris where they could obtain a divorce on the grounds of incompatibility. She retained her married surname and purchased a house on the rue Boulard in Paris, where she remained for ten years, pursuing studies in painting and sculpture.

Financial constraints forced Parsons to return to the United States in 1933. She first traveled west to California, but it was her return to New York in 1935 that marked the start of her career as an art dealer. Her first opportunity to connect with the New York art world came after a successful exhibition of her watercolors at the Midtown Galleries where the owner, Alan Gruskin, noted Parson's faithful and wealthy group of supporters and offered her work installing exhibitions and selling paintings on commission. Her work for the Midtown Galleries led to a second position in the Park Avenue gallery of Mary Sullivan, one of the founders of the Museum of Modern Art. Here, Parsons learned the business of running a gallery. By 1940 Parsons was ready to take on more independent responsibility and agreed to manage a gallery within the Wakefield Bookshop. In this job, she exercised full curatorial control by selecting artists and organizing exhibitions. She championed then unknown contemporary American artists and the gallery's roster soon included Saul Steinberg, Hedda Sterne, Alfonso Ossorio, Joseph Cornell, Walter Murch, and Theodore Stamos. Although the majority of the exhibitions were solo shows, there were a few group shows and themed exhibitions, such as Love in Art (1941) and Ballet in Art (1942). Under Parson's direction, the gallery hosted an important exhibition of Pre-Columbian sculpture, curated by Barnett Newman.

When the owners of the Wakefield Bookshop decided to close the gallery late in 1944, Mortimer Brandt, a dealer who specialized in Old Master paintings and drawings, offered her a position as head of the newly created contemporary section of his gallery. Many of the artists who had shown with Parsons at the Wakefield Gallery followed her to her new gallery, where they were joined by Ad Reinhardt, Boris Mango, and Hans Hofmann. While the exhibitions garnered attention from the press and the interest of contemporary artists, the contemporary section was not a financial success and Brandt opted to close his gallery in 1946.

Using $1000 of her own money and an additional borrowed $4000, Parsons sublet the space that previously housed Mortimer Brandt's contemporary section, on the fifth floor of 15 East 57th Street, and opened the Betty Parsons Gallery.

In many respects the early years of the Betty Parsons Gallery were the most vital, as it was during the period of 1947-1951 that the gallery became linked with the Abstract Expressionists and the history of post-WWII American Art. In an unpublished history of the gallery, noted art critic Lawrence Alloway stated that the significance of the gallery's early exhibitions ranks with Durand-Ruel's Impressionists exhibitions or Kahnweiler's shows of the Cubists. Betty Parsons Gallery quickly became one of the most prestigious galleries in New York City associated with new American Art of all styles. Her close friend Barnett Newman organized the gallery's inaugural exhibition of Northwest Coast Indian Art and he soon began to exhibit his own work at the gallery. When Peggy Guggenheim's Art of This Century Gallery closed, Jackson Pollock, Clyfford Still, and Mark Rothko joined Parsons' growing stable of artists. Although Parsons continued to promote and exhibit many of the artists whom she had previously discovered, these four artists dominated this period. Newman, Pollock, Still, and Rothko worked closely together, holding themselves apart from the other artists somewhat. They were actively involved in the curatorial process and often hung their own shows. For these artists, the exhibition itself was an artistic act of creation.

Parsons provided a supportive environment and allowed her artists enormous freedom in planning and designing their exhibitions. She was not, however, an aggressive salesperson. During this early period the gallery ledgers document sales to an impressive array of museums including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago, as well as important collectors such as Edward Root and Duncan Phillips. Nevertheless, the art that the gallery promoted was not yet widely accepted. Sales were few, prices were low and the business would not turn a profit for several years. Meanwhile, there was mounting pressure from Pollock, Newman, Still, and Rothko to drop some of the other artists from Parsons' stable and focus all resources on them. They wanted to be promoted to a larger audience and have their work sold at higher prices, but Parsons enjoyed discovering new artists and did not want to be restricted in this endeavor. The year 1951 marks the last time that Pollock's drip paintings or the monumental works of Newman, Rothko or Still were shown at the Betty Parsons Gallery.

In the following years the Betty Parsons Gallery continued to attract a diverse group of talented artists. Ellsworth Kelly, Richard Tuttle, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jack Youngerman had their first New York exhibitions at the Betty Parsons Gallery. Parsons opened Section Eleven in 1958, a short-lived annex to the main gallery, so that she could promote younger, less well-known artists. It closed in 1960 due to the administrative difficulties in running two essentially separate galleries.

In 1962, Sidney Janis, another prominent art dealer, started proceedings to evict Parsons from the floor that they shared on 15 East 57th Street. The Betty Parsons Gallery moved to 24 West 57th Street in 1963, where it remained until it closed in 1983, following Parsons' death the preceding year. Throughout the gallery's history, Parsons continued to promote faithful artists such as Hedda Sterne and Saul Steinberg, who had been with her from the beginning and to seek out new talent, both for her main gallery and for other venues, such as the short-lived Parsons-Truman Gallery, which she opened in 1974 with former Parsons Gallery director Jock Truman to show works on paper by emerging artists.

In addition to being an art dealer, Betty Parsons was a respected artist and collector. With her connoisseur's eye and connections, Parsons amassed an impressive private collection of art. She bought her first piece while an art student in Paris in the 1920s, a small gouache by Zadkine, but did not begin acquiring works in earnest until she was established as an art dealer. Partial inventories of her personal collection show that the majority of her collection contained works by artists associated with the gallery. Mark Rothko, Hans Hofmann, Ad Reinhardt, Agnes Martin, and Kenzo Okada were among the artists represented. Many were gifts from the artists, such as an ink drawing by Jackson Pollock, inscribed "For Betty." Selections from her collection appeared in small museums across the United States, including a traveling exhibition organized by Fitch College, New York, in 1968. In her role as a promoter of contemporary American art, Parsons lent generously from her collection, particularly to the federal Art in the Embassies Program. Throughout her life she also donated works to a variety of museums, most notably, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark.

Parsons frequently claimed that her desire to pursue a career as an artist stemmed from a visit to the Armory Show when she was thirteen. In her late teens, after pressuring her father for art lessons, she studied with the sculptor Gutzon Burglum of Mount Rushmore fame. In Paris, she continued her studies first with Antoine Bourdelle, whose sculptures she had admired at the Armory Show, and later with Ossip Zadkine. The first exhibition of her work, figurative watercolors and sculptures, took place in Paris in 1927. As she matured as an artist, her art became more abstract. Her late works were painted wood sculptures that she pieced together from wood that she found near her studio in Long Island. Parsons's work was exhibited in more than thirty solo exhibitions, including, Betty Parsons; Paintings, Gouaches and Sculpture, 1955-1968, at the Whitechapel Gallery in London. During her lifetime, she would not allow her works to be shown in her own gallery. Shortly after she died of a stroke in 1982, In Memoriam, Betty Parsons: Late Sculptures, opened at the Betty Parsons Gallery.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are oral history interviews with Betty Parsons, June 4-9, 1969, by Paul Cummings, and June 11, 1981 by Gerald Silk.
Separated Material:
Some of the material originally loaned for microfilming in 1968 and 1969 was not included in later donations and can be viewed on microfilm reels N68/62-N68/74 and N69/105-N69/106. Loaned materials are not described in the container listing in this finding aid.
Provenance:
The gallery donated some records in 1974, many of which had been loaned earlier for microfilming. The bulk of the collection was donated in 1984 and 1986 by William Rayner and Christopher Schwabacher, executors of the Estate of Betty Parsons. Additional material was donated by William Rayner in 1998 and Christopher Schwabacher in 2017. Additional material was donated in 2018 by the Lee Hall estate via Carolyn Crozier and Deborah Jacobson, co-executors. Hall was Parsons's biographer and had the material in her possession at the time of Parsons's death. An additional photograph of Parons and Marie Carr Taylor by Henri Cartier-Bresson was donated in 2021 by Mary Carpenter, who inherited the photograph from her mother, Nan Thorton Jones, who received it as a gift from Taylor.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Gallery owners -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women art dealers  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Abstract expressionist  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Video recordings
Drawings
Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.parsbett
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-parsbett
Online Media:

Individuals and Collectors

Collection Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1941-1982
Scope and Contents note:
Files consist of correspondence with private collectors and other individuals, including artists, researchers, art critics, gallery assistants, politicians, and business acquaintances. Correspondence concerns most of the same topics as the correspondence with institutions and dealers, such as sales, purchases, invoicing, loans, requests for photographs and information, requests for information about artists and specific works of art, damages and conservation work, authentication and appraisal of works, and national and international shipping. In addition, there is correspondence about the gallery's role in forming a collection of contemporary drawings (John S. Newberry Collection), and sculpture commissions (including an Alexander Liberman sculpture commissioned by Solomon Smith for the Church of the Holy Spirit in Chicago).

The bulk of the correspondence with artists represented by the gallery can be found amongst the artists files. Artists' correspondence found here typically relates to artists seeking representation by the gallery and written recommendations (for grants, fellowships, and jobs) provided by Betty Parsons.

Correspondence with gallery assistants includes letters from people seeking a position or making arrangements to travel from abroad to take a position, as well as letters from Jock Truman, Marie Hartley, and others to Parsons while she was away, concerning gallery matters.

