Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
251 documents - page 1 of 13

“Chiura Obata: American Modern” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Creator:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-11-21T23:17:21.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
americanartmuseum
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
YouTube Channel:
americanartmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_7_IbPsRVhAA

Eugenie Gershoy papers

Creator:
Gershoy, Eugenie, 1901?-1983 or 6  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Federal Art Project (N.Y.)  Search this
Woodstock Artists Association (Woodstock, N.Y.)  Search this
Yaddo (Artist's colony)  Search this
Baker, Mildred, 1905-  Search this
Blanch, Arnold, 1896-1968  Search this
Blanch, Lucile, 1895-1981  Search this
Breeskin, Adelyn Dohme, 1896-1986  Search this
Calder, Alexander Stirling, 1870-1945  Search this
Dehn, Virginia  Search this
Force, Juliana, 1876-1948  Search this
Fruhauf, Aline, 1909-1978  Search this
Gottlieb, Harry, 1895-  Search this
Hart, Agnes, 1912-1979  Search this
Knight, Frederic C., 1898-1979  Search this
Marantz, Irving, 1912-1972  Search this
Millay, Edna St. Vincent, 1892-1950  Search this
Nakian, Reuben, 1897-1986  Search this
Picken, George, 1898-  Search this
Pollet, Joseph C., 1897-1979  Search this
Presser, Josef, 1906-1967  Search this
Refregier, Anton, 1905-  Search this
Scaravaglione, Concetta, 1900-1975  Search this
Soyer, Moses, 1899-1974  Search this
Soyer, Raphael, 1899-1987  Search this
Thomson, Virgil, 1896-  Search this
Varda, Jean  Search this
Extent:
7.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Christmas cards
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Photographs
Place:
Woodstock (N.Y.)
Date:
1914-1983
Summary:
The papers of sculptor and art instructor, Eugenie Gershoy, measure 7.2 linear feet and date from 1914 to 1983. The collection documents Gershoy's career through biographical material, correspondence, business records, notes, writings, artwork, printed material, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The Eugenie Gershoy papers date from 1914 to 1983, measure 7.2 linear feet, and reflect Gershoy's career as a sculptor and teacher. The collection contains biographical material, correspondence, business records, notes, writings, artwork of Gershoy and others, printed material including exhibition catalogs, and photographs with subjects including Gershoy, her friends and colleagues, her studio, and her artwork.

Correspondence forms the bulk of the collection and includes correspondence between Gershoy and her siblings and their families regarding her activities, as well as with colleagues, many of whom were associated with the Woodstock Artist Association, and many of whom were museum colleagues.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into eight series according to material type. The contents of each series have been arranged chronologically.

Missing Title

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1939-1971 (boxes 1, 8-9; 3 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1914-1983, undated (boxes 1-6, 8-9; 5.8 linear ft.)

Series 3: Business Records, 1952-1978 (box 6; 5 folders)

Series 4: Notes, 1967-1970, undated (box 6; 3 folders)

Series 5: Writings, 1970, undated (box 6; 2 folders)

Series 6: Artwork, 1932-1978, undated (boxes 6, 8-9, OV 10, 26 folders)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1932-1983, undated (boxes 7, 9; 19 folders)

Series 8: Photographs, 1916-1983, undated (boxes 7, 9; 12 folders)
Biographical Note:
Born in Krivoi Rog, Russia on January 1, 1901, Eugenie was the youngest of the Gershoy children. The family immigrated to New York City in 1903. She later became a U.S. citizen.

With the aid of two scholarships, she attended the Art Students League and studied under A. Stirling Calder, Leo Lentelli, Kenneth Hayes Miller, Boardman Robinson, and Carl Walters. During the late 1920s and early 1930s, she maintained a studio with Harry Gottlieb in Woodstock, New York. From 1936 to 1939, under the WPA Federal Art Project, she worked in conjunction with Max Spivak on murals for the children's recreation room in the Astoria branch of the Queens Borough Public Library, New York.

Gershoy's first solo show was at the Robinson Gallery in New York in 1940. Following a year of teaching at the New Orleans Art School, she moved to San Francisco in 1942. In 1946 she taught ceramics at the California School of Fine Arts, and in May 1950, she studied at Yaddo.

In addition to visits to England and France in the early 1930s, Gershoy travelled to Mexico and Guatemala in 1947, 1948, and 1961. She worked in Paris in 1951 and toured Africa, India, and the Orient in 1955.

