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Oral history interview with Jean Paul Slusser, 1973 March 14-July 26

Interviewee:
Slusser, Jean Paul, 1886-1981  Search this
Slusser, Jean Paul, 1886-1981  Search this
Interviewer:
Barrie, Dennis, 1947-  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Painting  Search this
Museum directors -- Michigan -- Ann Arbor -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- Michigan -- Ann Arbor -- Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12333
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213100
AAA_collcode_slusse73
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213100

Oral history interview with James Thrall Soby, 1970 July 7

Interviewee:
Soby, James Thrall, 1906-1979  Search this
Soby, James Thrall, 1906-1979  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul, 1933-1997  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12688
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213104
AAA_collcode_soby70
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213104

Oral history interview with Alexis Smith, 2014 January 24-April 14

Interviewee:
Smith, Alexis, 1949-  Search this
Smith, Alexis, 1949-  Search this
Interviewer:
Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter  Search this
Subject:
Bell, Larry  Search this
Burden, Barbara  Search this
Burden, Chris  Search this
Celmins, Vija  Search this
Chicago, Judy  Search this
Coplans, John  Search this
Gehry, Frank O.  Search this
Grieger, Scott  Search this
Howard, Coy  Search this
Irwin, Robert  Search this
Krull, Craig  Search this
Moses, Avilda  Search this
Ruppersberg, Allen  Search this
Sedivy, Richard  Search this
Solomon, Jerry  Search this
Holly Solomon Gallery  Search this
Honor Fraser Gallery  Search this
Margo Leavin Gallery  Search this
Mizuno Gallery  Search this
Nicholas Wilder Gallery  Search this
University of California, Irvine  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
France -- description and travel
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Installations (Art)  Search this
Multimedia (Art)  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16169
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)366489
AAA_collcode_smith14
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_366489
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Dore Ashton, 2010 November 21 - 2011 March 9

Interviewee:
Ashton, Dore, 1928-2017  Search this
Ashton, Dore, 1928-2017  Search this
Interviewer:
Sampson, George E., 1951-  Search this
Subject:
De Kooning, Willem  Search this
Devree, Howard  Search this
Guston, Philip  Search this
Kline, Franz  Search this
Klüver, Billy  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Orlovsky, Peter  Search this
Paz, Octavio  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert  Search this
Reynal, Jeanne  Search this
Rothko, Mark  Search this
Selz, Peter Howard  Search this
Smith, David  Search this
Yunkers, Adja  Search this
Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
New York Times Company  Search this
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Women art critics  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15918
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)297206
AAA_collcode_ashton10
Theme:
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_297206
Online Media:

Dore Ashton papers, circa 1928-2014

Creator:
Ashton, Dore, 1928-2017  Search this
Ashton, Dore, 1928-2017  Search this
Subject:
Adley, James  Search this
Adams, Pat  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Albee, Edward  Search this
Hiss, Alger  Search this
Howes, Barbara  Search this
Guston, Philip  Search this
Hellman, Lillian  Search this
Lindner, Richard  Search this
Malamud, Bernard  Search this
Kaprow, Allan  Search this
Licht, Fred  Search this
Moy, Seong  Search this
Mumford, Lewis  Search this
Miró, Joan  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Vasilikos, Vasilēs  Search this
Yunkers, Adja  Search this
Reuterswärd, Carl Fredrik  Search this
Sterne, Hedda  Search this
Tinguely, Jean  Search this
Borges, Jacopo Luis  Search this
Congdon, Dennis  Search this
Herbert, George  Search this
Oldenburg, Claes  Search this
Giacometti, Alberto  Search this
Guidieri, Remo  Search this
Diebenkorn, Richard  Search this
Driskell, David C.  Search this
Berthot, Jake  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Arnheim, Rudolf  Search this
Avedon, Richard  Search this
Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art  Search this
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Yale University  Search this
Type:
Diaries
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Topic:
Women art critics  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Art, Modern  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Artists -- United States  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Art Theory and Historiography  Search this
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)5858
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)208698
AAA_collcode_ashtdore
Theme:
Women
Art Theory and Historiography
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_208698
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Dore Ashton

Interviewee:
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Sampson, George E., 1951-  Search this
Creator:
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Names:
Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art -- Faculty  Search this
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Harvard University -- Students  Search this
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
New York Times Company  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Devree, Howard, 1891-1966  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Kline, Franz, 1910-1962  Search this
Klüver, Billy, 1927-2004  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Orlovsky, Peter, 1933-2010  Search this
Paz, Octavio, 1914-  Search this
Rauschenberg, Robert, 1925-2008  Search this
Reynal, Jeanne, 1903-  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Selz, Peter Howard, 1919-2019  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Extent:
67 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2010 November 21 - 2011 March 9
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Dore Ashton conducted 2010 November 21 and 2011 March 9, by George W. Sampson, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts project, at Ashton's home, in New York, New York.
Ashton talks about growing up politically active; protesting the internment of the Japanese Americans during WWII; attending The New School and then Harvard University; briefly working as a gallery receptionist; writing her first reviews for Art Digest; Howard Devree hiring her as a writer for The New York Times; travels and living in Europe; writing feature pieces about individual artists for The New York Times; writing for Cahiers d'art; her relationships Franz Kline, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, Philip Guston, Robert Motherwell, Billy Kluver, Robert Rauschenberg, Octavio Paz, and others; marriage to Adja Yunkers; teaching at Cooper Union; interest in Latin American Art; flirting; being a "dedicated reader of Nietzsche"; visits to the Cedar Tavern; being a peacenik; and other topics. She recalls Jeanne Reynal, Mario Pedrosa, Alger Hiss, Peter Selz, Peter Orlovsky, David Smith, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Dore Ashton (1928-2017) was an art historian in New York, New York. George W. Sampson (1951-) is an arts administrator in Charlottesville, Virginia.
General:
Originally recorded on 2 memory cards. Duration is 2 hr., 57 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women art critics  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.ashton10
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ashton10

Dore Ashton papers

Creator:
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Names:
Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art -- Faculty  Search this
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.) -- Faculty  Search this
Yale University -- Faculty  Search this
Adams, Pat, 1928-  Search this
Adley, James, 1931-  Search this
Albee, Edward, 1928-  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Arnheim, Rudolf  Search this
Avedon, Richard  Search this
Berthot, Jake, 1939-  Search this
Borges, Jacopo Luis  Search this
Congdon, Dennis  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Diebenkorn, Richard, 1922-1993  Search this
Driskell, David C.  Search this
Giacometti, Alberto, 1901-1966  Search this
Guidieri, Remo  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Hellman, Lillian, 1905-1984  Search this
Herbert, George  Search this
Hiss, Alger  Search this
Howes, Barbara  Search this
Kaprow, Allan  Search this
Licht, Fred, 1928-  Search this
Lindner, Richard, 1901-  Search this
Malamud, Bernard  Search this
Miró, Joan, 1893-  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Moy, Seong  Search this
Mumford, Lewis, 1895-1990  Search this
Oldenburg, Claes, 1929-  Search this
Reuterswärd, Carl Fredrik, 1934-  Search this
Sterne, Hedda, 1910-  Search this
Tinguely, Jean, 1925-  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Vasilikos, Vasilēs, 1934-  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Extent:
35.6 Linear feet
35.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Date:
circa 1928-2014
1849
circa 1928-2014
1849
Summary:
The papers of Dore Ashton measure 35.6 linear feet and date from circa 1928-2014, with one letter in the Joseph Cornell subject file dating from 1849. The records document Dore Ashton's career as an art critic, historian and educator, with particular depth for the period of 1952 through 1990. The collection contains a small amount of biographical material, as well as correspondence, writings, subject files, printed materials, artwork, and reference photographs of artworks. An addition to the Dore Ashton papers includes biographical material, correspondence, writings, writing project and subject files, teaching files, printed material, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographic material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Dore Ashton measure 35.6 linear feet and date from circa 1928-2014, with one letter in the Joseph Cornell subject file dating from 1849. The records document Dore Ashton's career as an art critic, historian and educator, with particular depth for the period of 1952 through 1990. The collection contains a small amount of biographical material, as well as correspondence, writings, subject files, printed materials, artwork, and reference photographs of artworks. An addition to the Dore Ashton papers includes biographical material, correspondence, writings, writing project and subject files, teaching files, printed material, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographic material.