Files are arranged alphabetically.
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.parsbett, Subseries 3.2
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers / Series 3: Correspondence Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-parsbett-ref944

Lucy R. Lippard papers

Creator:
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Names:
Addison Gallery of American Art  Search this
Alliance for Cultural Democracy  Search this
Art Workers Coalition  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Political Art Documentation/Distribution (Organization)  Search this
Printed Matter, Inc.  Search this
Studio International (Firm)  Search this
University of Colorado -- Faculty  Search this
Women's Caucus for Art  Search this
Andre, Carl, 1935-  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Darboven, Hanne  Search this
Edelson, Mary Beth  Search this
Hammond, Harmony  Search this
Henes, Donna  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-  Search this
LeWitt, Sol, 1928-2007  Search this
Pearson, Henry, 1914-2006  Search this
Stevens, May  Search this
Extent:
56.5 Linear feet
0.454 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
1930s-2007
bulk 1960-1990
Summary:
The papers of New York and New Mexico writer, art critic, and curator, Lucy R. Lippard, measure 56.5 linear feet and 0.454 GB and date from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Over half of the collection consists of correspondence files documenting Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism and political activism. Also found are Lippard's notes and writings including sound recordings and interviews, teaching and exhibition files, printed and digital material, several works of art, and photographs of artwork and artists. Scattered throughout the collection are a small number of records concerning Lippard's personal life. An addition of 3.0 linear feet donated 2015 includes subject files on feminist and conceptual art as well as land use, development, and local politics and history in New Mexico.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York and New Mexico writer, art critic, and curator, Lucy R. Lippard, measure 56.5 linear feet and 0.454 GB and date from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Over half of the collection consists of correspondence files documenting Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism and political activism. Also found are Lippard's notes and writings including sound recordings and interviews, teaching and exhibition files, printed and digital material, several works of art, and photographs of artwork and artists. Scattered throughout the collection are a small number of records concerning Lippard's personal life. An addition of 3.0 linear feet donated 2015 includes subject files on feminist and conceptual art as well as land use, development, and local politics and history in New Mexico.

A small amount of biographical material comprises resumes and an address book.

Correspondence files document all aspects of Lippard's professional life including her relationships with artists such as Carl Andre, Judy Chicago, Hanne Darboven, Ray Johnson, Sol LeWitt, and Henry Pearson; feminist artists including Mary Beth Edelson, Harmony Hammond, Donna Henes, and May Stevens; political and art-related activist groups such as Alliance for Cultural Democracy, Art Workers Coalition, Political Art Documentation/Distribution, Printed Matter, and Women's Caucus for Art; galleries and museums including Addison Gallery of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art, and publishers including Art International and Art Forum. The series also traces the development of Lippard's involvement in activist causes including censorship and the rights of artists, Central America and the impact of U.S. policy on the region, and equality and reproductive rights for women, as well as her interest in conceptual and minimalist art. The series includes scattered artwork and photographs of artists.

Writings are primarily by Lippard and include correspondence, manuscript drafts, extensive notes, and publication records for some of her best-known books such as The Graphic Work of Philip Evergood (1966), Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object (1973), Eva Hesse (1976), Ad Reinhardt (1985), and Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America (1990), as well as essays for publications such as Art Forum and Studio International and contributions to exhibition catalogs. Also found are edited transcripts from conferences, symposia and interviews conducted by and of Lippard, some audio recordings of interviews and symposia, including an interview with Donald Judd, and notes and typescripts for lectures and speeches.

A small number of files document Lippard's teaching work during the 1970s and 1980s, primarily at the University of Colorado, Boulder where she taught several courses and seminars.

Exhibition files document Lippard's involvement with exhibitions she helped to organize or curate such as A Different War: Vietnam in Art (1989-1991) 557,087 and 955,000 (1969, 1970), 2,972, 453 (1971) c.7,500 (1973-1974) and those for which she wrote catalog contributions.

Printed material includes a collection of articles written by Lippard and a small amount of material concerning events, such as speaking engagements, in which Lippard was involved. Other printed material reflects Lippard's wide range of artistic, political and activist interests and documents exhibitions and performances and the activities of art-related and political groups. Material includes many exhibition catalogs, announcements, invitations, printed posters, news clippings, journal articles, brochures, pamphlets and other publications.

Artwork includes sixteen items by unidentified artists, including two by children. Photographs consist primarily of photographs of works of art in addition to a small number of photos of exhibition installations.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as eight series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1960s-circa 1980s (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1950s-2006 (Boxes 1-28, 51, OVs 54-63; 28.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1930s-1990s (Boxes 28-41, 51-52, OVs 64-66; 13.24 linear feet, ER01; 0.454 GB)

Series 4: Teaching Files, 1966-1993 (Boxes 41, 52; 0.76 linear feet)

Series 5: Exhibitions, 1960s-1990s (Boxes 42-45, 52, OVs 67-68; 4.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1940s-2007 (Boxes 45-49, 52, OVs 69-77; 5.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork and Ephemera, circa 1960s-circa 1990s (Boxes 50, 53; 4 folders)

Series 8: Photographs, 1950s-circa 1990s (Boxes 50, 53, OV 71; 1.0 linear foot)
Biographical / Historical:
New York and New Mexico writer and art critic, Lucy R. Lippard, is the curator of numerous exhibitions and the author of over twenty-four books and other writings that trace the emergence of minimalist and conceptual art and document Lippard's commitment to feminism and political activism.

Born in New York City in 1937, Lippard earned a B.A. from Smith College in 1958 and an M.A. in 1962 from New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. In the 1960s she began writing art criticism for the journals Art International and Artforum. In 1966 she curated the landmark exhibition Eccentric Abstraction at the Fischbach Gallery in New York City. Lippard then curated the first of four defining conceptual art exhibitions that became known as her "numbers" shows, each titled after the populations of the cities in which they took place, with catalogs in the form of a set of 10 x 15 cm index cards. Opening at the Seattle Art Museum in 1969, 557,087 was followed by 955,000 in Vancouver, Canada, a few months later. 2,972,453 was held at the Centro de Arte y Comunicacíon in Buenos Aires in 1971 and c.7500 opened in Valencia, California, in 1973-1974 before traveling to several other venues in the United States and Europe.

Lippard's first book, The Graphic Work of Philip Evergood was published in 1966, followed by Pop Art the same year, and a collection of her early essays, Changing, in 1971. Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object (1973) and From the Center: Feminist Essays on Women's Art (1976) documented the emergence of conceptual art and the early years of feminist art respectively. In 1976 Lippard published her seminal book on the life and work of Eva Hesse.

Between 1977 and 1978 Lippard lived on a farm in Devon, England, and worked on a novel, The First Stone, about the role of politics in the lives of three generations of women. During her walks across the English countryside she became interested in landscape art and conceived of her book Overlay: Contemporary Art and the Art of Prehistory which was subsequently published in 1983. Other books include Get the Message?: A Decade Of Art For Social Change (1984), Ad Reinhardt (1985), and Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America (1990). Lippard has also written regular columns on art and politics for the Village Voice, In These Times and Z Magazine, and has been a contributing editor of Art in America.

Lippard was radicalized during a trip to Argentina in 1968 when she was invited to be a juror at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires. On her return to the United States she became heavily involved in anti-war activities and the Art Workers Coalition. She is a co-founder of several feminist and artist organizations including the feminist collective Heresies, which produced Heresies: A Feminist Journal on Art and Politics from 1977-1992, Ad Hoc Women Artists, Alliance for Cultural Democracy, Artists Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America, Women's Action Coalition, and Women's Art Registry. In 1976 she was a founder of Printed Matter, a New York nonprofit dedicated to producing artists' publications. She also worked closely with Franklin Furnace, an artist-run space devoted to the promotion of artists' books, installation art, and video and performance art, and served on the organization's International Committee.

Lippard has been a visiting professor at the School of Visual Arts, the University of Colorado, Boulder, and the University of Queensland, Australia, and was Eminent Artist in Residence at the University of Wyoming Department of Art in 2015. She has received honorary doctorates in fine arts from Maine College of Art, the Massachusetts College of Art, Moore College of Art, San Francisco Art Institute, and others, and awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship, two National Endowment for the Arts grants in criticism, the Smith College Medal, the ArtTable Award for Distinguished Service to the Visual Arts, and the Bard College Center for Curatorial Studies Award for Excellence.

Lippard has lived in New Mexico since 1992 and works as a freelance writer and speaker.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Lucy Lippard conducted in 2011 March 15, by Sue Heinemann, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts project, funded by a grant from the A G Foundation.
Provenance:
Lucy R. Lippard donated her papers in several increments between 1972-1995, and 2006.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics  Search this
Topic:
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Artists -- Political activity  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Conceptual art  Search this
Art criticism -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Minimal art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Citation:
Lucy R. Lippard papers, 1930s-2007, bulk 1960s-1990s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lipplucy
See more items in:
Lucy R. Lippard papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lipplucy
Online Media:

Cuban Book of Essays and Art Criticism, Preface

Collection Creator:
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Container:
Box 38, Folder 27-28
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1980s
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Lucy R. Lippard papers, 1930s-2007, bulk 1960s-1990s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Lucy R. Lippard papers
Lucy R. Lippard papers / Series 3: Writings / 3.1: Writings by Lippard / Other Writings
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-lipplucy-ref2620

Correspondence by Name

Collection Creator:
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1950s-2006
Scope and Contents:
The series documents all aspects of Lippard's professional life, primarily from the 1960s on, including her relationship with artists such as Carl Andre, Iain Baxter (N. E. Thing Co.), Bruce Barber, Carole Berge, Steve Cagan, Don Celender, Judy Chicago, Hanne Darboven, Ken Friedman, Donna Henes, Hera, Alexis Hunter, Ray Johnson, Joseph Kossuth, Sol LeWitt, Martha Rosler, Henry Pearson, Arthur and Irene Siegel, Tal Streeter, Bill Vazan and many more. Lippard's interest in and commitment to the emerging feminist art scene can be traced in correspondence with artists such as Joan Braderman, Mary Beth Edelson, Harmony Hammond, Ruth Hardinger, Elizabeth Hess, Miriam Schapiro, May Stevens and Merle Temkin, many of whom, along with Lippard, were founding members of the New York-based Heresies Collective.