Eugenie Gershoy died in 1986.
Related Material:
Related material in the Archives of American Art includes a transcribed oral history interview with Eugenie Gershoy conducted by Mary McChesney for the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts Oral History Program, October 15, 1964. A link to the transcript is provided from the online catalog.
Provenance:
The Eugenie Gershoy papers were donated to the Archives of American Art between 1975 and 1983 by the artist.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Draftsmen (artists) -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Ceramicists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
New Deal, 1933-1939  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women ceramicists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Function:
Artists' studios -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Prints
Christmas cards
Sketchbooks
Sketches
Photographs
Citation:
Eugenie Gershoy papers, 1914-1983. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.gerseuge
See more items in:
Eugenie Gershoy papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9140504d0-90c4-45af-91c8-9c39b74aa139
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-gerseuge

Hisako Hibi and Matsusaburo "George" Hibi papers, circa 1906-2000

Creator:
Hibi, Hisako, 1907-1991  Search this
Hibi, Matsusaburo George, 1886-1947  Search this
Type:
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Hisako Hibi and Matsusaburo "George" Hibi papers, circa 1906-2000. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Forced removal and internment, 1942-1945  Search this
Theme:
Asian American  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)22180
AAA_collcode_hibihisa
Theme:
Asian American
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_22180

Hisako Hibi and Matsusaburo "George" Hibi papers

Creator:
Hibi, Hisako, 1907-1991  Search this
Hibi, Matsusaburo George, 1886-1947  Search this
Extent:
3.3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Date:
circa 1906-2000
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Japanes American artists Hisako Hibi and Matsusaburo "George" Hibi measure 3.3 linear feet and date from circa 1906-2000. These papers are mainly focused on Hisako Hibi's life and career, with some small elements related to Matsusaburo "George" Hibi. Included are biographical material consisting of immigration documents and interview transcripts; scrapbooks; photographs of family members; printed material including catalogs and newspaper clippings; personal and professional correspondence; records of works sold, loaned and donated; and few sketches. Also found is Matsusaburo's handwritten account of founding the art school at Topaz camp.
Biographical / Historical:
Hisako Hibi née Shimizu (1907-1991) was Japanese American an artist in Hayward and San Francisco, California. She was married to­ artist Matsusaburo "George" Hibi (1886-1947). Both artists were incarcerated at the Topaz relocation center in Utah during World War II.
Provenance:
Donated in 2022 by Ibuki Hibi Lee, Hisako and Matsusaburo "George" Hibi's daughter.
Restrictions:
This collection is temporarily closed to researchers due to archival processing and digitization. For more information, please contact Reference Services.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Printmakers -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Forced removal and internment, 1942-1945  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.hibihisa
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw96ad4ec94-a26a-44a8-94e1-868fddd32f1d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hibihisa

Valor in Black and White: War Stories of Horace Poolaw

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Conversations and talks
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-11-17T15:43:57.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_Npi_Nrw-B9o

Charles Cajori papers

Creator:
Cajori, Charles, 1921-2013  Search this
Names:
New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture  Search this
Tanager Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Dodd, Lois, 1927-  Search this
Finkelstein, Louis  Search this
Extent:
7.4 Linear feet
0.07 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Transcripts
Date:
1928-2018
Summary:
The papers of New York painter, Charles Cajori measure 7.4 linear feet and 0.070 GB and date from 1928-2018. The collection documents Cajori's activities as a painter, educator, and co-founder of the Tanager Gallery, located on the Lower East Side in New York, through biographical material; correspondence; writings and notes; interviews, talks, and panel discussions on art and artists; printed materials; and photographic materials.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of New York painter, Charles Cajori measure 7.4 linear feet and 0.070 GB and date from 1928-2018. The collection documents Cajori's activities as a painter, educator, and co-founder of the Tanager Gallery, located on the Lower East Side in New York, through biographical material; correspondence; writings and notes; interviews, talks, and panel discussions on art and artists; printed materials; and photographic materials.

Biographical material consists of Charles Cajori's high school records, air force records, passports and other travel documents, material related to his 90th birthday celebration, resumes, exhibition lists, a few drawings, obituaries, memorial service information, conservation reports on paintings, and other material.

Correspondence is personal and professional and consists of mostly incoming letters to Cajori from artists, friends, family, art historians, and academic institutions. There are a few letters from Charles Cajori, including draft of his letters. Among the correspondents are Pat Adams, Leland Bell, Bernard Chaet, Cooper Union, Cleve Gray, Barbara Grossman, Louis Finkelstein, Philip Pearlstein, Sidney Simon, Norman Turner, and the University of California at Berkeley. Of interest, are letters from the founders of the Tanager Gallery, such as Lois Dodd, Angelo Ippolito, and William King. Correspondence also documents Cajori's dealings with galleries and museums as well as his involvement in arts organizations; included are letters from American University, Watkins Gallery; Bertha Schaffer Gallery; Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center; Gallery Association of New York; Museum of Modern Art; Roko Gallery; Stable Gallery; and the Whitney Museum of American Art. There are also condolences to Barbara regarding Cajori's death.