The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence with many artists, writers and others, including Pat Adams, James Adley, Rudolf Arnheim, Jake Berthot, Dennis Congdon, George Herbert, Remo Guidieri, Barbara Howes, Fred Licht, Joan Punyet Miro, Carl Fredrik Reuterswärd, and Hedda Sterne, among others. Smaller amounts of letters are from Joseph Albers, Edward Albee, Richard Avedon, Richard Diebenkorn, David Driskell, Alberto Giacometti, Philip Guston, Lillian Hellman, Alger Hiss, Bernard Malamud, Joan Miro, Robert Motherwell, Lewis Mumford, Claes Oldenburg, and Vassilis Vassilikos.

Writings consist of transcripts of miscellaneous articles or those written for various publications. Research files include reference or research materials for books, exhibitions, individuals and various topics. Individuals and topics include Jacopo Luis Borges, Allan Kaprow, Richard Lindner, Seong Moy, Jean Tinguely, Mark Tobey, Jack Tworkov, Adja Yunkers; and Dadaism, poetry and symbolism.

The addition to the Dore Ashton papers (Series 8) includes biographical material, correspondence, writings, writing project and subject files, teaching files, printed material, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographic material. Writings make up a significant part of the addition and contain hundreds of manuscripts, as well as lectures, notes, sixty notebooks, ten diaries, and writings by others. Writing project and subject files comprise over half of the addition and encompass a large collection of alphabetical files pertaining to artists, actors, writers, thinkers, and collaborators; work projects including writings, exhibitions, panels, symposia, and lecture series; as well as various other subjects and topics. The addition also contains teaching files related to Ashton's positions at the Cooper Union, the New School for Social Research, and Yale University. The photographic material in this series is also abundant and contains hundreds of original photographs of Ashton throughout all stages of her life, many with friends and family.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1962-1978

Series 2: Correspondence, 1945-2010, undated

Series 3: Writings, 1952-1976, undated

Series 4: Research files, 1849, 1950-1984, 2009, undated

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1931-1981, undated

Series 6: Artwork, 1949, 1952, 1983, undated

Series 7: Photographs of Artwork, circa 1950-2010

Series 8: Addition to the Dore Ashton Papers, circa 1928-2013
Biographical / Historical:
Dore Ashton (1928-) is an art critic, author, and educator living in New York City. She wrote, contributed , and edited more than 30 books. Ashton was born in Newark New Jersey in 1928 and received an MA from Harvard University in 1950. Her many books and articles focus on late 19th and 20th century art and artists. Ashton was associate editor at Art Digest from 1952-1954, and critic for Arts and Architecture at the New York Times, 1955-1960. Starting in 1962 she held several lecturing posts at various institutions including the School of Visual Arts, Cooper Union, and the New School for Social Research. She was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship in 1964 and a National Endowment for the Humanities grant in 1980. Among Ashton's books are Abstract Art Before Columbus, 1956; Poets and the Past, 1959; A Joseph Cornell Album, 1974; Yes, But…A Critical Study of Philip Guston, 1976, About Rothko, 1983; The New York School: a Cultural Reckoning, 1973; Noguchi East and West, 1992; and David Rankin: The New York Years, 2013. Dore Ashton was the first critic to develop a comprehensive and eye-witness account of the history of the Abstract Expressions.

Ashton married artist Adja Yunkers (1900-1983) in 1953, and they had two daughters Alexandra (known as Sasha) and Marina. In 1985 she married writer Matti Megged (1923-2003).
Related Materials:
Among the holdings of the Archives is an oral history interview with Dore Ashton conducted November 21, 2010 by George W. Sampson, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project.

Dore Ashton papers are also located at Emory University Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library.
Provenance:
The Dore Ashton papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Dore Ashton May 27, 1982, May 8, 1997, June 2, 2011, and March, 25, 2016.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women art critics  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Art, Modern  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Artists -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Citation:
Dore Ashton papers, 1849, circa 1928-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.ashtdore
See more items in:
Dore Ashton papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ashtdore
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Patricia Mainardi and Irene Peslikis, 1972

Interviewee:
Mainardi, Patricia Madelena, 1942-  Search this
Mainardi, Patricia Madelena, 1942-  Search this
Interviewer:
Holmes, Doloris  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12140
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214195
AAA_collcode_mainar72
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_214195

ArtTable, Inc. records, 1979-2013

Creator:
ArtTable, Inc.  Search this
ArtTable, Inc.  Search this
Subject:
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Weiss, Dorothy  Search this
Albers, Patricia  Search this
Tuchman, Phyllis  Search this
Artwire  Search this
Type:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women art dealers  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Communities, Organizations, Museums  Search this
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6451
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)215603
AAA_collcode_arttabl
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Communities, Organizations, Museums
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_215603

ArtTable, Inc. records

Creator:
ArtTable, Inc.  Search this
Names:
Artwire  Search this
Albers, Patricia  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Tuchman, Phyllis  Search this
Weiss, Dorothy, 1921-  Search this
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet
90.41 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1979-2013
Summary:
The records of non-profit organization ArtTable, Inc., measure 1.4 linear feet and 90.41 GB and date from 1979-2013. The collection includes administrative documents, correspondence, and printed material, as well as audiovisual and born-digital recordings and transcripts of interviews conducted by the organization as part of an oral history project on women in the art world.
Scope and Contents:
The records of non-profit organization ArtTable, Inc., measure 1.4 linear feet and 90.41 GB and date from 1979-2013. The collection includes administrative documents, correspondence, and printed material, as well as audiovisual and born-digital recordings and transcripts of interviews conducted by the organization as part of an oral history project on women in the art world.

Administrative records consist of board and committee meeting minutes; mailings to members that include newsletters, event schedules, and subscription slips; membership lists; ArtTable, Inc.'s biannual publication Artwire; and some miscellaneous clippings.

The interview portion of the collection consists of audiovisual material and transcripts, some in digital format, of interviews with gallery owners, art historians, art critics, and curators that were conducted for ArtTable's oral history project from 2000 to 2013. Interviewees include Patricia Albers, Lucy Lippard, Phyllis Tuchman, Dorothy Weiss and others.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as two series.

Series 1: Administrative Records, 1980-1994 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Oral History Interviews, 1979, 1999-2013 (0.9 linear feet; Boxes 1-2, 90.41 GB; ER01-ER28)
Biographical / Historical:
ArtTable, Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the business, financial, administrative, and scholastic leadership of women in the visual arts. Members include curators, museum administrators, art historians, and gallery owners. Founded in San Francisco, California in 1980, ArtTable, Inc. now has chapters throughout the United States.
Provenance:
The records were donated in multiple installments by ArtTable, Inc. from 1994-2014.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing born-digital and audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.

