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Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Nevelson, Louise, 1899-1988  Search this
Extent:
(Boxes 1-2, 31-35, Sol 42; 6 linear feet)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1931-1984
Scope and Contents note:
Series consists primarily of Nevelson's professional correspondence, as well as some personal and family correspondence. Files are typically made up of letters, invitations, greeting cards, and telegrams received by Nevelson, copies of letters sent on her behalf (by lawyers and assistants) or shared with her by others, and photographs, press releases, clippings, and other printed material enclosed with correspondence. Correspondents include artists, dealers, museums, universities, art critics, collectors, arts-related and social organizations, admirers, along with some friends, colleagues, and family members in addition to her son. (See appendix for a select list of notable correspondents.)

General correspondence details the exhibition of Nevelson's work in various group and one-man shows; the consignment, sale, and disposition of her work, especially her dealings with the Martha Jackson Gallery and Daniel Cordier (in Europe); her donations of art work to museums and universities, and for auction by charitable organizations; and the various honors and awards received by her later in her career (including the Creative Arts Medal in Sculpture from Brandeis University and honorary degrees from the Philadelphia College of Art and Bowdoin College, among others). General correspondence also concerns Nevelson's various art-related activities, including her participation on various panels, and in workshops, conferences, and lecture series on art; her involvement in professional organizations, such as the Sculptor's Guild; and her service on various award juries and arts committees (such as the Arts and Entertainment Committee for the Rockefeller Team).

Correspondence is arranged chronologically. Correspondence in this series from the 1966-1979 acquisition has been scanned in its entirety, except for Louise Nevelson's correspondence with her son, Mike. The bulk of correspondence donated by the Farnsworth Art Museum includes an item-level inventory, and is mostly separated by personal and business subject matter.

See Appendix for a list of selected correspondents from Series 2.
Appendix: Selected Correspondents from Series 2:
List represents only a selection of correspondents and does not include names of family.

Albright-Knox Art Gallery: 1971

American Federation of Arts: 1961, 1964

American Women in Radio and Television: 1959

Art in America -- : 1963, 1965

Art Institute of Chicago: 1962

The Artists' Gallery: 1955

Bloch, Ernest: 1933

Bourgeois, Louise: undated

Bowdoin College: 1971

Brandeis University: 1971

Brooklyn Museum: 1956

Brooklyn Society of Artists: 1957

Buffalo Fine Arts Academy: 1962

Calder, Sandy: 1955

Chatham College: 1971

City of Scottsdale, Arizona: 1973

Cleveland Museum of Art: 1977

Colby College: 1957, 1973

Contemporary Arts Association of Houston: 1953

Cordier, Daniel: 1961

Dallas Museum of Fine Arts: 1974

Dehner, Dorothy: 1960

Detroit Institute of the Arts: 1966

Dord Fitz School and Gallery: 1960

Feininger, Lyonel: 1955

Galerie Jeanne-Bucher: 1961

Genauer, Emily: 1955

Grand Central Art Galleries: 1959

Guggenheim, Peggy: 1946

Hamline University: 1970, 1971

Harry Salpeter Gallery: 1961

Hirschhorn, Joseph: 1968

Hobart and William Smith Colleges: 1971

Indiana, Robert: 1966

Jackson, Martha (See Martha Jackson Gallery)

Jacobi, Lotte: 1960, 1963, 1965

Kendall, Tom: 1959, 1961, undated

Knox, Seymour: 1968

Kramer, Hilton: 1957

Lipman, Howard: 1962

Lipton, Seymour: 1955

Mademoiselle -- : 1961, 1962

Martha Jackson Gallery: 1956, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1967, 1968, undated

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Center for Advanced Visual Studies: 1971

Miller, Kenneth Hayes: 1931, 1933

Milone, Joe: 1941

Minneapolios College of Art and Design: 1971

Mount Holyoke College: 1962, 1964

Museum of Art, Carnegie Institution: 1967, 1971, 1974

Museum of Fine Arts of Houston: 1954

Museum of Modern Art: 1943, 1953, 1955, 1964, 1967, 1968

National Association of Women Artists: 1953, 1954

National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities: 1966

Neumann, Hans: 1962

Neumann, J. B.: 1954

New School for Social Research: 1961

The New York Times -- : 1968

New York State Council on the Arts: 1968

The New Yorker -- : 1967

Newsweek -- : 1967

Nierenforf, Karl: 1941, 1943, 1946

Nordjyllands Kunstmuseum: 1973

Ono, Yoko: 1971

Pace Gallery: 1976

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts: 1952, 1970

Philadelphia College of Art: 1961, 1968

Philadelphia Museum of Art: 1965

Princeton University: 1962

Queens College: 1958

Rhode Island School of Design: 1971

Riverside Museum: 1964

Rockefeller, Nelson: 1960, 1962, 1966, 1968

Roberts, Collette: 1952, 1953

Robus, Hugo: 1958

Rosenblum, Robert: 1958

Sewall, Mrs. Sumner: 1943

Silvermine Guild of Artists: 1953, 1954, 1955

Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture: 1970, 1971

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum: 1964, 1966

Tamarind Lithography Work Shop: 1971

Tate Gallery: 1963, 1966, 1967, 1968

Teachers College, Columbia University: 1964

Trenton State College: 1961

Tyler, Parker: 1958

United States Committee of the International Association of Art: 1971

University of Alabama, Department of Art: 1964

University of Bridgeport: 1971

University of Nebraska Art Galleries: 1951

Vogue -- : 1964

Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: 1962

Walker Art Center: 1971, 1973

Weber, Max: 1947, 1948, 1950, 1951

Western College for Women: 1964

The White House: 1974

Whitney Museum of American Art: 1950, 1956, 1957, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1967

Wichita State University: 1974

The Woman's College of The University of North Carolina: 1951

Women's Interart Center: 1973

Yale University, Department of Art: 1961
Collection Restrictions:
The bulk of this collection has been digitized and is available online via AAA's website, with the exception of the 2017 addition. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Louise Nevelson papers, circa 1903-1982. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.neveloui, Series 2
See more items in:
Louise Nevelson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw93cd690b9-9c7f-4b65-95a4-9fb34488e325
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-neveloui-ref37

Walter Pach papers, 1857-1980

Creator:
Pach, Walter, 1883-1958  Search this
Subject:
Renoir, Auguste  Search this
Rivera, Diego  Search this
Schamberg, Morton L.  Search this
Pach, Raymond  Search this
Picasso, Pablo  Search this
Villon, Jacques  Search this
Orozco, José Clemente  Search this
Pach, Nikifora  Search this
Pach, Magda  Search this
Prendergast, Maurice Brazil  Search this
Sloan, John  Search this
Chase, William Merritt  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen)  Search this
Burroughs, Bryson  Search this
Brooks, Van Wyck  Search this
Miró, Joan  Search this
Avery, Milton  Search this
Barye, Antoine-Louis  Search this
Matisse, Henri  Search this
Marsh, Reginald  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques  Search this
Henri, Robert  Search this
Faure, Elie  Search this
Duchamp-Villon, Raymond  Search this
Duchamp, Marcel  Search this
Ogihara, Moriye  Search this
Of, George F. (George Ferdinand)  Search this
Charlot, Jean  Search this
Monet, Claude  Search this
Laurel Gallery  Search this
Association of American Painters and Sculptors (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
New York School of Art  Search this
Armory Show (1913: New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Brummer Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Type:
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Prints
Drawings
Diaries
Travel diaries
Photographs
Topic:
Art schools -- Photographs  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- Expertising  Search this
Mural painting and decoration, Mexican  Search this
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16128
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212350
AAA_collcode_pachwalt2
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_212350
Online Media:

Irving Sandler interviews and papers

Creator:
Sandler, Irving, 1925-  Search this
Names:
Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Extent:
2.8 Linear feet
1.63 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1944-2017
Summary:
The interviews and papers of art critic, art historian, and educator Irving Sandler measure 2.8 linear feet and 1.63 GB and date from 1944-2017. Included are interviews and recorded lectures, some in digital format; photographs of artwork and artists; membership files, meeting minutes, and ephemera from the Club organization; printed material from individual artist and group exhibits; and teaching files.
Scope and Contents:
The interviews and papers of Irving Sandler measure 2.8 linear feet and 1.63 GB and date from 1944-2017. Included are interviews and recorded lectures, some in digital format; photographs of artwork and artists; membership files, meeting minutes, and ephemera from the Club organization; printed material from individual artist and group exhibits; and teaching files.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 4 series.

Series 1: Interviews, 1962-2017 (2.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-3, 1.63 GB; ER01-ER03)

Series 2: Photographs, 1955-1965 (2 folders; Box 4)

Series 3: Printed Material, 1944-1978 (7 folders; Box 4)

Series 4: Professional Activities, 1951-1969 (4 folders; Box 4)
Biographical / Historical:
Irving Sandler (1925-2018) was an art critic, art historian, and educator in New York, NY. Sandler was the art critic for Art News, 1956-1962; for the New York Post, 1960-1965; and an instructor of art history at New York University, 1960-1971. During his career, he was director of the Tanager Gallery and the Club organization.
Provenance:
The bulk of the collection was donated in 1981-1982 by Irving Sandler. Sandler donated an additional interview with Mira Lehr in 2008. Sandler's widow, Lucy Freeman Sandler, donated the 2017 interview of Charles Simonds in 2019.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Archival audiovisual recordings must be digitized for research access. Researchers may access digitized audiovisual materials in the Archives' Washington, D.C. or New York, N.Y. Research Centers by appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art teachers -- New York (State)  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Irving Sandler interviews and papers, 1944-2017. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.sandirvi
See more items in:
Irving Sandler interviews and papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9323dd266-9966-48b9-aff2-9e6479a8cbb0
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sandirvi
Online Media:

August Jaccaci papers

Creator:
Jaccaci, Augusto Floriano, 1857-1930  Search this
Names:
Cox, Kenyon, 1856-1919  Search this
Gardner, Isabella Stewart, 1840-1924  Search this
La Farge, John, 1835-1910  Search this
Sickert, Bernard, 1862-1932  Search this
Extent:
7.2 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
1889-1935
bulk 1904-1914
Summary:
The papers of art historican August Jaccaci measure 7.2 linear feet and date from 1889 to 1935, with the bulk of the material dating from 1904 to 1914. The collection documents Jaccaci's work as an art historian, writer, and editor, primarily during the period he researched, compiled, and published his book Noteworthy Paintings in Private American Collections. More than one-half of the collection consists of extensive correspondence to and from many notable artists, collectors, and art historians, including John La Farge, Kenyon Cox, Isabella Stewart Gardner, and Bernard Sickert concerning the research and publication of the book. The papers also house legal files, writings and notes, art collection research files, and photographs of artwork.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of art historican August Jaccaci measure 7.2 linear feet and date from 1889 to 1935, with the bulk of the material dating from 1904 to 1914. The collection documents Jaccaci's work as an art historian, writer, and editor, primarily during the period he researched, compiled, and published his book Noteworthy Paintings in Private American Collections. More than one-half of the collection consists of extensive correspondence to and from many notable artists, collectors, and art historians, including John La Farge, Kenyon Cox, Isabella Stewart Gardner, and Bernard Sickert concerning the research and publication of the book. The papers also house legal files, writings and notes, art collection research files, and photographs of artwork.

Correspondents include art historians, critic, artists, and art collectors, as well as publishers, photographers, printers, and agents. These letters discuss the research of famous American art collections, writing of essays for the book, and the book production and publication. There is extensive correspondence with his co-editor John La Farge, and with his employee Carl Snyder who was working in Europe. Other correspondence is with magazines, art associations, academic institutions, and French service organizations. Also included is a small amount of personal correspondence with friends and colleagues.

Legal files include contracts and legal agreements for the August F. Jaccaci Company, as well as legal agreements with John La Farge concerning the research and publication of their joint book. Writings and notes include Jaccaci's lists and notes pertaining to the Noteworthy Paintings project, as well as other miscellaneous notes. Also found are writings by John La Farge that include drafts of a book, lectures, and notes about his artwork. Writings by others in this series also include draft essays by many art historians for Jaccaci's book. For the Noteworthy Paintings project, Jaccaci created numerous research files for American art collections and collectors that would be included. These research files include lists of works of art, essays and other notes about the collection written by prominent art historians. Photographs are of works of art supporting the research files. Also found in this collection are photographs of and notes about New England stencil designs. It is unclear what the connection is between Jaccaci and the stencil designs.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 5 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Correspondence, 1895-1929, undated (Box 1-5; 4.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Legal Files, 1895-1911, undated (Box 5; 4 folders)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1903-1914, undated (Box 5; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 4: Art Collection Research Files, 1889, 1892, 1903-1914, undated (Box 5-7; 2.0 linear feet)

Series 5: Photographs, 1904-1912, 1928-1935, undated (Box 7-8; 0.4 linear feet)

Due to re-processing, the order of the collection varies slightly from the order of the collection on microfilm. References to the microfilm reel numbers have been added for researcher access.
Biographical Note:
August Florian Jaccaci was born in Fontainebleau, France in 1856. After traveling extensively in various countries including Mexico and Cuba, he settled in the United States in the early 1880s. He worked briefly as an artist in the Midwest, creating murals on commission, including a mural in the Capitol building in St. Paul, Minnesota. Jaccaci then moved to New York City and worked as art editor for Century magazine. Besides serving as art editor, he also wrote several articles and executed illustrations for the magazine. On the recommendation of artist Will H. Low he became art editor of McClure's magazine at its founding in 1896. A year later he wrote the book on his travels entitled, On the trail of Don Quixote: being a record of rambles in the ancient province of La Mancha [sic]. He left McClure's in 1902 and in 1903 began working on a major multi-volume book entitled Noteworthy Paintings in Private American Collections. Jaccaci envisioned a 15 volume set with essays about American art collections written by distinguished art historians. Though Jaccaci knew many writers, art critics, and artists through his magazine work, he was not a well-known art historian and asked artist John La Farge to be the co-editor of the book. La Farge's reputation provided access to major American collections of artwork. The publishing company Merrill and Baker was to publish the work, but it went bankrupt in 1904. Jaccaci then bought their property for his project and called it the August F. Jaccaci Co. The first volume was published in 1909, and John La Farge died in 1910. Though Jaccaci continued working on the next volume, the project failed in 1912. Besides working on this project, Jaccaci also served as editor of the "Art in America" section of Burlington Magazine from 1907 to 1910.

In 1914 August Jaccaci went to Europe on art related business. With the start of World War I, he decided to stay in France and pursue philanthropic work. He founded the Society for Protection of Children of the Frontier, and established a children's hospital, receiving many honors for his service. He died in Neuf-De-Grasse, France in 1930.
Provenance:
The August Jaccaci papers were purchased by the Archives of American Art from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1957 and microfilmed shortly after receipt.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Patrons must use microfilm copy. Use of materials not available on microfilm requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
August Jaccaci papers, 1889-1935. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.jaccaugu
See more items in:
August Jaccaci papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97692c28d-c0b5-4714-a10d-cbb2b7e728fc
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-jaccaugu
Online Media:

Dore Ashton papers

Creator:
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Names:
Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art -- Faculty  Search this
New School for Social Research (New York, N.Y.) -- Faculty  Search this
Yale University -- Faculty  Search this
Adams, Pat, 1928-  Search this
Adley, James, 1931-  Search this
Albee, Edward, 1928-  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Arnheim, Rudolf  Search this
Avedon, Richard  Search this
Berthot, Jake, 1939-  Search this
Borges, Jacopo Luis  Search this
Congdon, Dennis  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Diebenkorn, Richard, 1922-1993  Search this
Driskell, David C.  Search this
Giacometti, Alberto, 1901-1966  Search this
Guidieri, Remo  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Hellman, Lillian, 1905-1984  Search this
Herbert, George  Search this
Hiss, Alger  Search this
Howes, Barbara  Search this
Kaprow, Allan  Search this
Licht, Fred, 1928-  Search this
Lindner, Richard, 1901-  Search this
Malamud, Bernard  Search this
Miró, Joan, 1893-  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Moy, Seong  Search this
Mumford, Lewis, 1895-1990  Search this
Oldenburg, Claes, 1929-  Search this
Reuterswärd, Carl Fredrik, 1934-  Search this
Sterne, Hedda, 1910-  Search this
Tinguely, Jean, 1925-  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Vasilikos, Vasilēs, 1934-  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Extent:
35.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Date:
circa 1928-2014
1849
Summary:
The papers of Dore Ashton measure 35.6 linear feet and date from circa 1928-2014, with one letter in the Joseph Cornell subject file dating from 1849. The records document Dore Ashton's career as an art critic, historian and educator, with particular depth for the period of 1952 through 1990. The collection contains a small amount of biographical material, as well as correspondence, writings, subject files, printed materials, artwork, and reference photographs of artworks. An addition to the Dore Ashton papers includes biographical material, correspondence, writings, writing project and subject files, teaching files, printed material, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographic material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Dore Ashton measure 35.6 linear feet and date from circa 1928-2014, with one letter in the Joseph Cornell subject file dating from 1849. The records document Dore Ashton's career as an art critic, historian and educator, with particular depth for the period of 1952 through 1990. The collection contains a small amount of biographical material, as well as correspondence, writings, subject files, printed materials, artwork, and reference photographs of artworks. An addition to the Dore Ashton papers includes biographical material, correspondence, writings, writing project and subject files, teaching files, printed material, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographic material.

The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence with many artists, writers and others, including Pat Adams, James Adley, Rudolf Arnheim, Jake Berthot, Dennis Congdon, George Herbert, Remo Guidieri, Barbara Howes, Fred Licht, Joan Punyet Miro, Carl Fredrik Reuterswärd, and Hedda Sterne, among others. Smaller amounts of letters are from Joseph Albers, Edward Albee, Richard Avedon, Richard Diebenkorn, David Driskell, Alberto Giacometti, Philip Guston, Lillian Hellman, Alger Hiss, Bernard Malamud, Joan Miro, Robert Motherwell, Lewis Mumford, Claes Oldenburg, and Vassilis Vassilikos.

Writings consist of transcripts of miscellaneous articles or those written for various publications. Research files include reference or research materials for books, exhibitions, individuals and various topics. Individuals and topics include Jacopo Luis Borges, Allan Kaprow, Richard Lindner, Seong Moy, Jean Tinguely, Mark Tobey, Jack Tworkov, Adja Yunkers; and Dadaism, poetry and symbolism.

The addition to the Dore Ashton papers (Series 8) includes biographical material, correspondence, writings, writing project and subject files, teaching files, printed material, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographic material. Writings make up a significant part of the addition and contain hundreds of manuscripts, as well as lectures, notes, sixty notebooks, ten diaries, and writings by others. Writing project and subject files comprise over half of the addition and encompass a large collection of alphabetical files pertaining to artists, actors, writers, thinkers, and collaborators; work projects including writings, exhibitions, panels, symposia, and lecture series; as well as various other subjects and topics. The addition also contains teaching files related to Ashton's positions at the Cooper Union, the New School for Social Research, and Yale University. The photographic material in this series is also abundant and contains hundreds of original photographs of Ashton throughout all stages of her life, many with friends and family.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1962-1978

Series 2: Correspondence, 1945-2010, undated

Series 3: Writings, 1952-1976, undated

Series 4: Research files, 1849, 1950-1984, 2009, undated

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1931-1981, undated

Series 6: Artwork, 1949, 1952, 1983, undated

Series 7: Photographs of Artwork, circa 1950-2010

Series 8: Addition to the Dore Ashton Papers, circa 1928-2013
Biographical / Historical:
Dore Ashton (1928-) is an art critic, author, and educator living in New York City. She wrote, contributed , and edited more than 30 books. Ashton was born in Newark New Jersey in 1928 and received an MA from Harvard University in 1950. Her many books and articles focus on late 19th and 20th century art and artists. Ashton was associate editor at Art Digest from 1952-1954, and critic for Arts and Architecture at the New York Times, 1955-1960. Starting in 1962 she held several lecturing posts at various institutions including the School of Visual Arts, Cooper Union, and the New School for Social Research. She was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship in 1964 and a National Endowment for the Humanities grant in 1980. Among Ashton's books are Abstract Art Before Columbus, 1956; Poets and the Past, 1959; A Joseph Cornell Album, 1974; Yes, But…A Critical Study of Philip Guston, 1976, About Rothko, 1983; The New York School: a Cultural Reckoning, 1973; Noguchi East and West, 1992; and David Rankin: The New York Years, 2013. Dore Ashton was the first critic to develop a comprehensive and eye-witness account of the history of the Abstract Expressions.

Ashton married artist Adja Yunkers (1900-1983) in 1953, and they had two daughters Alexandra (known as Sasha) and Marina. In 1985 she married writer Matti Megged (1923-2003).
Related Materials:
Among the holdings of the Archives is an oral history interview with Dore Ashton conducted November 21, 2010 by George W. Sampson, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project.

Dore Ashton papers are also located at Emory University Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library.
Provenance:
The Dore Ashton papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Dore Ashton May 27, 1982, May 8, 1997, June 2, 2011, and March, 25, 2016.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women art critics  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Art, Modern  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Artists -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Citation:
Dore Ashton papers, 1849, circa 1928-2014. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.ashtdore
See more items in:
Dore Ashton papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw96b23d022-d02d-4a06-ba62-e34c59ad25ae
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ashtdore
Online Media:

Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers

Creator:
Parsons, Betty  Search this
Names:
Betty Parsons Gallery  Search this
Bess, Forrest, 1911-1977  Search this
Congdon, William, 1912-1998  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Extent:
61.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Video recordings
Drawings
Date:
1916-1991
bulk 1946-1983
Summary:
The Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers measure 61.1 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1991, with the bulk of the material dating from 1946-1983. Records provide extensive documentation of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1946 to its closing in 1983 and of the activities of Betty Parsons as one the leading art dealers of contemporary American Art in the latter half of the twentieth century, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists. Over one third of the of the collection is comprised of artists files containing correspondence, price lists, and printed materials. Additional correspondence is with galleries, dealers, art institutions, private collectors, and the media. Also found are exhibition files, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales records, stock inventories, personal financial records, and photographs. Betty Parsons's personal papers consist of early curatorial files, pocket diaries, personal correspondence, and evidence of her own artwork, including sketchbooks, and files documenting her personal art collection.
Scope and Content Note:
The Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers measure 61.1 linear feet and date from 1916 to 1991, with the bulk of the material dating from 1946-1983. Records provide extensive documentation of the gallery's operations from its inception in 1946 to its closing in 1983 and of the activities of Betty Parsons as one the leading art dealers of contemporary American Art in the latter half of the twentieth century, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists. Over one third of the of the collection is comprised of artists files containing correspondence, price lists, and printed materials. Additional correspondence is with galleries, dealers, art institutions, private collectors, and the media. Also found are exhibition files, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales records, stock inventories, personal financial records, and photographs. Betty Parsons's personal papers consist of early curatorial files, pocket diaries, personal correspondence, and evidence of her own artwork, including sketchbooks, and files documenting her personal art collection. Personal papers also include personal photographs.

Artists files, the largest and most extensive series, consist of a wide variety of documents, including biographical materials, correspondence with or related to the artist, exhibition catalogs and announcements, sales and expense invoices, clippings, price lists, and photographs of the artist, exhibitions, and artwork. The files reflect Parsons's close personal relationships with certain artists, particularly Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still, and Barnett Newman. Extensive documentation is also found for Forrest Bess, William Congdon, Paul Feeley, Thomas George, Alexander Liberman, Seymour Lipton, Richard Pousette-Dart, Jesse Reichek, and Jack Youngerman. Historians and researchers will find these files to be an invaluable resource both in tracing Betty Parsons's role in promoting Abstract Expressionism and researching individual artists.