Cajori's writings include drafts on painting and drawing that Cajori prepared for classroom lectures and panel discussions; essays on Paul Cézanne and Chaim Soutine; and his account of the founding of the Tanager Gallery. Cajori's writings also include a biographical account and an artist's statement. There are writings by Louis Finkelstein, Andrew Forge, and Mercedes Matter about Cajori's work. Included are several guest registers for Cajori's exhibitions at the David Findlay Gallery, Lohin Geduld Gallery, and the New York Studio School. There are also some class notes and essays that are probably from Cajori's college days, as well as some undated writings that include notes on art and artist statements.

Interviews, talks, and panel discussions include a transcript of an interview with Charles Cajori, audiotaped and videotaped as well as born digital interviews with Charles Cajori, and panel discussions with Cajori and others. Panel discussions with Cajori and others cover such topics as the New York school artists and Chaim Soutine. Many of recordings focus on Cajori's association with the Tanager Gallery, the art scene in New York during the 1950s, and his reflections on art. Also included are miscellaneous videotaped recordings. One panel discussion is digitized.

Printed material contains exhibition catalogs, checklists, announcements, invitations, press releases, clippings, reviews, brochures, and miscellaneous printed material. There are files of printed materials on the New York Studio School as well as Tanager Gallery that include exhibition catalogs and clippings.

Photographic material includes photographs, slides, and negatives of Charles Cajori, his studio, family and friends, black and white and color photographs of works of art, events and exhibition installations.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1928-2018 (Box 5; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1929-2015 (Boxes 1-2, 5-6; 1.8 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1940-2012 (Boxes 2, 6, 8; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Interviews, Talks, and Panel Discussions, 1983-2012 (Boxes 2-3, 6; 1.3 linear feet, ER01; 0.070 GB)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1943-2018 (Boxes 3-4, 6, 8, OV 9; 2 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographic Material, circa 1928-2015 (Boxes 6-8; 1.6 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Painter and teacher Charles Cajori (1921-2013) worked in New York City and Connecticut.

Born in Palo Alto, California in 1921, Charles Cajori studied painting at Colorado College and the Cleveland Art School. Cajori served in the United States Air Force during World War II. Upon his return, he attended Columbia University and then spent two years at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture.

Charles Cajori was one of the founding members of the Tanager Gallery, an early artists' cooperative gallery, originally located at 90 East Tenth Street in New York, which provided a venue for contemporary artists to exhibit their work. Through Tanager Gallery, Cajori became acquainted with Franz Kline, Willem de Kooning, and other Abstract Expressionist artists. In 1956, Charles Cajori had his first solo exhibition at the Tanager Gallery and since then, he continuously showed his work in numerous solo and group exhibitions in the United States and abroad including American University, Bertha Schaeffer Gallery, David Findlay Jr. Gallery, El Museo de Bellas Artes de Caracas, Ingber Gallery, Lohin Geduld Gallery, Mattatuck Museum, New Arts Gallery, Paesaggio Gallery, Sala di Esposizione della Biblioteca Americana, Stable Gallery, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Charles Cajori's work is represented in a number of public and private collections including the Ciba-Geigy Corporation, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Academy of Design, Walker Art Center, and the Weatherspoon Museum.

In conjunction with his activities as an artist, Charles Cajori taught painting and drawing at major academic institutions and art schools: Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Cooper Union, Cornell University, the University of California at Berkeley and Queens College (CUNY) where he taught for 20 years. Cajori was a co-founder of the New York Studio School, where he continued to serve on the faculty and the Board.

Charles Cajori received many honors for his work including the 1959 Distinction in the Arts, Yale University; Benjamin Altman, Figure Prize at the National Academy, 1983, 1987; the Childe Hassam Purchase Award by the Institute of Art and Letters Award, 1975-1976, 1980; and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Award, 1979. Also, Cajori was awarded a Fulbright grant to Italy, 1952-1953, and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1981, as well as a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2001.

Charles Cajori was married to the painter Barbara Grossman and they lived in Watertown, Connecticut.
Provenance:
The Charles Cajori papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Charles Cajori in 2011 and by Barbara Grossman in 2015 and 2021.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointments and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Interviews
Video recordings
Transcripts
Citation:
Charles Cajori papers, 1928-2018. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.cajochar
See more items in:
Charles Cajori papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9f4683c60-e4b6-49e4-8bc3-1f44de6b3349
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cajochar