.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women art dealers  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Function:
Arts organizations
Nonprofit organizations
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
ArtTable, Inc. records, 1979-2013. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.arttabl
See more items in:
ArtTable, Inc. records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-arttabl

Margery Mann files on photography

Creator:
Mann, Margery  Search this
Names:
Group f.64  Search this
Bullock, Wynn  Search this
Graham, Martha  Search this
Ruscha, Edward  Search this
Photographer:
Connor, Linda, 1944-  Search this
Cunningham, Imogen, 1883-1976  Search this
Dater, Judy  Search this
Heinecken, Robert, 1931-  Search this
Noggle, Anne, 1922-  Search this
Rice, Leland, 1940-  Search this
Swedlund, Charles  Search this
Tress, Arthur  Search this
Uelsmann, Jerry, 1934-  Search this
Walker, Todd  Search this
Welpott, Jack, 1923-  Search this
Weston, Brett  Search this
Extent:
8.2 Linear feet ((on 14 microfilm reels))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1955-1978
Scope and Contents:
Over 600 subject files containing Mann's research on the history of photography; and an extensive interview conducted by Mann with Imogen Cunningham.
REELS 1860-1872: 630 files cover photographers, photo exhibitions, societies, publications, and collections and contain biographical information, correspondence, published and unpublished transcripts by Mann, exhibition catalogs and announcements, price lists, photographs, organization records, clippings and printed material along with Mann's interviews of Wynn Bullock, Imogen Cunningham (partial), and Edward Ruscha. Photographs are by Linda Connor, Imogen Cunningham (includes one of dancer Martha Graham), Judy Dater (of Cunningham), Robert Heinecken, Anne Noggle, Leland Rice, Charles Swedlund, Arthur Tress, Jerry Uelsmann, Todd Walker, Jack Welpott, and Brett Weston.
REEL 5051 (fr. 390-600): Interview (232 p. transcript from 3 sound reels, 3 in.) of Imogen Cunningham conducted by Mann, 1960-1973, in preparation for her book, Imogen Cunningham: Photographs. Cunningham speaks of the sale and exhibition of her prints; being a "darkroom slave"; portrait photography; photographs as documents; the "soft-focus era"; teaching; and the f/64 Group. Cunningham comments on 104 of her photographs, including her portraits of Edward Weston and Margrethe Mather, Martha Graham, Cary Grant, Alfred Stieglitz, Upton Sinclair, Adedee Ozenfant, Frieda Kahlo Rivera, Getrude Stein, Shen Yao, Lyonel Feininger, Morris Graves, Anna Freud, and Minor White. She recalls Diane Arbus, Arthur Fellig, Paul Strand, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Photographer, photography historian and critic; Davis, Calif.
Related Materials:
Files of Margery Mann, 1919-1977, are also located at the National Gallery of Australia.
Provenance:
The Cunningham interview was donated by Mann in 1975; the remainder by Mann's husband, Thomas K. Vasey, 1978.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Microfilmed materials must be consulted on microfilm. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Photographers -- United States  Search this
Art critics  Search this
Art historians  Search this
Photographers  Search this
Topic:
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Portrait photography  Search this
Photography -- History -- Sources  Search this
Women photographers -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mannmarg
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mannmarg

Oral history interview with Benito Huerta

Interviewee:
Huerta, Benito, 1952-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cordova, Cary  Search this
Creator:
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Names:
Galería de la Raza (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Lynn Goode Gallery  Search this
Recuerdos Orales: Interviews of the Latino Art Community in Texas  Search this
Beardsley, John  Search this
Caton, David  Search this
Chin, Mel, 1951-  Search this
Garza, Carmen Lomas  Search this
Hernandez, John, 1952-  Search this
Livingston, Jane  Search this
Pitman, Bonnie  Search this
Vargas, Kathy  Search this
Yanez, Rene  Search this
Zamudio-Taylor, Victor  Search this
Extent:
5 Sound discs (Sound recording, master (5 hrs., 52 min.), digitial, 2 5/8 in.)
84 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound discs
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2004 Feb. 29-Mar. 2
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Benito Huerta conducted 2004 Feb. 29-Mar. 2, by Cary Cordova, for the Archives of American Art, in Arlington, Tex.
Huerta speaks of his early childhood; interest in art; attending graduate school at New Mexico State University; the exhibition "Hispanic Art in the United States: Thirty Contemporary Painters and Sculptors," 1987; interest in music and planning programs while attending undergraduate school at the University of Houston; his relationship with artist Mel Chin; his exhibition at the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston; the Lynn Goode Gallery and an exhibition entitled "Aneurism"; criticism of his artwork; living in San Francisco for two years; Galería de la Raza; painting on black velvet; the exhibition "Chulas Fronteras (Beautiful Borders)" 1986; his chalupas series; the value of curating versus making his own art; "Seen and Unseen" at Diverse Works 1983; "Cowboys, Cadillacs, and Computers" Lawndale Art and Performance Center, University of Houston, 1985; his installation pieces; maps and global images in his work; his co-founding of the art Magazine "Artlies"; public commissions; connections to North Carolina; the Serie project; and the artists he has worked with since arriving at University of Texas, Arlington. Huerta also recalls David Caton, Jane Livingston, John Beardsley, René Yañez, Carmen Lomas Garza, John Hernandez, Kathy Vargas, Victor Zamudio Taylor, Bonnie Pitman, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Beniton Huerta (1952-) is an artist from Arlington, Tex. Interviewer Cary Cordova (1970-) is an art historian.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Latino and Latin American artists  Search this
Curators -- Texas -- Interviews  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Painting -- Technique  Search this
Function:
Art commissions
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.huerta04
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-huerta04

W. Royal Stokes Collection of Music Photoprints and Interviews

Interviewee:
Sun Ra  Search this
Gaskin, Leonard, 1920-  Search this
Taylor, Billy  Search this
Sullivan, Maxine, 1911-1987  Search this
Wells, Ronnie  Search this
Whiting, Margaret  Search this
Towers, Jack  Search this
Venuti, Joe, 1903-1978  Search this
Pullen, Don, 1941-  Search this
Roney, Wallace  Search this
Pizzarelli, Bucky, 1926-  Search this
Pizzarelli, John, 1960-  Search this
Shaw, Artie, 1910-2004  Search this
Shepp, Archie, 1937-  Search this
Sanders, Pharaoh  Search this
Grant, Felix, 1918-1993  Search this
Scott, Jimmy  Search this
McPhail, Jimmy  Search this
McPartland, Marian  Search this
McFerrin, Bobby  Search this
Krall, Diana  Search this
O'Connell, Helen  Search this
Mulligan, Gerry  Search this
Metheny, Pat  Search this
McShann, Jay  Search this
Horn, Shirley, 1934-  Search this
Hinton, Milt, 1910-  Search this
Hill, Andrew, 1937-  Search this
Hendricks, Jon, 1921-  Search this
Keane, Helen  Search this
Kaminsky, Max, 1908-  Search this
Jordan, Sheila, 1928-  Search this
Humes, Helen, 1913-1981  Search this
Hampton, Lionel  Search this
Harris, Eddie, 1934-  Search this
Heath, Jimmy, 1926-  Search this
Frishberg, Dave  Search this
Ennis, Ethel  Search this
Farmer, Art, 1928-  Search this
Flanagan, Tommy, 1930-  Search this
Hampton, Slide  Search this
D'Rivera, Paquito, 1948-  Search this
Daniels, Billy  Search this
Davison, Bill  Search this
Donegan, Dorothy, 1922-  Search this
Crouch, Stanley, 1945-  Search this
Conyers, John, 1929-  Search this
Cruz, Celia, 1920-  Search this
Byard, Jaki  Search this
Brown, Ruth  Search this
Carter, Betty, 1930-  Search this
Byron, Don  Search this
Betts, Keter, 1928-  Search this
Bellson, Louis  Search this
Bowie, Lester, 1941-  Search this
Blakey, Art, 1919-1990  Search this
Allen, Steve, 1921-2000  Search this
Adderly, Nat, 1931-  Search this
Bailey, Benny, 1925-  Search this
Collector:
Stokes, W. Royal, Dr., 1930-  Search this
Names:
Armstrong, Louis, 1901-1971  Search this
Davis, Miles  Search this
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Gillespie, Dizzy, 1917-  Search this
Extent:
10 Cubic feet (39 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Photographs
Publicity photographs
Date:
1940s-2005
Summary:
Publicity photographs of musicians and entertainers, mostly jazz musicians, such as Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, and Dizzy Gillespie, but including many rock and even a few classical performers. The collection also contains tape recorded radio interviews conducted between 1970 and 2003. In addition there are posters relating to musical performances.
Scope and Contents:
This collection was formed by W. Royal Stokes in the course of his professional work as a music and arts critic. It is composed primarily of publicity portraits of musical performers, both single acts and groups. The emphasis is on jazz musicians and singers, although many rock stars and groups, and other popular musical performers are included. Even a few classical musicians are represented. The pictures are primarily mass-produced black and white publicity photographs distributed to newspapers, writers, etc., by agents for entertainment personalities. Some prints were made from the original negatives, while others clearly were made from copy negatives after typography was stripped together with a print and re-photographed. However, there are some rarer original photographs included in the collection, such as personal color snapshots, higher quality prints by art photographers, etc. Nearly all the prints are unmounted, and are 8 x 10 inches or smaller in size. The bulk of the photographs date from circa 1970 to 2000, however, a number of the earlier photographs are included as well as slightly later examples.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into nine series.