Exhibition files primarily document the gallery's infrequent group or themed exhibitions. Of particular note are the files on The Ideographic Picture, which was organized by Barnett Newman and included his work, as well as that of Pietro Lazzari, Boris Margo, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko, Theodoros Stamos, and Clyfford Still. Price lists, artist biographies and exhibition schedules are housed in the general exhibition files. Loan exhibition files provide documentation of artwork borrowed by other galleries or institutions for exhibitions, as well as shows outside of the gallery that were organized by Betty Parsons. Also found are gallery exhibition guest books, and announcements and catalogs.

Gallery correspondence is primarily with galleries and dealers, museums, arts organizations, and collectors. Scattered letters from artists are also found, although the bulk of the artists' correspondence is filed in the Artists Files. Also found here are memoranda and letters between Betty Parsons and her staff that contain detailed information concerning Parsons's schedule and gallery activities. Similar correspondence is found amongst the correspondence files within the series Betty Parsons papers.

Appraisal and conservation files include correspondence, appraisal invoices, forms, and appraisal requests and other information from the Art Dealers Association of America, and conservation invoices and reports. The majority of the appraisal records contain information about the specific works of art, including artist, title, date, current owner and the estimated value at the time of the request. Conservation records document conservation treatments undertaken by outside conservators to gallery stock.

Sales, purchases, stock and inventory are well documented in the sales and inventory records. The records provide detailed information about individual sales, prices of individual pieces of artwork, consignments, and loans. Most sales records also include detailed information about the buyer and are a valuable resource for provenance research. Files documenting the general administration, routine business operations, and financial transactions (not individual sales) of the gallery are housed in the general business and financial records. These records include ledgers, receipts, tax records, and banking records. There is some limited information about works of art scattered amongst the receipts and in the "in/out slips" files. Legal records house general legal documents and those concerning specific lawsuits. Of particular note is the file detailing the lawsuit between Betty Parsons and Sidney Janis over the fifth floor of 24 West 57th Street.

The remainder of the collection consists of Betty Parsons's personal papers which document her career prior to opening her own gallery, her work as an artist, and her personal art collection.

Some information about Parsons's work prior to opening her own gallery is found in the early curatorial files she retained from her curatorial and administrative work at the Wakefield Gallery and the Mortimer Brandt Gallery. Clippings, correspondence, announcements, exhibition lists and exhibition files are found. For both positions, she kept only the exhibition files for a small group of exhibitions organized around a specific theme, the most notable being the exhibition of Pre-Columbian Sculpture at the Wakefield Gallery.

Biographical materials include copies of her biography, family genealogies, photographs of Parsons, interviews with Colette Roberts and WYNC radio, memberships, photographs, and ephemera, including a collection of programs and invitations from events that she attended. Throughout her life Parsons gave generously of her time to various cultural and charitable institutions and was awarded for her contributions. There are also a number of files that document her speaking engagements, her participation as a juror in numerous juried exhibitions, charitable work, and awards that she received.

Parsons's personal correspondence files reflect how deeply Parsons's life was intertwined with the gallery. There are letters from museum directors, dealers, artists seeking representation, and personal letters from artists with whom she had close personal relationships, most notably Larry Bigelow, Alexander Calder, William Condon, and Ad Reinhardt. There are also letters from the English artist Adge Baker, with whom Parsons was romantically involved. Correspondence also includes several files of postcards and Christmas cards.

Pocket diaries and engagement calendars, spanning from 1933-1981, record social engagements, meetings, vacations, and telephone numbers. Also found are circa two linear feet of notebooks and sketchbooks, many of which are annotated with addresses, poetry, journal entries, and other observations of people, places, and travels. Writings by others include writings about Betty Parsons or the Betty Parsons Gallery, such as Lawrence Alloway's unpublished typescript titled "An American Gallery" and other topics.

Printed material consists of exhibition announcements and catalogs, art magazines, and newspaper and magazine clippings about Betty Parsons, her family and acquaintances, artists, and other art related topics, coupled with a miscellaneous selection of clippings, and a video recording, on topics that presumably captured Parsons's attention.

Personal art work records document Betty Parsons's career as an artist through inventories, group and solo exhibitions files, price lists, appraisals, sales and consignment invoices. Photographs are primarily reproductions of her works of art, although there are scattered photographs of exhibition installations.

Betty Parsons's private art collection files document her extensive personal collection of art that included works by Jackson Pollock, Agnes Martin, Romare Bearden, Barnett Newman, and Mark Rothko, in addition to Amlash sculpture from ancient Persia and primitive sculpture from New Hebrides. These files include inventories, lists, exhibition records, sales and purchase invoices, and photographs. There are also files for donations and loans from Parsons's personal collection to museums and fund raising auctions for several non-profit institutions.

Finally, the personal financial records provide information about the Parsons's family finances and her personal financial success as an art dealer. In addition to her own investments, Parsons inherited shares in family investments through the estates of her parents, J. Fred Pierson, Jr. and Suzanne Miles Pierson, and younger sister, Emily Rayner. Real estate files include correspondence, utility bills, receipts, area maps, and land plots for houses in Sheepscot, Maine and St. Maartens, Netherlands Antilles. Tax returns, ledger worksheets, receipts, banking statements, deposit slips, and cancelled checks are among the other financial records.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as seven series. Many of the series are further divided into subseries.

Missing Title

Series 1: Artists Files, 1935-1983 (19.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-18, 51, 55-56, OVs 53, 65)

Series 2: Exhibition Files, 1941-1983 (2.9 linear feet; Boxes 18-21, 51, 55, OVs 54, 66)

Series 3: Correspondence Files, 1941-1983 (3.9 linear feet; Boxes 21-24, 52, 56)

Series 4: Appraisal Files, 1954-1983 (0.7 linear feet; Box 24)

Series 5: Sales and Inventory Records, 1946-1983 (3.9 linear feet; Boxes 25-28, 51)

Series 6: General Business and Financial Records, 1946-1983 (9.3 linear feet; Boxes 28-38, 51, 56)

Series 7: Betty Parsons Personal Papers, 1916-1991 (21 linear feet; Boxes 38-51, 55-64, OVs 65-67)
Historical Note:
Betty Parsons (1900-1982) was one of the leading art dealers in New York City specializing in modern art, particularly the work of the Abstract Expressionists, and an abstract painter and sculptor in her own right. She opened Betty Parsons Gallery in 1946 at 15 E. 57th St., later moving to 24 W. 57th St.

The history of the Betty Parsons Gallery is inextricably bound to the life and experiences of its founder. Betty Parsons was born Betty Bierne Pierson on January 31, 1900 in New York City. She enjoyed a privileged childhood, which included vacation homes in Newport and Palm Beach. Her only formal education was a five-year stint at the prestigious Chapin School from 1910-1915, where she met many of the women who would become life-long friends and supporters. In the spring of 1920, she married Schuyler Livingston Parsons from one of New York's oldest families. The marriage ended after only three years and the couple traveled to Paris where they could obtain a divorce on the grounds of incompatibility. She retained her married surname and purchased a house on the rue Boulard in Paris, where she remained for ten years, pursuing studies in painting and sculpture.

Financial constraints forced Parsons to return to the United States in 1933. She first traveled west to California, but it was her return to New York in 1935 that marked the start of her career as an art dealer. Her first opportunity to connect with the New York art world came after a successful exhibition of her watercolors at the Midtown Galleries where the owner, Alan Gruskin, noted Parson's faithful and wealthy group of supporters and offered her work installing exhibitions and selling paintings on commission. Her work for the Midtown Galleries led to a second position in the Park Avenue gallery of Mary Sullivan, one of the founders of the Museum of Modern Art. Here, Parsons learned the business of running a gallery. By 1940 Parsons was ready to take on more independent responsibility and agreed to manage a gallery within the Wakefield Bookshop. In this job, she exercised full curatorial control by selecting artists and organizing exhibitions. She championed then unknown contemporary American artists and the gallery's roster soon included Saul Steinberg, Hedda Sterne, Alfonso Ossorio, Joseph Cornell, Walter Murch, and Theodore Stamos. Although the majority of the exhibitions were solo shows, there were a few group shows and themed exhibitions, such as Love in Art (1941) and Ballet in Art (1942). Under Parson's direction, the gallery hosted an important exhibition of Pre-Columbian sculpture, curated by Barnett Newman.

When the owners of the Wakefield Bookshop decided to close the gallery late in 1944, Mortimer Brandt, a dealer who specialized in Old Master paintings and drawings, offered her a position as head of the newly created contemporary section of his gallery. Many of the artists who had shown with Parsons at the Wakefield Gallery followed her to her new gallery, where they were joined by Ad Reinhardt, Boris Mango, and Hans Hofmann. While the exhibitions garnered attention from the press and the interest of contemporary artists, the contemporary section was not a financial success and Brandt opted to close his gallery in 1946.

Using $1000 of her own money and an additional borrowed $4000, Parsons sublet the space that previously housed Mortimer Brandt's contemporary section, on the fifth floor of 15 East 57th Street, and opened the Betty Parsons Gallery.

In many respects the early years of the Betty Parsons Gallery were the most vital, as it was during the period of 1947-1951 that the gallery became linked with the Abstract Expressionists and the history of post-WWII American Art. In an unpublished history of the gallery, noted art critic Lawrence Alloway stated that the significance of the gallery's early exhibitions ranks with Durand-Ruel's Impressionists exhibitions or Kahnweiler's shows of the Cubists. Betty Parsons Gallery quickly became one of the most prestigious galleries in New York City associated with new American Art of all styles. Her close friend Barnett Newman organized the gallery's inaugural exhibition of Northwest Coast Indian Art and he soon began to exhibit his own work at the gallery. When Peggy Guggenheim's Art of This Century Gallery closed, Jackson Pollock, Clyfford Still, and Mark Rothko joined Parsons' growing stable of artists. Although Parsons continued to promote and exhibit many of the artists whom she had previously discovered, these four artists dominated this period. Newman, Pollock, Still, and Rothko worked closely together, holding themselves apart from the other artists somewhat. They were actively involved in the curatorial process and often hung their own shows. For these artists, the exhibition itself was an artistic act of creation.

Parsons provided a supportive environment and allowed her artists enormous freedom in planning and designing their exhibitions. She was not, however, an aggressive salesperson. During this early period the gallery ledgers document sales to an impressive array of museums including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago, as well as important collectors such as Edward Root and Duncan Phillips. Nevertheless, the art that the gallery promoted was not yet widely accepted. Sales were few, prices were low and the business would not turn a profit for several years. Meanwhile, there was mounting pressure from Pollock, Newman, Still, and Rothko to drop some of the other artists from Parsons' stable and focus all resources on them. They wanted to be promoted to a larger audience and have their work sold at higher prices, but Parsons enjoyed discovering new artists and did not want to be restricted in this endeavor. The year 1951 marks the last time that Pollock's drip paintings or the monumental works of Newman, Rothko or Still were shown at the Betty Parsons Gallery.

In the following years the Betty Parsons Gallery continued to attract a diverse group of talented artists. Ellsworth Kelly, Richard Tuttle, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jack Youngerman had their first New York exhibitions at the Betty Parsons Gallery. Parsons opened Section Eleven in 1958, a short-lived annex to the main gallery, so that she could promote younger, less well-known artists. It closed in 1960 due to the administrative difficulties in running two essentially separate galleries.

In 1962, Sidney Janis, another prominent art dealer, started proceedings to evict Parsons from the floor that they shared on 15 East 57th Street. The Betty Parsons Gallery moved to 24 West 57th Street in 1963, where it remained until it closed in 1983, following Parsons' death the preceding year. Throughout the gallery's history, Parsons continued to promote faithful artists such as Hedda Sterne and Saul Steinberg, who had been with her from the beginning and to seek out new talent, both for her main gallery and for other venues, such as the short-lived Parsons-Truman Gallery, which she opened in 1974 with former Parsons Gallery director Jock Truman to show works on paper by emerging artists.

In addition to being an art dealer, Betty Parsons was a respected artist and collector. With her connoisseur's eye and connections, Parsons amassed an impressive private collection of art. She bought her first piece while an art student in Paris in the 1920s, a small gouache by Zadkine, but did not begin acquiring works in earnest until she was established as an art dealer. Partial inventories of her personal collection show that the majority of her collection contained works by artists associated with the gallery. Mark Rothko, Hans Hofmann, Ad Reinhardt, Agnes Martin, and Kenzo Okada were among the artists represented. Many were gifts from the artists, such as an ink drawing by Jackson Pollock, inscribed "For Betty." Selections from her collection appeared in small museums across the United States, including a traveling exhibition organized by Fitch College, New York, in 1968. In her role as a promoter of contemporary American art, Parsons lent generously from her collection, particularly to the federal Art in the Embassies Program. Throughout her life she also donated works to a variety of museums, most notably, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark.

Parsons frequently claimed that her desire to pursue a career as an artist stemmed from a visit to the Armory Show when she was thirteen. In her late teens, after pressuring her father for art lessons, she studied with the sculptor Gutzon Burglum of Mount Rushmore fame. In Paris, she continued her studies first with Antoine Bourdelle, whose sculptures she had admired at the Armory Show, and later with Ossip Zadkine. The first exhibition of her work, figurative watercolors and sculptures, took place in Paris in 1927. As she matured as an artist, her art became more abstract. Her late works were painted wood sculptures that she pieced together from wood that she found near her studio in Long Island. Parsons's work was exhibited in more than thirty solo exhibitions, including, Betty Parsons; Paintings, Gouaches and Sculpture, 1955-1968, at the Whitechapel Gallery in London. During her lifetime, she would not allow her works to be shown in her own gallery. Shortly after she died of a stroke in 1982, In Memoriam, Betty Parsons: Late Sculptures, opened at the Betty Parsons Gallery.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are oral history interviews with Betty Parsons, June 4-9, 1969, by Paul Cummings, and June 11, 1981 by Gerald Silk.
Separated Material:
Some of the material originally loaned for microfilming in 1968 and 1969 was not included in later donations and can be viewed on microfilm reels N68/62-N68/74 and N69/105-N69/106. Loaned materials are not described in the container listing in this finding aid.
Provenance:
The gallery donated some records in 1974, many of which had been loaned earlier for microfilming. The bulk of the collection was donated in 1984 and 1986 by William Rayner and Christopher Schwabacher, executors of the Estate of Betty Parsons. Additional material was donated by William Rayner in 1998 and Christopher Schwabacher in 2017. Additional material was donated in 2018 by the Lee Hall estate via Carolyn Crozier and Deborah Jacobson, co-executors. Hall was Parsons's biographer and had the material in her possession at the time of Parsons's death. An additional photograph of Parons and Marie Carr Taylor by Henri Cartier-Bresson was donated in 2021 by Mary Carpenter, who inherited the photograph from her mother, Nan Thorton Jones, who received it as a gift from Taylor.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Gallery owners -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art dealers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Women art dealers  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Abstract expressionist  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Video recordings
Drawings
Citation:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers, 1916-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.parsbett
See more items in:
Betty Parsons Gallery records and personal papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw956c1036f-b673-4dc1-8c1b-cde0bd641c60
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-parsbett
Online Media:

Lucy R. Lippard papers

Creator:
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Names:
Addison Gallery of American Art  Search this
Alliance for Cultural Democracy  Search this
Art Workers Coalition  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Political Art Documentation/Distribution (Organization)  Search this
Printed Matter, Inc.  Search this
Studio International (Firm)  Search this
University of Colorado -- Faculty  Search this
Women's Caucus for Art  Search this
Andre, Carl, 1935-  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Darboven, Hanne  Search this
Edelson, Mary Beth  Search this
Hammond, Harmony  Search this
Henes, Donna  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-  Search this
LeWitt, Sol, 1928-2007  Search this
Pearson, Henry, 1914-2006  Search this
Stevens, May  Search this
Extent:
70.5 Linear feet
0.454 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
1930s-2010
bulk 1960-1990
Summary:
The papers of New York and New Mexico writer, art critic, and curator, Lucy R. Lippard, measure 70.5 linear feet and 0.454 GB and date from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Over half of the collection consists of correspondence files documenting Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism and political activism. Also found are Lippard's notes and writings including sound recordings and interviews, teaching and exhibition files, printed and digital material, several works of art, and photographs of artwork and artists. Scattered throughout the collection are a small number of records concerning Lippard's personal life. An addition of 3.0 linear feet donated 2015 includes subject files on feminist and conceptual art as well as land use, development, and local politics and history in New Mexico.

There is a 17.0 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2015 and 2021 that incudes research files (press clippings, notes, correspondence, ephemera) related to the publications 'Lure of the Local' and 'Undermining' are a significant portion. In addition there are approximetley 50 notebooks ranging from 1965-1996, containing notes and daily tasks. Printed material and ephemera includes promotional materials for talks and public engagements, as well as press clippings of reviews and other news items featuring Lippard. Another significant portion of the addition is labeled "miscellaneous professional correspondence."Materials date from circa 1965-2010.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York and New Mexico writer, art critic, and curator, Lucy R. Lippard, measure 70.5 linear feet and 0.454 GB and date from the 1930s to 2007, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1960s to the 1990s. Over half of the collection consists of correspondence files documenting Lippard's professional relationships with artists, writers, galleries, art institutions, and political organizations, and her interest in conceptual and minimalist art, feminism and political activism. Also found are Lippard's notes and writings including sound recordings and interviews, teaching and exhibition files, printed and digital material, several works of art, and photographs of artwork and artists. Scattered throughout the collection are a small number of records concerning Lippard's personal life. An addition of 3.0 linear feet donated 2015 includes subject files on feminist and conceptual art as well as land use, development, and local politics and history in New Mexico.

A small amount of biographical material comprises resumes and an address book.

Correspondence files document all aspects of Lippard's professional life including her relationships with artists such as Carl Andre, Judy Chicago, Hanne Darboven, Ray Johnson, Sol LeWitt, and Henry Pearson; feminist artists including Mary Beth Edelson, Harmony Hammond, Donna Henes, and May Stevens; political and art-related activist groups such as Alliance for Cultural Democracy, Art Workers Coalition, Political Art Documentation/Distribution, Printed Matter, and Women's Caucus for Art; galleries and museums including Addison Gallery of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art, and publishers including Art International and Art Forum. The series also traces the development of Lippard's involvement in activist causes including censorship and the rights of artists, Central America and the impact of U.S. policy on the region, and equality and reproductive rights for women, as well as her interest in conceptual and minimalist art. The series includes scattered artwork and photographs of artists.

Writings are primarily by Lippard and include correspondence, manuscript drafts, extensive notes, and publication records for some of her best-known books such as The Graphic Work of Philip Evergood (1966), Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object (1973), Eva Hesse (1976), Ad Reinhardt (1985), and Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America (1990), as well as essays for publications such as Art Forum and Studio International and contributions to exhibition catalogs. Also found are edited transcripts from conferences, symposia and interviews conducted by and of Lippard, some audio recordings of interviews and symposia, including an interview with Donald Judd, and notes and typescripts for lectures and speeches.

A small number of files document Lippard's teaching work during the 1970s and 1980s, primarily at the University of Colorado, Boulder where she taught several courses and seminars.

Exhibition files document Lippard's involvement with exhibitions she helped to organize or curate such as A Different War: Vietnam in Art (1989-1991) 557,087 and 955,000 (1969, 1970), 2,972, 453 (1971) c.7,500 (1973-1974) and those for which she wrote catalog contributions.

Printed material includes a collection of articles written by Lippard and a small amount of material concerning events, such as speaking engagements, in which Lippard was involved. Other printed material reflects Lippard's wide range of artistic, political and activist interests and documents exhibitions and performances and the activities of art-related and political groups. Material includes many exhibition catalogs, announcements, invitations, printed posters, news clippings, journal articles, brochures, pamphlets and other publications.

Artwork includes sixteen items by unidentified artists, including two by children. Photographs consist primarily of photographs of works of art in addition to a small number of photos of exhibition installations.

There is a 17.0 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2015 and 2021 that incudes research files (press clippings, notes, correspondence, ephemera) related to the publications 'Lure of the Local' and 'Undermining' are a significant portion. In addition there are approximetley 50 notebooks ranging from 1965-1996, containing notes and daily tasks. Printed material and ephemera includes promotional materials for talks and public engagements, as well as press clippings of reviews and other news items featuring Lippard. Another significant portion of the addition is labeled "miscellaneous professional correspondence."Materials date from circa 1965-2010.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as nine series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1960s-circa 1980s (Box 1; 2 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1950s-2006 (Boxes 1-28, 51, OVs 54-63; 28.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1930s-1990s (Boxes 28-41, 51-52, OVs 64-66; 13.24 linear feet, ER01; 0.454 GB)

Series 4: Teaching Files, 1966-1993 (Boxes 41, 52; 0.76 linear feet)

Series 5: Exhibitions, 1960s-1990s (Boxes 42-45, 52, OVs 67-68; 4.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1940s-2007 (Boxes 45-49, 52, OVs 69-77; 5.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork and Ephemera, circa 1960s-circa 1990s (Boxes 50, 53; 4 folders)

Series 8: Photographs, 1950s-circa 1990s (Boxes 50, 53, OV 71; 1.0 linear foot)

Series 9: Unprocessed Addition, circa 1965-2010, (Boxes 78-94; 17.0 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
New York and New Mexico writer and art critic, Lucy R. Lippard, is the curator of numerous exhibitions and the author of over twenty-four books and other writings that trace the emergence of minimalist and conceptual art and document Lippard's commitment to feminism and political activism.

Born in New York City in 1937, Lippard earned a B.A. from Smith College in 1958 and an M.A. in 1962 from New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. In the 1960s she began writing art criticism for the journals Art International and Artforum. In 1966 she curated the landmark exhibition Eccentric Abstraction at the Fischbach Gallery in New York City. Lippard then curated the first of four defining conceptual art exhibitions that became known as her "numbers" shows, each titled after the populations of the cities in which they took place, with catalogs in the form of a set of 10 x 15 cm index cards. Opening at the Seattle Art Museum in 1969, 557,087 was followed by 955,000 in Vancouver, Canada, a few months later. 2,972,453 was held at the Centro de Arte y Comunicacíon in Buenos Aires in 1971 and c.7500 opened in Valencia, California, in 1973-1974 before traveling to several other venues in the United States and Europe.

Lippard's first book, The Graphic Work of Philip Evergood was published in 1966, followed by Pop Art the same year, and a collection of her early essays, Changing, in 1971. Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object (1973) and From the Center: Feminist Essays on Women's Art (1976) documented the emergence of conceptual art and the early years of feminist art respectively. In 1976 Lippard published her seminal book on the life and work of Eva Hesse.

Between 1977 and 1978 Lippard lived on a farm in Devon, England, and worked on a novel, The First Stone, about the role of politics in the lives of three generations of women. During her walks across the English countryside she became interested in landscape art and conceived of her book Overlay: Contemporary Art and the Art of Prehistory which was subsequently published in 1983. Other books include Get the Message?: A Decade Of Art For Social Change (1984), Ad Reinhardt (1985), and Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America (1990). Lippard has also written regular columns on art and politics for the Village Voice, In These Times and Z Magazine, and has been a contributing editor of Art in America.