Archives Center Lesbian Pulp Fiction Collection

Former owner:
Swann Auction Galleries  Search this
Extent:
3.1 Cubic feet (7 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1932-1999
Summary:
A collection of pulp fiction titles centering on lesbian characters and lesbianism.
Content Description:
A collection of eighty-five pulp fiction titles dealing with lesbian characters and lesbianism. Parts of this collection are extremely fragile and should be handled with care. The collection is arranged chronologically by date of publication.
Arrangement:
Collection arranged by date of publication into one series.
Biographical / Historical:
Between 1950 and 1965, over 500 distinct lesbian pulp novels were published in the US. These novels were exceptionally influential on lesbian communities in a time where LGBT media was extremely limited. Sold at the counters of grocery stores and in other common shops, these novels became a tangible way for many women to interact with a community they would otherwise have been unable to access. Some of the best loved books were the work of lesbian or bisexual women, many of whom—such as the influential Artemis Smith (Dr. Annselm L.N.V. Morpurgo) and Ann Bannon (Ann Weldy)— went on to become vocal activists and scholars in LGBT matters. Authors of this genre generally used pseudonyms for publication, which helped conceal their identity both as writers of explicit content and potentially as lesbians. Pseudonyms frequently crossed or confused the author's gender, such as in the case of Kay Addams (male author Orrie Hitt), Randy Salem (lesbian author Pat Perdue), and March Hastings (lesbian author Sally Singer). Some writers chose to use multiple pseudonyms, such as Gilbert Fox (published under Dallas Mayo and Paul Russo, among others), and some chose to use a separate name for each genre of pulp novel which they produced. This practice had the benefit of concealing some authors' outright connection to lesbian culture but was also a practice of pulp more generally. Because pulp was poor quality literature, due primarily to the constraints of cheap publishing and quick production, writers often intended these novels to be their introduction to large publishing houses. Authors would begin by writing pulp and then, once they had become accustomed to the industry, would move onto more serious works without having trashy pulp as part of their reputation.

The majority of lesbian pulp novels are original stories created for mass production by American writers. A few key exceptions to this rule existed. The first was reproductions of older lesbian literary works, including Radclyffe Hall's influential The Well of Loneliness (original 1928), Lillian Hellman's script for the play The Children's Hour (original 1934), and Anna Elisabet Weirauch's The Scorpion (original 1919, published in German). The other exception is international works, which would be translated and printed in pulp for the US. Tereska Torrès's Women's Barracks (1950), the novel which started the lesbian pulp genre, was translated from its original French for its mass production in America. Other translated works include Lucie Marchal's, The Mesh (original French, published as pulp in 1959), Francoise Mallet's The Loving and the Daring (original French, also known in English as The Illusionist, published as pulp in 1952), and Torrès's By Cecile (1963). Many of these republished works are among the most favorable to lesbians, as they reflect personal experiences of the author or are canonical entries into broader lesbian literature. While many of the best-regarded novels in the genre were written by lesbian or bisexual women, the bulk of what was produced by American publishers was by male authors for a male audience. Considered perverse erotica, lesbian pulps were written and marketed towards male gratification.

These pulp novels occupy a conflicted space in lesbian culture. Because they were published and distributed en masse, these books became a way for closeted lesbian and bisexual women in areas where there were no strong LGBT communities to find self-recognition and connection with others. Some found the books changing how they thought of their sexuality, particularly if they had only experienced straight relationships. However, buying and keeping these books could be taboo, despite their general popularity. Purchasers often tried to buy lesbian pulps as covertly as possible, and many took advantage of the disposable quality of pulp and abandoned or destroyed the books when they had finished reading them. Publishers were willing to produce lesbian novels because they were an extremely profitable genre, but the US Post Office refused to deliver "explicit" materials, including any promotion of lesbian relationships—regardless of the actual sexual content within. Authors circumvented this issue by creating narratives which appeared to condemn lesbianism. Characters would frequently be killed, go insane, convert back to heterosexuality, or be otherwise fatally punished in the conclusion of the book. In others, the entire novel's plot would include a pervasive element of shame or corruption when a young woman would be manipulated into a lesbian relationship. Compounding these issues is the trite or formulaic nature of the plots, which were often a product of the hastened publishing schedule and low budget for production. These factors create difficulty for many in the current lesbian community to relate to the condemning nature of the genre, particularly as many works of far better quality in both writing and representation have appeared in recent decades.

The cover artwork of these novels is another important aspect. Although there were some strong communities of LGBT women, particularly in urban areas, many had difficulty finding or accessing them. Particularly for those who lived in rural areas or with deep homophobia, the covers of pulp novels would be the first time they saw themselves reflected in popular culture. Lesbian pulp covers usually contained a depiction of two or more women, at least one of whom was exhibiting an identifiable lesbian desire. Common themes included women undressing in private or in communal rooms, women ignoring men in favor of gazing at another woman's body, or women in the midst of a romantic encounter. These covers generally teased at the sexual content within the books, which was typical of all pulp romances. Every identified artist for this collection's covers is a man. Although some women did paint for pulp novels and magazines, they would be frequently relegated to less controversial subjects, such as demure heterosexual romances, and in the rare case horrors, mysteries, and thrillers. Many of the artists for the lesbian novels also produced for many other pulp publications. Artists would receive the covers as an assignment from their publishing company, often without any contact with the author. Because of the tight production schedule, they would often be working off skimming the book's contents, its (publisher-generated) title, or in the lucky case a plot synopsis. Due to this, although some covers hint at community subgroups such as butch and femme aesthetics, they are generally inaccurate to the fashion of real lesbian communities.