Series 1, Photographs of Musicians and Ensembles, circa 1970-2000; undated

Subseries 1.1, Musicians and Ensembles

Subseries 1.2, Recording Company Photographs

Subseries 1.3, Unidentified Musicians

Series 2, Photographs of Performances, 1987-2002; undated

Subseries 2.1, Music Festivals, 1987-2002; undated

Subseries 2.2, Concerts, Music Clubs and Other Venues, 1920s-1940s and circa 1980s-1990s; undated

Series 3, Formal and Informal Groups, circa 1980s-2000; undated

Series 4, Photographs of Musicians in Films, Radio, Television and Theater, 1940s-2000; undated Series 5, Photographs of Subjects and Products related to Musicians and Music, 1970-2000; undated

Series 6, Photographs of Non-Musicians, circa 1980s-2000; undated

Series 7, Interviews with Musicians, 1970-2003

Series 8, Audiovisual Materials, 1970-2003

Subseries 8.1, Audio Recordings - Audiocassettes

Subseries 8.2, Audio Recordings-Audiotapes

Series 9, Posters, 1976-1990; undated
Biographical / Historical:
Born in Washington, D.C., W. Royal Stokes served in the Army and then embarked on an academic career, teaching at the University of Pittsburgh, Tufts University, Brock University and the University of Colorado. He left the academic profession in 1969 and become a writer, broadcaster and lecturer, journalist, and critic and authority on jazz music. A follower of jazz since his teens in the 1940s, Stokes has written about music for such publications as Down Beat, Jazz Times, and the Washington Post, and hosted the public radio shows "I Thought I Heard Buddy Bolden Say . . ." and "Since Minton's". Today he is the editor of the quarterly Jazz Notes, and is the author of The Jazz Scene: An Informal History From New Orleans to 1990 and Swing Era New York: The Jazz Photographs of Charles Peterson.. He is also the author of Living the Jazz Life: Conversations with Forty Musicians about Their Careers in Jazz (Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2000). Dr. Stokes lives in Silver Spring, Maryland.
Materials in the Archives Center, National Museum of Ameican History:
Duke Ellington Collection, 1928-1988 (AC0301)

Herman Leonard Photoprints, 1948-1993

Frank Driggs Collection of Duke Ellington Photographic Reference Prints [copyprints], 1923-1972

Jazz Oral History Collection, 1988-1990

Ernie Smith Jazz Film Collection, 1910s-1970s (mostly 1930s-1960s)

Jeffrey Kliman Photographs

Stephanie Myers Jazz Photographs, 1984-1987, 2005

Chico O'Farrill Papers

Paquito D'Rivera Papers, 1989-2000.

Louis Armstrong Music Manuscripts, undated

Tito Puente Papers, 1962-1965.

Audrey Wells "Women in Jazz Radio Series, 1981-1982

Mongo Santamaria Papers, 1965-2001

Ramsey Lewis Collection, 1950-2007

Earl Newman Collection of Monterey Jazz Festival Posters, 1963-2009

James Arkatov Collection of Jazz Photographs, 1995-2003

Francis Wolff Jazz Photoprints, 1953-1966

Floyd Levin Jazz Reference Collection, circa 1920s-2006

Jazz Oral History Program Collection, 1992-2009

Leslie Schinella Collection of Gene Krupa Materials
Provenance:
Donated by W. Royal Stokes to the Archives Center in 2001.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Jazz musicians -- 1950-2000 -- United States  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Publicity  Search this
Portraits -- Musicians  Search this
Popular music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Entertainers  Search this
Rock music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin -- 1950-2000
Publicity photographs
Citation:
W. Royal Stokes Collection of Jazz Musicians' Photographs, ca. 1970-2000, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0766
See more items in:
W. Royal Stokes Collection of Music Photoprints and Interviews
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0766
Online Media:

Charles Henry Caffin papers

Creator:
Caffin, Charles Henry, 1854-1918  Search this
Names:
Andreyev, Leonid, 1871-1919. Sorrows of Belgium  Search this
Corn, Wanda M.  Search this
Greet, Ben, Sir, 1857-1936  Search this
Kennedy, Charles Rann, 1871- Servant in the house  Search this
Layton, Donna Caffin  Search this
Steichen, Edward, 1879-1973  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Photographer:
Genthe, Arnold, 1869-1942  Search this
Johnston, Frances Benjamin, 1864-1952  Search this
Käsebier, Gertrude, 1852-1934  Search this
Extent:
1.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Date:
circa 1883-1973
bulk 1883-1918
Summary:
The scattered papers of art critic and writer Charles Henry Caffin measure 1.2 linear feet and date from circa 1883-1973, bulk circa 1883-1918. Found within the papers are an interview transcript, two letters, printed materials, one scrapbook, and family photographs dating from circa 1883 to circa 1911, many by noted photographers Arnold Genthe, Frances Benjamin Johnston, Gertrude Käsebier, Edward Steichen, and Alfred Stieglitz. The scrapbook contains Caffin's columns for the New York American, 1913-1915.
Scope and Content Note:
The scattered papers of art critic and writer Charles Henry Caffin measure 1.2 linear feet and date from circa 1883-1973. Found within the papers are an interview transcript, two letters, printed materials, one scrapbook, and family photographs dating from circa 1883 to circa 1911, many by noted photographers Arnold Genthe, Frances Benjamin Johnston, Gertrude Käsebier, Edward Steichen, and Alfred Stieglitz. The scrapbook contains Caffin's columns for the New York American, 1913-1915.

Biographical information includes an autograph book, and a transcript and written summary of a 1973 interview with Caffin's daughter, Donna Layton, conducted by Wanda Corn and Deborah Loft concerning Charles Henry Caffin. The two letters found within the papers are written to Caroline Caffin. Printed material consists of play announcements, a play written by Charles Rann Kennedy, and excerpts from a 1974 published book on photography mentioning Caffin.

Photographs are of the Caffin family, including Charles Henry, Caroline, Donna, Freda and Charles's mother Harlet. Also found are photographs of Ben Greet. Notable photographers include Arnold Genthe, Frances Benjamin Johnston, Gertrude Käsebier, Edward Steichen, and Alfred Stieglitz. There is one scrapbook containing Charles Henry Caffin's articles written for the New York American magazine from 1913-1915.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 5 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1915, 1973 (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1920 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 3: Printed Material, 1908, circa 1920, 1973 (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 4: Photographs, circa 1883-circa 1910s (Box 1, 3-4; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 5: Scrapbooks, 1913-1915 (Box 2; 0.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Charles Henry Caffin was born in 1854 in England. After graduating from Oxford University, Caffin served as stage manager for outdoor productions with Ben Greet and His Shakespearean Players. During this time, he met actress Caroline Scurfield, whom he later married and had two daughters, Freda and Donna. Caffin moved to United States in 1892 where he began to write about art, drama, and dance. He was an early supporter of the Photo-Secessionists and American modern art.

Initially, Caffin worked for several years executing murals from designs prepared by other artists for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago and the new Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. Shortly thereafter, however, he began writing for Alfred Stieglitz's Camera Notes and later Camera Work. He moved to the New York City area and worked as a critic for the New York Evening Post, New York Sun, and later for the New York American. Caffin wrote many books about art, drama, and dance, including Photography as Fine Art (1901), American Masters of Painting (1902), How to Study Pictures (1905), and Art for Life's Sake (1913).