Also found here are correspondence and other material documenting Lippard's involvement with art galleries, art institutions and activist groups including Addison Gallery of American Art, Alliance for Cultural Democracy, and Political Art Documentation/Distribution (PAD/D). PAD/D material consists of 11 audio recordings from circa 1984 related to "Artists Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America" and other activities of the group. Eight folders document the founding and early years of the Women's Caucus for Art from the early 1970s to 1981 and the series includes Lippard's correspondence with related individuals and organizations such as Arlene Raven, Sheila de Bretteville and the College Art Association. Records on the Art Workers Coalition (AWC) and the Museum of Modern Art document Lippard's involvement in the AWC's artists' rights protests aimed at pressurizing the Museum of Modern Art and other museums to implement certain reforms, including a weekly free admission day.

Correspondence with Ray Johnson includes original letters from Johnson to Lippard and many examples of his mail art. A folder of letters from Christo and Jean-Claude includes a letter illustrated with sketches of artwork that had impressed Christo at a University of British Columbia art show and describing a meeting with Ray Johnson. Six folders of correspondence from Hanne Darboven are interspersed with her distinctive colors, dashes, numbers and wavy lines and letters and postcards from Sol LeWitt include sketches and descriptions of artwork.

Lippard corresponded with many artists outside the United States, including Australian artists Vivienne Binns and Peter Kennedy, and New Zealand artist Bruce Barber, and wrote an article for Arts Canada on the Canadian group Pulsa. Her interest in landscape art can be traced in her correspondence with artists such as Bill Vazan and British artist Richard Long.

There are 4 folders of correspondence between Lippard and James (Jim) Fitzimmons regarding her work for the publication Art International during the 1960s, and two folders of correspondence with publisher Harry N. Abrams, Inc., but the bulk of the correspondence related to Lippard's writings can be found in Series 3.1. Other writers with whom Lippard corresponded include New York art critic Frederick Ted Castle, artist and writer Judy Loeb, writer and storyteller Gioia Timpanelli and Argentine-born critic Susana Torre, who designed the cover for Lippard's book From the Center: Feminist Essays on Women's Art (1976).

The series includes one folder each of correspondence from Lippard's parents Margaret Lippard and Vernon W. Lippard.

Sound recordings are on seven sound tape reels and seventeen sound cassettes.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Lucy R. Lippard papers, 1930s-2007, bulk 1960s-1990s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lipplucy, Subseries 2.1
See more items in:
Lucy R. Lippard papers
Lucy R. Lippard papers / Series 2: Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-lipplucy-ref1209

Arlene Raven Memorial Celebration Material

Collection Creator:
Hassinger, Maren  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 29
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2006-2009
Scope and Contents:
Includes handwritten notes with pressed flowers, as well as note of congratulations for Raven's receipt of the CAA's Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism (2002).
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Maren Hassinger papers, 1955-2018. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Maren Hassinger papers
Maren Hassinger papers / Series 7: Printed Material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-hassmare-ref187

André Emmerich Gallery records

Creator:
André Emmerich Gallery  Search this
Names:
Galerie André Emmerich  Search this
Sotheby Parke Bernet & Co.  Search this
Sotheby's (Firm)  Search this
Caro, Anthony, 1924-  Search this
Emmerich, André  Search this
Francis, Sam, 1923-1994  Search this
Frankenthaler, Helen, 1928-2011  Search this
Greenberg, Clement, 1909-1994  Search this
Hockney, David  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Louis, Morris, 1912-1962  Search this
Noland, Kenneth, 1924-2010  Search this
Olitski, Jules, 1922-2007  Search this
Pepper, Beverly  Search this
Extent:
311.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Visitors' books
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Etchings
Date:
circa 1929-2009
Summary:
The André Emmerich Gallery records and André Emmerich papers measure 311.4 linear feet and date from 1929 to 2009. The collection documents the business of the André Emmerich Gallery as well as André Emmerich's life and activities related to the business of selling art. Gallery records include correspondence; appointment books; administrative and subject files; exhibition files; artist files and accounts; inventory, sales, purchase, and consignment records; chronological files; financial and legal records; printed materials; original artwork; photographic and audiovisual materials. Also found are personal papers and records relating to André Emmerich. TheA small addition received in 2014 includes general correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, artists' files, inventory records, consignment records, printed material, photographic materials, and André Emmerich personal papers and records.
Scope and Content Note:
The André Emmerich Gallery records and André Emmerich papers measure 311.4 linear feet and date from 1929 to 2009. The collection documents the business of the André Emmerich Gallery as well as André Emmerich's life and activities related to the business of selling art. Gallery records include correspondence; appointment books; administrative and subject files; exhibition files; artist files and accounts; inventory, sales, purchase, and consignment records; chronological files; financial and legal records; printed materials; original artwork; photographic and audiovisual materials. Also found are personal papers and records relating to André Emmerich.

The records document the gallery's daily business operations, exhibitions, and relationships with artists, dealers, clients, galleries, and museums. Artists particularly well-represented throughout the collection include Anthony Caro, Sam Francis, Helen Frankenthaler, David Hockney, Hans Hofmann, Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, and Beverly Pepper.

Records pre-dating the gallery's establishment in 1954 are primarily newspaper and magazine clippings related to artists, personal photographs and photographs of artists, an original etching, and some of André Emmerich's personal records including biographical materials, correspondence, writings, and legal and financial records. Records post-dating the gallery's closure in 1998 are primarily residual business records related to the final disposition of artwork, clippings, photographs of André Emmerich and gallery staff, biographical materials, personal correspondence, writings, legal and financial records, and condolences received by Emmerich's wife upon his death in 2007.

Correspondence is primarily with galleries, museums and clients about business matters. Correspondence files also cover topics such as appraisals, authentications, offers of sale, artists seeking representation, image requests, job applications and recommendations. Also included are the New York gallery's copies of correspondence between the New York staff and the Zurich staff.

André Emmerich's appointment books document appointments, notes, and reminders about Emmerich's business and personal activities. Four appointment books relating to the birth of Emmerich's three sons and second marriage were kept by the family. The appointment books are access restricted and require written permission to use.

Administrative files include corporate records establishing the Andre Emmerich gallery's structure, records documenting the gallery's daily operations, advertising and publicity material, and records about the Sotheby's acquisition. There are also materials related to Top Gallant Farm, from its establishment to its closure. Travel records relate to André Emmerich's business trips and vacations along with some files on the travels of a several staff members at the gallery. Files about the operations of the Galerie André Emmerich in Zurich, Switzerland are included in the series as well.

Subject files relate to Emmerich's gallery business as well as personal and political interests, such as antiquities, art fairs and exhibitions, lecture research, art associations, and sculpture parks. There are several files on the art critic Clement Greenberg and former president of Gay Men's Health Crisis, Nathan Kolodner, who was also an art dealer and director of the Andre Emmerich Gallery.

Exhibition files contain numerous exhibition catalogs and printed materials related to exhibitions held or organized by the André Emmerich Gallery in Manhattan and Galerie André Emmerich in Zurich. The files contain materials ranging such as exhibition invitations, posters, printed materials, press releases, and guest books. Photographs of exhibitions can be found in the Photographic Materials series.

Artist files include biographical materials, clippings, correspondence, mailing lists, price lists, printed materials, and occasionally lectures, writings, and audiovisual materials for many of the artists represented or shown by André Emmerich Gallery. The General Correspondence files might contain duplicates or expanded versions of some of the correspondence. Photographs of artists can be found in the Photographic Materials series.

Artist accounts comprise account statements prepared periodically by the gallery documenting each artist's expenses and sales. Ledgers and general accounting files can be found in the Other Financial and Legal Records series.

Inventory records include inventory cards describing artwork entering and leaving the gallery and files containing various gallery inventories. Artist inventory cards, representing artists from both the New York and Zurich galleries, list the artist, title, date, media and measurements of an artwork. The cards also indicate whether the work was ultimately sold, returned to the artist, consigned, etc., and divided into categories accordingly. Inventory files show various gallery inventories.

Sales records document gallery sales and include paid invoices, records relating to Zurich sales, general sales records such as price lists and canceled sales, and Sotheby's Parke-Bernet auction reports. There are gaps in sales invoices in 1961-1964 and 1969-1971.

Purchase records include correspondence and invoices related to purchases and offers; annotated invoices for works of art bought by the gallery; André Emmerich, Inc. related purchase records; "Non-Modern" art related purchase records.

Consignment records include correspondence and consignment agreements documenting consignments to and from the André Emmerich Gallery; consignments from other galleries to André Emmerich, Inc.; and general consignment records.