Some cover artists of the novels remain unidentified, which can be for a multitude of reasons. First, in the early 1950s many pulp publishers did not allow artists to keep the rights to their work, and so the paintings were considered the sole property of the company. Some publishers would even reuse covers, as is the case for Kay Addams's Warped Desire (1960) and Richard Villanova's Her Woman (1962). Although artists were eventually given more rights, many were unable to claim important works as their intellectual property. Second, because of the controversial nature of the genre, many artists chose not to include specific covers in their portfolio. Like the authors, pulp was sometimes considered a way to launch a more extensive fine arts career, although successful artists often committed to long-term work in the industry. It was far more acceptable to use works from other pulp genres like mystery and horror as promotional and professional material. Paul Rader is one of the few artists who was able and willing to sign his covers. Many pulp illustrators were fresh graduates of New York art schools, but Rader entered the industry later in life. Rader's work was exceptionally suited to the demands of romance and lesbian pulps, because he was notably better at depicting "sexy" bodies than painting for other genres, like sci-fi. When Midwood Books was founded in 1957, he was one of the first to paint for them and quickly became a favorite of the publisher. Six of the novels in this collection have covers that can be attributed to Rader.

Lesbian pulps were the backdrop to an extensive fight over the right to produce and sell explicit content. The publication of Women's Barracks is famous as the event which precipitated the formation of the House Select Committee on Current Pornographic Materials from 1952-1953. The Committee ultimately accomplished little in restricting pulp novels, but it did cause editorial changes to the book (the addition of a disapproving narrator) and demonstrated political attitudes towards the genre. In 1956, a bookseller was punished with 30 days of imprisonment for selling copies of Mark Tryon's Sweeter than Life, republished after the lawsuit as The Twisted Loves of Nym O'Sullivan. This case was eventually appealed to the Supreme Court, resulting in the Smith v. California (1959) decision, which voided the California law preventing the sale of "obscene" content on the grounds that it violated the First Amendment right to free speech. Over the course of the 1960s, lawsuits continued to erode the restrictions on explicit content. Rather than boost the lesbian pulp genre, however, this caused its collapse.

The expansion of publishers' rights meant that the Postal Service could no longer deny delivering lesbian-friendly or pornographic novels on content alone. However, mass publishers were not willing to print works which portrayed lesbianism positively or which increased the amount of graphic content. Smaller presses and collectives began to emerge, which were able to siphon the market for pulps with novels that were better written and more satisfying for their audiences. Unable and unwilling to meet this new competition, publishers like Midwood and Beacon-Signal turned towards the other genres of pulp fiction. The year 1965 marks the end of the lesbian pulp era. Though lesbian fiction had improved in quality, smaller presses were unable to reach the same closeted and isolated women that pulps appealed to as they were considerably limited in their geographic distribution by the size of their operations and the cost of shipping. For many lesbians who had relied on pulps in lieu of community, their access to LGBT content became incredibly restricted in the coming decades. However, lesbian pulp fiction incentivized a new generation of writers to produce better literature through the 1970s and 80s. Publishing houses like Naiad Press were established, which were able to support the ambition of these new authors. Although genuine pulp manufacture had ceased, these presses would continue to reprint the most influential lesbian pulps for the next generation to enjoy. (Written by Sara Kunkemueller.)

Sources

Blakemore, Erin. "Pulp Fiction Helped Define American Lesbianism," Jstor Daily, 2019. Accessed through https://daily.jstor.org/pulp-fiction-helped-define-american-lesbianism/.

Fonesca, Sarah. "Reality Is a Drag: I'd Rather Live in Lesbian Pulp Fiction," them, Mar. 2019. Accessed through https://www.them.us/story/lesbian-pulp-fiction.

Frost, Natasha. "The Lesbian Pulp Fiction That Saved Lives," Atlas Obscura, May 2018. Accessed through https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/lesbian-pulp-fiction-ann-bannon. Hermes, Joke. "Sexuality in Lesbian Romance Fiction," Feminist Review, no. 42, Autumn 1992, pp. 49-66. Accessed through https://www.jstor.org/stable/1395129.

Keller, Yvonne. "'Was It Right to Love Her Brother's Wife so Passionately?': Lesbian Pulp Novels and U.S. Lesbian Identity, 1950-1965," American Quarterly, vol. 57, no. 2, Jun. 2005, pp. 385-410. Accessed through https://www.jstor.org/stable/40068271.

Munroe, Lynn. "The Notebooks of Paul Rader," Lynn Munroe Books, n.d. Accessed through http://lynn-munroe-books.com/list64/RaderHome/RaderNotebooks-home.htm.