Charles Caffin died in 1918.
Provenance:
Donna Caffin Layton, daughter of Charles Caffin, donated most of the papers in 1974. Stephen D. Rockstroh, Caffin's son-in-law, donated additional material in 1985.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Photographers  Search this
Theater -- History -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Charles Henry Caffin papers, circa 1883-1973, bulk circa 1883-1918. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.caffchar
See more items in:
Charles Henry Caffin papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-caffchar
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Lloyd Goodrich

Creator:
Goodrich, Lloyd, 1897-1987  Search this
Interviewer:
Phillips, Harlan B. (Harlan Buddington), 1920-  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.) -- Students  Search this
National Academy of Design (U.S.)  Search this
Public Works of Art Project  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Eakins, Thomas, 1844-1916  Search this
Field, Hamilton Easter  Search this
Force, Juliana, 1876-1948  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
Miller, Kenneth Hayes, 1876-1952  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Watson, Forbes, 1880-1960  Search this
Extent:
225 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Date:
1962 June 13-1963 March 25
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Lloyd Goodrich conducted 1962 June 13-1963 March 25, by Harlan Phillips, for the Archives of American Art. Goodrich speaks of his youth in Nutley, New Jersey; his family background; his father's influence; his friendship with Reginald Marsh; studying at the Art Students League under Kenneth Hayes Miller; attending the National Academy of Design; his interest in music and poetry; deciding upon a career in art; working as a writer, editor, and critic for "The Arts"; his travels for "The Arts"; critics he knew; his book on Thomas Eakins; his work with the Public Works of Art Project; political problems with government support of the arts in the 1930s through the 1950s; working as a curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art; the problem of forgeries; the Whitney's relationship with other museums; and politics at the Whitney. He recalls Juliana Force, Forbes Watson, Alfred Stieglitz and Hamilton Easter Field.
Biographical / Historical:
Lloyd Goodrich (1897-1987) was a museum director and art historian living in New York, New York.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. No audio exists. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art and state  Search this
Art -- Forgeries  Search this
Museum directors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Function:
Art museums -- New York (State) -- New York
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.goodri62
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-goodri62

Oral history interview with Harold Rosenberg, 1970 December 17-1973 January 28

Interviewee:
Rosenberg, Harold, 1906-1978  Search this
Rosenberg, Harold, 1906-1978  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul, 1933-1997  Search this
Subject:
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Baumbach, Harold  Search this
Gorky, Arshile  Search this
De Kooning, Willem  Search this
Pollock, Jackson  Search this
Blume, Peter  Search this
Krasner, Lee  Search this
Rothko, Mark  Search this
Inverarity, Robert Bruce  Search this
Matta  Search this
Miró, Joan  Search this
Breton, André  Search this
Léger, Fernand  Search this
Smith, David  Search this
Newman, Barnett  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Lundeberg, Helen  Search this
Prestopino, Gregorio  Search this
Davis, Stuart  Search this
United States. Work Projects Administration  Search this
Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Office of War Information. Washington, D.C.  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Art -- Philosophy  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Art and literature  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Surrealism  Search this
Avant-garde (Aesthetics) -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12896
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213056
AAA_collcode_rosenb70
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213056

Oral history interview with Alexis Smith

Creator:
Smith, Alexis, 1949-  Search this
Interviewer:
Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter  Search this
Names:
Holly Solomon Gallery  Search this
Honor Fraser Gallery  Search this
Margo Leavin Gallery  Search this
Mizuno Gallery  Search this
Nicholas Wilder Gallery  Search this
University of California, Irvine -- Students  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles -- Faculty  Search this
Bell, Larry, 1939-  Search this
Burden, Barbara  Search this
Burden, Chris, 1946-  Search this
Celmins, Vija, 1938-  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Coplans, John  Search this
Gehry, Frank O., 1929-  Search this
Grieger, Scott  Search this
Howard, Coy  Search this
Irwin, Robert, 1928-  Search this
Krull, Craig  Search this
Moses, Avilda  Search this
Ruppersberg, Allen, 1944-  Search this
Sedivy, Richard  Search this
Solomon, Jerry  Search this
Extent:
5 Items (Sound recording: 5 sound files (3 hr., 11 min.), digital, wav)
84 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
France -- description and travel
Date:
2014 January 24-April 14
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Alexis Smith conducted 2014 January 24 and April 14, by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, for the Archives of American Art at Smith's studio, in Venice, California.
Ms. Smith discusses growing up in Southern California and her early years living with her parents on the grounds of Metropolitan State Hospital, a mental institution in Norwalk, California; her mother's death when Ms. Smith was 11; the family's time in Whittier and Palm Springs and being raised as an only child by her father; her early interest in French studies and travel to France as a student; her interest in studying art beginning with a John Coplans class at UC Irvine; her time at at UC Irvine in the early days of the university and her growing attraction to the life of an artist; the origin of her name Alexis Smith; and the encouragement of her fellow artists to continue pursuing her cut-up collages from literature, photos, magazines, and Hollywood ephemera. Ms. Smith also describes her time with her artist women's group in the 70s; her husband Scott Grieger; working for Frank Gehry; her showing with the Nicholas Wilder Gallery; her relationship with Chris Burden and her time with him during his period of performance pieces in the 70s; the Riko Mizuno Gallery; her work with terrazzo and its use for installations at the LA Convention Center, Ohio State University, and other installations; the appropriation of text and the assistance of Jerry Solomon utilizing custom frames in her artwork; the impact of women from history, media and literature on her art; her relationship with Coy Howard; the Holly Solomon Gallery; her Jane series; her On the Road series; her installation Snake Path at UC San Diego; her piece for SITE Santa Fe Red Carpet; teaching at UCLA; her installation of the piece Scarlet Letter at Las Vegas Central Library and its subsequent removal; her associations with Margo Leavin Gallery and Honor Fraser gallery; and the loss of her long-time studio space and the challenges of storing her artwork. Ms. Smith also recalls Judy Chicago, Robert Irwin, Vija Celmins, Larry Bell, Barbara Burden, Richard Sedivy, Avilda Moses, Craig Krull, and Allen Ruppersberg among others.
Biographical / Historical:
Alexis Smith (1949- ) is a collage, multimedia, and installation artist in Los Angeles, California. Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is an art critic and writer from Beverly Hills, California.
General:
Originally recorded as 5 sound files. Duration is 3 hr., 11 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Collagists -- California  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Installations (Art)  Search this
Multimedia (Art)  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.smith14
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-smith14

Elizabeth McCausland papers

Topic:
Springfield Republican
Creator:
McCausland, Elizabeth, 1899-1965  Search this
Names:
American Art Research Council  Search this
Barnard College -- Faculty  Search this
Federal Art Project (U.S.)  Search this
United States. Farm Security Administration  Search this
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Dove, Arthur Garfield, 1880-1946  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Hawthorne, Charles Webster, 1872-1930  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Henry, Edward Lamson, 1841-1919  Search this
Hine, Lewis Wickes, 1874-1940  Search this
Inness, George, 1825-1894  Search this
Kleinholz, Frank, 1901-  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000  Search this
Maurer, Alfred Henry, 1868-1932  Search this
Morgan, Barbara Brooks, 1900-1992  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Weegee, 1899-1968  Search this
Weston, Edward, 1886-1958  Search this
Extent:
45 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Prints
Drawings
Photographs
Watercolors
Place:
New York N.Y. -- Pictorial works -- Photographs
Date:
1838-1995
bulk 1920-1960
Summary:
The papers of art critic, writer, and historian Elizabeth McCausland measure 45 linear feet and date from 1838 to 1995, with the bulk of the material dating from 1920 to 1960. The collection provides a vast accumulation of research data on various artists and aspects of American art, especially the early American modernists and the Federal Arts Projects. Papers include McCausland's extensive research and writing files, particularly on Marsden Hartley, E. L. Henry, Lewis Hine, George Inness, and Alfred H. Maurer. McCausland's correspondence with artists includes a substantial amount with Arthur Dove and Alfred Stieglitz. Her collaborative work with Berenice Abbott on the Changing New York book and series of photographs is well-documented within the collection. Also found are general writings, subject files, files relating to exhibitions, teaching, and committees, photographs, art work, personal papers, and printed material. Additional McCausland material donated later from the estate of Berenice Abbott include biographical materials, project files, writings, and printed materials.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of art critic, writer, and historian Elizabeth McCausland measure approximately 45 linear feet and date from 1838 to 1995, with the bulk of the material dating from 1920 to 1995. The collection provides a vast accumulation of data on various artists and aspects of American art, especially the early American modernists and the Federal Arts Projects. Papers include McCausland's extensive research and writing files, particularly on Marsden Hartley, E. L. Henry, Lewis Hine, George Inness, and Alfred H. Maurer. McCausland's correspondence with artists includes a substantial amount with Arthur Dove and Alfred Stieglitz. Her collaborative work with Berenice Abbott on the Changing New York book and series of photographs is well-documented within the collection. Also found are general writings, subject files, files relating to exhibitions, teaching, and committees, photographs, art work, personal papers, and printed material. Additional McCausland material from the estate of Berenice Abbott include biographical materials, project files, writings, and printed materials.