Lippard was radicalized during a trip to Argentina in 1968 when she was invited to be a juror at the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes in Buenos Aires. On her return to the United States she became heavily involved in anti-war activities and the Art Workers Coalition. She is a co-founder of several feminist and artist organizations including the feminist collective Heresies, which produced Heresies: A Feminist Journal on Art and Politics from 1977-1992, Ad Hoc Women Artists, Alliance for Cultural Democracy, Artists Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America, Women's Action Coalition, and Women's Art Registry. In 1976 she was a founder of Printed Matter, a New York nonprofit dedicated to producing artists' publications. She also worked closely with Franklin Furnace, an artist-run space devoted to the promotion of artists' books, installation art, and video and performance art, and served on the organization's International Committee.

Lippard has been a visiting professor at the School of Visual Arts, the University of Colorado, Boulder, and the University of Queensland, Australia, and was Eminent Artist in Residence at the University of Wyoming Department of Art in 2015. She has received honorary doctorates in fine arts from Maine College of Art, the Massachusetts College of Art, Moore College of Art, San Francisco Art Institute, and others, and awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship, two National Endowment for the Arts grants in criticism, the Smith College Medal, the ArtTable Award for Distinguished Service to the Visual Arts, and the Bard College Center for Curatorial Studies Award for Excellence.

Lippard has lived in New Mexico since 1992 and works as a freelance writer and speaker.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Lucy Lippard conducted in 2011 March 15, by Sue Heinemann, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts project, funded by a grant from the A G Foundation.
Provenance:
Lucy R. Lippard donated her papers in several increments between 1972-1995, 2006, 2015 and 2021.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Artists -- Political activity  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Conceptual art  Search this
Minimal art  Search this
Women museum curators  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Citation:
Lucy R. Lippard papers, 1930s-2007, bulk 1960s-1990s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lipplucy
See more items in:
Lucy R. Lippard papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9101c6a69-dde9-42ed-94cc-d03650c249ed
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lipplucy
Online Media:

About Lippard

Collection Creator:
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Container:
Box 45, Folder 38
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1950s-circa 1990s
Scope and Contents:
Oversized material housed in Box 52, Folder 5
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Lucy R. Lippard papers, 1930s-2007, bulk 1960s-1990s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Lucy R. Lippard papers
Lucy R. Lippard papers / Series 6: Printed Material / 6.1: Lippard Printed Material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9155f6f2b-1299-4add-8241-be9c27f5863f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-lipplucy-ref2954
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E.C. (Eugene) Goossen papers

Creator:
Goossen, E. C.  Search this
Names:
Bennington College  Search this
Hunter College  Search this
Frankenthaler, Helen, 1928-2011  Search this
Johanson, Patricia, 1940-  Search this
Kelly, Ellsworth, 1923-  Search this
Ohlson, Douglas Dean, 1936-  Search this
Extent:
10.8 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
circa 1935-2004
Summary:
The papers of art historian and educator E.C. (Eugene) Goossen measure 10.8 linear feet and date from circa 1935 to 2004. The collection documents Goossen's career through biographical material, correspondence, artist files, writing project files and notes, exhibition files, other professional files and subject files, teaching files, and printed material.
Scope and Contents:
The collection documents Goossen's career through biographical material, correspondence, artist files, writing project files and notes, exhibition files, other professional files and subject files, teaching files, and printed material.

Biographical materials include an address book, three appointment books, records regarding Goossen's retirement and death, artwork donations records, files for Goossen's wife Patricia Johanson, and other personal records. Correspondence is with Irene Alexander, the Guggenheim Foundation, Linda Nochlin, Ad Reinhardt, students, and other colleagues and friends. Artist files for Joseph Cornell, Stuart Davis, Alexander Dorner, Paul Feeley, Herbert Ferber, Helen Frankenthaler, Tony Smith, and others include drafts, notes, research material, and five sound recordings of interviews with Robert Morris and Ellsworth Kelly. Writing projects files and notes are for book contributions, essays, lectures, and reviews. Exhibition files for 8 Young Artists (1964), 8 Young Artists Then and Now (1991), Art of the Real (1968), and a few other exhibitions are also included. Professional files document Goossen's activities outside of teaching and a small set of subject files include the topics of landscape sculpture, Mayan and Coptic art, and other art related subjects. Teaching files document Goossen's tenures at Bennington College, Hunter College, and the City University of New York's Graduate Center. Printed materials include clippings featuring Goossen's writings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, press releases, and other published material.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as nine series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1945-2004 (0.6 linear feet; Box 1, OV 15)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1930s-1990s (0.6 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 3: Artist Files, circa 1947-1997 (4.5 linear feet; Boxes 2-6, 12-14)

Series 4: Writing Projects and Notes, circa 1940-circa 1994 (1.7 linear feet; Boxes 6-8)

Series 5: Exhibition Files, 1958-1991 (1.0 linear feet; Box 8, OV 15)

Series 6: Professional Files, 1948-circa 1997 (0.5 linear feet; Box9, OV 15)

Series 7: Subject Files, 1956-1991 (0.2 linear feet; Box 9, OV 15)

Series 8: Teaching Files, circa 1950-1997 (1.1 linear feet; Boxes 9-10)

Series 9: Printed Materials, 1964-1997 (0.6 linear feet; Boxes 10-11, OV 15)
Biographical / Historical:
E.C. (Eugene) Goossen (1920-1997) was an art historian, critic, and educator in New York, N.Y.

Goossen attended Hamilton College, the Corcoran School of Fine Arts, and The New School in New York City where he received his bachelor of arts degree in 1950. He also received a certificate from the Sorbonne in Paris in 1948. He was Director of Exhibitions at Bennington College from 1958 to 1961, a professor at Hunter College from 1961 to 1991, and a student advisor at the City University of New York Graduate Center. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship Award in 1971 and a Critics' Award from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1975.

Goossen curated several major exhibitions including The Art of the Real (1968) at the Museum of Modern Art, Art in Space (1972) in Detroit, Helen Frankenthaler (1969) at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Ellsworth Kelly (1972) at the Museum of Modern Art, as well as Paul Feeley (1970), 8 Young Artists (1964), and Doug Ohlson exhibitions (1962-1982) at Bennington College. He produced numerous articles, essays, and books on Georgia O'Keeffe, Ellsworth Kelly, Herbert Ferber, Tony Smith, and other prominent artists.

Goossen was married to artist Patricia Johanson. He died in 1997 in Bennington, Vermont.
Provenance:
The E.C. (Eugene) Goossen papers were donated by Goossen's widow, Patricia Johanson, in 1997, 1998, and 2006.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Citation:
E.C. (Eugene) Goossen papers, circa 1935-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.goose
See more items in:
E.C. (Eugene) Goossen papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw909f6bdc2-c482-4a21-ad6b-64d1a3c3edf2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-goose
Online Media:

William Anderson Coffin papers, 1886-1924

Creator:
Coffin, William A. (William Anderson), 1855-1925  Search this
Subject:
Stella, Joseph  Search this
Warren, Whitney  Search this
Mauer, Alfred  Search this
Benson, Frank Weston  Search this
Blashfield, Edwin Howland  Search this
Zorach, William  Search this
Gay, Walter  Search this
Gussow, Bernard  Search this
Bouché, Louis  Search this
Cortissoz, Royal  Search this
Pan-American Exposition (1901: Buffalo, N.Y.)  Search this
Société des artistes français  Search this
Exposition d'artistes de l'école Américaine (1919 : Paris, France)  Search this
American Rights Committee  Search this
American Artists' Committee of One Hundred  Search this
Lotos Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Musée d'histoire et d'art (Luxembourg)  Search this
Committee for the Exhibition of American Painting and Sculpture (Paris, France)  Search this
Type:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Topic:
Harper's Weekly  Search this
New York Post  Search this
Art Exhibitions France Paris  Search this
Landscape painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, American  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Theme:
Lives of American Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7476
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209634
AAA_collcode_coffwill
Theme:
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209634
Online Media:

National Arts Club records

Creator:
National Arts Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Names:
Arts Realty  Search this
De Kay, Charles  Search this
Extent:
32.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Date:
1898-1960
Summary:
The records of the National Arts Club measure 32.1 linear feet and date from 1898 to 1960. The collection documents the founding of the club, and it's governance, administration, exhibitions, and social activities
Scope and Content Note:
Records of the National Arts Club, spanning the period 1898 to 1960, document the founding of the organization, and its governance, administration, finances, exhibitions, and social activities. There are large gaps in the records and many of those surviving are incomplete, which can be explained by a 1932 resolution of the Board of Governors that "old files and letters and bills in the storeroom prior to 1922 may be destroyed at the discretion of the Secretary and Treasurer."

Minutes and reports of the Board of Governors and Executive Committee are fairly complete through 1949, but sparse thereafter. Records do not exist for all standing and special committees, and those remaining tend to be concentrated in the early twentieth century.

Correspondence of the officers, for the most part, is routine and relates to administrative matters. Financial records cover the period 1917 to 1950, with a large number of gaps.

A small number of records of the Arts Realty Co. (later known as 15 Gramercy Park, Inc.) are extant. These include lists of stockholders, correspondence concerning mortgage bonds, and minutes.

Membership records, arranged alphabetically, are available for the years 1931 to 1959, and there are rosters arranged by membership category, 1940-1952; in addition, printed membership lists were issued circa 1900-1951.

More than four hundred exhibitions are known to have been held in the galleries of the National Arts Club between 1899 and 1960. Catalogs for 124 National Arts Club exhibitions are available at the Archives of American Art; 69 titles are to be found among the Club's records and an additional 55 were microfilmed previously as parts of other collections. Other exhibition documentation includes printed matter such as invitations, entry blanks, publicity, and photographs (see Appendix A). For some exhibitions, supporting documentation such as correspondence with exhibitors and collectors, sales and consignment records, and shipping receipts have survived. These files are mainly confined to Books of the Year exhibitions, Arts and Crafts/Decorative Arts exhibitions, and a smaller number of exhibitions of Living American Etchers, 1928-1957.

General social events, activities sponsored by Arts Club committees, and special commemorative occasions are documented by invitations, programs, publicity, calendars of events, and photographs. The majority of this material is contained in seventeen scrapbooks, 1898-1940. Programs of the Men's Open Table, 1915-1950, are particularly well documented by the Chairman's correspondence and three volumes containing meeting notices with signatures of members in attendance.

In addition to printed matter relating to exhibitions and events, scrapbooks, 1898-1940, contain general publicity, clippings concerning members, and samples of National Arts Club printed matter such as form letters to the general membership, brochures, ballots, house rules, published membership lists, year books, and the like. Loose printed matter augments that preserved in the scrapbooks. These sources combined provide a fairly complete set of the Bulletin, but the number of year books is small, and there are catalogs of only slightly more than a third of the exhibitions identified.

Photographs, in addition to those recording exhibitions and events, include portraits of governors, officers, distinguished visitors, speakers, and performers; views of Gramercy Park and the interior and exterior of the clubhouse; and works of art in the permanent collection.

Miscellaneous material includes information on the National Arts Club's first home on West 34th Street, and the Tilden Mansion, its current clubhouse on Gramercy Park; histories of the organization; unpublished speeches presented at Club occasions; and copies of legal documents, including the Club's charter and act of incorporation.

See Appendix A for an annotated list of National Arts Club exhibitions, 1899-1960
Arrangement:
The records are arranged into the following series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Board of Governors, 1898-1960, undated

Series 2: Administration, 1898-1960, undated

Series 3: Financial Records, 1917-1952

Series 4: Membership, circa 1900-1962

Series 5: Arts Realty Co., 1909-1913, 1945-1956, undated

Series 6: Miscellaneous, 1890-1961, undated

Series 7: Photographs, 1899-1957, undated

Series 8: Printed Matter, 1893-1960, undated

Series 9: Scrapbooks, 1898-1940
Historical Note:
The National Arts Club was founded by Charles de Kay, literary and art critic for the New York Times who believed there was a need for a club uniting all of the arts. In March of 1898, de Kay called together a number of civic leaders and men prominent in the art world who supported the idea, elected the first officers and incorporated the Club in 1899.

As stated in a circular issued by the Club, its specified purposes were: to promote the mutual acquaintance of art lovers and art workers in the United States; to stimulate and guide toward practical and artistic expression the artistic sense of the American people; to maintain in the City of New York a Club House...for social purposes in connection with the arts; to provide proper exhibition facilities for such lines of art, especially applied and industrial art, as shall not be otherwise adequately provided for in the same City; and to encourage the publication and circulation of news, suggestions and discussions relating to the fine arts.

During its initial months, the National Arts Club operated from a temporary office at 156 Fifth Avenue. In the search for a permanent site, considerable care was taken to select an auspicious location and accommodations, and in 1899 the first clubhouse was opened at 37 West 34th Street in leased quarters renovated expressly for the Club. Within a year, the gallery and restaurant required additional space, and there was a desire to provide overnight quarters for members visiting from out of town. In 1901 the Club created a corporation, Arts Realty Co., which issued shares to members and other investors for the purpose of raising funds to purchase the adjacent property (39 West 34th Street). This end was accomplished, and when it was decided to move the Club to another location, proceeds from the sale of the lease on 37 West 34th Street and the lot next door, augmented by additional funds subscribed by members, enabled Arts Realty Co. to acquire the Tilden Mansion at 15 Gramercy Park in 1905. Construction was begun immediately on a connecting studio tower to the rear (119-121 East 19th Street), designed by architect and Club President George B. Post. Upon completion, the Club bought the property from Arts Realty Co., issuing both First and Second Mortgage Bonds to individual subscribers. The Gramercy Park property has been occupied by the Club since 1906.

A show of American gold and silver work in October 1899 was the first exhibition held at the National Arts Club. Decorative arts, crafts, and industrial arts figured prominently in early exhibitions, as did designs for civic improvements. The monthly exhibition schedule emphasized contemporary American art, but also included some historical shows. Members of the public were admitted without charge to the galleries, where they could view such innovative and important exhibitions as Pictorial Photographs presented by the Photo-Secession (1902) and a group exhibition featuring the works of Robert Henri, William Glackens, George Luks, Arthur B. Davies, and Maurice Prendergast (1904). After about 1907, exhibitions grew more conservative, probably reflecting the personal tastes of Art Committee members rather than a formal opposition of the Club to nonrepresentational art. Increasingly, the exhibition schedule was filled by shows of members' work, the Club's permanent collection (mainly works by artist members, usually given in payment for life membership), the Annual Arts and Crafts exhibitions, Books of the Year exhibitions, and shows organized by various art societies.

In addition to exhibitions, the National Arts Club regularly featured a variety of cultural programs such as concerts, lectures, and dramatic presentations for members and guests. Parties, dinner, dances, and other social activities drew members to the Club, too. During its first years, some artist members expressed dissatisfaction with the high priority given social functions; by 1905, J. Carroll Beckwith, Walter Shirlaw, and Stanford White were among those who had resigned for this reason.

Within the National Arts Club there have been some smaller societies. The earliest of these were The Discus, a short lived dining and debating club, and The Vagabonds, a lunch group of writers, editors, printers and illustrators. The Men's Open Table, founded in 1910, met weekly for more than forty years for dinner followed by a talk, given by a fellow member or an outside, often professional, lecturer. A wide range of topics, not necessarily on the arts, were presented and discussed at the Men's Open Table. The American Institute of Graphic Arts is one of the organizations said to have developed from associations formed and discussions held at the Men's Open Table. A Women's Open Table, patterned after the men's, was established later.

The National Arts Club, unlike many other private clubs founded during the same era, admitted women members from its inception. Throughout its history, the Club's membership has been comprised of artists, musicians, writers, and performers, as well as collectors and supporters of the arts drawn from all parts of the country. Membership peaked at around 1,800 in 1920, declining throughout the Depression and again in the mid-1950s, and remaining at about 600 for the next two decades.

Missing Title

1898 -- Founding; occupied temporary office at 156 Fifth Ave.

1899 -- Incorporation; leased clubhouse at 37 West 34th St.; opened first exhibition, American Gold and Silver Work

1900 -- Constitution adopted

1901 -- First donations to permanent collection; Arts Realty Co. formed for the purpose of acquiring and financing the adjacent property (39 West 34th St.)

1905 -- Arts Realty Co. purchased Gramercy Park property (Tilden Mansion) on behalf of NAC; remodeling of clubhouse and construction of studio tower begun

1906 -- Plan for financing new clubhouse approved; second Mortgage Bonds issued; clubhouse and studio tower occupied; First Annual Books of the Year Exhibition

1907 -- Annual Members' Exhibition initiated; Bulletin began publication

1910 -- First meeting of Men's Open Table (established 1909)

1914 -- Essay contest, "A Critical Estimate of the Altman Collection"

1917 -- American Artists War Emergency Fund Committee issues art stamp

1923 -- Junior Artist membership category created

1930-1931 -- Essay contest, "Soul of America"

1940 -- Works by deceased artist life members deaccessioned from permanent collection; fund for refugee artists established

1962 -- Clubhouse designated New York City Landmark

1976 -- Clubhouse designated National Historic Landmark

1987 -- NAC records donated to Archives of American Art
Appendix A: Annotated List of National Arts Club Exhibitions, 1899-1960:
* = photographs included with records of NAC (See pp. 22-23 for reel and frame numbers)

+ = photograph in NAC album (See pp. 24 for reel and frame numbers)

x = catalog, checklist, or printed announcement included with NAC printed matter

s = copy of catalog in NAC scrapbook (volume number noted, see pp. 27-32 for reel and frame numbers of each volume)

Microfilm reel and frame numbers (e.g.: N134:416-419) are cited below for NAC catalogs appearing in other collections within the Archives of American Art.

DateExhibitionOct. 30 *, 1899 -- House Warming, Exhibition of American Gold and Silver Work

Nov. 13-18, 1899 -- Tenth Exhibition of the Woman's Art Club; Reception to Miss Cecilia Beaux (N134:416-419)

Nov. 27-Dec. 10, 1899 -- Art Pottery, American, Oriental, and European (N134:407-415)

Dec. 23-Jan. 8, 1899 -- Exhibition of Small Bronzes (N134:437-443)

Jan. 13, 1900 -- Exhibition of Photographs, works by members of the Society of Mural Painters

Jan. 29, 1900 -- Design for Street Refuge, shown by New York Municipal Art Society

Feb. 5-22, 1900 -- Exhibition of Embroideries and Native Rugs (N134:420-425)

Feb. 24-Mar. 10, 1900 -- John Leslie Breck Memorial Exhibition (N443:703-708; N551:719-724)

Mar. 24-Apr. 14, 1900 -- Pastel Exhibition, American Work

Apr., 1900 -- Old and Modern Japanese Prints

Apr. 14-21, 1900 -- Ernest Tarleton Memorial Exhibition

Apr. 21-May 3, 1900 -- Exhibition of Color Reproductions, American and European

May 10-21, 1900 -- American Art Leatherwork (N134:432-426)

May 24-30, 1900 -- Small Exhibition of Japanese Water Colors

May 31-June 14, 1900 -- William Hamilton Gibson Memorial Exhibition

June, 1900 -- New York Municipal Art Society Competition

Nov. 28-Dec. 19 x, 1900 -- Arts and Crafts (N134:421-431)

Jan., 1901 -- Birds and Beasts in Art

Feb., 1901 -- Art Leatherwork and Objects Relating to the Hearth

Mar., 1901 -- Works by the Society of Mural Painters

Apr., 1901 -- Books and Bookmaking

Apr., 1901 -- Howard Walter, Water Colors Taken in Europe

May, 1901 -- Glass in the Arts

May, 1901 -- Memorial to John A. Fraser, His Paintings

May-Nov., 1901 -- Arts and Crafts in the Liberal Arts Building, Pan-American Pacific Exhibition, Buffalo, N.Y.

June-Sept., 1901 -- Sculpture, Oil Paintings, Pastels, Water Colors, and Objects of Industrial Art by Members of the Club

Oct., 1901 -- Memorial Window for the Ames Family by John La Farge

Nov., 1901 -- Annual Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture by the Woman's Art Club

Dec., 1901 -- Objects Shown at the Pan-American Pacific Exposition

Jan., 1902 -- Ecclesiastical Art

Feb., 1902 -- Art Objects Relating to Civic Art, under the auspices of the Municipal Art Society

Mar., 1902 -- American Pictorial Photographs, shown by the Photo-Secession

Mar. 26-Apr. 21, 1902 -- Fourth Annual Exhibition of the National Sculpture Society (N551:725-729; N134:446-451)

May, 1902 -- Pictures of "Womanhood"

May, 1902 -- Memorial Window for Baltimore by D. Maitland Armstrong; Memorial Window for Wells College by Mrs. Ella Condie Lamb June Window in Stained Glass, Memorial to Julia Doane, Chicago, by John La Farge

Oct., 1902 -- Collection of Objects in Metal; Artistic Bird Cages lent by A. W. Drake, Esq.