Chronological files include copies of invoices or cover letters documenting the movement of artwork into and out of the gallery through sales, consignments, loans, and approvals. Records dating January through August 1968, January through March 1969, and September 1969 through July 1971 are missing.

Financial and legal records include client and partner account statements, resale and exempt organization certificates, accounting ledgers, and legal files related to disputes involving or of interest to the gallery.

Printed materials include auction catalogs and reports, books, and clippings describing André Emmerich, the galleries in New York and Zurich, Top Gallant Farm, and the art world. Also included is a large scrapbook created by the gallery containing clippings and gallery announcements dated 1955-1958. Clippings relating to particular artists can be found in the Artists Files series.

There are two pieces of original artwork in the collection. One is a 1974 print of a 1933 composite etching by Esther Dick Gottlieb, Adolphe Gottlieb, Edgar Levy, Lucille Corcos Levy, David Smith, and Dorothy Dehner Smith. The second is a 1998 lithograph by Louise Bourgeoise, called The Face of the Critic. The artist gave the lithograph as a gift in honor of Robert Hughes and the Archives of American Art and is numbered 61 out of a series of 300.

Photographic materials include prints, slides, negatives, and transparencies. Subjects include artists, André Emmerich, gallery installations, Top Gallant Farm, events, artists' studios, gallery staff, gallery space, and artwork. Photographs which show André Emmerich are indicated as such in the finding aid.

Audiovisual materials includes videocassettes and one audiocassette related to the art world. Videocassettes related to specific artists can be found in the Artists Files series. Videocassettes related to André Emmerich can be found in the André Emmerich Personal Papers and Records series. Videocassettes related to Top Gallant Farm and Sotheby's can be found in the Administrative Files series.

Personal papers and records relating to André Emmerich include biographical materials, personal correspondence, writings and lectures, and legal and financial records. The biographical materials include an address book, interviews and identifying documents. Writings include articles, edits, dissertations, lectures, etc. There are also some miscellaneous correspondence which is organized chronologically.

The small addition received in 2014 includes general correspondence, administrative files, exhibition files, artists' files, inventory records, consignment records, printed material, photographic materials, and André Emmerich personal papers and records.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 19 series:

Series 1: General Correspondence Files, 1958-2006 (boxes 1-18, OV 314-315; 18.2 linear feet)

Series 2: André Emmerich Appointment Books, 1954-2007 (boxes 19, 325, 326; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Administrative Files, 1954-2003 (boxes 20-31, 306, OV 314, OV 316-319; 11 linear feet)

Series 4: Subject Files, 1958-1967, 1971-2000 (boxes 31-32, 306, OV 318, OV 320; 2 linear feet)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, circa 1954-1998 (boxes 32-40, 306, 307, OV 318-322; 8.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Artists Files, 1929-1932, 1938-2007 (boxes 40-68, 307, 308, OV 320-323; 28 linear feet)

Series 7: Artist Accounts, 1958-1998 (boxes 68-81; 13.5 linear feet)

Series 8: Inventory Records, circa 1954-2000(boxes 82-128; 46.5 linear feet)

Series 9: Sales Records, 1959-1998 (boxes 128-168; 40 linear feet)

Series 10: Purchase Records, 1961-1966, 1972-1994 (boxes 168-170; 2 linear feet)

Series 11: Consignment Records, 1961-2002 (boxes 170-177; 7.7 linear feet)

Series 12: Chronological File of Incoming and Outgoing Artwork, 1968-1998 (boxes 178-185; 8 linear feet)

Series 13: Other Financial and Legal Records, 1956-1999 (boxes 186-202; 16.5 linear feet)

Series 14: Printed Materials, 1955-1960, 1965-2008 (boxes 202-204, 308, 309; 3 linear feet)

Series 15: Original Artwork, 1933, 1974, 1998 (box 205, 310; 0.7 linear feet (2 folders))

Series 16: Photographic Materials, circa 1930-1935, 1941-1998, circa 2005 (Boxes 205-296, 311-313, OV 324; 92.8 linear feet)

Series 17: General Audio and Video Recordings, 1985, 1990-1995 (Boxes 297-298; 1.3 linear feet)

Series 18: André Emmerich Personal Papers and Records, 1937-1940, 1946-2008 (Boxes 298-305, OV 321, OV 323; 7.7 linear feet)

Series 19: Addition to the The André Emmerich Gallery records and André Emmerich papers, 1956-2009 (Boxes 328-329, OV 330; 2.1 linear feet)
Historical Note:
André Emmerich (1924-2007) was one of America's most noted contemporary art dealers and opened the André Emmerich Gallery in New York in 1954. The gallery showcased contemporary art, particularly Color Field painting and monumental sculpture.

André Emmerich was born on October 11, 1924 in Frankfurt, Germany. From age 7 he was raised in Amsterdam before emigrating with his family to New York City in 1940. He studied at Oberlin College and developed an interest in pre-Columbian art and antiquities. After graduation, he spent ten years in Paris working as a writer and editor before returning to New York. He married Constance Emmerich and the couple had three sons, Adam, Noah, and Toby.

In 1954 Emmerich opened the André Emmerich Gallery at 18 East 77th Street and initially specialized in contemporary American and European art and pre-Columbian antiquities. In 1956, the gallery moved to 17 East 64th Street, and in 1959 to the Fuller Building at 41 East 57th Street. Emmerich wrote two books about pre-Columbian art, Art Before Columbus in 1963 and Sweat of the Sun, Tears of the Moon: Gold and Silver in Pre-Columbian Art in 1965.

In 1961, Emmerich learned that French and Company, a gallery advised by art critic Clement Greenberg, was closing its department of contemporary art. French and Company had represented Color Field painters Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland, and Jules Olitski. Emmerich immediately invited Louis and Noland to be represented by his gallery. In 1966 he extended the invitation to Olitski as well, and Helen Frankenthaler joined soon after. The gallery's reputation as one of the earliest and most important promoters of Color Field painters was launched.

In addition to Color Field painters, the gallery represented, among others, Pierre Alechinsky, Karel Appel, Milton Avery, Herbert Ferber, Sam Francis, John Graham, Al Held, David Hockney, Hans Hofmann, John Hoyland, Judy Pfaff, Miriam Schapiro, and Anne Truitt.

Until January 1983, sales of pre-Columbian art primarily went through an entity called André Emmerich Inc. (AE Inc.), while sales of contemporary went through the André Emmerich Gallery Inc. (AEG). In 1983, the two entities were merged and operated under the name André Emmerich Gallery Inc.

In 1971, Emmerich began operating a downtown gallery at 420 West Broadway, in SoHo, in space shared with Leo Castelli, Virginia Dwan, and Ileana Sonnabend. In 1972, Emmerich opened a branch of his gallery in Zurich. He incorporated the Galerie André Emmerich Gmbh primarily for the purpose of leasing gallery space in Zurich. Until February 1974, sales of Pre-Columbian art in Zurich were made by an entity called André Emmerich Gallery Inc., New York Filiale Zurich. The Galerie André Emmerich Gmbh was officially liquidated in May 1982. The Filiale was formally closed in October 1996. Galerie André Emmerich also enjoyed a short-lived joint venture with Gimpel & Hanover.

André Emmerich served as president of the Art Dealers Association of America from 1972-1974 and again from 1991-1994.

Emmerich opened a private 150 acre sculpture park, Top Gallant Farm, on his estate in Pawling, New York, in 1982, where he stored and exhibited monumental sculptures by artists his gallery represented including Anthony Caro, Beverly Pepper, Alexander Liberman, Alexander Calder, Mark di Suvero, George Rickey, and Keith Haring. David Hockney painted waves onto floor of the property's swimming pool in 1986. Emmerich operated the sculpture park until 1996.

Emmerich sold his gallery to Sotheby's in 1996. He continued to be affiliated with the gallery until Sotheby's closed the gallery in 1998. Emmerich then began work on his memoir, My Life With Art, excerpts of which have been published in Art News, the Wall Street Journal, and The New Criterion.