McCausland's personal papers consist of appointment books and engagement calendars, scrapbooks, student papers, works printed on her private press, financial records, biographical material, and scattered memorabilia, which together document other aspects of her life apart from her work. Correspondence includes incoming and outgoing letters along with enclosures, dating from McCausland's time as a journalist for The Springfield Republican in the 1920s and 1930s to her time as a freelance writer, art critic, and historian (1940s-1960s) and mostly concerning professional matters. Also included is a substantial amount of correspondence with artists, particularly Arthur Dove and Alfred Stieglitz, and some personal correspondence with her mother. General writings consists primarily of copies of McCausland's speeches and lectures on various art topics in addition to her early poems (dating from the 1930s) and scattered essays and articles.

The most extensive part of the collection is comprised of McCausland's research and writing files pertaining to large research and curatorial projects, such as ones on the artists Alfred H. Maurer and Marsden Hartley (which was begun by the American Art Research Council and subsequently taken over by McCausland), and one for the American Processional exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery in 1950. A wide variety of smaller projects are also well-documented in the series Other Research and Writing Files, including ones on E. L. Henry, Lewis Hine, George Inness, her collaborative work with Berenice Abbott on the Changing New York book and series of photographs. Numerous other artists and art topics are covered as well, such as Arthur Dove, Robert Henri, Jacob Lawrence, Charles Hawthorne, film, and photography. Files for her book Careers in Art (1950), her many speaking and lecture engagements, and editing work are also found in this series. Files consist primarily of correspondence, notes, research material, manuscripts, bibliographies, photographs of works of art, completed research forms for works of art, card index files, and printed material.

Also found are subject files containing printed material, scattered notes and correspondence, and photographs, which may have been used for reference and/or collected in the course of McCausland's research activities; files relating to various exhibitions organized by McCausland from 1939 to 1944, including ones of silk screen prints and modern photography; files relating to courses on art history taught by McCausland, especially the one she taught at Barnard College in 1956; and files stemming from her participation in various art organizations and committees, especially during the time period just before and during the Second World War.

Printed material consists primarily of clippings and tear sheets of McCausland's newspaper articles and columns, which document her contributions to The Springfield Republican from 1923 to 1946, in addition to scattered exhibition catalogs, announcements, books, and miscellaneous publications. Photographs include ones of various artists and works of art, ones from the Farm Security Administration, and ones by photographers, such as Berenice Abbott (including ones from the Federal Art Project book, Changing New York), Barbara Morgan, Weegee, and Edward Weston, among others. Photographs, sometimes annotated or including notes, are scattered throughout her research files. Also included are photographs of McCausland, dating from her childhood. Art work found in the collection includes drawings, prints, and watercolors that were either given to McCausland by the artist or collected by her in the course of her work as an art critic and historian.

Additional material belonging to Elizabeth McCausland and donated by the estate of Berenice Abbott includes biographical material; business and personal correspondence; professional project files and writings, including drafts and research materials related to the book projects Art in America, Conversations with March, and Frank Kleinholz; and printed materials, including reprints of critical essays and articles by McCausland.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 15 series:

Series 1: Personal Papers, 1838, 1920-1951 (Boxes 1-2, 34; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1923-1960 (Boxes 2-5; 2.9 linear feet)

Series 3: General Writings, circa 1930-1954 (Boxes 5-6; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 4: Alfred H. Maurer, 1851-1951, bulk 1948-1950 (Boxes 6-9; 3.7 linear feet)

Series 5: American Processional, 1949-1951 (Boxes 10-11; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 6: Marsden Hartley, 1900-1964, bulk 1944-1964 (Boxes 11-21, OV 37; 10 linear feet)

Series 7: Other Research and Writing Files, 1896, 1926-1958 (Boxes 21-25, 31; 4.6 linear feet)

Series 8: Subject Files, 1927-1954 (Boxes 25-26; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 9: Other Exhibition Files, 1939-1941, 1944 (Box 26; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 10: Teaching Files, 1939-1965 (Box 27; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 11: Committee Files, 1936-1960 (Box 27; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 12: Printed Material, 1923-1953 (Boxes 28-32, 34, OV 38, BV 44-47; 4.6 linear feet)

Series 13: Photographs, circa 1905-1950 (Boxes 32-36, OV 37; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 14: Art Work, 1887-1942 (Boxes 33-34, OV 39-43; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 15: Elizabeth McCausland Material from the Estate of Berenice Abbott, 1920-1995 (Boxes 48-53; 5.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Elizabeth McCausland, the art critic and writer, was born in Wichita, Kansas in 1899. She attended Smith College, receiving her Bachelor's degree in 1920 and her Master's in 1922. Beginning in 1923, she worked as a general reporter for The Springfield Republican (Springfield, Massachusetts). After several years, she began to review art exhibitions and soon became an established art critic. In the course of her work, she began to develop friendships with artists, such as Alfred Stieglitz and Arthur Dove. During these early years, she also wrote poetry and designed and printed limited edition publications on her private press.

McCausland moved to New York in 1935, but continued to contribute a weekly art column to The Springfield Republican until it suspended publication in 1946. From the mid-1930s on, she worked primarily as a freelance writer and art critic, contributing articles to publications such as Parnassas, The New Republic, and Magazine of Art. In the latter part of her career, her writings focused more on art history and special studies on artists.

In the late-1930s, McCausland collaborated with the photographer Berenice Abbott on the Federal Art Project book, Changing New York, for which she provided the text to Abbott's now-famous photographs of New York City neighborhoods, architecture, and street scenes. She studied and wrote about photography, including numerous articles on the photographer Lewis Hine (of whose work she organized a retrospective exhibition at the Riverside Museum in 1939), and was appointed to the Advisory Committee of the Museum of Modern Art's Department of Photography in 1944.

McCausland went on to organize other exhibitions, including a show of contemporary work, "The World of Today" (Berkshire Museum, 1939), shows of silk screen prints (Springfield Museum of Fine Arts, March 1940 and New York State Museum, Summer 1940), and a photography show, "Photography Today" (A.C.A. Gallery, 1944). In the late 1930s, she embarked upon a study of "the status of the artist in America from colonial times to the present, with especial attention to the relation between art and patronage," which continued over twenty years (and was never completed) and for which she received a Guggenheim fellowship in 1943.

In addition to her other writing, during the 1940s, McCausland carried out studies on the artists, E. L. Henry and George Inness, which resulted in exhibitions at the New York State Museum in 1942 and the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum in 1946, respectively and publications (a report on Henry and a book on Inness). From 1948 to 1949, she carried out an extensive study of the painter, Alfred H. Maurer, organizing an exhibition, "A. H. Maurer: 1868-1932," which showed at the Walker Art Center and the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1949, and publishing the biography, A. H. Maurer, in 1951. In 1950, she worked as a special consultant on the American Processional exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery and as editor of the accompanying book. Shortly thereafter, she began a study of Marsden Hartley for a monograph, which was published in 1952, and she helped organize the Hartley exhibition at the University of Minnesota that same year. She continued the Hartley study on larger scale for a planned biography and catalogue raisonne; although she continued to work on it off and on for the next decade, the project was never completed.