Nov., 1902 -- Annual Exhibition by the Woman's Art Club

Nov., 1902 -- Paintings by Four Western Artists, Messrs. Duveneck, Steele, Meakin and Sharp, through the courtesy of the Cincinnati Museum Association

Dec., 1902 -- Designs Submitted for Competition for the Emblem of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition

Jan. s, 1903 -- Portraits of Napoleon, lent by John Leonard Dudley, Jr., Esq. (volume 4)

Jan., 1903 -- "Autumn," Stained Glass Window for the country residence of William C. Whitney, by John La Farge

Feb., 1903 -- Eskimo and Arctic Objects, with Paintings from the Arctic and Antarctic Circles by Frank Wilbert Stokes

Mar., 1903 -- Objects of Municipal Art

Apr., 1903 -- Examples of Ideal Art by American Artists

May, 1903 -- Sculptures by Rodin, Roche, and Rivere, belonging to Miss Lois Fuller

May, 1903 -- Portraits and other Paintings by American Artists of the Colonial and Early Periods

June-Oct., 1903 -- Summer Exhibition of Paintings, Water Colors, and Sculpture by Members of the Club

Nov., 1903 -- Jewelry and Precious Stones, Modern, Old and Oriental

Dec. 1-14, 1903 -- Thirteenth Annual Exhibition of the Woman's Art Club (N134:452-456)

Dec., 1903 -- Stained Glass Window, designed by Miss Mary E. Tillinghast

Dec., 1903 -- Sketches for the Sculpture at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, shown by the National Sculpture Society

Jan. 5-16 s, 1904 -- Loan Exhibition of Pictures by Eminent American Painters (N134:426-464, and volume 4)

Jan. 5-16 s, 1904 -- Loan Exhibition of Pictures by Robert Henri, William Glackens, George Luks, Arthur B. Davies, and Maurice Prendergast (volume 4)

Feb., 1904 -- Pictures by Contemporary American Artists

Mar. 2-15, 1904 -- Loan Exhibition of Pictures by American Figure Painters (N50:471-472; N134:460-461)

Mar., 1904 -- Annual Exhibition of Objects of Municipal Art

Apr. 5-15 s, 1904 -- Loan Exhibition of Pictures by Some Boston Artists (N443:713-715, and volume 4)

Apr. 19-30 s, 1904 -- Loan Exhibition of Pictures by Old Masters, lent by the Messrs. Durand-Ruel (N443:711-712; N134:462-464, and volume 4)

May 3-14 s, 1904 -- Oil Paintings, Water Colors, and Drawings by John La Farge, N.A. (volume 4)

May, 1904 -- Photographs of Paintings by Old Italian Masters, under the auspices of the Library Committee

Oct., 1904 -- Work of Holders of the Lazarus and Reinhart Scholarships executed while at the American Academy in Rome

Nov., 1904 -- "The Moral and Divine Law," painting by John La Farge

Nov., 1904 -- Exhibition by Members of the Nippon-Bijitsuin (Japanese Art Academy)

Jan., 1905 -- Exhibition by the Lyme Group of Painters

Feb., 1905 -- "Old Masters" and Aphrodite

Feb., 1905 -- Pictures by Some Boston Artists

Mar., 1905 -- Annual Exhibition of the Municipal Art Society of New York

Apr., 1905 -- Artistic and Commercial Posters, under the Auspices of the Municipal Art Society

Apr., 1905 -- Textiles and Ceramics

Oct., 1905 -- "Out of Doors" as Seen by Various Artists

Nov., 1905 -- Color Prints by S. Arlent-Edwards

Dec., 1905 -- American Indians as Seen by the Artist and the Artist Photographer

Jan., 1906 -- Birds and Beasts in Art

Feb., 1906 -- Miniatures

Mar., 1906 -- Fifth Annual Exhibition of the Municipal Art Society

Mar., 1906 -- Exhibition by the Alumni of Cooper Institute

Apr. 2-14 s, 1906 -- Municipal Art Society Exhibit of Poster Designs (volume 4)

Apr.-May, 1906 -- Exhibition by the Women's Art Club of New York

Nov. 8-18 s, 1906 -- Opening Exhibition [first exhibition in new quarters]: American Paintings from the Collection of Mr. William T. Evans (D45:29-34, and volume 4)

Dec., 1906 -- Books of the Year

Dec. 8-Jan. 1 s, 1906 -- Pictures by Some American Painters (volume 4)

Jan. 12-Feb. 1 s, 1907 -- Modern German Paintings from the Collection of Mr. Hugo Reisinger (N443:716-717, and volume 4)

Feb. s, 1907 -- Exhibition of Wood Engravings by Timothy Cole made for Century Magazine

Feb., 1907 -- Longfellow Memorial

Mar. 13-31, 1907 -- Sixth Annual Exhibition of the Municipal Art Society of New York

Apr., 1907 -- New York Society of Ceramic Artists

Apr., 1907 -- Paintings and Sculpture by Members

May s, 1907 -- Exhibition of Artists' Preliminary Sketches

May-Nov., 1907 -- Sketches by Members

Oct. 16-Nov. 16 s, 1907 -- Fall Exhibition of Sketches by Members (volume 4)

Nov. 20-Dec. 11, 1907 -- Arts and Crafts Exhibition (N29:1001-1026)

Dec., 1907 -- Second Annual Exhibition of the New Books of the Year

Jan. 4-25 s, 1908 -- Contemporary Art (N443:744-746, and volume 5)

Feb., 1908 -- First Annual Exhibition of Advertising Art

Feb. 1-15 s, 1908 -- Contemporary Paintings (volume 5)

Mar., 1908 -- Exhibition of the Municipal Art Society of New York

Apr. 2-25 * s, 1908 -- Special Exhibition of Members' Work (volume 5)

Apr. 15-May 8 s, 1908 -- Members' Spring Exhibition (volume 5)

Apr. 25-May 15 s, 1908 -- Paintings Loaned by C. C. Ruthrauff (volume 5)

May *, 1908 -- Exhibition of Painting, Sculpture, and Illustration under the auspices of the Art Students League of New York

Oct. 21-Nov. 7 s, 1908 -- Members' Fall Sketch Exhibition (volume 5)

Nov. *, 1908 -- Third Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec., 1908 -- Arts and Crafts Exhibition

Jan., 1909 -- Second Annual Exhibition of Advertising Art

Jan., 1909 -- Small Exhibition of Paintings and Drawings by Contemporary Artists

Feb. 2-20 s, 1909 -- International Exhibition of Pictorial Photography (volume 1)

Feb. 23-Mar. 17 s, 1909 -- John W. Alexander Retrospective Exhibition (volume 5)

Apr., 1909 -- Exhibition of the New York Society of Keramic Arts

May, 1909 -- Spring Exhibition of Members' Work

July, 1909 -- Paintings from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. William T. Evans

Sept.-Oct., 1909 -- Three Centuries of New York, under the auspices of the Hudson-Fulton Celebration

Nov. 3-26 s, 1909 -- Fourth Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year (volume 5)

Dec., 1909 -- Third Annual Exhibition of Arts and Crafts

Jan., 1910 -- William M. Chase Retrospective Exhibition

Feb., 1910 -- Exhibition of American Landscape Painting

Mar. 2-28 s, 1910 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Louis Mark, of Budapest (volume 5)

Apr. 6-30 s, 1910 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Alfred East, of London (N134:465-469, and volume 5)

May, 1910 -- Exhibition of Household Art, under the auspices of the Domestic Training Department of the Public Schools

May 4-Oct. s, 1910 -- Third Annual Exhibition of the Former Students of the Art Students League (volume 5)

Oct. 20-Nov. 1 s +, 1910 -- Third Annual Exhibition of Advertising Art (volume 5)

Nov.-Dec., 1910 -- Fifth Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. * +, 1910 -- Fourth Annual Arts and Crafts Exhibition

Jan. 5-Feb. 3 s +, 1911 -- First Annual Artist Life Members' Exhibition (volume 5)

Feb. +, 1911 -- Exhibition of the New York Society of Keramic Arts

Feb. 11-Mar. 10, 1911 -- Circuit Exhibition of Contemporary Art (D12:437-439; N52:105-107)

Mar. 8-Apr. 5 * s +, 1911 -- Paintings and Drawings by Walter Shirlaw, N.A. (N52:967-973, and volume 5)

Apr., 1911 -- Exhibition of the Municipal Art Society of New York

Apr. 26-May * s +, 1911 -- Group Exhibition of Paintings: William R. Derrick, Reynolds Beal, Frederick J. Waugh (volume 5)

Oct. 25-Nov. 4 * +, 1911 -- Exhibition of Color Schemes and Model Rooms in Miniature

Nov. 8-30 * +, 1911 -- Sixth Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 7-28 * +, 1911 -- Fifth Annual Arts and Crafts Exhibition

Jan. 3-28 s +, 1912 -- First Prize Exhibition of Artist Life Members (N443:754-756, and volume 6)

Jan. 31-Feb. 18 * s +, 1912 -- Otto Walter Beck Exhibition (volume 6)

Feb. 21-Mar. 10 s +, 1912 -- Etchings of E. T. Hurley (volume 6)

Mar. 13-20 s +, 1912 -- National Park Pictures Collected and Exhibited by the Department of the Interior (volume 3)

Apr. 4-21 s +, 1912 -- Paintings, Embroideries, and Tapestries from the Collection of Mr. Emerson McMillan (D45:462-468; N443:757-762, and volume 6)

Apr. 4-Mar. 12 s, 1912 -- Exhibition of Original Dickens and Thackeray Drawings by Harry Furniss (volume 3)

May 8-June 1 * s +, 1912 -- Sculpture Exhibition (volume 6)

June 4-8 +, 1912 -- Exhibition of Industrial Art, under the auspices of The School Art League and the Art Departments of the City High Schools

June-Oct., 1912 -- Summer Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture

Oct. 16-Nov. 12 +, 1912 -- Third Special Exhibition of the Society of Illustrators

Nov. 13-29, 1912 -- Seventh Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 4-28 +, 1912 -- Sixth Annual Exhibition of the National Society of Craftsmen

Jan. 8-Feb. 9 +, 1913 -- Work of the Painter, Sculptor, and Architect Members (N443:763-767; N50:126-130)

Feb. 12-Mar. 9 * +, 1913 -- Exhibition of Works by the Late Frederick Warren Freer

Mar. 12-31 +, 1913 -- The Applied Arts of Germany

Apr. 2-27 +, 1913 -- Small Works by Six Painters: Richard E. Miller, Frederick Carl Frieseke, Charles W. Hawthorne, William Wendt, William Ritschel, and Elise Dodge Pattee

Apr. 30-June 1 +, 1913 -- Small Marbles and Bronzes (N551:732-737)

May-June, 1913 -- Summer Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture

Oct. 15-Nov. 9, 1913 -- Society of Illustrators

Nov. 12-28, 1913 -- Eighth Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 3-28 * +, 1913 -- Seventh Annual Exhibition of the National Society of Craftsmen

Jan. 8-Feb. 1 +, 1914 -- Work of Painter, Sculptor, and Architect Members

Feb. 4-21, 1914 -- The Pastellists

Feb. 5-Mar. 21 x +, 1914 -- Contemporary Art

Mar. 11-29 * +, 1914 -- Hungarian Peasant Art (N134:470-479)

Apr. 1-May 2 +, 1914 -- Paintings by Eleven Western Artists

May 6-31 * +, 1914 -- Exhibition of Small Sculpture (N551:738-743)

June-Sept., 1914 -- Paintings

Nov. 4-27, 1914 -- Ninth Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 3-28 +, 1914 -- Eighth Annual Exhibition of National Society of Craftsmen

Jan. 7-31 +, 1915 -- Work of Painter Members (N551:744-746)

Feb. 4-25 +, 1915 -- Forty-eighth Annual Exhibition of American Water Color Society

Mar. 3-24 +, 1915 -- Portraits (N551:747-748)

Apr. 7-13 +, 1915 -- Sculpture

May 5-21, 1915 -- Exhibition of Municipal Art Society

June-Oct. *, 1915 -- Work of Painter Members

Oct. 13-30 +, 1915 -- Fifth Special Exhibition of the Society of Illustrators

Nov. 5-13 +, 1915 -- American Wood Engraving, under the auspices of the American Institute of Graphic Arts

Nov. 17-Dec. 3, 1915 -- Tenth Anniversary Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 8-30 +, 1915 -- Ninth Annual Exhibition of the National Society of Craftsmen

Jan. 6-28 +, 1916 -- Work of Painter Members

Feb. 3-27 +, 1916 -- Forty-ninth Annual Exhibition of American Water Color Society

Mar. 2-25 * +, 1916 -- Loan Exhibition of Portraits of Academicians and Associates Selected from the Permanent Collection of the National Academy of Design (N551:749-752; N134:480-483)

Mar. 28-Apr. 14 +, 1916 -- One Hundred American Paintings by the American Institute of Graphic Arts (N443:768-770)

Mar. 28-Apr. 14 +, 1916 -- Exhibition of American Printing

Apr. 19-May 6, 1916 -- Exhibition of the Municipal Art Society

May 10-26, 1916 -- English Posters

June-Aug. +, 1916 -- Members' Summer Sketch Exhibition

Oct. 5-Nov. 3, 1916 -- Photography, under the auspices of the American Institute of Graphic Arts

Nov. 9-30, 1916 -- Eleventh Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 7-29, 1916 -- Tenth Annual Exhibition of the National Society of Craftsmen

Jan. 3-28 +, 1917 -- Annual Exhibition of the Work of Artist Members

Feb. 1-24 +, 1917 -- Fiftieth Annual Exhibition of the American Water Color Society

Feb. 28-Mar. 23 +, 1917 -- Etchings, under the auspices of the American Institute of Graphic Arts

Mar. 29-Apr. 27, 1917 -- Paintings by Boston Artists

May 2-Sept. +, 1917 -- Members' Sketch Exhibition

Oct. 3-31 +, 1917 -- Paintings from the Netherlands Section of the Panama-Pacific Exposition

Oct. 4-31, 1917 -- Illustrations of the Catskill Aqueduct

Nov. 8-30 +, 1917 -- Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 6-29, 1917 -- Eleventh Annual Exhibition of the National Society of Craftsmen

Jan. 3-Feb. 1 +, 1918 -- Annual Exhibition of Paintings by Members

Feb. 7-Mar. 1 +, 1918 -- Fifty-first Annual Exhibition of the American Water Color Society

Mar. 20-Apr. 26, 1918 -- Life Membership Pictures from the Permanent Collection

May, 1918 -- War Posters, under the auspices of the American Society of Graphic Arts

June 2-Oct. 1 +, 1918 -- Sketch Exhibition by Members

Dec. 5-28 +, 1918 -- Twelfth Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Jan. 8-31 +, 1919 -- Retrospective Exhibition of the Work of the Artist Life Members

Feb., 1919 -- Fifty-second Annual Exhibition of the American Water Color Society

Mar., 1919 -- Exhibition of War Housing

Apr. 2-May 3 +, 1919 -- Special Exhibition of the Society of Illustrators (N29:873-875)

May-Oct. +, 1919 -- Annual Exhibition of Sketches by Members

Nov., 1919 -- Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Jan. 7-30 +, 1920 -- Annual Exhibition of Painter and Sculptor Members (N29:864-866)

Feb., 1920 -- Fifty-third Annual Exhibition of the American Water Color Society

Mar., 1920 -- Drawings from Artists' Portfolios

Mar. 3-27 x +, 1920 -- American Drawings and Sculpture Sketches

Mar. 31-Apr. 16 +, 1920 -- Special Exhibition of the Society of Illustrators (N29:867-869)

May, 1920 -- Printing by the American Institute of Graphic Arts

June-Oct. +, 1920 -- Sketches and Small Sculpture by Members

Nov., 1920 -- Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 1-29 +, 1920 -- Exhibition of Art Expression by Club Members

Jan. 5-27 +, 1921 -- Members' Annual Prize Exhibition

Mar. 2-31 +, 1921 -- Art Directors Club First Annual Exhibition of Drawings and Paintings Used in American Advertising

Apr. 7-30, 1921 -- Exhibition of Old Prints, under the auspices of the American Institute of Graphic Arts (N443:775-778)

May-Oct., 1921 -- Pictures from the Club's Permanent Collection

Nov., 1921 -- Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 7-30 +, 1921 -- Humorists Exhibition

Jan. 5-28 +, 1922 -- Members' Annual Prize Exhibition

Feb., 1922 -- Seventh Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Bookplates, held by the American Bookplate Society

Feb. 15-Mar. 5 +, 1922 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Charles C.Curran, Franklin de Haven, George Glenn Newell, Harry W. Watrous

Mar., 1922 -- Lithographs

Apr. 5-30 +, 1922 -- Loan Exhibition of American Painting and Sculpture Owned by Club Members

May-Oct. +, 1922 -- Summer Exhibition of Artist Members

Nov., 1922 -- Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 6-29 +, 1922 -- Work by Members

Jan. 10-Feb. 10 +, 1923 -- Members' Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture

Feb. 14-Mar. 3 +, 1923 -- Humorists Exhibition

Mar., 1923 -- Craftwork from Berea College, Kentucky

Mar., 1923 -- Group Exhibition: Roy Brown, Oscar Fehrer, Edmund Greacen, Eugene Higgins, Lee Laurie, F. Luis Mora, Carl Rungius, Edward C. Volkert.

Mar. 28-Apr. 20 +, 1923 -- Group Exhibition: Leon Dabo, William R. Derrick, Charles P. Gruppe, Hayley Lever, Charles R. Patterson

Apr., 1923 -- Miniature Garden Exhibition, by the Garden Club of America

May-July, 1923 -- Exhibition Selected from the Permanent Collection

June 5-28 +, 1923 -- Annual Prize Exhibition of Painter and Sculptor Members

Nov., 1923 -- Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 12-29 +, 1923 -- Work of Living American Etchers

Jan. 9-Feb. 2 +, 1924 -- Members' Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture

Mar. 5-29 +, 1924 -- Exhibition of Sculpture

Apr., 1924 -- Selected Paintings from the Permanent Collection

Apr. 30-May 15 +, 1924 -- Exhibition of Books Illustrating the History of Printing

June, 1924 -- Adirondack Mountain Club Exhibition of Photographs

Nov. *, 1924 -- Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 10-27 +, 1924 -- Second Annual Exhibition of Living American Etchers

Jan. 7-31 +, 1925 -- Members' Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture (N552:122-159)

Feb. 23-Mar. 7 +, 1925 -- Autograph Letters with Accompanying Portraits of Authors, Statesmen, Artists, etc.

Apr. 8-May 9 +, 1925 -- Exhibition of Lithographs, Wood Blocks, and Linoleum Cuts

Nov., 1925 -- Twentieth Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 3-20, 1925 -- Work of Living American Etchers (N552:1-7)

Jan. 13-Feb. 6 +, 1926 -- Members' Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture (N552:19-21)

Feb. 10-27 +, 1926 -- Group Exhibiton by Members of the National Arts Club

Mar. 3-27 +, 1926 -- Copies of Old Masters

Apr., 1926 -- Architecture, Sculpture, and Decorative Painting

May +, 1926 -- Fifth International Exhibition of the Brooklyn Society of Etchers (N552:34-48)

Summer +, 1926 -- Summer Exhibition

Aug.-Oct. x, 1926 -- The Vollbehr Incunabula Exhibition

Nov., 1926 -- Twenty-first Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 2-22 +, 1926 -- Fourth Annual Exhibition of Works of Living American Etchers (N552:8-12)

Jan. 5-29 +, 1927 -- Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture by Members

Feb. 11-27 +, 1927 -- Exhibition and Auction of Works of Art by Artist Members

Mar. 2-21 +, 1927 -- Invited Exhibition by Distinguished American Painters (NHS4:693-695)

Apr. 6-29 +, 1927 -- Norse Pictorial Weaving--Mrs. Berthea Aske Bergh (N552:66-68)

Nov., 1927 -- Twenty-second Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 7-24 +, 1927 -- Fifth Annual Exhibition of Works of Living American Etchers (N552:13-18)

Jan., 1928 -- Members' Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture

Feb. 8-29 +, 1928 -- Small Paintings

Mar. 8-31 x, 1928 -- Exhibition of Decorative Arts

Apr. 4-20 +, 1928 -- Exhibition by Junior Artist Members of the Club

Nov., 1928 -- Twenty-third Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec., 1928 -- Small Paintings

Jan. 8-Feb. 8 + -- Members' Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture

Feb. 13-Mar. 8 -- Sixth Annual Exhibition by Living American Etchers

Mar. + -- Richard M. Hurd Loan Exhibition of Italian Primitives

Apr. 3-26 + -- Exhibition by Junior Artist Members of the Club

May 1-Oct. 1 + -- Summer Exhibition by Painter Life Members

Nov. -- Twenty-fourth Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 4-26 * + -- Exhibition of the Decorative Arts

Jan. 8-Feb. 1 +, 1930 -- Members' Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture

Feb. 5-28 x +, 1930 -- Seventh Annual Exhibition of Living American Etchers

Mar. 5-28 +, 1930 -- Junior Artist Members' Exhibition

Apr. 16-Sept. 30 +, 1930 -- Members' Exhibition of Small Paintings (N134:484-490)

Nov., 1930 -- Silver Anniversary Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 3-26 * +, 1930 -- Eighth Annual Exhibition by Living American Etchers

Jan. 7-Feb. 6 +, 1931 -- Members' Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture

Mar. 4-27 +, 1931 -- Exhibition by the Junior Artist Members

Mar. 13-Apr. 15 x, 1931 -- Auction Exhibition and Sale by Artist Members

Apr. 1-25 +, 1931 -- Members' Work of the New York Water Color Club

May 2-24 +, 1931 -- The Story of Gramercy Park in Portraits and Historical Objects of the Period, in connection with Gramercy Park Centenary Celebration

June 3-Oct. 1 +, 1931 -- Members' Exhibition of Small Paintings

Oct. 21-Nov. 20, 1931 -- Twenty-sixth Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Nov. 26-Dec. 26, 1931 -- Sixteenth Annual Exhibition by the Society of American Etchers (formerly The Brooklyn Society of Etchers)

Jan. 6-13 +, 1932 -- Members' Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture

Feb. 3-27 +, 1932 -- Exhibition of Drawings by Artist Members

Mar. 2-26 +, 1932 -- Paintings by Junior Artist Members

Mar. 13-Apr. 15 +, 1932 -- Auction Exhibition and Sale by Artist Members

Apr. 20-30 +, 1932 -- Exhibition by a Group of New York Art Schools

May 4-Oct. 1 +, 1932 -- Members' Annual Exhibition of Small Paintings

Jan. 4-27 +, 1933 -- Members' Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture

Mar. 1-31 +, 1933 -- Junior Artist Members

Apr. 5-22 +, 1933 -- Society of Illustrators

May 3-Oct. 1 +, 1933 -- Members' Exhibition of Small Paintings and Sculpture

Jan. 3-27 +, 1934 -- Members' Annual Exhibition

Jan. 31-Mar. 2 +, 1934 -- Memorial Exhibition of a Group of Former Painter and Sculptor Members: Max Bohm, Emil Carlsen, Charles Hawthorne, Robert Henri, Karl Bitter, Solon Borglum, Daniel Chester French, Edmund Quinn

Mar. 7-29 +, 1934 -- Junior Artist Members

Apr. 4-27 +, 1934 -- Society of Illustrators, Thirty-second Annual Exhibition

May 2-June 28 +, 1934 -- Members' Exhibition of Small Paintings and Sculpture (N552:69-71; N134:491-494)

Nov.-Dec., 1934 -- Seventeenth Annual Exhibition of the Society of American Etchers (formerly The Brooklyn Society of Etchers) (N552:49-65)

undated -- Twenty-ninth Annual Exhibition of Fifty Books of the Year

Jan. 9-Feb. 1 +, 1935 -- Members' Exhibition (N552:22-24)

Feb. 6-Mar. 2 +, 1935 -- Members' No Jury Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture (N552:72-74)

Mar. 6-29 +, 1935 -- Junior Artist Members (N552:75-77)

Apr. 3-27 +, 1935 -- Loan Exhibition of Works of Art owned by Artist Members (N552:84-96)

undated -- Thirtieth Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

undated -- Twentieth Annual Exhibition of the Society of American Etchers

Jan. 8-31 +, 1936 -- Members' Annual Exhibition (M552:25-27)

Mar. 4-27 +, 1936 -- Junior Artist Members (N552:78-80)

Apr. 1-May 1 x +, 1936 -- Exhibition of Neighboring Art Organizations (N552:92-94)

Spring +, 1936 -- First Annual Exhibition of Pictorial Photography by the Pictorial Forum (N552:87-91)

1936 -- Thirty-first Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

undated -- Twenty-first Annual Exhibition of the Society of American Etchers

Jan. 6-29 +, 1937 -- Members' Annual Exhibition

Mar. 3-26 +, 1937 -- Exhibition by the Younger Artists Group (N134:495-497)

Mar. 31-Apr. 27 +, 1937 -- Second Exhibition of Neighboring Art Organizations (N552:95-97)

Nov. *, 1937 -- Thirty-second Annual Exhibition of Books of the Year

Dec. 8-25 +, 1937 -- Members' Exhibition of Smaller Paintings and Black and Whites (N552:110-112)

Jan. 12-27, 1938 -- Exhibition of Former Painter and Sculptor Members (N552:113-115)

Mar. 14-Apr. 2 +, 1938 -- Third Exhibition of Neighboring Art Organizations (N552:98-100)

Apr. 6-20 +, 1938 -- Younger Artists Group Exhibition (N552:107-109)

Jan. 12-27 x +, 1939 -- Memorial Exhibition of the Work of a Group of Former Painter and Sculptor Members (N134:498-499)

Feb. 1-25 +, 1939 -- Members' Exhibition (N552:28-30)

Mar. 1-31 +, 1939 -- Exhibition of Flower Paintings (N552:116-118; N134:500-502)

Mar. 3-26, 1939 -- Younger Artists Group (N552:104-106)