Andre Emmerich died in New York 2007 and is survived by his second wife, Susanne Emmerich.
Related Material:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with André Emmerich conducted by Mona Hadler on January 18, 1993.
Provenance:
The André Emmerich Gallery records and André Emmerich papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by André Emmerich in eight accretions between 1999 and 2002. Two additional accretions were donated by Emmerich's wife Susanne in 2008 and 2009; and by James Yohe, Emmerich's former business partner, in 2009 and 2014.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Access of diaries and appointment books required written permission.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Sculpture, Abstract  Search this
Color-field painting  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- Switzerland -- Zurich  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Visitors' books
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Etchings
Citation:
André Emmerich Gallery records and André Emmerich papers, circa 1929-2009. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.andremmg
See more items in:
André Emmerich Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-andremmg
Online Media:

Berryman family papers

Creator:
Berryman family (Washington, D. C.)  Search this
Names:
American Federation of Arts  Search this
Gridiron Club (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Society of Washington Artists (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Baruch, Bernard M. (Bernard Mannes), 1870-1965  Search this
Berryman, Clifford Kennedy, 1869-1949  Search this
Berryman, Florence Seville, 1900-1992  Search this
Berryman, James Thomas, 1902-1971  Search this
Berryman, Kate  Search this
Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925  Search this
Byrd, Harry Flood, 1887-1966  Search this
Clay, Henry, 1777-1852  Search this
Coolidge, Calvin, 1872-1933  Search this
Daniels, Josephus, 1862-1948  Search this
Darling, Jay N. (Jay Norwood), 1876-1962  Search this
Debs, Eugene V. (Eugene Victor), 1855-1926  Search this
Garner, John Nance, 1868-1967  Search this
Grosvenor, Gilbert Hovey, 1875-1966  Search this
Harding, Warren G. (Warren Gamaliel), 1865-1923  Search this
Hays, Will H. (Will Harrison), 1879-1954  Search this
Hoover, Herbert, 1874-1964  Search this
Hoover, J. Edgar (John Edgar), 1895-1972  Search this
Lodge, Henry Cabot, 1850-1924  Search this
McCutcheon, John T. (John Tinney), 1870-1949  Search this
Mechlin, Leila, 1874-1949  Search this
Putnam, Brenda, 1890-1975  Search this
Reynolds, Joseph G., 1886-1972  Search this
Rogers, Will, 1879-1935  Search this
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (Franklin Delano), 1882-1945  Search this
Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919  Search this
Taft, William H. (William Howard), 1857-1930  Search this
Truman, Harry S., 1884-1972  Search this
Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924  Search this
Extent:
11.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Illustrated letters
Photographs
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Date:
1829-1984
bulk 1882-1961
Summary:
The Berryman family papers measure 11.4 linear feet and date from 1829 to 1984, with the bulk of the material dating from 1882 to 1961. The collection presents a good overview of the careers of Washington Star cartoonist Clifford Berryman, his daughter, Star art critic, Florence, and to a lesser extent, son Jim Berryman.
Scope and Content Note:
The Berryman family papers measure 11.4 linear feet and date from 1829 to 1984, with the bulk of the material dating from 1882 to 1961. The collection presents a good overview of the careers of Washington Star cartoonist Clifford Berryman, his daughter, Star art critic, Florence, and his son, Jim Berryman, though the latter's career is not as well represented. The papers also contain material relating to Kate Berryman, including a scrapbook and diaries.

The collection contains biographical material, correspondence, business records, notes and writings, scrapbooks, printed material, photographs, and artwork by Clifford and Jim Berryman and others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into three series according to individual family members; each series is arranged into subseries and material within each subseries is arranged chronologically.

Series 1: Clifford and Kate Berryman papers, 1829-1963, undated (boxes 1-7, 11-12, OVs 14-15, 7.9 linear ft.)

Series 2: Florence Berryman Papers, 1902-1984, undated (boxes 8-10, 13, 2.3 linear ft.)

Series 3: Jim Berryman Papers, 1919-1964, undated (boxes 10, 13, 1.1 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
The patriarch of the Berryman family, Clifford Kennedy Berryman, was born in Versailles, Kentucky, in 1869. His first job was in the U.S. Patent Office in Washington, D.C. He became a cartoonist for the Washington Post in 1891. From 1907, until his death in 1949, Clifford Berryman was political cartoonist for the Washington Star, earning a reputation as the "Dean of American Cartoonist," and winning a Pulitzer Prize in 1944. His cartoon of Theodore Roosevelt, "Drawing the Line in Mississippi," 1902, began the American Teddy Bear craze, and created Berryman's cartoon trademark. He was also the first cartoonist to become president of the Gridiron Club. His wife, Kate, was an avid member of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Their daughter, Florence Berryman, 1900-1992, abandoned her study of music because of a loss of hearing and turned her attention to art. In the 1920s, she became a free-lance local art critic, writing articles for newspapers. She later assisted Leila Mechlin, as an art critic for the Washington Star. In 1946, Florence Berryman succeeded Mechlin and worked for the Star until her retirement in 1961. She also served as editor for the American Federation of Arts until 1944.

Clifford and Kate Berryman's son, James Thomas Berryman, 1902-1976, attended George Washington University and the Corcoran School of Art. He worked as a reporter for the New Mexico State Tribune, until his return, in 1923, to Washington, D.C. because of his mother's illness. He worked at the Washington Star, as an editorial artist and illustrator, until 1933, when he became a sports cartoonist. When his father suffered a storke in 1935, Jim intermittently drew political cartoons for the STAR. Jim Berryman also won a Pulitzer Prize for his political cartoons.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming (reel D111) including a scrapbook of memorabilia, 1905-1945, collected by Kate Berryman regarding her husband. The scrap book includes letters from Bernard Baruch, William Jennings Bryan, Harry Flood Byrd, Jay Darling, John Nance Garner, Herbert Hoover, Henry Cabot Lodge, Harry Truman, and Woodrow Wilson; clippings; cartoons; printed material; and photographs of Clifford, family members, William Jennings Bryan, John Nance Garner, Brenda Putnam, and William Howard Taft. Though some items in the scrapbook were subsequently donated, lent materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Portions of the Berryman family papers were donated in 1965 by Florence Berryman, and in 1992 by her estate. The latter donation included portions of a scrapbook of memorabilia which had previously been lent for filming (reel D111) by Florence Berryman in 1962. The whearabouts of the other items in the scrapbook which were donated is unknown.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Cartoonists -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art critics -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Politicians -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Art criticism -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Women art critics -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Politicians -- Caricatures and cartoons  Search this
Political cartoons -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Caricatures and cartoons -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Cartooning -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Illustrated letters
Photographs
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Citation:
Berryman family papers, 1829-1984, bulk 1882-1961. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.berrfami
See more items in:
Berryman family papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-berrfami

Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás (see also: Goldman, Shifra; National Task Force on Hispanic American Art; Quirarte, Jacinto; RCAF),

Collection Creator:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Extent:
(2 folders)
Container:
Box 29, Folder 9-10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1978-1996, undated
Scope and Contents note:
(drafts of essays, handwritten and typed; notes; blank contract; photocopy of memo to Concilio de Arte Popular from Shifra Goldman and TYF, 11/1/1978, re. Contemporary Chican Popular Art: Antecedents and Actuality ; photograph of TYF; photocopy of letter to Eva Wisbar, Visual Resources, Inc., from Shifra Goldman, 10/20/1978; clippings; photocopy of letter to Jacinto Quirarte from Shifra Goldman, 03/23/1981; essay by Goldman, "The State of Chicano Art Criticism"; course notes)
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material, 1965-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material / Series 1: Subject Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-ybartoma-ref1804

Albright, Thomas, Art Critic

Collection Creator:
Ybarra-Frausto, Tomás, 1938-  Search this
Extent:
(clipping)
Container:
Box 1, Folder 14
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material, 1965-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material
Tomás Ybarra-Frausto research material / Series 1: Subject Files
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-ybartoma-ref30

Correspondence Files

Collection Creator:
Cahill, Holger, 1887-1960  Search this
Extent:
1.5 Linear feet (Boxes 1-2)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1922-1979, 1993
Scope and Contents note:
This series consists of personal and work-related correspondence (primarily incoming correspondence) between Cahill and various friends and colleagues. While a large portion of the series documents Cahill's position as Director of the FAP, it also extends beyond those years and illuminates other aspects of Cahill's career including his interest in folk and Asian art, and his work as an art critic.

There is significant correspondence with the artist Stanton MacDonald Wright between 1936 and 1950, and with the artist Irene Pereira between 1950 and 1953. The series also documents research which Cahill conducted in the late 1940s on the development of the Index of American Design for his introduction to a book on the Index by the National Gallery of Art, published by the Macmillan Company. Correspondence from 1949 provides another angle on the historical details of the FAP through lengthy correspondence documenting Cahill's criticism of William Francis McDonald's book Federal Relief Administration and the Arts (Ohio State University Press, 1969).

There is a large amount of correspondence from July 1960 comprising sympathy letters to Dorothy C. Miller following Cahill's death. Correspondence from 1977 encloses a catalog of an exhibition organized by New York WPA Artists, Inc., at the Parsons School of Design in November 1977. The exhibition, New York City WPA Art, was dedicated to the memory of Holger Cahill.

See Appendix for a list of correspondents (with the exception of those microfilmed on reel 1105) in Series 2
Appendix: Correspondents in Series 2:
Abbott, Berenice: 1944 (letter to the Editor)

Abbott, John: [1946]

Abell, Walter ( -- Canadian Art): -- 1943-1944 (2 letters)

Adams, Charles C.: 1940

Alcopley, Mr.: [1952] (including typescript "Pictures of Alcopley" by Saburo Hasegawa); 1953-1960 (4 letters)

Alsberg, Henry G. (Director, Federal Writers' Projects): 1936 (4 letters)

American Council of Learned Societies: 1949

American Federation of Arts: 1949-1952 (3 letters)

American Folk Art Gallery: 1941

American Heritage: 1954

American Swedish Historical Foundation: 1949

Andrews, Robert Armstrong and Eleanor: [1960], undated

Art in America: 1953

Artists For Victory: [1942]

Artists League of America: 1945

Artists Union of Massachusetts: 1936 (telegram to President Roosevelt)

Arts Council of Japanese Americans for Democracy: 1944

Ashton, Dore: [1960]

Bach, Richard F. (Metropolitan Museum): 1924 and 1950

Bailey, Herbert: 1972 (letter from Naomi Bliven)

Baker, Donald: [1936]

Baker, Jacob (WPA): 1935-1960, undated (10 letters)

Barach, Frederica (Writers' War Board): 1944

Barker, Virgil and Ida: 1945-1960 (4 letters)

Barnard College: 1951 (2 letters)