McCausland published other books, including Careers in the Arts (1951), and undertook other research and consulting projects, such as photo-editing Carl Sandburg's Poems of the Midwest (1946), conducting surveys of art and advertising for an article in Magazine of Art and of art education for Cooper Union Art School, and contributing yearly articles on art to various encyclopedias. At different times throughout her career, she supplemented her income by taking teaching positions. She taught courses on art history at Sarah Lawrence College from 1942 to 1944 and at Barnard College in 1956, as well as courses at the Design Laboratory (1939) and the New School for Social Research (1946). She also gave numerous lectures and speeches on various art topics, and regularly participated in conferences and symposiums. Towards the end of her career, she was publishing less, but was still involved in many projects, most notably the Hartley study.

McCausland was a tireless promoter of the arts, and often an advocate for artists. Even though her work was well-known among certain art circles, she never received the recognition as a writer that she deserved. Nor was she ever able to free herself from the pressure of writing for a living. Continually suffering from poor health, she died on May 14, 1965.
Related Material:
Related material found in the Archives includes a sound recording from a symposium on Marsden Hartley, of which McCausland was a participant, held at the Portland Museum of Art in 1961. The Frank Kleinholz papers contain a recorded interview of McCausland done in 1944-1945 for radio station WNYC. Some of McCausland's correspondence is found in the G. Alan Chidsey papers; Chidsey served as a trustee of the Marsden Hartley estate.
Separated Material:
Material separated from the collection includes some issues of Camera Work (Vol. 30, 47, 49/50), which were combined with other issues in an artificial collection created by the Archives at some earlier point.
Provenance:
Elizabeth McCausland donated the bulk of her papers in several installments from 1956 to 1961. An unknown donor, perhaps her literary executor, donated additional papers sometime after her death in 1965. It appears that McCausland originally donated her research files on Marsden Hartley, measuring 10 linear feet, to the Whitney Museum, who then lent them to the Archives for microfilming in 1966, and donated them sometime thereafter. McCausland originally donated files of newspaper clippings and offprints of her articles to the The New York Public Library, who gave them to the Archives in 1968. Additional McCausland material from the estate of Berenice Abbott was donated to the Archives in 2009.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Art criticism -- United States  Search this
Documentary photography -- United States  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Exhibitions -- United States  Search this
Art -- History -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Function:
Arts organizations
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Prints
Drawings
Photographs
Watercolors
Citation:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mccaeliz
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mccaeliz
Online Media:

Philip Leslie Hale papers

Creator:
Hale, Philip Leslie, 1865-1931  Search this
Names:
Panama-Pacific International Exposition (1915: San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
Butler, Theodore Earl, 1861-1936  Search this
Cox, Kenyon, 1856-1919  Search this
Hale, Nancy, 1908-  Search this
Hart, William H., b. 1863  Search this
Kennedy, Albert J. (Albert Joseph), 1879-1968  Search this
Tarbell, Edmund Charles, 1862-1938  Search this
Extent:
7.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Interviews
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Date:
1818-1962
bulk 1877-1939
Summary:
The papers of Boston painter, teacher, critic, and writer Philip Leslie Hale measure 7.4 linear feet and date from 1818 to 1962, with the bulk of the material dating from 1877 to 1939. Biographical information; correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues, including many artists; sketches and 9 sketchbooks; writings; printed material; and photographs document the artist's career and personal life. The collection also includes research materials and catalogs compiled by Albert J. Kennedy for a never-published Philip Leslie Hale memorial volume.
Scope and Contents note:
The papers of Boston painter, teacher, critic, and writer Philip Leslie Hale measure 7.4 linear feet and date from 1818 to 1962, with the bulk of the material dating from 1877 to 1939. Biographical information; correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues, including many artists; sketches and 9 sketchbooks; writings; printed material; and photographs document the artist's career and personal life. The collection also includes research materials and catalogs compiled by Albert J. Kennedy for a never-published Philip Leslie Hale memorial volume.

Biographical materials include financial and legal records; personal documents, such as educational records and biographical notes; printed material; and notes concerning art classes and teaching. Also included are scattered letters, invitations, schoolwork, and notebooks from his youth. Ten notebooks contain sketches, along with some class notes and essays.

Family, general, and business correspondence document the personal and professional life of Philip Leslie Hale and, to a lesser extent, several of his relatives. Family correspondence includes Hale's exchanges with various relatives, and some of their correspondence with others. General correspondence with friends, colleagues, and other artists is both personal and professional in nature. Correspondents include Theodore Butler, Kenyon Cox, Nancy Hale, William H. Hart, and Edmund C. Tarbell. Business correspondence concerns many aspects of Hale's career. Correspondents include students, arts institutions, models, and publishers.

Writings by Philip L. Hale consist of lectures on anatomy, art history, and various art topics; miscellaneous articles; notes on artists, esthetics and philosophy either for classroom use or his writings; character sketches, a play, poems, and political writings.

Artwork consists of 9 sketchbooks and loose sketches in pencil and ink of heads, figures, anatomical studies, landscapes, and miscellaneous subjects. A much smaller number of pastels, prints, and oil sketches are included. This series also includes a few items by other artists.

Research files and catalogs, compiled from 1932 to 1939 by Hale's friend Albert J. Kennedy for a never-published memorial volume, include extensive correspondence and notes of interviews with friends, relatives, colleagues, former students, and models recording their reminiscences of Hale. Kennedy collected exhibition catalogs and a variety of other printed material, along with biographical and genealogical information, and photographs of Hale's work. Many of his research notes consist of handwritten transcriptions of published articles by and about Hale.

Printed material about Philip L. Hale includes articles, reviews, and miscellaneous newspaper clippings mentioning him or containing reproductions of his work. Printed items by Hale consist of art reviews, miscellaneous articles on art topics, copies of his columns that appeared in Arcadia: A Journal Devoted to Music, Art and Literature, and the text of a speech.

The majority of photographs record works of art, mainly by Philip L. Hale, and also by Lilian Westcott Hale, Robert Payne, and Edmund C. Tarbell. Personal photographs include images of Hale, his relatives, and friends. There are also several group portraits of the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exhibition Jury, a group portrait with students, views of Hale at work in his studio and in the classroom, pictures of a summer house, and landscapes.
Arrangement note:
The collecion is arranged as 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1875-1939 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1818-1944 (2 linear feet; Boxes 1-3)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1910-1930 (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 3-4)

Series 4: Artwork, circa 1870-1930 (0.4 linear feet; Box 4)

Series 5: Memorial Book, circa 1862-1962 (2.8 linear feet; Boxes 4-8, OV 9)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1883-1951 (8 folders; Box 7)

Series 7: Photographic Material, 1868-1931 (12 folders; Box 7)
Biographical/Historical note:
Philip Leslie Hale (1865-1931) was the son of prominent Unitarian minister and well-known author, Edward Everett Hale. Members of this distinguished old Boston family included such ancestors as Revolutionary War hero Nathan Hale, influential preacher Lyman Beecher, educator Catherine Beecher, and Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom's Cabin. From a young age Philip's talent and interest in drawing was encouraged by his parents, especially his mother. An older artist sister, Ellen Day Hale (1855-1940) and an aunt, Susan Hale (1834-1910), a trained painter, provided Philip with his first art lessons.

Family tradition and expectations decreed that after completing studies at the Boston Latin School and Roxbury Latin School, Hale would attend Harvard. After passing Harvard's entrance examination, as required by his father, Philip was free to pursue art. He enrolled in the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the fall of 1883, where he was an early pupil of Edmund C. Tarbell. The following year he continued his studies in New York at the Art Students League under J. Alden Weir and Kenyon Cox.