Apr. 5-21 +, 1939 -- Fourth Annual Exhibition of Neighboring Art Organizations (N552:101-103)

May 10-24 +, 1939 -- Annual Junior Members' Exhibition (N552:81-83; N134:503-505)

June-Oct. +, 1939 -- Selected Works by Deceased Artists from the National Arts Club Permanent Collection (N552:119-121; N134:506-508)

Oct. 18-28 +, 1939 -- Special Exhibition of Paintings by Junior Members

Dec. 4-25 +, 1939 -- Christmas Sale of Paintings, Drawings, Photographs, and Sculpture by Junior Members

Jan. 3-19 +, 1940 -- Members' Annual Exhibition

Jan. 24-Feb. 9 +, 1940 -- Distinguished Exhibition of the Work of Living American Painters, Non-Members

Feb. 14-29 +, 1940 -- Exhibition and Sale of Ceramics (N134:511-513)

Mar. 19-29, 1940 -- Fontainebleau Alumni Exhibition

Apr. 3-19 +, 1940 -- Annual Junior Members' Exhibition

Apr. 24-May 3 +, 1940 -- Flower and Still Life Paintings

May 8-June 1, 1940 -- Special Exhibition of Water Colors, Architectural Renderings, Type Compositions, and Color Reproductions by Edwin Hooper Denby, A.I.A., S.A.D.G. (N443:779-780; N134:509-510)

Dec. +, 1940 -- Twenty-fifth Annual Exhibition of the Society of American Etchers

Feb. 4-Mar. 1, 1942 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Artists of the United Nations (N134:512-518)

June 12-Sept. 30, 1942 -- Members' Summer Exhibition (N134:519)

Dec. 16-Jan. 22, 1942 -- Exhibition of Chinese and Indian Art (N134:520)

Mar. 31-, 1943 -- Exhibition of Junior Members (N134:521)

July 1-Sept. 30, 1943 -- Summer Exhibition of Smaller Paintings by Members (N134:522)

Feb. 17-Mar. 15, 1944 -- Exhibition of Studies by American Masters (N134:523)

Oct. 5-27, 1944 -- Exhibition of Enlarged Photographs of American Patriots as Seen in Sculpture (N134:523)

Jan. 10-Feb. 9 x, 1945 -- Members' Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture

Dec. 22-Jan. 4, 1945 -- Seventh Annual Exhibition of the American Veterans Society of Artists, Inc. (N134:527-540)

May 21-30, 1946 -- The Traphagen School Exhibition of Costume Design, Illustrating the Development of American Fashion (N134:526)

Feb. 20-Mar. 7, 1947 -- Exhibition of Contemporary Chinese Paintings (N134:541)

Apr. 20-May 2, 1947 -- Junior Members' Exhibition

Dec. 10-24, 1947 -- Ninth Annual Exhibition of American Veterans Society of Artists, Inc. (N121:721-733)

Feb. 23-Mar. 6, 1948 -- Forty-seventh Annual Exhibition of the New York Society of Ceramic Arts (N134:543)

Mar. 9-21, 1948 -- Annual Exhibition of Junior Members (N134:543)

Apr. 8-May 30, 1948 -- Fiftieth Anniversary Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture by Members, Past and Present (N134:543)

June 10-Sept., 1948 -- Members' Summer Exhibition (N134:544)

Jan. 19-Feb. 9, 1949 -- Fifty-first Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture by Members and Guest Artists (N134:544)

Mar. 14-31, 1949 -- Exhibition by Members of the Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors (N134:545)

May 5-Sept. 15, 1949 -- Members' Summer Exhibition (N134:546)

Oct. 15-Nov. 4, 1949 -- Fourth Annual Exhibition of the Photo-Engravers Society

Jan. 4-Feb. 1, 1950 -- Fifty-second Annual Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture by Members and Guest Artists (N134:546-548 and 550)

Jan. 28-Feb. 19, 1950 -- Eighty-third Annual Exhibition of the American Water Color Society (N134:549)

Feb. 8-23, 1950 -- Exhibition of Creative Art Associates (N134:549)

Mar. 16-Apr. 2, 1950 -- Exhibition of Room Interiors Especially Designed by Members of the American Institute of Decorators, in collaboration with Members of the National Society of Mural Painters (N134:551)

May 7-28, 1950 -- Active Members' Exhibition (N134:551-554)

June 28-Sept. 15, 1950 -- Members' Summer Exhibition (N134:555)

Feb. 26-Mar. 17 x, 1951 -- Paul Mommen

Mar. 24-Apr. 19, 1951 -- Exhibition of Paintings by Non-Members (N134:558-559)

May 5-31, 1951 -- Spring Water Color Exhibition (N134:560)

June 6-, 1951 -- Group Exhibition by Distinguished Artist Members: Gifford Beal, Louis Betts, Charles Clapman, Walter Farndon, Albert Groll, Eugene Higgins, Leon Kroll, Van Dearing Perrine, Keith Shaw Williams

Jan. 6-30, 1952 -- Fifty-fourth Annual Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture by Members and Guest Artists (D176:917-919; N134:561)

Feb. 9-28, 1952 -- Annual Water Color Exhibition (N134:562)

Mar. 9-27, 1952 -- Exhibition of Oil Paintings by Distinguished American Artists (N134:572)

Jan. 4-18, 1953 -- Fifty-fifth Annual Exhibition by Painter and Sculptor Members and Guest Artists (N134:563)

Jan. 25-Feb. 8, 1953 -- Annual Water Color Exhibition (N134:564)

Feb. 15-Mar. 1, 1953 -- Open Exhibition of Oil Paintings (N134:565-568)

Mar. *, 1953 -- Art of Indonesia

May 3-24, 1953 -- Members' Exhibition of Smaller Paintings in Oil (N134:569-571)

Nov. 1-14, 1954 -- The American Artists Professional League, American Art Week (N121:258-259)

Oct. 2-19, 1955 -- Open Water Color Exhibition

Jan. 8-22 x, 1956 -- Fifty-eighth Annual Exhibition by Painter and Sculptor Members and Guest Artists (N134:573-575)

June 17-Sept. 7 x, 1956 -- Members' Summer Exhibition

Sept. 24-Oct. 8 x, 1956 -- James H. Walsh

Oct. 28-Nov. 10 x, 1956 -- Small Picture Exhibition by Members and Guests

Nov. 16-30 x, 1956 -- August Benziger

Dec. 5-22 *, 1956 -- Fiftieth Anniversary Exhibition of Books of the Year

Jan. 6-27, 1957 -- Fifty-ninth Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture by Members and Guest Artists

Feb. 1-15, 1957 -- Catherine Lorillard Wolfe Art Club Sixtieth Annual Exhibition (N134:576-577)

Sept. * x, 1957 -- International Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture

Jan. 10-24 x, 1958 -- Sixtieth Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture by Members and Guest Artists

May 21-31 x, 1958 -- Water Color and Graphic Arts Exhibition by Members and Non-Members

Oct. 17-31 x, 1958 -- Twelfth Annual Exhibition of the Photo-Engravers Society

Nov. 22-Dec. 3 x, 1958 -- Metropolitan Young Artists Show

Jan. 11-26 x, 1959 -- Sixty-first Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture by Members and Guest Artists

Dec. 9-Jan. 7 x, 1959 -- Metropolitan Young Artists Show

Jan. 15-28 x, 1960 -- Sixty-second Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture by Members and Guest Artists

Apr. 18-May 1, 1960 -- Catherine Lorillard Wolfe Art Club Flower Painting Exhibition and Sale (D176:1128-1129)

June 8-29 x, 1960 -- Summer Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture by Members

undated -- * Arts and Crafts Exhibitions

undated -- * x Annual Exhibitions of Books of the Year

undated -- * Ceramic Art Exhibition

undated -- x Water-Oils by Charles S. Chapman, N.A.

undated -- x Fine Art of the Caribbean

undated -- x Painters of the United States, 1720-1920, from the Permanent Collection of the Fine Arts Department, International Business Machines Corp.

undated -- * Pottery Exhibition

undated -- * Traveling Exhibition of Enlarged Photographs of Sculpture and Spring Exhibition of Small Sculpture by Members of the National Sculpture Society

undated -- * Exhibition of Small Sculpture

undated -- x Modern Tapestries from Vienna

undated -- x Annual Open Water Color Exhibition

undated -- x Catherine Lorillard Wolfe Art Club, Flower Paintings Exhibition and Sale

undated -- * Unidentified exhibition installations
Related Material:
These citations were compiled from Art Index, 1929-1960; The New York Times Index, 1898-1960; Poole's Index to Periodical Literature, 1898-1906; Nineteenth Century Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature, 1898-1899; and Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature, 1900-1960, using the format employed in Art Index. Citations are presented in chronological order, as it is anticipated that most researchers consulting the National Arts Club Records will be interested in a specific event or era in the Club's history, or are apt to be researching artists whose National Arts Club affiliation or exhibition activities were confined to a particular period.

1898

National Art Club. -- Harpers Weekly -- 42:329, April 2.

1899

Club to advance art industries. -- Critic -- 34:349-51, April.

National Arts Club organized. -- New York Times -- (7-2), 29-288-2, April 26.

1909

Position as a factor in the encouragement of the fine arts. G. Teall. -- Craftsman -- 15:604-13, February.

Club officials rule a member may take a process server into club as a guest to serve papers on fellow member, case of R.S. Perrin vs. D. Whipple. -- New York Times -- 7:3, June 29.

1913

Lecture of Prof. Eucken on Art and Morality. -- New York Times -- 9:3, March 1.

Offers prize to member who writes best manuscript on "A Critical Estimate of the Altman Collection." -- New York Times -- 12:7, November 8.

Annual exhibition of Books of the Year; organization of American Institute of Graphic Arts planned. -- New -- York Times 9:3, November 13.

1914

Alexander de Yourevitch has visited Russian political exiles as agent from the Czar; arranges for Russian trade exhibit in New York; National Arts Club has agreed to cooperate. -- New York Times -- 20:2, March 27.

Dinner in honor of Shakespeare celebration, address by Henry Clews. -- New York Times -- 13:2, April 24.

Farewell dinner to Karl Vollmoeller and George Sylvester Viereck at National Arts Club by Alfred Rau. -- New York Times -- III, 7:3, May 7.

Exhibition of Books of the Year (editorial). -- New York Times -- VI, 514:2, November 22.

1915

Awards announced. -- New York Times -- 10:1, January 7.

Paintings exhibition. -- New York Times -- V, 11:13, January 10.

Poster exhibition. -- New York Times -- III, 2:5, March 28.

Thanksgiving dinner to east side waifs. -- New York Times -- 11:1, November 26.

1917

Annual exhibition; Gold Medal and $1000 prize awarded to Ben Foster. -- New York Times -- 10:6, January 4.

Memorial services for W.B. Howland. -- New York Times -- 7:3, March 3.

Offers prizes for best patriotic medal, poem, and song. -- New York Times -- 9:14, April 6.

Offers prizes to promote expression of American patriotism in art. -- New York Times -- IV, 13:2, April 15.

H.A.W. Wood speaks at distribution of prizes. -- New York Times -- 11:3, May 31.

"Road to France," $500 prize offered for appropriate music. -- New York Times -- 13:2, June 9.

American Artists' War Emergency Fund Committee announces that art stamp will be sold to aid artists reduced in circumstances through the war. -- New York Times -- 13:6, July 10.

Offers prize of $500 for best musical setting for D.M. Henderson's "The Road to France." -- New York Times -- VIII, 9:3, August 12.

Prize for music for war song by D.M. Henderson is awarded to Signe Lund. -- New York Times -- 13:3, November 1.

1919

Annual books exhibition. -- New York Times -- VIII, 686:1, November 23.

1921

Comment on suggestion by G. Bellows that proposed members should possess some work by living American artist. -- New York Times -- III, 20:3, February 6.

Elects governors. -- New York Times -- 9:2, April 13.

1922

Awards Agar prize to Christine Herter. -- New York Times -- 16:7, April 7.

Address by Ann Martin. -- New York Times -- 4:3, August 3.

1923

Annual exhibition of books; I. Zangwill speaks; protest by member. -- New York Times -- 6:1, November 8.

1924

Prize winners of annual exhibition. -- New York Times -- 4:15, January 10.

Honors J.G. Agar at dinner. -- New York Times -- 6:2, February 26.

1925

Mural panels of Old NY used for New Year's fete to be put on exhibition. -- New York Times -- 29:1, January 4.

Announces prize winners at Members' Annual Exhibition. -- New York Times -- VIII, 11:2, January 18.

Murals depicting history of NYC, painted for New Years' ball, to be given to Museum of the City of New York. -- New York Times -- 25:4, February 3.

Exhibition of lithographs, woodcuts, and linoleum prints. -- New York Times -- VIII, 11:13, April 12.

1926

Exhibition. -- New York Times -- 4:5, January 14.

Exhibition. -- New York Times -- 17:3, April 8.

Exhibition of photographs of recent buildings. -- New York Times -- VIII, 12:6, April 18.

15th century books brought from Germany by Dr. Otto H.F. Vollbehr on exhibition at the National Arts Club. -- New York Times -- 6:6, August 24.

15th century Book of Hours, worth $15,000, stolen from exhibition at National Arts Club. -- New York Times -- 1:2, August 26.

Feature article on exhibition. -- New York Times -- IV, 15:1, August 29.

Book of Hours mysteriously returned to Vollbehr by E.M. Garlock, attorney, acting for unnamed client who claims to have bought book from stranger. -- New York Times -- 19:1, September 12.

Editorial on return of book. -- New York Times -- 20:4, September 13.

21st annual book exhibit; addresses. -- New York Times -- 28:3, November 4.

History in connection with 20th anniversary celebration. -- New York Times -- VIII,18:6, November 7.

1927

New Year's Eve costume ball. -- New York Times -- 15:3, January 1.

Exhibition of American paintings. -- New York Times -- 25:5, March 3.

Exhibition of etchings. -- New York Times -- IX, 10:4, December 11.

1928

Exhibits. -- New York Times -- 30:2, January 12; -- New York Times -- IX, 13:2, January 29.

Awards in small painting exhibition. -- New York Times -- 27:2, February 10.

Exhibit. -- New York Times -- VIII, 15:3, February 12.

First exhibition of decorative arts. -- New York Times -- 28:4, March 15; -- New York Times -- IX, 15:4, March 18.

Exhibition. -- New York Times -- IX, 15:2, April 15.

1929

J. Lie, P. Manship, and C. Beach win prizes. -- New York Times -- 25:3, January 11.

Annual members' exhibition. -- New York Times -- X, 18:4, January 27.

Exhibition of crafts. -- New York Times -- X, 15:6, December 8.

Prize awarded to D.C. Nisbet. -- New York Times -- 23:5, December 29.

1930

Arts Club prizes announced. -- Art News -- 28:21, January 4.

Annual exhibition of painting and sculpture. -- New York Times -- VIII, 13:3, January 19.

Seventh annual exhibition. -- New York Times -- VIII, 13:1, February 16.

Annual junior art show. -- New York Times -- 3:5, March 15; -- New York Times -- X, 19:3, March 16.

Exhibition of prints by living American etchers. -- New York Times -- X, 18:1, December 14.

1931

New York season; Living American Etchers. -- Art Digest -- 5:14, January 1.

M. Gregg Memorial Prize awarded to I.G. Olinsky; medal to H.W. Watrous. -- New York Times -- 34:6, January 10.

Exhibitions. -- New York Times -- VIII, 12:7, February 22.

Exhibition of Junior Artist Members. -- New York Times -- IX, 13:4, March 15.

Hold exhibition of portraits and other objects relating to history of Gramercy Park. -- New York Times -- II, 1:7 and 18:4, May 3.

Annual exhibition of paintings by members. -- New York Times -- 30:6, June 4.

Awards to R.D. Bowden $3000 prize, offered by J.G. Agar for best book on "The Soul of America." -- New York Times -- 20:6, June 8.

1932

Annual exhibition of work by painter and sculptor members; prizes announced. -- New York Times -- 27:7, January 7.

Art Club prizes. -- Art Digest -- 6:10, January 15.

Forum on development of art talent in young artists. -- New York Times -- 13:8, January 18.

Arts Club prizes. -- Art News -- 30:20, January 23.

Opening. -- New York Times -- 16:7, February 4.

Prizes awarded to junior artists. -- New York Times -- 19:2, March 8.

Art auction totals $600. -- New York Times -- 19:5, April 14.

Members' exhibition of small paintings. -- New York Times -- 16:6, May 5.

National Arts Club book exhibition. E. Yost. -- Publishers Weekly -- 122:2382-3, December 31.

1933

R. Nickerson, new member, wins medal at annual painting and sculpture show; other awards. -- New York Times -- 18:2, January 5.

Annual members' exhibition. -- New York Times -- 13:2, January 13; -- New York Times -- IX, 12:6, January 15.

National Arts club prizes. -- Art Digest -- 7:15, January 15; -- Art News -- 31:7, January 28 Celebrates 119th birthday of S.J. Tilden. -- New York Times -- 17:6, February 8.

Exhibition by junior artist members. -- New York Times -- 15:2, March 2.

1934

Prizes for annual members' show announced. -- New York Times -- IX, 12:3, January 14.

Annual dinner. -- New York Times -- 17:4, January 18.

Prizes. -- Art Digest -- February 1, 8:19; -- Art Digest -- 8:13, May 15.

Memorial exhibition of eight of its deceased painter and sculptor members. -- New York Times -- IX, 12:6, February 4.

Junior members exhibit. -- New York Times -- 17:1, March 8; -- New York Times -- IX, 9:7, March 18; Prizes awarded. -- New York Times -- 22:8, March 22.

Annual members' show. -- New York Times -- 17:2, May 3; Awards, -- New York Times -- 21:1, May 8; -- New York Times -- IX, 7:7, May 13.

Awards given by Arts Club. -- Art News -- 32:4, June 2.

Rare book exhibition planned. -- New York Times -- 19:4, September 18; Exhibition. -- New York Times -- 17:1, September 19.

1935

Annual exhibition of members' work opened. -- New York Times -- 17:5, January 10; -- New York Times -- 9:3, January 14.

Annual dinner; awards. -- New York Times -- 20:7, January 17.

Stag dinner; portrait of Victoria replaces painting of nude. -- New York Times -- 23:4, February 1.

Prizes, annual exhibition of painting and sculpture. -- Art Digest -- 9:21, February 1.

Members' annual exhibition. -- New York Times -- 18:2, February 8; -- New York Times -- VIII, 9:6, February 17.

Annual exhibition by junior artists. -- New York Times -- 18:5, March 9.

Arts Club plans a large bazaar. -- Art News -- 33:10, August 17.

Series of articles on traditions of club being written. -- New York Times -- II, 7:1, October 6.

Plans for annual book week. -- New York Times -- II and III, 8:5, October 13; exhibitors to be entertained by J.R. Gregg, president. -- New York Times -- 19:2, October 30.

To award two trips to Europe for mural decoration. New -- York Times -- 26:7, November 1; -- New York Times -- 19:5, November 14.

To hold "At Home" tea. -- New York Times -- II, 8:2, December 8.

Dinner. -- New York Times -- 14:8, December 11.

1936

Annual members' exhibition. -- New York Times -- 19:6, January 9; -- New York Times -- 13:8, January 11; -- New York Times -- IX, 10:1, January 19.

Exhibition of modern textbooks. -- New York Times -- 17:7, February 6.

Announces winners of trips to Europe. -- New York Times -- 21:2, February 11.

Exhibition by neighboring organizations. -- New York Times -- IX, 8:1, April 12.

Summer exhibit from permanent collection. -- New York Times -- IX, 7:4, June 21.

Exhibition of contemporary books; authors' night. -- New York Times -- VI, 9:2, November 8.

Plans for children's matinee at annual book exhibition. -- New York Times -- VI, 7:2, November 8.

Women's open table plans dinner. -- New York Times -- 16:4, November 23.

Exhibition of Society of American Etchers. -- New York Times -- XII, 9:2, November 29.

1937

Awards at members' exhibit. -- New York Times -- 24:3, January 27.

Exhibitions sponsored by Society of American Etchers. -- New York Times -- 21:3, February 3; -- New York Times -- X, 9:7, February 7.

Women's committee holds drama dinner. -- New York Times -- 13:1, February 15.

R.D. Kohn speaks, -- New York Times -- 25:7, March 11.

Jr. artists group exhibit. -- New York Times -- IX, 10:1, March 14; Awards. -- New York Times -- 23:6, March 25.

Photographic exhibition. -- New York Times -- X, 10:2, May 16.

Officers elected. -- New York Times -- 19:1, May 20.

H. Hamilton exhibit. -- New York Times -- IX, 6:7, September 26.

Book of the year exhibit. -- New York Times -- 23:6, November 4; -- New York Times -- VI, 4:3, November 28.

Mr. H.P. Crine elected life member. -- New York Times -- 9:1, November 28.

Members' exhibit. -- New York Times -- 28:3, December 9.

1938

Women's Open Table plans. -- New York Times -- 11:2, January 17.

Members' annual exhibit. -- New York Times -- , January 18 26:2; -- New York Times -- IX,9:3, January 23; Awards. -- New York Times -- 22:2, January 27.

Members studio receptions planned. -- New York Times -- VI, 2:7, January 30.

Dinner honoring Dr. W. Damrosch. -- New York Times -- 12:5, March 7.

Exhibit by art groups near NYC. -- New York Times -- 20:8, March 28.

Group show. -- New York Times -- X, 8:2, April 17.

Viennese ball. -- New York Times -- 22:6, April 21.

J.F. Talcott elected president; D.E. Waid executive committee chairman. -- New York Times -- 21:6, November 19.

Victorian ball. -- New York Times -- 18:1, December 17.

1939

Members' memorial exhibit. -- New York Times -- 15:1, January 13; -- New York Times -- IX, 9:2, January 22.

Members' painting and sculpture exhibit. -- New York Times -- IX, 9:2, February 5.

Jr. Members' lecture. -- New York Times -- 10:2, February 6.

Painting exhibit. -- New York Times -- 18:1, March 1; -- New York Times -- X, 10:2, March 5.

Jr. Members party planned. -- New York Times -- 50:3, March 5.

Exhibit of neighboring art organizations. -- New York Times -- 13:2, April 17.

Wild West party planned to benefit Jr. Members Scholarship Fund; to close 40th anniversary celebration. -- New York Times -- II, 2:8, April 23; -- New York Times -- II, 3:1, April 30.

Jr. Members plan New Year's Eve Olympian Ball. -- New York Times -- 30:2, December 19; -- New York Times -- II, 1:2, December 31.

1940

Art by deceased life members to be sold. -- New York Times -- 17:2, January 5.

Group show; awards. -- New York Times -- 21:2, January 11.

Group show. -- New York Times -- 24:2, January 24; -- New York Times -- IX, 9:2, January 28.

Non-members exhibition. -- Art News -- 38:15, February 3.

Exhibits: ceramics. -- New York Times -- 17:4, February 16; Ceramics and flowers. -- New York Times -- 15:5, February 19; Ceramics. -- New York Times -- II, 5:2, February 25; Exhibits: Jr. members. -- New York Times -- IX, 10:2, April 14; Group show awards. -- New York Times -- 21: 5, April 25.

Pan-American Ball held. -- New York Times -- 21:5, April 20.

Fund campaign for refugee artists started. -- New York Times -- 8:2, July 31.