Barr, Alfred H., Jr. (Museum of Modern Art): 1935-1960 (16 letters)

Barr, Tony: 1960

Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, Inc.: 1950

Baur, John (Brooklyn Museum): 1946-1960 (6 letters)

Baylinson, Ada: 1950

Bear, Donald J. (Denver Art Museum): 1939

Beckmann, Mrs. Max: 1960

Bennington College: 1950

Benson, Emanuel M. (FAP): 1936-1940 (7 letters)

Berlandina, Jane: 1960

Bessinger, Frederic (artist): 1933

Biddle, George: 1936-1940

Biesel, Fred and Frances: 1941-1955 (13 letters)

Bird, Elzy: [1949]

Bittermann, Eleanor: 1951

Black, Mary: [1960]

Bliven, Naomi: 1972 (letter to Herbert Bailey)

Block, Edgar S.: 1950

Block, Lou: 1949

Bluemner, Oscar: 1934-1937 (3 letters)

Blue Ribbon Books: 1935

Blume, Peter: 1944 and 1950

Blumenfeld, Willow (Cahill's granddaughter): [1960]

Blumenschein, Ernest L.: 1936

Blumenthal, Joseph: [1960]

Bolotowsky, Ilya: 1960

Borgenicht, Grace (art dealer): [1960]

Boston Marine Museum: 1949

Boston: Museum of Fine Arts: 1950

Boulton, Margaret: 1936

Bragozzi, Tony and Olive (curator of David Rockefeller's collection): 1960

Breck, George and Ruth: [1960]

Brennan, Francis: 1960

Brook, Alex: 1959 (2 letters)

Brook, Gina (wife of artist Alexander Brook): 1960

Brooks, James and Charlotte: [1960]

Brown, Clara D. (antiques dealer): [1935]

Brown, Yaeger: 1943 (2 letters)

Bruce, Edward: 1937

Bucks County Historical Society: 1950

Bufano, Beniamino: [1940-1942], undated (3 letters)

Bulau, Alwin E.: 1952

Burnham, Ralph Warren (antiques dealer): 1933

Byron, Evelyn S.: 1942 (memo from Wilda Sawyer)

Bywaters, Jerry: 1960

Calder, Alexander: 1956 (photocopy) and 1960

Calkins, K: 1936 (2 letters to Constance Rourke)

Campbell, Robert B.: 1960

Carolina Art Association: 1935-1950 (5 letters)

Carroll, Bob: 1960

Carroll, Eleanor: 1936

Castelli, Leo: 1960

Catlin, Tod: 1960

Cavanna, Elise: 1960

Chamberlain, Betty: 1960

Chanin, Abraham and Maralt (Museum of Modern Art): [1960]

Chapin, Lucy Stock: 1932-1933 (2 letters)

Chapman, Suzanne: 1946-1949 (2 letters)

Charm -- (Barbara Lee Johnson): 1929

Chermayeff, Serge (Institute of Design): 1948

Chichester, Jim Hinchman (college friend of Elizabeth Holt): 1960

Church, Elizabeth D. (antiques dealer): 1935 (including 10 photographs of folk art)

Citizens Committee for Support of WPA: 1937

Claflin, Agnes: 1960

Clark, Stephen C.: 1939

Cleveland Institute of Art: 1950 (letter from Alfred Barr)

Coffey, Katherine: 1960

Coggeshall, Calvert and Suzanne: 1956-1960 (2 letters)

Cole, Mrs. Charley Tidd (Friends of the FAP): 1940 (letter from Martha Davidson)

Colie, Annetta (Elizabeth Holt's sister): 1960

Colin, Georgia and Ralph: 1960

Collier, Nina (Index of American Design): 1936 (6 letters)

Collins, Lloyd and Lib: 1960

Colman, Anne (FAP, Michigan): 1937 (2 letters)

Colonial Williamsburg, Incorporated: 1935-1960 (13 letters)

Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center: 1939-1960 (3 letters)

Columbia Broadcasting System, Inc.: 1939 (contract for Cahill to broadcast "What's Art to Me" program)

Columbia University: [1939]

Conklin, Franklin (Newark Museum): 1944

Connolly, Elizabeth (FAP, Southern California): 1940

Cooper, Charlotte Gowing (FAP, Ohio): 1937-1937 (4 letters)

Cooper, Samuel C.: 1941 (including certificate of dissolution for the American Folk Art Gallery); 1951 (3 letters)

Corcoran Gallery of Art: 1950 (3 letters)

Cornelius, Charles: 1936 (2 memoranda from others)

Cosmopolitan Fire Insurance: 1931

Coussirat, Elizabeth (Index of American Design): 1936 (6 letters)

Crampton, Rollin: 1960

Craven, Thomas: 1944 (2 letters)

Crawford, Phyllis: 1945-1960 (4 letters)

Crofut, Edward F. (WPA and Museum of Modern Art): 1936-1938 (3 letters)

Cronin, Agnes S.: 1939-1944 (2 letters)

Crosby, Hildegard (FAP, Illinois): 1937-1949 (8 letters)

Culler, Julia Abbott: 1935

Cummin, Hazel (Index of American Design): 1937 (5 letters)

Curran, Mary (FAP, Pennsylvania): 1937 (2 letters)

Daly, Matthew A. (WPA): 1936 (2 letters)

Dana, John Cotton (Newark Museum): 1924-1925 (4 letters)

Daugherty, D. H. (American Council of Learned Societies): 1949 (11 letters)

Davidson, Jo: 1944 (letter to the Editor)

Davidson, Martha (Friends of the FAP): 1939-1940 (3 letters)

Davies, Terry: 1960 (2 letters)

Davis, Charles (artist): mentioned in invitation dated [1938]

Davis, D. and Phyllis: 1960

Davis, George Earl: 1952

Davis, Lew and Mathilde: 1960

Davis, Stuart: 1936-1960 (5 letters)

Dehner, Dorothy: [1960]

Delson, Sidney: 1958-1959 (2 letters)

de Nagy, Tibor: 1960

Dentsch, Hilda: [1941-1960] (2 letters)

DeVoto, Bernard: 1949 (4 letters)

De Young Memorial Museum: 1939

d'Harnoncourt, Rene: 1944-1960 (5 letters)

Dickinson, Edwin: 1960

Dienes, Sari (artist): 1960

Don, Michael: 1939-1940 (2 letters)

Donati, Enric: 1960

Douglas, Eric: 1949

Downtown Gallery: 1935

Dows, Olin (Treasury Relief Art Project): 1935-1960 (5 letters)

Dunbar, Anna: 1960

Duntley, Seibert Q.: 1941

du Pont, H. F.: 1950 (2 letters)

Durieux, Caroline: 1943

Durham, Mr.: 1936

Dutt, Alska: 1956

du Von, Jay: 1941

East Liverpool, Ohio, Chamber of Commerce: 1939

Eaton, Allen: 1938 and 1945

Edwards, Paul (WPA, Washington, D.C.): 1941

Eglington, Laurie (Index of American Design): 1936 (2 letters)

Eilshemius, Louis M.: 1931-1939 (2 letters)

Emery, Humphrey J. (American Handicraft Council): 1939

Emil, Allan and Kate (art collectors): 1960

Emmerich, Andre: 1960

Engineer Replacement Center, Fort Belvoir: 1941 (2 letters)

Essex Institute: 1950

Evans, Ernestine: 1947 (2 letters)

Evergood, Philip: 1944 (letter to the Editor)

Fairweather, Sally: [1960]

Feininger, Julia: 1960, undated

Feitelson, Lorser and Helen: 1943-1960 (3 letters)

Ferber, Herbert and Lisi: 1960 (2 letters)

Ferren, John: 1949 (2 letters)

Field, George H. (Federal Works Agency): 1943 (2 letters)

Flanagan, Hallie: 1949 (3 letters)

Fleming, Philip B.: [1943]

Fogel, Barbara: 1960

Follmer, Frank J.: 1942

Force, Juliana: 1946

'47 -- Magazine: 1946

Frankenberg, Lloyd: 1937 and 1960

French, Helen: [1960]

Frick Art Reference Library: 1946

Fried: Rose Fried Gallery: 1953

Friends of the FAP: 1939 (13 letters)

Fuller, Buckminster: 1942-1949 (including a brochure about the Dymaxion House)

Fultz, Harry T.: 1942 (memo from Fred Biesel)

Gaskin, William: 1940-1961 (12 letters)

Gates, Marguerite (Public Library of Newark, N.J.): 1929-1935 (3 letters)

Gavert, Olive Lyford (Alfred Barr's secretary): 1960

General Services Administration: 1950

Gershoy, Toni: [1960]

Gibbs, Peggy (widow of artist Howard Gibbs): [1960]

Giedion, Siegfried: mentioned in letter dated Oct 07, 1951

Glarner, Fritz: 1949 and 1960

Glassgold, Cook Adolph: 1936-1940 (43 letters)

Goldberg, Albert L. (Illinois Music Project): 1940

Goldberg, Mike: [1960]

Goldwater, Louise and Robert: 1960

Goodall, Donald B.: 1960

Goodchild, Donald: 1939

Goodrich, Lloyd (Whitney Museum of American Art): 1948-1960 (7 letters)

Goodyear, A. Conger: 1935-1960 (5 letters)

Gordon, Jack (Whitney Museum of American Art): [1960]

Gorsline, Douglas W.: 1950 (2 letters)