In early 1887, Hale went to Paris, adopted a bohemian lifestyle, and studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and the Académie Julian. He became friends with fellow students Theodore Butler and William Howard ("Peggy") Hart. In the summer of 1888, the three made their first trip to Giverny, where they were among the first Americans to experiment with Impressionism. They met other American artists, including Theodore Robinson, John Leslie Breck, and Theodore Wendel, who also had been drawn to Giverny by the presence of Claude Monet. Hale returned to Boston in the summer of 1890, but was soon drawn back to Paris to be with his sweetheart Katharine Kinsella. He spent the summers of 1891-1893 continuing his experiment with Impressionism in Giverny, and during that period traveled to London, Paris, and Spain, periodically returning home and to the family's Rhode Island summer place.

In 1893 Hale began teaching cast drawing at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where he remained on the faculty until his death in 1931. Eventually he became the chief instructor of drawing, and also offered courses in life drawing, artistic anatomy, and art history. Hale also taught at the Worcester Art Museum (1898-1910), the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (1913-1928), and Boston University (1926-1928).

Hale's first solo exhibition, held in 1899 at Durand-Ruel Galleries in New York City, consisted of Impressionist paintings and pastels that received mixed reviews. In subsequent years his work became increasingly academic and focused on figure paintings and portraits. He exhibited frequently in national and international shows, won numerous medals and prizes, and was elected an Associate National Academician of the National Academy of Design in 1917.

In 1902, Hale married former student, Lilian Westcott, a painter and portraitist whose success during some periods eclipsed that of her husband.

Philip Leslie Hale, like many of his relatives, was a noted writer and speaker. His column "Art in Paris" appeared regularly in the Canadian-based periodical Arcadia: A Journal Devoted to Music, Art and Literature between 1892 and 1893 and discussed Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, and Symbolism. Hale regularly contributed art columns, reviews, and miscellaneous articles to the Boston Daily Advertiser, Boston Commonwealth, Boston Herald, and Boston Evening Transcript during the first decade of the twentieth century.

Hale's teaching stressed the importance of learning Old Master's techniques. He had a life-long interest in Vermeer, and as a writer and critic he generated quite a bit of enthusiasm for that artist among the figurative painters of the Boston School, his own students, and others. Jan Vermeer of Delft, a highly regarded monograph by Philip Leslie Hale - the first on the subject published in the United States - appeared in 1913. He wrote several other books on art subjects, and his services as a lecturer on art topics were sought after by a variety of organizations both locally and nationally.

Philip Leslie Hale died following emergency surgery in Dedham, Massachusetts, on February 2, 1931.
Related Archival Materials note:
The Archives of American Art also holds a separately cataloged collection of Philip Leslie Hale drawings on microfilm reel 3766 and two collections related to the Hale family, including the Ellen Hale and Hale family papers and the Edward Everett Hale letter to an unidentified person.
Provenance:
The Philip Leslie Hale papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in 1962 by the artist's daughter, Nancy Hale Bowers. Additionally, notes written by Mrs. Nathan Hale were donated by Lilian Westcott Hale in 1963.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Art critics -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Art -- History  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Authors -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Function:
Artists' studios -- Massachusetts
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Interviews
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Citation:
Philip Leslie Hale papers, 1818-1962, bulk 1877-1939. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.halephil
See more items in:
Philip Leslie Hale papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-halephil
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Douglas Crimp

Interviewee:
Crimp, Douglas  Search this
Interviewer:
Fialho, Alex, 1989-  Search this
Names:
ACT UP (Organization)  Search this
Century 21 Exposition (1962 : Seattle, Wash.)  Search this
Gay Activists Alliance  Search this
Rutgers University -- Faculty  Search this
Tulane University -- Students  Search this
University of Rochester -- Faculty  Search this
Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project  Search this
Baker, Elizabeth C., 1934-  Search this
Belaygue, Christian  Search this
Bordowitz, Gregg  Search this
Cooke, Lynne  Search this
Copjec, Joan  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel, 1887-1968  Search this
Elovich, Richard  Search this
Jonas, Joan, 1936-  Search this
Kohlmeyer, Ida, 1912-1997  Search this
Krauss, Rosalind E.  Search this
Lemann, Bernard, 1905-  Search this
Leonard, Zoe  Search this
Michelson, Annette  Search this
Olander, William  Search this
Owens, Craig  Search this
Robinson, Marilynne  Search this
Santos, René, 1954-1986  Search this
Torm, Fernando  Search this
Waldman, Diane  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-1987  Search this
Wodiczko, Krzysztof  Search this
Wolfe, Daniel, 1960-  Search this
Extent:
5 Items (Sound recording: 5 sound files (6 hr., 2 min.), digital, wav)
69 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
Germany -- description and travel
New York (N.Y.) -- Description and Travel
Date:
2017 January 3-4
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Douglas Crimp, conducted 2017 January 3-4, by Alex Fialho, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Crimp's home in New York, New York.
Crimp speaks of growing up in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho; his athleticism in water skiing and ice skating; sibling rivalry as a child; seeing art for the first time at the Seattle World Fair; being closeted and conflicted as a young gay man in 1950s Idaho; attending Tulane University in New Orleans and the culture shock he experienced there; his first year in Tulane's rigorous architecture program and ultimately changing his major to art history; the pageantry of Mardi Gras parades and the gay society he explored; writing an undergraduate paper analyzing Marcel Duchamp's "The Large Glass"; deciding to go to New York City; finding his voice as an art critic while beginning his career at Art News and Art International; his extensive analysis of Joan Jonas; attending Firehouse dances sponsored by Gay Activist Alliance and coming into his sexuality; being a patient of esteemed doctor Dr. Dan William; first learning of the AIDS crisis and epidemic through a New York Times article in 1981 describing a gay cancer; receiving an NEA art critic grant and spending a year in Germany from 1985-86; returning to find friends and acquaintances sick with HIV/AIDS or having died from it; the Dia Conversations; his role as editor of October and bringing queerness and AIDS to the forefront; joining ACT UP; the genesis of October's AIDS double issue in 1987-1988 and its success; how the journal issue changed the course of his career and steered him to teach gay studies and further his work with AIDS activism; the inner workings of ACT UP meetings; the sense of community ACT UP provided and the empowerment everyone felt; noting a sense of personal and professional urgency during the crisis; the timeline of his AIDS writings; his reaction to seeing the AIDS quilt for the first time at the March on Washington; writing to a wide, non-academic audience; his 1988 course at Rutgers University on AIDS video; his complex relationships with Rosalind Krauss and Annette Michelson; the poor coverage of the AIDS epidemic in the media and how it informed his writing; the understanding of the need for safe sex practices and writing "How to Have Promiscuity in an Epidemic;" teaching courses on AIDS at the University of Rochester and how his teaching interest evolved into queer theory and studies; evaluating Warhol's work with a queer lens; writing about his experience with queer life in New York City in the 1970s to counter the condescending conservative narrative; his current writing projects and interests; experience in demonstrations held by ACT UP; and the tremendous communal support he felt during his seroconversion. Crimp also recalls Marilynne Summers (Robinson), Bernard Lemann, Marimar Benetiz, Ida Kohlmeyer, Lynn Emory, Diane Waldman, Betsy Baker, Lucinda Hawkins, Christian Belaygue, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Rosalind Krauss, Joan Copjec, Gregg Bordowitz, Terri Cafaro, Rene Santos, Craig Owens, Fernando Torm, Bill Olander, Richard Elovich, Daniel Wolfe, Hector Caicedo, Lynne Cooke, and Zoe Leonard.
Biographical / Historical:
Douglas Crimp (1944- 2019) was a professor and art critic in New York, New York. Alex Fialho (1989- ) is a curator and arts writer who is the Programs Director for Visual AIDS in New York, New York.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
AIDS activists  Search this
AIDS (Disease) and the arts  Search this
Art -- History -- Study and teaching  Search this
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Mardi Gras  Search this
NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt  Search this
Queer theory  Search this
Activists (LGBTQ)  Search this
Queer studies  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.crimp17
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-crimp17

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