Establishes artist refugee fund. -- New York Times -- 19:1, August 1.

Benefit exhibit plans. -- New York Times -- 20:8, October 2; Exhibit. -- New York Times -- IX, 5:4, October 6.

County fair planned. -- New York Times -- II, 3:3, October 6.

Refugee artists show their work. -- Art News -- 39:10, October 12.

Annual book exhibit opens. -- New York Times -- 3:5, November 3.

Testimonial luncheon for foreign authors in U.S. -- New York Times -- 45:2, November 10.

National Arts Club dramatizes books at the 35th annual new books of the year exhibition. -- Publishers Weekly -- 138:2046, November 30.

1941

Annual members' exhibit. -- New York Times -- 24:8, January 10; Comment. -- New York Times -- IX, 9:2, January 12; Awards. -- New York Times -- 24:6, January 23.

Annual prizes. -- Art Digest -- 15:13, February 1.

Benefits concerts planned. -- New York Times -- 39:1, February 23; -- New York Times -- 20:7, March 28.

Annual exhibit awards. -- New York Times -- 28:3, March 11; Comment. -- New York Times -- I, 10:3, March 16.

Group shows. -- New York Times -- IX, 10:1, March 30; -- New York Times -- IX, 8:2, May 25; -- New York Times -- X, 13:5, May 25; -- New York Times -- IX, 7:5, June 15.

Book exhibit. -- New York Times -- 1:6,November 9.

1942

Group show. -- New York Times -- X, 10:1, January 18.

Group show. -- New York Times -- 14:4, February 4; Private preview. -- New York Times -- 15:4, February 5; Comment. -- New York Times -- IX, 9:6, February 8.

Jr. members to honor servicemen at Hallowe'en party. -- New York Times -- 16:3, October 30.

37th annual show of new books. -- Publishers Weekly -- 142:2044, November 14.

To sponsor Chinese and Indian art exhibit in NYC. -- New York Times -- VIII, 9:1, December 13; Exhibit. -- New York Times -- 42:5, December 17.

1945

Holds Xmas fair. -- New York Times -- 13:3, November 16.

1946

Contemporary American painting exhibit planned. -- New York Times -- 23:6, February 20.

Jr. members and young non-members exhibition. -- Art News -- 45:67, May.

Annual book show plans. -- New York Times -- 21:2, November 1; Show, W.L. Laurence speaks. -- New York Times -- 13:1, November 12.

Annual book show. -- Publishers Weekly -- 150:2731, 2718, November 9.

Packaging the book. P. Boswell. -- Art Digest -- 21:3, November 15.

Choosing best book jackets, 41st annual book show. -- Art News -- 45:8, December.

1947

Preview exhibit. -- New York Times -- 21:5, January 9.

Forming symphony orchestra. -- New York Times -- 27:1, September 19.

1948

Ninth annual exhibition of American Veterans Society of Artists. -- Art Digest -- 22:19, January 1.

Conservatives score at the 50th annual exhibition of painting and sculpture. -- Art Digest -- 22:17, February 1.

Fiftieth annual exhibition. -- Art News -- 47:49, March.

Book fair opens in NYC. -- New York Times -- 30:7, December 9.

1949

Summer annual. -- Art Digest -- 23:14, August.

Dinner honors Mrs. F.D. Roosevelt. -- New York Times -- 39:5, October 11.

1950

Fifty-second annual exhibition of oils and sculptures. -- Art Digest -- 24:12, January 15.

Members' summer exhibition. -- Art Digest -- 24:18, August.

Fair plans. -- New York Times -- 44:8, November 1.

1951

Members-guests annual. -- New York Times -- II, 19:1, January 14.

53rd Annual Exhibition. -- Art Digest -- 25:18, January 15; -- Art News -- 49:47, February.

Non-members annual. -- New York Times -- 21:5, March 30.

Open competition for non-members. -- Art Digest -- 25:18, April 15.

Summer painting exhibition series opens. -- New York Times -- 42:8, June 7.

Members work. -- New York Times -- II, 6:4, June 17.

Summer exhibition. -- Art Digest -- 25:19, July.

1952

Fifty-fourth annual exhibition. -- Art Digest -- 26:19, January 15; -- Art News -- 49:47, February.

Members and guests annual. -- New York Times -- 59:2, January 6; Awards. -- New York Times -- 16:2, January 17.

Watercolor annual; awards. -- New York Times -- 14:4, February 8; -- Art News -- 51:56, March.

Non-members painting annual; awards. -- New York Times -- 16:5, March 10; -- New York Times -- 27:3, March 13.

Small pictures by members; awards. -- New York Times -- 25:5, April 9.

Exhibition of small oils. -- Art Digest -- 26:18-19, April 15; -- Art News -- 49:47, February.

1953

Theatre in an art gallery. A. Scheff. -- Theatre Arts -- 37:92, January.

Members-guests annual; awards. -- New York Times -- II, 11:2, January 11.

Non-members painting annual; awards. -- New York Times -- 21:5., February 19.

Members work; awards. -- New York Times -- II, 13:2, May 10; -- New York Times -- II, 8:5, June 21.

1954

Painting and sculpture annual by members and guests. -- New York Times -- 25:5, January 26.

Fifty-sixth annual exhibition. -- Arts Digest -- 28:17, February 1.

Members and non-members annual; contemporary watercolors; awards. -- New York Times -- 27:5, February 11; Review. -- New York Times -- II, 14:2, February 14.

Grand national annual members' competition. -- Art News -- 53:63, May.

1955

Painting and sculpture annual; awards. -- New York Times -- 23:1, January 12.

Fifty-sixth annual exhibition. -- Arts Digest -- 28:17, February 1.

Paintings annual; awards. -- New York Times -- 18:4, March 1.

Annual exhibition of American oil paintings. -- Art Digest -- 29:26, March 15.

Poet P. MacKaye honored on 80th birthday. -- New York Times -- 28:2, March 16.

1957

Arts Club honors Neuman; WNYC. C. Durgin. -- Musical America -- 77:12, April.

Art Clubs of America. -- Artist -- 53:67, June.

1958

At founding [sixtieth anniversary]. -- New York Times -- 49:2, November 27.

First annual metropolitan young artists show; awards. -- New York Times -- 49:2, November 27

1959

Stadium Concerts founder Mrs. C.S. Guggenheimer gets scroll from Mayor Wagner and National Arts Club medal. -- New York Times -- 9:2, March 12.

1960

Tenor competition awards. -- New York Times -- 47:8, November 15.
Provenance:
The National Arts Club donated its records to the Archives of American Art in 1987. Although a limited amount of printed matter was available at various libraries and on microfilm through the Archives of American Art, scholars have not had access to unpublished records of the Club until this time.

In November 2017 an addition to the Officers' Correspondence was donated by Elizabeth G. Knudsen, granddaughter of Edmund Greacen, former Arts Committee Chair.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Photography -- Exhibitions  Search this
Bibliographical exhibitions -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Clubhouses -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Handicraft  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Function:
Arts organizations
Arts organizations -- Taxation
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Citation:
National Arts Club records, 1898-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.natiartc
See more items in:
National Arts Club records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw945ac729a-aadb-4fcd-8e02-a05f4a198d34
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-natiartc

Elizabeth McCausland papers

Topic:
Springfield Republican
Creator:
McCausland, Elizabeth, 1899-1965  Search this
Names:
American Art Research Council  Search this
Barnard College -- Faculty  Search this
Federal Art Project (U.S.)  Search this
United States. Farm Security Administration  Search this
Abbott, Berenice, 1898-1991  Search this
Dove, Arthur Garfield, 1880-1946  Search this
Hartley, Marsden, 1877-1943  Search this
Hawthorne, Charles Webster, 1872-1930  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Henry, Edward Lamson, 1841-1919  Search this
Hine, Lewis Wickes, 1874-1940  Search this
Inness, George, 1825-1894  Search this
Kleinholz, Frank, 1901-  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000  Search this
Maurer, Alfred Henry, 1868-1932  Search this
Morgan, Barbara Brooks, 1900-1992  Search this
Stieglitz, Alfred, 1864-1946  Search this
Weegee, 1899-1968  Search this
Weston, Edward, 1886-1958  Search this
Extent:
45 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Drawings
Photographs
Place:
New York N.Y. -- Pictorial works -- Photographs
Date:
1838-1995
bulk 1920-1960
Summary:
The papers of art critic, writer, and historian Elizabeth McCausland measure 45 linear feet and date from 1838 to 1995, with the bulk of the material dating from 1920 to 1960. The collection provides a vast accumulation of research data on various artists and aspects of American art, especially the early American modernists and the Federal Arts Projects. Papers include McCausland's extensive research and writing files, particularly on Marsden Hartley, E. L. Henry, Lewis Hine, George Inness, and Alfred H. Maurer. McCausland's correspondence with artists includes a substantial amount with Arthur Dove and Alfred Stieglitz. Her collaborative work with Berenice Abbott on the Changing New York book and series of photographs is well-documented within the collection. Also found are general writings, subject files, files relating to exhibitions, teaching, and committees, photographs, art work, personal papers, and printed material. Additional McCausland material donated later from the estate of Berenice Abbott include biographical materials, project files, writings, and printed materials.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of art critic, writer, and historian Elizabeth McCausland measure approximately 45 linear feet and date from 1838 to 1995, with the bulk of the material dating from 1920 to 1995. The collection provides a vast accumulation of data on various artists and aspects of American art, especially the early American modernists and the Federal Arts Projects. Papers include McCausland's extensive research and writing files, particularly on Marsden Hartley, E. L. Henry, Lewis Hine, George Inness, and Alfred H. Maurer. McCausland's correspondence with artists includes a substantial amount with Arthur Dove and Alfred Stieglitz. Her collaborative work with Berenice Abbott on the Changing New York book and series of photographs is well-documented within the collection. Also found are general writings, subject files, files relating to exhibitions, teaching, and committees, photographs, art work, personal papers, and printed material. Additional McCausland material from the estate of Berenice Abbott include biographical materials, project files, writings, and printed materials.

McCausland's personal papers consist of appointment books and engagement calendars, scrapbooks, student papers, works printed on her private press, financial records, biographical material, and scattered memorabilia, which together document other aspects of her life apart from her work. Correspondence includes incoming and outgoing letters along with enclosures, dating from McCausland's time as a journalist for The Springfield Republican in the 1920s and 1930s to her time as a freelance writer, art critic, and historian (1940s-1960s) and mostly concerning professional matters. Also included is a substantial amount of correspondence with artists, particularly Arthur Dove and Alfred Stieglitz, and some personal correspondence with her mother. General writings consists primarily of copies of McCausland's speeches and lectures on various art topics in addition to her early poems (dating from the 1930s) and scattered essays and articles.

The most extensive part of the collection is comprised of McCausland's research and writing files pertaining to large research and curatorial projects, such as ones on the artists Alfred H. Maurer and Marsden Hartley (which was begun by the American Art Research Council and subsequently taken over by McCausland), and one for the American Processional exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery in 1950. A wide variety of smaller projects are also well-documented in the series Other Research and Writing Files, including ones on E. L. Henry, Lewis Hine, George Inness, her collaborative work with Berenice Abbott on the Changing New York book and series of photographs. Numerous other artists and art topics are covered as well, such as Arthur Dove, Robert Henri, Jacob Lawrence, Charles Hawthorne, film, and photography. Files for her book Careers in Art (1950), her many speaking and lecture engagements, and editing work are also found in this series. Files consist primarily of correspondence, notes, research material, manuscripts, bibliographies, photographs of works of art, completed research forms for works of art, card index files, and printed material.

Also found are subject files containing printed material, scattered notes and correspondence, and photographs, which may have been used for reference and/or collected in the course of McCausland's research activities; files relating to various exhibitions organized by McCausland from 1939 to 1944, including ones of silk screen prints and modern photography; files relating to courses on art history taught by McCausland, especially the one she taught at Barnard College in 1956; and files stemming from her participation in various art organizations and committees, especially during the time period just before and during the Second World War.

Printed material consists primarily of clippings and tear sheets of McCausland's newspaper articles and columns, which document her contributions to The Springfield Republican from 1923 to 1946, in addition to scattered exhibition catalogs, announcements, books, and miscellaneous publications. Photographs include ones of various artists and works of art, ones from the Farm Security Administration, and ones by photographers, such as Berenice Abbott (including ones from the Federal Art Project book, Changing New York), Barbara Morgan, Weegee, and Edward Weston, among others. Photographs, sometimes annotated or including notes, are scattered throughout her research files. Also included are photographs of McCausland, dating from her childhood. Art work found in the collection includes drawings, prints, and watercolors that were either given to McCausland by the artist or collected by her in the course of her work as an art critic and historian.

Additional material belonging to Elizabeth McCausland and donated by the estate of Berenice Abbott includes biographical material; business and personal correspondence; professional project files and writings, including drafts and research materials related to the book projects Art in America, Conversations with March, and Frank Kleinholz; and printed materials, including reprints of critical essays and articles by McCausland.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 15 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Personal Papers, 1838, 1920-1951 (Boxes 1-2, 34; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1923-1960 (Boxes 2-5; 2.9 linear feet)

Series 3: General Writings, circa 1930-1954 (Boxes 5-6; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 4: Alfred H. Maurer, 1851-1951, bulk 1948-1950 (Boxes 6-9; 3.7 linear feet)

Series 5: American Processional, 1949-1951 (Boxes 10-11; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 6: Marsden Hartley, 1900-1964, bulk 1944-1964 (Boxes 11-21, OV 37; 10 linear feet)

Series 7: Other Research and Writing Files, 1896, 1926-1958 (Boxes 21-25, 31; 4.6 linear feet)

Series 8: Subject Files, 1927-1954 (Boxes 25-26; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 9: Other Exhibition Files, 1939-1941, 1944 (Box 26; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 10: Teaching Files, 1939-1965 (Box 27; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 11: Committee Files, 1936-1960 (Box 27; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 12: Printed Material, 1923-1953 (Boxes 28-32, 34, OV 38, BV 44-47; 4.6 linear feet)

Series 13: Photographs, circa 1905-1950 (Boxes 32-36, OV 37; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 14: Art Work, 1887-1942 (Boxes 33-34, OV 39-43; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 15: Elizabeth McCausland Material from the Estate of Berenice Abbott, 1920-1995 (Boxes 48-53; 5.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Elizabeth McCausland, the art critic and writer, was born in Wichita, Kansas in 1899. She attended Smith College, receiving her Bachelor's degree in 1920 and her Master's in 1922. Beginning in 1923, she worked as a general reporter for The Springfield Republican (Springfield, Massachusetts). After several years, she began to review art exhibitions and soon became an established art critic. In the course of her work, she began to develop friendships with artists, such as Alfred Stieglitz and Arthur Dove. During these early years, she also wrote poetry and designed and printed limited edition publications on her private press.

McCausland moved to New York in 1935, but continued to contribute a weekly art column to The Springfield Republican until it suspended publication in 1946. From the mid-1930s on, she worked primarily as a freelance writer and art critic, contributing articles to publications such as Parnassas, The New Republic, and Magazine of Art. In the latter part of her career, her writings focused more on art history and special studies on artists.

In the late-1930s, McCausland collaborated with the photographer Berenice Abbott on the Federal Art Project book, Changing New York, for which she provided the text to Abbott's now-famous photographs of New York City neighborhoods, architecture, and street scenes. She studied and wrote about photography, including numerous articles on the photographer Lewis Hine (of whose work she organized a retrospective exhibition at the Riverside Museum in 1939), and was appointed to the Advisory Committee of the Museum of Modern Art's Department of Photography in 1944.

McCausland went on to organize other exhibitions, including a show of contemporary work, "The World of Today" (Berkshire Museum, 1939), shows of silk screen prints (Springfield Museum of Fine Arts, March 1940 and New York State Museum, Summer 1940), and a photography show, "Photography Today" (A.C.A. Gallery, 1944). In the late 1930s, she embarked upon a study of "the status of the artist in America from colonial times to the present, with especial attention to the relation between art and patronage," which continued over twenty years (and was never completed) and for which she received a Guggenheim fellowship in 1943.

In addition to her other writing, during the 1940s, McCausland carried out studies on the artists, E. L. Henry and George Inness, which resulted in exhibitions at the New York State Museum in 1942 and the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum in 1946, respectively and publications (a report on Henry and a book on Inness). From 1948 to 1949, she carried out an extensive study of the painter, Alfred H. Maurer, organizing an exhibition, "A. H. Maurer: 1868-1932," which showed at the Walker Art Center and the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1949, and publishing the biography, A. H. Maurer, in 1951. In 1950, she worked as a special consultant on the American Processional exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery and as editor of the accompanying book. Shortly thereafter, she began a study of Marsden Hartley for a monograph, which was published in 1952, and she helped organize the Hartley exhibition at the University of Minnesota that same year. She continued the Hartley study on larger scale for a planned biography and catalogue raisonne; although she continued to work on it off and on for the next decade, the project was never completed.

McCausland published other books, including Careers in the Arts (1951), and undertook other research and consulting projects, such as photo-editing Carl Sandburg's Poems of the Midwest (1946), conducting surveys of art and advertising for an article in Magazine of Art and of art education for Cooper Union Art School, and contributing yearly articles on art to various encyclopedias. At different times throughout her career, she supplemented her income by taking teaching positions. She taught courses on art history at Sarah Lawrence College from 1942 to 1944 and at Barnard College in 1956, as well as courses at the Design Laboratory (1939) and the New School for Social Research (1946). She also gave numerous lectures and speeches on various art topics, and regularly participated in conferences and symposiums. Towards the end of her career, she was publishing less, but was still involved in many projects, most notably the Hartley study.

McCausland was a tireless promoter of the arts, and often an advocate for artists. Even though her work was well-known among certain art circles, she never received the recognition as a writer that she deserved. Nor was she ever able to free herself from the pressure of writing for a living. Continually suffering from poor health, she died on May 14, 1965.
Related Material:
Related material found in the Archives includes a sound recording from a symposium on Marsden Hartley, of which McCausland was a participant, held at the Portland Museum of Art in 1961. The Frank Kleinholz papers contain a recorded interview of McCausland done in 1944-1945 for radio station WNYC. Some of McCausland's correspondence is found in the G. Alan Chidsey papers; Chidsey served as a trustee of the Marsden Hartley estate.
Separated Material:
Material separated from the collection includes some issues of Camera Work (Vol. 30, 47, 49/50), which were combined with other issues in an artificial collection created by the Archives at some earlier point.
Provenance:
Elizabeth McCausland donated the bulk of her papers in several installments from 1956 to 1961. An unknown donor, perhaps her literary executor, donated additional papers sometime after her death in 1965. It appears that McCausland originally donated her research files on Marsden Hartley, measuring 10 linear feet, to the Whitney Museum, who then lent them to the Archives for microfilming in 1966, and donated them sometime thereafter. McCausland originally donated files of newspaper clippings and offprints of her articles to the The New York Public Library, who gave them to the Archives in 1968. Additional McCausland material from the estate of Berenice Abbott was donated to the Archives in 2009.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Art -- History -- Study and teaching  Search this
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Women art historians  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Function:
Arts organizations
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Drawings
Photographs
Citation:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mccaeliz
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9cebe32f8-0180-44bb-a2a8-8ed061f173c1
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mccaeliz
Online Media:

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
McCausland, Elizabeth, 1899-1965  Search this
Extent:
2.9 Linear feet (Boxes 2-5)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1923-1960
Scope and Contents note:
Series consists primarily of McCausland's professional and, to a lesser extent, personal correspondence, which includes general, artist, and some family correspondence. Correspondence typically consists of letters to and copies of letters from McCausland, along with enclosures (such as clippings and other printed material; contracts, agreements, and other business and financial papers; and proposals and manuscripts) and related material (such as notes, illustrations, and writings). Correspondents include artists, art organizations, museums, curators, editors, publishers, scholars, research institutions, her agent (Mary Squire Abbot), friends, and her mother, Belle Noble McCausland. Correspondence largely documents McCausland's various professional activities as an art critic, art historian, and freelance writer, and her relationships with various figures of the art and publishing worlds before, during, and immediately after the Second World War.

General correspondence relates to articles and reviews that McCausland wrote for the Springfield Republican; to freelance articles she wrote over the years for various publications, including ones for Parnassus, The New Republic, and Magazine of Art, as well as yearly articles for various encyclopedias (such as Encyclopedia Britannica, Encyclopedia Americana, and Collier Encyclopedia); and to various book projects, including Changing New York (1939), Careers in the Arts (1950), and ones on the artists E. L. Henry, George Inness, and Alfred H. Maurer. General correspondence also relates to her teaching job at Sarah Lawrence College and other courses taught; to various editing projects, including photo-editing Carl Sandburg's Poems of the Midwest and the planned book Art and Advertising; her work as a research consultant on the American Processional exhibition and book, and on other exhibitions; and her involvement in various art and social organization, as well as her participation in various conferences. General correspondence largely documents McCausland's tireless efforts to drum up work, and to fund (through various grants and fellowships) and carry out her many research and writing projects.

Correspondence from particular artists, including Arthur Dove, Louis Eilshemius, Marsden Hartley, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Alfred Stieglitz, was maintained by McCausland in files separate from general correspondence. Artist correspondence documents her relationships with these artists - particularly well-documented are her relationships with Dove and Stieglitz - and the artists' reactions to her reviews of their shows. Files of artist correspondence also include some of McCausland's own notes on her feelings about or relationship with particular artists.

Family correspondence consists almost entirely of letters and copies of letters from McCausland to her mother, Belle Noble McCausland. These seem to have originated from the scrapbook kept by McCausland's mother which can be found amongst personal papers.

See Appendix for a list of notable correspondents from Series 2
Arrangement note:
General correspondence is arranged in rough chronological order. Within individual yearly files, McCausland often grouped together letters to and from a particular correspondent; this existing organization has for the most part been maintained. Selected artist correspondence and family correspondence are arranged in files at the end of the series. Correspondence can also be found amongst research and writing files.
Appendix: Notable Correspondents from Series 2:
List represents only a selection of correspondents from general correspondence.