Gowing, Lawrence: 1960

Graham, Ralph (FAP, Illinois): 1941-1942 (3 letters)

Graves, Morris: 1946

Green, Wilder: 1960

Greenberg, Clement: 1960

Greenwell, Darrell J. ( -- Ogden Standard Examiner): -- 1949

Griffis, Toni (Mrs. Hughes Griffis): 1960

Griffith, E. J. (FAP, Oregon): 1938 and 1960

Grossman, Mrs. I. Donald: [1960]

Guerrero, Jose and Roxane: [1960]

Guggenheim, Olga: 1960

Gwathmey, Robert: 1944 (letter to the Editor)

Hale, Bob (Metropolitan Museum of Art): 1960

Hall, Edward T. (Universal School of Handicrafts): 1939

Halpert, Edith: 1930-1960, undated (20 letters)

Hardin, Shirley: [1960]

Hare, Michael M.: 1948

Harper's Magazine: 1943-1944 (2 letters)

Harrison, Preston: 1934

Hart, "Pop": 1930-1932 (2 letters)

Hartigan, Grace: 1960

Hasegawa, Saburo: 1952 (letter to Franz Kline, including typescript "Pictures of Alcopley")

Hatch, John Davis: 1960

Hatcher, Harry and Doris: 1960 (3 letters)

Haupers, Clement (FAP, Minnesota): 1937-1949 (5 letters)

Haydon, Hal: 1955

Henley, Helen B. (Wadsworth Atheneum): 1937 (2 letters)

Herbert, David: 1960

Hess, Thomas: 1960

Hinckley, Robert H. (American Broadcasting Co.): 1960

Hirsch, Joseph: 1960

Hofmann, Hans and Maria: 1960 (2 letters)

Holt, Elizabeth (art historian): 1960

Holzhauer, Mildred: 1937-1940 (4 letters)

Hope, Henry R. (Indiana Univ.): 1948-1949 (2 letters)

Hopkins, Harry L.: 1936-1943 (13 letters)

Horr, Axel (artist): mentioned in invitation dated [1938]

House Beautiful: 1950

Houston: Museum of Fine Arts of Houston: 1955

Hunter, Howard O.: 1941

Hunter, Virginia and Russell Vernon Hunter: 1951-1960, undated (4 letters)

Huxley, Julia S.: 1942

Illinois Art Project: 1941-1942 (6 letters)

Index of American Design: 1936 (form letter)

Interior: Department of the Interior: 1950 (3 letters)

Inverarity, Robert Bruce (FAP State Dir., Washington): 1937-1950 (5 letters)

Isaacs, Betty and Julius: 1960

Jackson, Martha: [1960]

Jerry, Sylvester (FAP, Michigan): 1939 (3 letters)

Johns, Jasper: 1960

Johnson, Anna: 1952

Johnson, Buffie: 1960

Johnson, Irene Edith: 1960

Johnson, Philip C.: 1960

Jones, Anne (Mrs. E. Powis Jones): 1960

Kallen, Horace (publisher): 1960

Karpel, Ray and Bernard (Museum of Modern Art): [1960]

Kavanaugh, George R. (Berea College): 1936

Kaye, Harold: 1958

Kayser, Dr.: 1954

Keck, Caroline and Sheldon (art conservators): 1960

Kellogg, Elizabeth R.: 1949 (2 letters)

Kent, Rockwell: 1944

Kerr, Florence (Work Projects Administration): 1940-1942 (4 letters)

Keyes, Homer Eaton ( -- Antiques -- Magazine): 1936

Kiesler, Frederick J.: 1960

Kiplinger, Walter M.: 1941 (4 letters)

Kipper, Katrina (antiques dealer): 1935 (3 letters)

Kirby, Mr. O. A.: 1941

Kleinholz, Frank: 1944 (letter to the Editor)

Kline, Franz: 1952 (letter from Saburo Hasegawa, including typescript "Pictures of Alcopley") and 1960

Knight, Frederic (Artists' Coordination Committee): Nov 1936 (5 letters)

Knight, Harry: 1960

Knittle, Rhea Mansfield: 1936-1937 (2 letters)

Kokoschka, Oskar: 1944

Kootz, Jane and Sam: 1960

Kroll, Eleanor: 1937 (2 letters)

Kuniyoshi, Yasuo: 1944 (2 letters)

Labaudt, Lucien: 1943 (4 letters)

Lane, Harry: [1960]

Laning, Clair: 1960

Leech, Nancy T.: 1949

Leeds, Harold Eliot (architect): 1960

Legg, Alicia (Museum of Modern Art curator): 1960

Leggett, Eugene S. (National Emergency Council): 1936 (letter from Harry Hopkins)

Leicester, Louise B. (American Handicraft Council): [1940]

Lekakis, Michael: 1960

Lemmon, Warren W.: mentioned in letter dated Mar 08, 1940

Levine, Jack: 1960

Levy, Julian: 1944 and [1960]

Lewis and Clark High School: 1939

Lewis, Elizabeth Ray: 1943

Life -- Magazine: 1944 (4 letters)

Lipman, Jean and Howard: [1960]

Lipscomb, Isabel (Work Projects Admin.): 1941 (3 letters)

Lipton, Seymour: [1960]

Litchfield, Elizabeth (Museum of Modern Art): 1941 - [1960] (3 letters)

Lowenthal, Edith and Milton: 1960

Lundy, Margaret: 1938

Lunsford, Bascom Lamar: 1936

Lyles, Mary E.: 1935

Mabry, Tom and Ethel: 1960 (2 letters)

Macdonald-Wright, Stanton: 1936-1955, undated (60 letters)

Macdowell Colony: 1960

MacLeish, Archibald: [1943] (letter from Philip B. Fleming)

Macmillan Company: 1946-1959 (24 letters)

Magazine of Art: 1948-1951 (10 letters)

Mapes, Col. Milton C. (Civilian Camouflage): 1941

March, Frank A. (Project Control Division): 1941

Marcus, Marcia: 1960

Marg -- Magazine: 1956 (6 letters)

Marx, Ione F.: 1942

Maryland Historical Society: 1950 (2 letters)

Matisse, Patricia (Pierre Matisse Gallery Corp.): [1960]

Mattis, Astria: 1960

Maverick Maury (Congressman, Texas): 1936 (3 letters)

Mayor, A. Hyatt (Metropolitan Museum): 1960

Mazo, Sara (widow of Yasuo Kuniyoshi): 1960

McAndrew, Betty and John: 1960

McCormick, M. R.: 1938

McCrady, John: 1943

McCray, Porter (Museum of Modern Art): 1960

McDonald, W. F. (American Council of Learned Societies): 1944-1949 (3 letters)

McKeague, Robert I. (Community Service Projects Section): 1937-1940 (8 letters)

McMahon, Audrey (WPA): 1936-1941 (7 letters)

McPharlin, Paul (Michigan WPA): 1937 (7 letters)

Metropolitan Museum of Art: 1953

Miller, Dorothy C. (Museum of Modern Art): 1936-1956 (27 letters)

Miller, Emma Guffey: 1938

Minnesota Historical Society: 1952

Morgan, Anne: 1938-1939 (5 letters)

Morley, Grace: 1960

Morris, Lawrence: 1937-1939 (2 letters)

Morris, Suzy (Mrs. George L. K. Morris): 1960

Morrison, Richard: 1936-1949 (6 letters)

Morsell, Miss: 1938

Motherwell, Robert: 1960

Museum of Modern Art: 1936-[1960] (4 letters)

Myers, Bernard: 1948

Myers, John (art dealer): 1960

Nakian, Reuben: 1960

Nash, Susan Higginson: 1934 (2 letters)

Nathan, Reuben S.: 1949 (3 letters)

National Gallery of Art: 1943-1993 (27 letters)

National Institute on Education and the War: 1943

Navy: Department of the Navy: 1941

Neuberger, Roy: 1960

Neumeyer, Alfred (Mills College): 1944

Nevelson, Louise: 1960

Newhall, Beaumont: 1941

New Hampshire: University of New Hampshire: 1939

Newman, Barnett: 1960

Newmeyer, S.: [1936]

New Republic: 1949 (letter from Lloyd Goodrich)

New York WPA Artists, Inc.: 1977 (including exhibition catalog "Then and Now")

New Yorker: 1948 and 1952

New York Herald Tribune: 1948-1952 (3 letters)

New York Public Library: 1949 (including copies of Index of American Design correspondence dated 1935-1936)

New York State Historical Association: 1949-1951 (4 letters)

[New York Times]: 1944

Neyland, Harry: 1935 (letter to Mrs. Rockefeller with 13 photographs of folk art)

Norman, Charles: 1960

Norman, Dorothy (Stieglitz protegee): 1960

Norman, Geoffrey (Works Projects Administration): 1941 (3 letters)

North Texas Agricultural College: 1939

Northrop, F. S. C.: 1947

Northwest Missouri State Teachers College: 1939

Norton, Ann: [1960]

Norwegian Folk Art Museum: 1949 (2 letters)

Odegaard, Charles E. (American Council of Learned Societies): 1949 (3 letters)

O'Hara, Frank (poet and art critic): 1960

Okada, Kimi and Keryo: 1960

Olmsted, Harold S.: 1954

Olsen, Catharine M.: 1941, undated (3 letters)

O'Neill, John P. (Historic American Buildings Survey, Department of the Interior): 1936 (5 letters)