A. A. Wynn Inc.: 1951

ACA Gallery: 1941, 1943, 1945, 1946, 1947

Abbot, Mary Squire (McIntosh and Otis Company): 1941, 1945, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1958

Abbott, Berenice: 1934

Adams, Charles: 1938, 1939, 1940, 1943, 1944, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952

Adams, Harriet Dyer: 1946

Adelphi College: 1953

Adlow, Dorothy ( -- Christian Science Monitor -- ): 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954

Albany Institute of History and Art: 1946, 1947

Aldrich, Adolf: 1945

American Academy of Arts and Sciences: 1946, 1947

American Artist Magazine -- : 1952

American Artists Congress: 1938, 1939, 1942

American Artists Group: 1939, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1950

American Association of University Women: 1951

American Federation of Arts: 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1956

American Museum of Natural History: 1944

American Newspaper Guild: 1942

American Philosophical Society: 1947

Anderson, Mrs. Sherwood (Eleanor): 1949

Antiques -- : 1955

Arden, Elizabeth: 1937

Arnason, H. Harvard (Walker Art Center): 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954

Art Digest -- : 1951

Art in America -- (see also Jean Lipman): 1957

Art Institute of Chicago: 1945, 1947

Art of this Century: 1944

Artists for Victory: 1944

Artists Equity Association: 1956

Artists League of America: 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945

Artists Society for National Defense: 1941

Associated American Artists: 1940

Baltimore Museum of Art: 1953

Bard College: 1953

Barnes, Djuna: 1951

Barr, Alfred H.: 1939, 1944, 1947, 1951

Barr, Norman: 1941, 1942, 1943, 1945

Baumann, Gustave: 1946

Baur, John I. H.: 1939, 1942, 1946

Beam, Lura: 1945, 1958

Beard, Mary: 1938, 1939, 1944

Benn, Ben: 1951

Bennington School of the Arts: 1940

Berkshire Museum: 1939, 1940

Biddle, George: 1947

The Bobbs-Merrill Company: 1944

Bourke-White, Margaret (letter to Berenice Abbott): 1940

Brewster, William F.: 1954, 1955

The Brooklyn Museum: 1943, 1945, 1948, 1954

Brown, Milton: 1945

Buchholz Gallery: 1941, 1943

Butler, Joseph (Butler Institute of Art): 1954, 1955

Cahill, Holger: 1937, 1942, 1944, 1946, 1950

Carter, Clarence H.: 1945, 1946

Cinema -- : 1947

Clarke, Bert: 1950

Constantine, Mildred: 1939, 1941, 1942

Cook, Waldo Leland: 1949

Cooper Union: 1949, 1952

Cooper Union Art School: 1947, 1948

Corcoran Gallery of Art: 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951

Cowdrey, Mary Bartlett (Smith College Museum of Art): 1943, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954

Crawley, Lawrence: 1950

Crehan, Hubert ( -- Art Digest -- ): 1953

Crichlow, Ernest: 1941

Curran, Charles: 1942

D'Harnoncourt, Rene: 1947

Daura, Pierre: 1949, 1951, 1954

Detroit Institute of Arts: 1945

Devree, Howard: 1949

Diamond (Rotkin), Adele: 1941

Donato, Louis: 1939

Dows, Olin: 1942

Eames, Charles: 1950, 1951

Estler, William C.: 1944

Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors: 1946

Fitch, George: 1955

Fitch, James: 1940

Fortune Magazine -- : 1946

Francis, Robert: 1940, 1942, 1943

Frick Art Reference Library: 1944, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1958

Friedman, William: 1939

Fuerstenberg, Eugenia Maurer: 1950, 1951

Fulton, W. Joseph (University of Chicago): 1951, 1952, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1958, 1959

G. P. Putnam's Sons: 1937

Genauer, Emily: 1947

George Walter Vincent Art Museum (Cordelia Sargent Pond): 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948

Gibran, Khalil: 1928

Gilbert, Dorothy: 1950

Godsoe, Robert Ulrich: 1951

Golden, Samuel (see also American Artists Group): 1946

Goodrich, Lloyd: 1942, 1947, 1950, 1951, 1952

Goodwin, Phillip L.: 1943

Gottlieb, Harry: 1944

Griffin, Maude: 1953

Graham, Martha: 1934, 1942

Grossman, Sid: 1938

Gwathmey, Robert: 1945

Harcourt, Brace and Company: 1947, 1949

Harper and Brothers: 1951

Hayes, Bartlett (Addison Gallery of Art): 1942, 1945, 1947

Hess, Thomas ( -- Art News -- ): 1950

Hope, Henry (University of Indiana): 1949, 1950

International Fine Arts Council: 1950

Irvine, Rosalind: 1952

J. B. Lippincott Company: 1951, 1952

Jacques Seligmann and Company: 1938

James, Rebecca Salsbury: 1951

Javitz, Romana: 1946, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1955

Jewell, Edward Alden: 1946, 1947

John Day Company: 1950, 1951, 1955

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation: 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1952, 1953

Jones, Howard Mumford (Harvard University): 1947

Kauffer, E. McKnight: 1946

Kent, Rockwell: 1945, 1946

Kirstein, Lincoln: 1941, 1943, 1944, 1946, 1947

Kish, Maurice: 1945

Kistler, Aline: 1941

Knight Publishers Inc.: 1938

Kuniyoshi, Yasuo: 1945

Landon, Edward: 1939

Lange, Dorothea: 1945

Larkin, Oliver: 1943, 1944, 1949

Leeper, John and Blanche (see also Corcoran Gallery of Art): 1950, 1951, 1954

Leighton, George: 1945

Lerner, Abe (see also World Publishing Company): 1950, 1951

Lipman, Jean: 1945, 1946, 1947, 1952

Lipton, Norman C. ( -- Good Photography -- ): 1941, 1942, 1943

Longman, Lester: 1940

MacMahon, Audrey (see also -- Parnassus -- ): 1936, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1942

The MacMillan Company: 1943, 1947, 1949, 1950

Magazine of Art -- : 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947

Magriel, Paul: 1954

Maurer, Alfred L.: 1951

Metropolitan Museum of Art: 1943, 1947, 1955

Miller, Dorothy: 1950, 1951

Milwaukee Art Institute: 1948

Minicam Photography -- : 1941, 1943, 1944

Modernage Furniture Corp.: 1945

More, Herman (Whitney Museum of American Art): 1954

Morton, Phillip: 1951, 1952

Mount Holyoke College: 1943

Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute: 1956

Museum of Modern Art: 1934, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945

Museum of the City of New York: 1958

N.W. Ayer and Son: 1945, 1946, 1950

The Nation -- : 1940, 1955

National Gallery of Art: 1944, 1945

National Maritime Union: 1945

Navas, Elizabeth: 1952, 1953, 1954

Neuberger, Roy: 1952

The New American Library -- : 1955, 1956

The New Republic -- : 1944, 1947

The New School for Social Research: 1945

The New York Herald Tribune -- : 1945, 1947

New York Historical Society: 1943

New York Public Library: 1943, 1955, 1956

New York State Museum: 1949

The New York Times -- : 1940

Newark Museum: 1944

Newhall, Beaumont: 1944

Newhall, Nancy: 1945

Norman, Dorothy: 1934, 1937, 1938, 1940

Old Print Shop: 1945

Olmsted, Anna Wetherill (Syracuse Museum of Art): 1950

Opportunity -- : 1943, 1944, 1945

Ossorio, Alfonso: 1953

P. F. Collier and Son Corp.: 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1957, 1958

Pach, Walter: 1955

Parnassus -- : 1939

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art: 1951

Pepsi-Cola Company: 1944, 1945

Philadelphia Art Alliance: 1946

Pierre Matisse Gallery: 1938, 1939

Popular Photography -- : 1943

Portland Art Museum: 1940

Porter, Eliot: 1954

Printer's Ink (Carl Weiss): 1951

Railway Express Agency: 1949

Rivera, Diego: 1949

Rogers, John C.: 1941

Roosevelt, Eleanor: 1944

Rosenblum, Walter: 1944

Rothschild, Lincoln: 1937, 1942, 1945, 1946, 1949

Royce, William: 1933, 1934, 1935, 1942, 1958

Rukeyser, Muriel: 1941, 1950



San Francisco Chronicle -- : 1951, 1953

Sarah Lawrence College: 1942, 1943, 1944

Saturday Evening Post -- : 1946

Schlesinger, Arthur: 1943

School Art League of New York City: 1953, 1954

Schwimmer, Rosika: 1933, 1935, 1943

Sculpture's Guild: 1938, 1940, 1941

Segy, Ladislaw: 1943

Shelter -- : 1939

Sloan, John: 1951

Smith College Museum of Art: 1939, 1954

Soby, James Thrall: 1935, 1946, 1951

Social Science Research Council: 1948

Springfield Museum of Fine Art: 1938, 1940, 1941

Standard Oil: 1946

Stein, Gertrude: 1934

Sterling, Charles (Department of Painting, The Louvre): 1951

Strand, Paul: 1942

Survey Associates -- : 1938, 1939

Sweeney, James John: 1954, 1955, 1956

Thornton, Russell (see also Corcoran Gallery of Art): 1951, 1952, 1953

Time Magazine -- : 1945

Toklas, Alice B.: 1949

Traphagen School of Fashion: 1957

U.S. Camera -- : 1940

University of Chicago Library: 1951

University of Minnesota: 1951

University of Nebraska: 1953, 1954, 1956, 1957

Vanderbilt, Paul (Library of Congress): 1950

Vogue Magazine -- : 1953

Vose, Robert C.: 1945

Wade, Henry: 1954

Walker Art Center: 1946, 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951

Walker, Hudson: 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952

Ward, Lynd: 1942, 1945, 1947



Western Photography -- : 1946

Weston, Edward: 1943

Weyhe Gallery: 1940, 1951

Wheaton College: 1955

Wheeler, Monroe: 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945

Whitney Museum of American Art: 1946, 1947, 1951

Wichita Art Association: 1947

Williams, Hermann Warner (see also Corcoran Gallery of Art): 1950, 1951, 1952, 1954

Wilson, Sol: 1945

Worcester Art Museum: 1943, 1945

World Publishing Company: 1946, 1949, 1950, 1955

Yale University Art Gallery: 1949

Yale University Library: 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954

Young, Art: 1941

Young Artists Guild: 1948
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Elizabeth McCausland papers, 1838-1995, bulk 1920-1960. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mccaeliz, Series 2
See more items in:
Elizabeth McCausland papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c5d24e2b-e768-46c3-ad9f-cdb7e238e691
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-mccaeliz-ref60

Howard W. and Jean Lipman papers

Creator:
Lipman, Howard, 1905-1992  Search this
Names:
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Gaylor, Wood, 1883-1957  Search this
Huge, Jurgan Frederick, 1809-1878  Search this
Lipman, Jean, 1909-1998  Search this
Porter, Rufus, 1792-1884  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Extent:
46.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1848, 1916-2000
Summary:
The Howard W. and Jean Lipman papers measure 46.6 linear feet and span the years 1916 to 2000, with one brochure maintained in a research file dating to 1848. The bulk dates for the collection are 1932 to 1992. The papers primarily concern the art collecting activities and interests of the Lipmans which included modern American sculpture, American folk art, and other contemporary American paintings. Found within the papers are correspondence files, notes and printed material that served as research and reference material, along with financial material. The collection also contains writings, notes, and editorial material used by Jean Lipman in her dual roles as an editor for Art in America magazine and as a respected art critic and author.
Scope and Content Note:
The Howard W. and Jean Lipman papers measure 46.6 linear feet and span the years 1916 to 2000. A copy of an 1848 brochure, retained by Jean Lipman in her research and writings files accounts for the early span date listed in the title of the collection. The bulk dates for the collection are 1932 to 1992. The records include correspondence, notes and printed material that served as research and reference material, along with some financial material that documents the art collecting activities and interests of the Lipmans. The collection also contains writing and editorial material used by Jean Lipman in her dual roles as an editor for Art in America magazine and as a respected author.

The Personal Files describe the social activities and associations of the Lipmans and include biographical information, personal and family correspondence, gift giving activities, the art career of Jean Lipman, and relationships maintained by the Lipmans with various art organizations.

The Howard and Jean Lipman Art Collection Files describe the art collecting activities and interests of the Lipmans throughout their lifetime. The General Files section consists of reference files on art organizations and galleries with whom the Lipmans maintained relationships. Also included are particular topics or exhibitions of interest to the Lipmans. The Sculptors and Painters of Interest section served as reference files about the activities of artists in whom the Lipmans were interested and whose works they owned, or considered owning. The Folk Art Collection section documents the collecting and purchasing activities of the Lipmans as they amassed and then subsequently sold their two significant folk art collections.

The Artists Files document the friendship and projects that developed between the Lipmans and three major American artists: Alexander Calder, Louise Nevelson, and David Smith. Of special interest to researchers will be some original Calder artwork mixed into the correspondence between the Lipmans and Calder, as well as drawings, sketches, prints, and posters found in the associated oversize folder. Also found in the Calder subseries are some proofs from Calder's Circus, edited by Jean Lipman.

The Research and Writing Files is divided into five sections dealing with research and writing projects undertaken by Jean Lipman. The first three sections deal with biographical projects that resulted in books or articles about three significant American primitive artists: Jurgan Frederick Huge, Rufus Porter, and Samuel Wood Gaylor. The fourth section deals with writing projects that resulted in the publication of several generalized books on the topic of American folk art. The final section consists of materials associated with the published articles and other authored works of Jean Lipman on a variety of American art topics.

The Art in America Editorial Files consists of editorial material maintained by Jean Lipman during her tenure (1941-1971) as editor of Art in America. The Financial Files reflect the early financial activities of the magazine during the brief period when the Lipmans owned it.

During the period that Jean Lipman served as editor, a variety of distinguished art historians, artists, architects, novelists, and poets contributed articles, columns, or artwork to the magazine. A sampling of correspondents that can be found in the general correspondence of this series include: Joseph Albers, Marcel DuChamp, John Dos Passos, Nelson Rockefeller, Charles Sheeler, and Andrew Wyeth. The General Correspondence Files also document the two subsequent changes of ownership and the growth of subscribers that occurred during the period of Lipman's editorship.

Editorial material related to individual magazine issues is found within this series, as well as information pertaining to the innovative advertising and special projects undertaken by the magazine as it sought to expand its readership and prestige. The Art in America series also chronicles the changes at the magazine that led to Lipman's resignation as editor in 1971.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as five series. Arrangement is generally alphabetical by subject heading or type of material. Items within folders are arranged chronologically by year.

Missing Title

Series 1: Personal Files (Boxes 1-3; 3 linear ft.)

Series 2: Howard and Jean Lipman Art Collection (Boxes 3-15; 12 linear ft.)

Series 3: Artists Files (Boxes 15-18, 46-47, OV 50-52; 3.6 linear ft.)

Series 4: Research and Writings Files (Boxes 18-28, 48; OV 50, 53; 10.3 linear ft.)

Series 5: -- Art in America -- Editorial Files (Boxes 28-45; 49, OV 50; 17.3 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Howard W. and Jean Lipman shared a lifetime sponsorship of art. The Lipmans' personal art collection, acquired throughout their marriage, was eventually divided into three separate parts: The Howard W. Lipman Foundation collection that was donated and merged into the modern sculpture holdings of the Whitney Museum of American Art; an American folk art collection that was later sold through two separate auctions in 1950 and 1981 and is now part of the holdings of the New York Historical Association and the Museum of American Folk Art; and a personal collection that was retained and displayed in the Lipmans' various residences in Connecticut, New York, and Arizona.

Married in 1933, the Lipmans began jointly collecting American folk art at a time when few art museums or institutions recognized the historical and artistic value of early primitive, self-taught artists. By the late 1940s, the Lipmans had amassed a large, significant collection that was highly regarded for its quality and scope.

During the early 1950s, the Lipmans also began actively collecting sculpture, focusing upon American contemporary sculptors. In the late 1950s they created the Howard W. Lipman Foundation, with an initial inventory of forty sculptures and three paintings by contemporary American artists. The purpose of the foundation was to acquire significant works by emerging American sculptors and to make them available through loans or donations to various art institutions.

In 1965 the Howard W. Lipman Foundation approached the Whitney Museum of American Art with a proposal to coordinate the foundation's efforts and goals with the museum's contemporary sculpture program. The foundation offered a majority of its growing collection of sculpture and acquisition funds towards the development of the evolving permanent collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art. Thereafter, the Howard W. Lipman Foundation served in an advisory role to the museum's acquisitions, and the foundation supplied the necessary funds to acquire works of sculpture desired by the Whitney for its permanent collection.

In addition to their folk art and foundation collections, the Lipmans also acquired important works by Alexander Calder, Louise Nevelson, and David Smith, through their lifelong association and friendship with these artists. Many of these pieces were retained in the Lipmans' personal collection throughout their lives.

Individually the Lipmans also expressed their interest in art through various means. Jean Lipman served as editor of Art in America magazine from 1940 to 1970, which provided her with continuous exposure to emerging artists and trends in American art. Jean Lipman's abiding interest in folk and contemporary art was also expressed through her voluminous writings. Throughout her life she wrote and edited highly acclaimed books and articles about major themes and artists in American art, and she was a recognized folk art authority and connoisseur. Some of her best known works include: The Flowering of American Folk Art; Rufus Porter, Yankee Wall Painter; and Calder's Universe.

Jean Lipman, born in 1909, was also an amateur artist in her later years, creating paintings and assemblages that often dealt with the theme of "art about art." She was represented by a gallery in New York City, as well as one in Arizona, and she had several solo exhibitions.

Howard W. Lipman, born in 1905, showed an early interest in art. By the mid 1920s he had gone to Paris to study painting, but Lipman found himself more attracted to sculpture and he began studying with a German wood carver. In the late 1930s, after returning to the New York City area, Lipman began stone carving with the Clay Club on Eighth Street, adjacent to the Whitney Museum of American Art. He was represented by a New York City gallery and participated in local exhibitions.

Deciding that his sculptural talent was not sufficient for professional pursuit, Lipman began his business career as a stockbroker in Neuberger and Berman, a prominent New York investment management firm that he helped to establish in 1939. Lipman subsequently channeled his artistic endeavors toward collecting and supporting the work of established and emerging American sculptors. He also served on the boards of both the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Archives of American Art.

Howard and Jean Lipman maintained long and close relationships with three prominent American artists: Alexander Calder, Louise Nevelson, and David Smith. Jean Lipman, in particular, was involved in promoting and documenting Calder and his works through numerous articles, books, and exhibitions that she helped produce as editor of the magazine Art in America and publications director for the Whitney Museum of American Art. Calder's Universe, which she edited to accompany a major Whitney Museum of American Art retrospective exhibition of his works in 1976, was considered by Calder to be his "official" biography. The book went to fourteen printings, one of the largest ever, in the history of art books.

The Lipmans were also great admirers of Louise Nevelson and her work. They purchased her artwork for their own collection, as well as donating pieces to various art museums and institutions. Jean Lipman wrote articles about Nevelson and edited the book, Nevelson's World.

David Smith and the Lipmans established a friendship in the late 1950s that lasted until Smith's untimely death in May 1965. The Lipmans purchased several Smith sculptures, which they placed on the grounds of their Wilton, Connecticut, home. They also purchased Smith works for donation to public institutions, such as the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

The Lipmans retired to Carefree, Arizona, a private residential community renowned for its sensitivity to ecologically-based, architectural design. Howard Lipman died in 1992. Jean Lipman remained active in art and community affairs until her death in 1998.
Provenance:
The papers of Howard and Jean Lipman were initially donated to the Archives of American Art by Howard and Jean Lipman from 1965-1989. Subsequent additions to the original gift were made by Jean Lipman in 1998 and by Peter and Beverly Lipman in 2001. Several small portions of these early accessions were microfilmed.

An associated gift that was originally accessioned as the Art in America Magazine Records was made by Howard and Jean Lipman from 1970-1973. This group, which largely consisted of Jean Lipman's editorial files from her years as editor of the magazine, was subsequently merged with the Howard W. and Jean Lipman records in 2004.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art, Primitive  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Citation:
Howard W. and Jean Lipman papers, 1848, 1916-2000. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lipmhowa
See more items in:
Howard W. and Jean Lipman papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97247c5f0-a666-4bf1-a2ce-bcb5abf29458
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lipmhowa
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Lucy Lippard

Interviewee:
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Interviewer:
Heinemann, Sue  Search this
Creator:
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Names:
Art Workers Coalition  Search this
Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts Project  Search this
Guerilla Art Action Group  Search this
Heresies Collective, Inc.  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.) -- Employees  Search this
Political Art Documentation/Distribution (Organization)  Search this
Smith College -- Students  Search this
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Chicago, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Hammond, Harmony  Search this
Judd, Donald, 1928-1994  Search this
LeWitt, Sol, 1928-2007  Search this
Miss, Mary, 1944-  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Ryman, Robert, 1930-2019  Search this
Schneemann, Carolee, 1939-  Search this
Sholette, Gregory  Search this
Stevens, May  Search this
Extent:
4 Items (memory cards (4 hr., 29 min.), secure digital, wav, 1.25 in.)
97 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2011 Mar. 15
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Lucy Lippard conducted 2011 Mar. 15, by Sue Heinemann, for the Archives of American Art's Elizabeth Murray Oral History of Women in the Visual Arts project, at Lippard's home, in Galisteo, N.M.
Lippard discusses her childhood summers in Maine; growing up in New Orleans, La., and Charlottesville, Va.; attending the Abbot Academy and Smith College; her junior year in Paris; working in the Museum of Modern Art Library; living on Avenue D; meeting Bob Ryman and Sol Lewitt; birth of her son Ethan; Dore Ashton as a role model; involvement with various groups and political causes including the Angry Arts movement, the Art Workers' Coalition, Women Artists' Committee, Guerilla Art Action Group, Womanhouse, Political Art Documentation and Distribution (PAD/D), the Ad Hoc Women Artists Committee, and others; the development of Heresies Collective; her publications including, "From the Center: Feminist Essays on Women's Art," (1976), "On the Beaten Track: Tourism, Art and Place," (1999), "Mixed Blessings: New Art in a Multicultural America," (1990, 2000), "The Lure of the Local: Sense of Place in a Multicentered Society," (1997), and "Overlay: Contemporary Art and the Art of Prehistory," (1983) ; curating exhibitions; travels to Argentina and Mexico; moving to Galisteo, N.M.; interest in the Galisteo Basin; teaching; and other topics. She recalls Ad Reinhardt, Donald Judd, Harmony Hammond, Judy Chicago, Gregory Sholette, Carolee Schneemann, Max Koszloff, Joyce Koszloff, May Stevens, Betsy Hess, Mary Miss, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Lucy R. Lippard (1937- ) is a writer and art critic in New York, N.Y. and Galisteo, N.M.
General:
Originally recorded on Edirol R-09HR on 4 secure digital memory cards. Duration is 4 hr., 29 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. Access to the entire recording is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Feminism and art  Search this
Women authors  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Women museum curators  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.lippar11
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9b83cc211-01df-48fa-bb27-fb6ea7cd8d42
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lippar11
Online Media:

Thomas Hess papers

Creator:
Hess, Thomas B.  Search this
Names:
Mark Rothko Foundation  Search this
Bess, Forrest, 1911-1977  Search this
Campbell, Lawrence  Search this
De Kooning, Elaine  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Frankenthaler, Helen, 1928-2011  Search this
Gottlieb, Adolph, 1903-1974  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Kline, Franz, 1910-1962  Search this
Milles, Carl, 1875-1955  Search this
Newman, Barnett, 1905-1970  Search this
Noguchi, Isamu, 1904-1988  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Rivers, Larry, 1925-2002  Search this
Rosenberg, Harold, 1906-1978  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Schapiro, Meyer, 1904-  Search this
Schuyler, James  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Still, Clyfford, 1904-1980  Search this
Extent:
10.01 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Drawings
Greeting cards
Illustrated letters
Paintings
Cartoons (humorous images)
Photographs
Collages
Date:
1939-1978
Summary:
The papers of New York editor and art critic Thomas Hess measure 10.01 linear feet and date from 1939 to 1978. The collection includes biographical materials, correspondence, extensive writings and notes, artists and subject files that also include recorded conversations with artists and others, printed materials, photographic materials, and artwork.

There is a .01 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2022 that includes a six page typed manuscript, "Think, American Painting," undated, by Thomas Hess and the book American Realists and Magic Realists, The Museum of Modern Art, 1943, signed by Hess.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York editor and art critic Thomas Hess measure 10.01 linear feet and date from 1939 to 1978. The collection includes biographical materials, correspondence, extensive writings and notes, artists and subject files that also include recorded conversations with artists and others, printed materials, photographic materials, and artwork.

Biographical material includes a certificate, architectural plans, investment information, invoices, publisher and loan agreements, will for Paul Stamm, and resumes. Correspondence is with members of Hess' family including his wife and children, Philip Guston, Meyer Schapiro, David Smith, James Schuyler, Forrest Bess, Elaine de Kooning, Barnett Newman, Larry Rivers, Clyfford Still, Ad Reinhardt, and others.

Writings and notes consist of manuscripts and drafts by Hess for Art News, Le Monde, Vogue, New York magazine, and other publications; Hess' senior essay and class notes; notes on Ingres, Italian artists, and travels abroad; notebooks on art and literature; and scattered writings by others.

Artists and subject files contain primarily photographs of artwork, artists, and colleaguesare mostly photographs of artwork, artists, and colleagues. Some of the files also contain printed materials, writings, notes, and other documentation. The file on Willem de Kooning includes a sound recording of a conversation between Hess, de Kooning, and Harold Rosenberg. There are also significant files on Elaine de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Adolph Gottlieb, Franz Kline, Carl Milles, Barnett Newman, Isamu Noguchi, Ad Reinhardt, Mark Rothko and the Mark Rothko Foundation Inc.

Printed materials include brochures and flyers, clippings, magazines and newspapers, press releases, travel memorabilia, and a printed scarf. Photographs are of of Hess, his wife Audrey, other family members, works of art, travel, Larry Rivers and Ad Reinhardt, and other artists and colleagues. Artwork includes drawings, paintings, collages, cartoons, and holiday cards made by Hess and his children, along with artwork by others including Audrey and Lawrence Campbell, Ad Reinhardt, and unidentified artists.

There is a .01 linear foot unprocessed addition to this collection donated in 2022 that includes a six page typed manuscript, "Think, American Painting," undated, by Thomas Hess and the book American Realists and Magic Realists, The Museum of Modern Art, 1943, signed by Hess.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1945-1977 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1, OV 15)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1945-1978 (1.0 linear feet; Box 1-2, OV 11)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1940-1978 (2.5 linear feet; Box 2-5, OV 12)

Series 4: Artists and Subject Files, circa 1946-1978 (4.5 linear feet; Box 5-9, OVs 13, 15-16)

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1943-1978 (0.5 linear feet; Box 9, OV 11)

Series 6: Photographic Materials, 1949-circa 1960s (0.8 linear feet; Box 9-10, OV14)

Series 7: Artwork, 1939-1978 (0.4 linear feet; Box 10, OV 11)

Series 8: Unprocessed Addition, 1943 and undated (0.01 linear feet; Folder 17)
Biographical / Historical:
Thomas B. Hess (1920-1978) was an editor, art critic, and curator who worked in New York City. He was on the staff at Art News for 26 years (1946-72). Starting as an editorial associate, he was named managing editor in 1948, then executive editor in 1954; he assumed the top editorial post in 1965 upon the death of long-time editor Alfred Frankfurter. In his critical writing from the late 1940s on, he was an influential supporter of the Abstract Expressionists. He wrote widely on other topics as well. In 1972 he left Art News after an ownership change. He then became the art critic for New York magazine (1972-78), a large-circulation weekly reaching a much larger public. (He was also, in the late '60s, a correspondent for the French daily newspaper Le Monde.)

Over the years he undertook several major curatorial projects including traveling retrospectives for Willem de Kooning (1968-69) and Barnett Newman (1971), which he organized for the Museum of Modern Art. His "New York School Painting and Sculpture" appeared at the New York State Museum in Albany in 1977. Both MoMA exhibitions were accompanied by comprehensive monograph/catalogues: Willem de Kooning (1968) and Barnett Newman (1971). Hess's other books include Abstract Painting: Background and American Phase (1951, Viking); Willem de Kooning (1959, Braziller); De Kooning, Recent Paintings (1967, Walker & Co.); Barnett Newman (1969, Walker & Co.); De Kooning: Drawings (1972, New York Graphic); and The Art Comics and Satires of Ad Reinhardt (1975, De Luca Editore, Rome).

Hess became consultative chairman of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Department of 20th-Century Art a few months before his death from a heart attack in July 1978, age 57. Already under way were a Clyfford Still retrospective and a smaller show of recent paintings and sculptures by Ellsworth Kelly. Both exhibitions, completed by Philippe de Montebello (the Met's then new director) and Lowery S. Sims (the Met's then acting 20th-century curator) respectively, took place the year after Hess's death.

Thomas Hess was born in Rye, New York, to Gabriel Lorie Hess, a lawyer, and Helen Baer. He attended school in the United States and Switzerland. He continued his education at Yale University majoring in French 17th-century art history and literature. After graduating in 1942, Hess worked for a short period at the Museum of Modern Art under Alfred H. Barr and Dorothy Miller, before entering World War II as a pilot. In 1944 he married Audrey Stern with whom he had three children, William, Philip, and Anne Helen.
Separated Materials:
Materials on legacy microfilm reel 5028 related to Barnett Newman are photocopies. The originals are located at the Barnett New Foundation in New York City.
Provenance:
The Thomas Hess papers were donated in multiple increments from 1985 to 1987 by Hess' children, Anne Helen, William, and Philip Hess, except for a file on Barnett Newman donated by Newman's widow, who presumably had borrowed it from Hess. In 2014, additional correspondence, writings, photographs, printed material, and cartoons, including some by Ad Reinhardt, were donated by Elizabeth Wolff, Hess' sister. A small addition was donated in 2022 by Anne Hess, Thomas Hess' daughter.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists -- Italy  Search this
Editors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Drawings
Greeting cards
Illustrated letters
Paintings
Cartoons (humorous images)
Photographs
Collages
Citation:
Thomas Hess papers, 1939-1978. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.hessthom
See more items in:
Thomas Hess papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9cfd2536a-b35e-4030-9768-bfa094d6db9e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hessthom
Online Media:

Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt papers

Creator:
Smithson, Robert  Search this
Names:
Dwan Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Holt, Nancy, 1938-2014  Search this
Insley, Will, 1929-2011  Search this
Johnson, Ray, 1927-  Search this
Kepes, Gyorgy, 1906-2001  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Extent:
67.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Moving images
Documentary films
Date:
1905-1987
bulk 1952-1987
Summary:
The papers of sculptor, painter, and author Robert Smithson and sculptor, filmmaker, and earthworks artist Nancy Holt measure 18.9 linear feet and date from 1905 to 1987, with the bulk of the material dating from 1952 to 1987. Also included is Smithson's personal library of books, vinyl records, and magazine, measuring 48.4 linear feet. The papers consist of Smithson's biographical material; business and personal correspondence, much of it with artists; interview transcripts; extensive writings and project files; financial records; printed material; a scrapbook of clippings; holiday cards with original prints and sketches; photographic material; and artifacts. Also found are project files related to Nancy Holt's motion picture film Pine Barrens and her seminal environmental work of art Sun Tunnels, including a video documentary about Sun Tunnels.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of sculptor, painter, and author Robert Smithson and sculptor, filmmaker, and earthworks artist Nancy Holt measure 18.9 linear feet and date from 1905 to 1987, with the bulk of the material dating from 1952 to 1987. Also included is Smithson's personal library of books, vinyl records, and magazine, measuring 48.4 linear feet. The papers consist of Smithson's biographical material; business and personal correspondence, much of it with artists; interview transcripts; extensive writings and project files; financial records; printed material; a scrapbook of clippings; holiday cards with original prints and sketches; photographic material; and artifacts. Also found are project files related to Nancy Holt's film Pine Barrens and her seminal environmental work of art Sun Tunnels, including a video documentary about Sun Tunnels.

Biographical material includes Robert Smithson's curriculum vitae, personal identification and medical documents, eight engagement/day planners Smithson and Holt maintained from 1966 to 1973, and Smithson's funeral register.

Correspondence is primarily with Smithson's family, friends, fellow artists, and business associates discussing personal relationships, proposed art projects, and exhibitions. Correspondents of note include Carl Andre, the Dwan Gallery (Virginia Dwan), Dan Graham, Will Insley, Ray Johnson, Gyorgy Kepes, Sol Lewitt, Lucy Lippard, and Dennis Wheeler. There is also substantial correspondence received by Holt upon Smithson's death in 1973, and between Holt and the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art regarding Smithson's retrospective exhibition in 1982.

There are nine interview transcripts with Smithson discussing his works and his general philosophy on art, and one transcript of the Andrew Dickson White Museum's Earth Art Symposium (1969) featuring the following artists: Mike Hiezer, Dennis Oppenheim, Robert Smithson, Neil Jenney, Gunther Uecker, Jan Dibbets, Richard Long, and Hans Haacke.

Writings are substantial and include 73 drafts of published and unpublished essays by Smithson on art, artists, and works in progress. The series also includes poems by Smithson, six notebooks containing notes and sketches by Smithson, and drafts of writings sent to Smithson and Holt by friends and colleagues, including Carl Andre, Terry Atkinson, Dan Flavin, Dan Graham, and Jack Thibeau.

Project files contain correspondence, project instructions, diagrams and sketches, research materials, photographic material, and maps related to over 50 of Smithson's artworks. These include concepts, proposed projects, sculptures, non-sites, and earthwork projects, including Spiral Jetty, Broken Circle, and Spiral Hill.

Personal business records include gallery related loan arrangements and receipts for miscellaneous art supplies. Financial records include tax forms and preparation documents, including cancelled checks, receipts, statements, and related correspondence.

Printed materials include books, clippings, and periodicals related to Smithson, either containing writings or sketches by him, or containing articles reviewing his work. There are also exhibition announcements and catalogs of Smithson's group and solo shows from 1959 to 1985.

The scrapbook contains clippings of Smithson's published articles from 1966 to 1973 with annotated shorthand notes.

Artwork consists of Christmas cards collaged by Smithson, and sketches by Smithson and Leo Valledor.

Photographic materials include prints and negatives of Smithson with friends, promotional Hollywood movie stills, and original prints and copyprints of other artists' artwork.

Artifacts consist of a paper bag silkscreened with a Campbell's soup can (Warhol), promotional buttons (N.E. Thing Co.), various organic materials, and two art kits.

Nancy Holt's papers consist of correspondence, a grant application, printed materials, and project files and audio visual material related to her motion picture film Pine Barrens (1975) and her seminal environmental work of art Sun Tunnels (1975).
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 14 series:

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1905-1974 (Box 1; 14 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1959-1987 (Boxes 1-2, OV 21; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Interview Transcripts, 1966-1973 (Box 2; 11 folders)

Series 4: Writings, 1959-1975 (Boxes 2-3; 1.1 linear feet)

Series 5: Project Files, circa 1950s-1982 (Boxes 4-5, Boxes 17-18, OV 20, OV 22-26, OV 36, RD 28-30, RD 32-35; 6.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Personal Business Records, circa 1967-1970s (Box 5; 4 folders)

Series 7: Financial Records, 1962-1972 (Box 6-7; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1955-1985 (Boxes 7-11, Box 18, RD 31; 5.6 linear feet)

Series 9: Scrapbook, 1966-1973 (Box 11, Box 16; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 10: Artwork, circa 1950s-1970s (Box 11; 4 folders)

Series 11: Photographs, circa 1950s-1970s (Box 11, Box 18; 5 folders)

Series 12: Artifacts, circa 1950s-1970s (Box 11, Box 14, OV 19; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 13: Nancy Holt Papers, circa 1960s-1980s (Box 12-13, 15, OV 27, FC 37-38; 1.9 linear feet)

Series 14: Robert Smithson Personal Library (Boxes 39-87; 48.4 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Robert Smithson (1938-1973) was a sculptor, painter, author, and lecturer who was known as a pioneer of land and earthworks art, based primarily in New York City. Nancy Holt (1938-2014) was a land artist, conceptual artist, and filmmaker. Smithson and Holt were married from 1963 until Smithson's death in 1973.

Born in Passaic, New Jersey, Smithson expressed an early interest in art, enrolling in classes at the Brooklyn Museum School and the Art Student's League in New York while still attending high school. Smithson's early works were primarily paintings, drawings, and collages. In 1959, he exhibited his first solo show of paintings at the Artists' Gallery in New York and had his first solo international show in Rome with the Galleria George Lester in 1961.

During the early to mid-1960s, Smithson was perhaps better known as a writer and art critic, writing numerous essays and reviews for Arts Magazine and Artforum. He became affiliated with artists who were identified with the minimalist movement, such as Carl Andre, Donald Judd, Nancy Holt, Sol LeWitt, Robert Morris and others. In 1963, Smithson married sculptor and filmmaker Nancy Holt and a year later started to create his first sculptural works. In 1966, Smithson joined the Dwan Gallery, whose owner Virginia Dwan was an enthusiastic supporter of his work.

Smithson's interest in land art began in the late 1960s while exploring industrial and quarry sites and observing the movement of earth and rocks. This resulted in a series of sculptures called "non-sites" consisting of earth and rocks collected from a specific site and installed in gallery space, often combined with photographs, maps, mirrors, or found materials. In September 1968, Smithson published the essay "A Sedimentation of the Mind: Earth Projects" in Artforum that promoted the work of the first wave of land art artists. Soon thereafter, he began creating his own large scale land art and earthworks.

From 1967 to 1973, Smithson's productivity was constant as he wrote, lectured, and participated in several solo and group shows a year, both at home and abroad. He explored narrative art as essay in "The Monuments of Passaic" and fully committed to his idea of visiting sites and using them as the basis for creating non-sites, Non-Site, Pine Barrens, (1968); incorporated and documented the use of mirrors at sites in Mirror Displacement, Cayuga Salt Mine Project (1968-1969); and created his first site-specific works through liquid pours of mud, asphalt, and concrete, including Asphalt Rundown (1969). In 1969, he also completed his first earth pour at Kent State University with his project Partially Buried Woodshed. Later that year, he created the sculptural artwork for which he is best known, Spiral Jetty (1969) on the Great Salt Lake in Utah. This was the first of his pieces to require the acquisition of land rights and earthmoving equipment, and would be followed two years later by Broken Circle and Spiral Hill in 1971.

On July 20, 1973, while surveying sites in Texas for the proposed Amarillo Ramp, Smithson died in a plane crash at the age of 35. Despite his early death, Smithson's writings and artwork had a major impact on many contemporary artists.

Nancy Holt began her career as a photographer and video artist. Today, Holt is most widely known for her large-scale environmental works, Sun Tunnels and Dark Star Park. Holt has also made a number of films and videos since the late 1960s, including Mono Lake (1968), East Coast, West Coast (1969), and Swamp (1971) in collaboration with her late husband Robert Smithson. Points of View: Clocktower (1974) features conversations between Lucy Lippard and Richard Serra, Liza Bear and Klaus Kertess, Carl Andre and Ruth Kligman and Bruce Brice and Tina Girouard. In 1978, she produced a film about her seminal work Sun Tunnels.
Related Material:
The Archives also holds several collections related to Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt, including an oral history interview with Robert Smithson conducted by Paul Cummings in 1972; an interview with Robert Smithson conducted by Tony Robbin in 1968; Robert Smithson letters to George B. Lester, 1960-1963; an oral history interviews with Nancy Holt conducted by Scott Gutterman in 1992 and Joyce Pomeroy Schwartz in 1993; and the Nancy Holt Estate records, circa 1960-2001.
Provenance:
The papers of Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt were donated by Nancy Holt in several accretions between 1986 and 2011.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, holds the intellectual property rights, including copyright, to all materials created by Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt with the exception of the following items: two holiday cards found in box 11, folders 22-23. For these two items, copyright held by Holt/Smithson Foundation / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Requests for permission to reproduce should be submitted to ARS.

The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Conceptual artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Earthworks (Art)  Search this
Filmmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women filmmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Moving images
Documentary films
Citation:
Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt papers, 1905-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.smitrobe
See more items in:
Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw96b7b3eff-59b4-4fed-a5db-394ea8d534bf
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-smitrobe
Online Media:

April Kingsley and Budd Hopkins papers

Creator:
Hopkins, Budd, 1931-2011  Search this
Kingsley, April  Search this
Names:
Long Point Gallery (Provincetown, Mass.)  Search this
Diebenkorn, Richard, 1922-1993  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Pindell, Howardena, 1943-  Search this
Rosenblum, Robert  Search this
Extent:
11 Linear feet
0.209 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
circa 1945-2017
Summary:
The papers of art critic, curator, and educator April Kingsley and painter, sculptor, writer, and educator Budd Hopkins measure 11 feet and 0.209 Gigabytes, and date from circa 1945-2017. Kingsley's papers are comprised primarily of artist files for figures that April had a significant engagement with, project files, interviews with artists, subject file index cards, biographical materials, and miscellaneous correspondence. Hopkins' papers are comprised of biographical material, as well as correspondence with various prominent art world figures including Richard Diebenkorn, Robert Motherwell, Carl Andre, Howardena Pindell, and Robert Rosenblum. Hopkins' personal business records include correspondence and sale and consignment information. Also found are writings, printed material, including exhibition invitations and catalogs and press clippings, and photographic material depicting Hopkins and his artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art critic, curator, and educator April Kingsley and painter, sculptor, writer, and educator Budd Hopkins measure 11 feet and 0.209 Gigabytes, and date from circa 1945-2017. Kingsley's papers are comprised primarily of artist files for figures that April had a significant engagement with, with contents ranging from correspondence to printed material, including invitations and catalogs and press clippings, as well as notes and manuscript material including reviews. Project files include various topics of interest and research for tentative and actualized exhibitions, as well as writing projects and committee work related to Kingsley's tenure at the American Craft Museum and the Kresge Museum at Michigan State University. Also found are recorded interviews with artists and other figures conducted by April Kingsley between the years of 1988 and 1990, most of which are affiliated with the Abstract Expressionist movement. The subject file index cards are comprised of various sets of notes and citations regarding themes, movements, and artists central to Kingsley's ongoing research throughout her career. Also included are various biographical materials and miscellaneous correspondence that comprise the personal papers subseries.

Hopkins' papers are comprised of biographical material including biographies and a chronology, correspondence with various prominent art world figures including Richard Diebenkorn, Robert Motherwell, Carl Andre, Howardena Pindell, and Robert Rosenblum. Personal business records include correspondence and sale and consignment information related to particular galleries, as well as records regarding the Long Point Gallery co-founded by Hopkins and twelve other artists on Cape Cod in 1977. His writings include manuscript material regarding one of Hopkins' titles on UFO abductions, as well as various typescripts for reviews and essays written by Hopkins, as well as one audio recording for a lecture regarding his essay "Modernism and the Collage Aesthetic." Printed material including exhibition invitations and catalogs and press clippings are also found. Photographic materials include images of Hopkins, exhibition installations, and artwork in various formats, such as photographic prints, negatives, slides, and transparencies.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in two series:

Series 1: April Kingsley papers, circa 1960s-2017 (7.7 Linear Feet; Boxes 1-8, 0.209 Gigabytes; ER01)

Series 2: Budd Hopkins papers, circa 1945-2010 (3.3 Linear Feet; Boxes 7, 9-11)
Biographical / Historical:
April Kingsley (1941- ) is an art historian, critic, and curator living in Harwich, Massachusetts. Budd Hopkins (1931-2011) was an Abstract Expressionist artist and writer of both art criticism and UFO and abduction phenomena accounts, who lived primarily in New York City and Cape Cod.

Following a short-lived career as a nurse while married to her first husband, Kingsley completed a Masters of Fine Arts from New York University, and later a PhD in Art History from the City University Graduate Center. Kingsley studied in depth the Abstract Expressionist art movement, and also focused heavily on women artists and contemporary craft art. Kingsley held curatorial positions at a range of institutions including at The Museum of Modern Art, The American Craft Museum, and at the Pasadena Art Museum. She has written major monographs on numerous artists including Jean Miotte and Alice Dalton Bown, and contributed to the catalogs of more than 75 artists. Among her most notable publications are The Turning Point: The Abstract Expressionists and the Transformation of American Art (1992) and Emotional Impact: American Figurative Expressionism (2013). Kingsley and Hopkins were married from 1973-1991, and had one daughter, Grace Hopkins-Lisle. Kingsley currently resides in Harwich, Massachusetts with her husband Donald Spyke, who she married in 2005.

Born Elliott Budd Hopkins in 1931 in Wheeling West Virginia, Hopkins survived an early battle with polio as a toddler, following which a period of convalescence made an early engagement with drawing possible. He graduated from Oberlin College with an art history degree where he heard a lecture from a future mentor Robert Motherwell. After college Hopkins moved to New York City and became a fixture of the Abstract Expressionist circle, and by 1956 had his first solo show of paintings. In 1976 he earned a Guggenheim Fellowship as well as a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1979. His paintings, which range from gestural Abstract Expressionism to color plane geometric compositions are held in major museum collections ranging from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the British Museum. In the 1980s Hopkins turned to making large scale sculptures evocative of ancient ritualist architecture, an addition to his well-known painting practice. Hopkins also published a number of reviews of the work of other artists which were very well received at the time. As much as his art career perhaps, Budd Hopkins is known for spreading the word about alien abduction in his popular books on the subject, following a UFO sighting he recounts in Cape Cod in 1964. While Hopkins does not claim to have been abducted he regularly held support groups for others to share their stories. He passed in 2011 in his home in New York City.
Provenance:
The bulk of April Kingsley and Budd Hopkins papers was donated in 2018 by Grace Hopkins, their daughter. Portions of the Budd Hopkins papers were donated by Budd Hopkins between 1980 and 1983.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Women art critics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
April Kingsley and Budd Hopkins Papers, circa 1945-2017. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kingapri
See more items in:
April Kingsley and Budd Hopkins papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw94156d765-6914-437a-9d3b-e520ab367d30
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kingapri
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Ted Gilien

Interviewee:
Gilien, Ted, 1914-1967  Search this
Interviewer:
McGlynn, Betty Hoag  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Bocour, Leonard, 1910-1993  Search this
Levine, Jack, 1915-2010  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound tape reels (Sound recording, 3 in.)
67 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1965 Mar. 3
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Ted Gilien conducted 1965 Mar. 3, by Betty Hoag, for the Archives of American Art. Gilien speaks of his background and education; getting on the WPA Federal Art Project; starting out as an assistant mural painter on Ellis Island; his military service in World War II as a combat artist; working in New York City and then in California after World War II; experimenting in screenwriting and novel writing; recurring themes in his paintings; his feelings about the FAP; art criticism; the politics of government support for the arts; camaraderie among artists during the WPA years. He recalls Leonard Bocour, James Dean, and Jack Levine.
Biographical / Historical:
Ted Gilien (1914-1967) was a painter and muralist in New York, N.Y. and Los Angeles, Calif.
General:
An unrelated interview of Charles White (3/9/65) conducted by B. Hoag is also on one tape.
An interview of F. J. Schwankovsky (3/1/65) conducted by B. Hoag is also on one tape.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
This interview is open for research. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Art and state  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Art and war  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Muralists -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- California -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- Interviews  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.gilien65
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9fc464c8e-b350-4f4f-8840-f7f2c6144164
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gilien65
Online Media:

East River Embankment, Winter

Artist:
Robert Henri, American, b. Cincinnati, Ohio, 1865–1929  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
25 3/4 x 32 1/8 in. (65.3 x 81.4 cm)
Type:
Painting
Date:
(1900)
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of the Joseph H. Hirshhorn Foundation, 1966
Accession Number:
66.2435
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
School:
American Realism (Ashcan School)
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py231970a3c-d47b-4754-ad0f-4ba72c4d97e3
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_66.2435

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