Organ, Violet: 1949

Ormsbee, Thomas H. (editor, -- American Collector): -- 1936 (letter to Ruth Reeves)

Osborn, Elodie: 1960

O'Steen, Alton (Alabama Dept. of Education): 1943

Pach, Walter: 1939 (photograph of letter to Friends of the FAP)

Parker, Margaret: [1960]

Parker, Thomas C. (Federal Art Proj.): 1936-1940 (14 letters)

Parkinson, Eliza (Museum of Modern Art trustee): 1960

Parr, Russell C.: 1936

Parsons, Betty: 1960

Pedlar, Sylvia: 1960

Pedro, Luis Martinez: 1947

Peixotto, Ernest: 1936

P.E.N. Club, The: 1948

People's Art Center Association, St. Louis: 1952 (5 letters)

Pereira, Irene Rice and George Reavey: 1950-1953 (21 letters)

Perry, Beatrice (Gres Gallery): 1960

Philadelphia Museum of Art: 1950

Pickens, Alton: 1955

Pietan, Norman: 1948 and [1949]

Pilgrim Society: 1949 (2 letters)

Pollack, Peter: 1960

Pollak, Frances M. (WPA): 1936-1949 (7 letters)

Pollet, Elizabeth (widow of artist Joseph Pollet): [1960]

Pollock, Jackson: 1952 (photocopy)

Price, R. Moore: 1945

Public Use of Arts Committee: 1939

Purcell, Ralph: 1949 (4 letters)

Pyle, Edward Frederick: 1939

Ramsay, John: mentioned in memo dated Mar 31, 1936

Reeves, Ruth: 1936-1949 (55 letters including field reports)letters)

Reines, Harriet: 1938

Reinhart, Ad: 1952-1959 (3 letters)

Reynal and Hitchcock, Inc.: 1937

Richardson, E. P. (Detroit Institute of Arts; Archives of American Art): 1951-1960 (7 letters)

Riefstahl, Elizabeth: 1936

Ritchie, Andrew C.: 1944 (2 letters)

Rivers, Larry: 1960

Robinson, Boardman: 1936 and 1960

Rockefeller Center, Inc.: 1934 (contract for the First Municipal Art Exhibition)

Rockefeller Foundation: 1949

Rockefeller, David: 1960

Rockefeller, John D., Jr., and Abby A.: 1934-1940 (4 letters)

Rockefeller, John III, and Blanchette: 1951-1960 (3 letters)

Rockefeller, Nelson A.: 1934-1960 (6 letters)

Rockefeller, Peggy: 1960

Roesen, Severin: mentioned in letter dated Mar 02, 1938

Roosevelt, Franklin D.: 1936-1940 (3 letters)

Rosenbaum, Belle ( -- New York Herald Tribune): -- 1949-1960 (4 letters)

Rosenwald, Janet: 1937 and 1960

Rothko, Mark: 1960

Rourke, Constance: 1935-1938 (57 letters)

Rowan, Edward B. (Treasury Department, Section of Painting and Sculpture): 1936-1943 (5 letters)

Rubenstein, Erica B.: 1945 (3 letters)

Rubenstein, Sarah (Museum of Modern Art): 1960

Russell, Morgan: 1950-1951 (2 letters)

St. Petersburg Federal Galleries: 1939

Sandoz, Mari (writer): 1960

Sawitzky, William (painting researcher): 1935 (2 letters)

Sawyer, Wilda A.: 1942

Saxon, Lyle: 1943

Schaefer, Bertha: [1960]

Scharf, Bill: [1960]

Scheidt, Melvin E. (War Relocation Authority): 1943

Schmidt, Katherine: 1944 and 1960

Schnitzer, Robert C.: 1949

Schwabacher, Ethel: 1960 (2 letters)

Scott, Cecil: 1960 (2 letters)

Scott, Phyllis C.: 1936-1937 (2 letters)

Scull, Ethel and Bob (art collectors): [1960]

Seckar, Alvena V.: 1946

Seeger, Charles: 1936

Selz, Peter and Thalia: 1960

Shaw, Charles: 1960

Simms, Agnes (artist): 1960

Siporin, Mitchell: 1943-1960 (4 letters)

Sloan, Helen (Mrs. John Sloan): 1951 and 1960

Sloane, William: 1945

Smedley, Agnes: 1947 (letter from Ernestine Evans)

Smith College: 1944-1950 (6 letters)

Smith, Ferdinand: 1952

Smith, Geneva: 1942 (memo from Frank J. Follmer)

Smith, Gordon M. (Index of American Design): 1936-1937 (8 letters)

Smith, Holly and Sam: [1960]

Smith, Joseph Lindon: mentioned in letter dated Mar 28, 1950

Smith, Laura: 1938-1939 (5 letters)

Smith, Louise: 1960

Smith, Margery Hoffman (FAP, Oregon): 1938

Soby, James Thrall: 1948-1960 (5 letters)

Soderblom, Nathan: 1922 (in Swedish)

Solomon, Saul (Cahill's doctor): 1960

Soyer, Moses: 1944 (letter to the Editor)

Spark, Mrs. Victor: 1960

Speck, Walter: 1939 (2 letters)

Spencer, Betty (Niles Spencer's first wife): 1960

Spencer, Catherine (Mrs. Niles Spencer): 1952-1960 (8 letters)

Stamos, Theodoros: 1960

Standards: National Bureau of Standards: 1941

State: Department of State: 1939 (3 letters)

Stavenitz, Alexander: 1937

Steegmuller, Francis: 1960

Stella, Joseph: 1936 (2 letters)

Sterner, Albert: 1935

Stieglitz, Alfred: 1932 and 1934

Stier, W. (Project Review Section): 1941

Still, Clyfford: 1953-1956 (4 letters)

Stix, Hugh: 1960

Stock, Joseph (artist): mentioned in letters dated 1932 and 1933

Stout, Rex: 1944

Strickland, Sidney: 1949 (2 letters)

Studio Publications, Inc.: 1951

Sunami, Soichi: 1960

Swasey, Jeannette: [1935]

Sweeney, Jim: [1960]

Tabak, Maynatalie (colleague of Jackson Pollock): [1960]

Taub, Alex: 1942 (memo from Buckminster Fuller)

Taylor, Francis Henry: 1939 and 1952

Taylor, Miss: 1936

Thomas, Yvonne (artist): 1960

Thomley, John: 1949

Thoms, Mr.: 1936 (letter from Matthew Daly)

Thorgurson, Nina: [1960]

Tobey, Mark: 1954 and 1960

Tobey, Judith (Resettlement Administration): 1936

Townsend, Gertrude: [1937]

Townsend, Mr.: 1938

Tranum, Carl K.: 1949 (2 letters)

Triggs, Clayton E.: 1940 (4 letters)

Turner, Katherine: [1935]

Tworkov, Jack and Wally: 1960

Uht, Charles (photographer of Nelson Rockefeller's collection): 1960

United American Artists: 1940

Valentin, Curt: 1954

Valentine, Chapin: 1932

Valentiner, W. R. (Detroit Institute of Arts): 1933

Varian, Dorothy: 1960

Viviano, Catherine (art dealer): [1960]

Volkmer, Jean (Museum of Modern Art conservator): [1960]

von Wiegand, Charmion (artist): 1960

Walker, Hudson D.: 1960

Walley, Jano and John: 1949 and 1960

Ward: 1925 and 1960 (3 letters)

War Department: 1938-1941 (5 letters)

Warren, William (FAP, Connecticut): 1937

Wasey, Jane: 1960

Washburn College: 1939

Washburn, Gordon (Albright Art Gallery): 1960

Washington: The State College of Washington: 1939

Watrous, Harry W.: 1936

Watson, Forbes: 1949

Webb, Aileen (American Handicraft Council): 1938 (4 letters)

Weber, Max: 1922-1960 (6 letters)

Weisenborn, Fritzi (Mrs. Rudolph Weisenborn): 1950

Wendt, Gerald (Time, Inc.): 1944 (2 letters)

Weston, Edward: 1936

Wharton, Frances L.: 1935 (2 letters)

Wheeler, Monroe (Museum of Modern Art): 1960

White, Francis Robert: 1944

White, Jim: 1960

Whitelaw, Robert N. S.: 1960

Whitney Museum of American Art: 1949 and 1979

Whyte, James C.: 1942

Wilfred, Thomas: 1960

Williams, Aubrey (WPA): 1936

Williamsburg Restoration, Incorporated: 1935 (4 letters)

Winchester, Alice ( -- Antiques -- Magazine): 1950-1951 (6 letters)

Winser, Beatrice: 1924-1944 (6 letters)

Winter, Anna K. (antiques dealer): 1935

Wisconsin: State Historical Society of Wisconsin: 1939

Woodstock Artists Association: 1960

Woodward, Ellen S.: 1936-1938 (3 letters)

Worcester, Wakefield (architect): 1936

Wright, Russell (industrial designer): [1960]

Wyn: A. A. Wyn, Inc.: 1951

Youngerman, Jack: 1960

Zegri, Armando (Galeria Sudamericana): 1960

Zimmerman, Fred and Dorothy: [1960]

Zorach, William: 1936-1960 (3 letters)
Collection Restrictions:
The microfilm of this collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Holger Cahill papers, 1910-1993, bulk 1910-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.cahiholg, Series 2
See more items in:
Holger Cahill papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-cahiholg-ref23

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