Rabinowitz, Paula. "Slips of the Tongue: Uncovering Lesbian Pulp," American Pulp: How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street, Princeton University Press, 2014, pp. 184-205. Accessed through https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt7zvdxq.11.

Many cover artists for this collection identified through: "Pulp Covers: The Best of the Worst," n.d. Accessed through pulpcovers.com.

Saunders, David. "Alphabetical Index of Pulp Artists," Wild American Field Guide to Pulp Artists, n.d. Accessed through https://www.pulpartists.com/index.html.
Provenance:
Collection purchased from Swann Auction Galleries, New York, New York in September 2021. Funds for purchase provided by the Jackson Fund, NMAH.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. Portions of this collection are extremely fragile; any photocopying must first be approved by the on-site reference archivist.
Topic:
Lesbianism  Search this
Pulp literature  Search this
Paperbacks  Search this
Citation:
Archives Center Lesbian Pulp Fiction Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1513
See more items in:
Archives Center Lesbian Pulp Fiction Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep86194bb36-0607-4796-a297-6d86eced7c86
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1513

Sylvia Snowden papers

Creator:
Snowden, Sylvia  Search this
Names:
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
M. Hanks Gallery (Santa, Monica, Calif.)  Search this
Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture  Search this
Extent:
1.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Date:
1962-2017
Summary:
The papers of African American abstract painter Sylvia Snowden measure 1.7 linear feet and date from 1962 to 2017. The collection contains biographical material, including recorded interviews with Snowden; correspondence; material related to professional activities, including exhibitions and symposia; printed material; and photographic material, as well as one sketch.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of African American abstract painter Sylvia Snowden measure 1.7 linear feet and date from 1962 to 2017. The collection contains biographical material, including recorded interviews with Snowden, resumes and chronologies, and certificates; correspondence with galleries and museums including M. Hanks Gallery and the Corcoran Gallery of Art; material related to professional activities, including exhibitions and symposia, and related audiovisual and born-digital materials; printed material, including exhibition invitations, exhibition catalogs, calendars, clippings, and magazines; and a small amount of photographic material, as well as one sketch.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as five series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1962, 1985-2004 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1975-2005 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 3: Professional Activities, 1985-2017 (Box1; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1964-2017 (Boes 1-3, OV 4; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 5: Photographic Material and Artwork, 1989-2005 (Box 3; 0.1 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Sylvia Snowden (1942- ) is an African American abstract painter in Washington, D.C. known for her large mixed-media works that convey a sense of texture or the "feel of paint."

Snowden earned both a Bachelor and a Master of Fine Arts degree from Howard University. She also attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine and earned a certificate from le Grande Chaumière in Paris, France. She has served as an instructor, visiting lecturer, panelist, and artist-in-residence at universities, galleries, and art schools across the country and internationally. Her work has been included in exhibitions at the National Gallery of Art, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Parish Gallery, and the California African American Museum; as well as in exhibitions in Chile, the Netherlands, Ethiopia, Australia, the Bahamas, France, Mexico, Italy, and Japan.
Provenance:
The Sylvia Snowden papers were donated in 2019 by Sylvia Snowden, as part of the Archives' African American Collecting Initiative funded by the Henry Luce Foundation.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
African American painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Sylvia Snowden papers, 1962-2017. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.snowsylv
See more items in:
Sylvia Snowden papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e8b1a2b3-151b-4f08-a338-66d25f4c383e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-snowsylv
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Ed Bereal

Interviewee:
Bereal, Edmund, 1937-  Search this
Interviewer:
Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter  Search this
Extent:
7 Items (sound files (2 hrs., 45 min.), digital, wav)
63 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2016 February 13
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Ed Bereal, conducted 2016 February 13, by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, for the Archives of American Art at the home of artist Warren Blakely, in Los Angeles, California.
Bereal discusses growing up in Riverside, California during World War Two; his parents, grandparents, and aunts and uncles and their musical activities in and around San Bernardino, Riverside, and Los Angeles; the racial make-up of Riverside during the '40s along with the effects of being near March Air Force Base; his time in school and early interest in art and illustration; his applications to art schools and eventual acceptance to Chouinard; the influence of Robert Irwin and Richards Ruben at Chouinard as well as the exposure to national and international artists brought there by Virginia Dwan; the Huysman Gallery group show War Babies in 1961 and the subsequent controversy; his work as an artist under a stipend from Ms. Dwan; his time teaching at UC Riverside and UC Irvine; and his relationships with his wives, girlfriends, and his daughters. Bereal also describes the impact of the Watts Riots in 1965 on his art and his family; his growing political awareness as a black man living in America at the time; his decision to leave the traditional art world and focus on political theater with his guerilla theater troupe Bodacious Buggerrilla; his time at the Watts Writers Workshop with Budd Schulberg; his focus on creating sets and environments for his theater troupe; the FBI questioning of his troupe and the subsequent decision to close it down and start the television studio Bodacious TV Works; his relocation with his wife Barbara Sternberger in the '90s to Bellingham, Washington to teach and work; his interest in holographic art and creating illusion in art; his perspective on the history of black artists in the Los Angeles area in the 1950s and '60s; his show from the same year as the interview at the Harmony Murphy Gallery and the incorporation of graffiti in that show. Bereal recalls Emerson Woelffer, Jerry McMillan, Ron Miyashiro, Laura Sterns, Gerald Buck, and Meade Lux Lewis along with Ed Kienholz, Joe Goode, Mary Pautsch, Barbara Temken, Barbara Lewis, Mike Frimkess, Dr. Cary Kaufman, Buster Jones, and Buddy Jones, among others.
Biographical / Historical:
Ed Bereal (1937- ) is an assemblage artist who worked in Los Angeles, California. Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is an art critic and writer from Beverly Hills, California.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Assemblage artists -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.bereal16
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9332406a5-81cf-4678-9149-fa62a4452dec
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bereal16
Online Media:

Interview Transcripts

Collection Creator:
White, Charles, 1918-1979  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 9
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1965
Collection Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Charles W. White papers, 1933-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Charles W. White papers
Charles W. White papers / Series 1: Biographical Material
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw99db5822b-dc66-4851-b2f6-0a053f734244
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-whitchar-ref21

Lucien and Marcelle Labaudt papers, 1896-1987

Creator:
Labaudt, Lucien Adolphe, 1880-1943  Search this
Labaudt, Marcelle, 1892-1987  Search this
Subject:
Arnautoff, Victor Mikhail  Search this
Moya del Pino, Jose  Search this
Ferier, André  Search this
Gerstle, Wilhelm  Search this
Kent, Adaline Dutton  Search this
Ford, C.  Search this
Oldfield, Otis  Search this
Rivera, Diego  Search this
Sotomayor, Antonio  Search this
Ozenfant, Marthe  Search this
Pflueger, Timothy Ludwig  Search this
Rowan, Edward Beatty  Search this
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton  Search this
Kuhn, Walt  Search this
Biberman, Edward  Search this
Feitelson, Lorser  Search this
Léger, Fernand  Search this
London, Charmian  Search this
Matisse, Henri  Search this
Ozenfant, Amédée  Search this
Federal Art Project (Calif.)  Search this
Lucien Labaudt Art Gallery  Search this
California School of Design  Search this
San Francisco Women Artists  Search this
Citation:
Lucien and Marcelle Labaudt papers, 1896-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts -- California -- San Francisco -- Exhibitions  Search this
Art and state -- California -- San Francisco -- Exhibitions  Search this
Mural painting and decoration -- 20th century -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Costume -- California -- San Francisco  Search this
Muralists  Search this
Theme:
New Deal  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7257
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209407
AAA_collcode_labaluci
Theme:
New Deal
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209407

Alice Brown Chittenden papers, 1860-1974

Creator:
Chittenden, Alice Brown, 1859-1944  Search this
Citation:
Alice Brown Chittenden papers, 1860-1974. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7411
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209568
AAA_collcode_chitalic
Theme:
Women
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209568

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974

Creator:
Jacques Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Subject:
Hauke, Cesar M. de (Cesar Mange)  Search this
Glaenzer, Eugene  Search this
Haardt, Georges  Search this
Seligman, Germain  Search this
Seligmann, Arnold  Search this
Parker, Theresa D.  Search this
Waegen, Rolf Hans  Search this
Trevor, Clyfford  Search this
Seligmann, René  Search this
Seligmann, Jacques  Search this
De Hauke & Co., Inc.  Search this
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Eugene Glaenzer & Co.  Search this
Germain Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Gersel  Search this
Type:
Gallery records
Citation:
Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Mackay, Clarence Hungerford, 1874-1938 -- Art collections  Search this
Schiff, Mortimer L. -- Art collections  Search this
Arenberg, duc d' -- Art collections  Search this
Liechtenstein, House of -- Art collections  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- France -- Paris  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
La Fresnaye, Roger de, 1885-1925  Search this
Art, Renaissance  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Art treasures in war  Search this
Art, European  Search this
Theme:
Art Gallery Records  Search this
Art Market  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9936
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212486
AAA_collcode_jacqself
Theme:
Art Gallery Records
Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_212486
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974 digital asset number 1
Online Media:

Wallace Berman papers, 1907-1979, bulk 1955-1979

Creator:
Berman, Wallace, 1926-1976  Search this
Subject:
Heinecken, Robert  Search this
Hirschman, Jack  Search this
DeFeo, Jay  Search this
Herms, George  Search this
Jess  Search this
Hopper, Dennis  Search this
Jordan, Patricia M.  Search this
Johnson, Ray  Search this
Bengston, Billy Al  Search this
Di Prima, Diane  Search this
Fonda, Peter  Search this
Duncan, Robert Edward  Search this
Ginsberg, Allen  Search this
Wieners, John  Search this
McClure, Michael  Search this
Lamantia, Philip  Search this
Miller, Henry  Search this
Meltzer, David  Search this
Perkoff, Stuart Z.  Search this
Patchen, Kenneth  Search this
Sherman, Donald  Search this
Ruscha, Edward  Search this
Type:
Drawings
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Wallace Berman papers, 1907-1979, bulk 1955-1979. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Poets  Search this
Collage  Search this
Art -- California -- San Francisco Bay Area  Search this
Assemblage (Art)  Search this
Beat generation  Search this
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Theme:
Photography  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10771
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214392
AAA_collcode_bermwall
Theme:
Photography
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_214392
Online Media:

Cleo (Cleo Dorman) papers, circa 1930s-1990

Creator:
Cleo, 1908-1990  Search this
Citation:
Cleo (Cleo Dorman) papers, circa 1930s-1990. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Theme:
Women  Search this
Art instruction and services  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6613
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)215922
AAA_collcode_cleo
Theme:
Women
Art instruction and services
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_215922

Lucile Lloyd papers, circa 1880-1991, bulk 1920-1941

Creator:
Lloyd, Lucile, 1894-1941  Search this
Subject:
Stickney Memorial Art School  Search this
Federal Art Project  Search this
Type:
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Lucile Lloyd papers, circa 1880-1991, bulk 1920-1941. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women muralists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6265
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216604
AAA_collcode_lloyluci
Theme:
Women
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_216604

Fiberworks, Center for the Textile Arts records, 1973-2005, bulk 1974-1987

Creator:
Fiberworks, Center for the Textile Arts  Search this
Subject:
Laky, Gyöngy  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Fiberworks, Center for the Textile Arts records, 1973-2005, bulk 1974-1987. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Fiber artists -- California  Search this
Theme:
Craft  Search this
Art Gallery Records  Search this
Art organizations  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13453
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)260407
AAA_collcode_fibecenf
Theme:
Craft
Art Gallery Records
Art organizations
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_260407
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Cindy Kolodziejski, 2007 May 5-16

Interviewee:
Kolodziejski, Cindy, 1962-  Search this
Interviewer:
Lloyd, Frank, 1951-  Search this
Subject:
Albuquerque, Lita  Search this
Bacerra, Ralph  Search this
Caroompas, Carole  Search this
Clark, Garth  Search this
Delisle, Roseline  Search this
Dowell, Roy  Search this
Giegerich, Jill  Search this
Lauria, Jo  Search this
Lodato, Peter  Search this
Marsh, Tony  Search this
Mason, John  Search this
Nagle, Ron  Search this
Pagel, David  Search this
Saxe, Adrian Anthony  Search this
Sturman, Eugene  Search this
Thomason, Barbara A.  Search this
California State University, Long Beach  Search this
Frank Lloyd Gallery  Search this
Garth Clark Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
J. Paul Getty Museum  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Otis College of Art and Design  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles. Library  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
New York (N.Y.) -- Description and views
Arizona -- Description and travel
California -- description and travel
China -- description and travel
Greece -- description and travel
Italy -- description and travel
Nepal -- description and travel
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Cindy Kolodziejski, 2007 May 5-16. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Ceramics  Search this
Self-taught artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)13604
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)270853
AAA_collcode_kolodz07
Theme:
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_270853
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Cindy Kolodziejski

Interviewee:
Kolodziejski, Cindy, 1962-  Search this
Interviewer:
Lloyd, Frank, 1951-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
California State University, Long Beach -- Faculty  Search this
Frank Lloyd Gallery  Search this
Garth Clark Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
J. Paul Getty Museum  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Otis College of Art and Design -- Students  Search this
University of California, Los Angeles. Library  Search this
Albuquerque, Lita  Search this
Bacerra, Ralph, 1938-2008  Search this
Caroompas, Carole  Search this
Clark, Garth, 1947-  Search this
Delisle, Roseline  Search this
Dowell, Roy  Search this
Giegerich, Jill, 1952-  Search this
Lauria, Jo  Search this
Lodato, Peter  Search this
Marsh, Tony, 1954-  Search this
Mason, John, 1927-2019  Search this
Nagle, Ron  Search this
Pagel, David  Search this
Saxe, Adrian Anthony, 1943-  Search this
Sturman, Eugene  Search this
Thomason, Barbara A.  Search this
Extent:
7 Items (Sound recording: 7 wav files (4 hr., 10 min.), digital)
36 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Place:
New York (N.Y.) -- Description and views
Arizona -- Description and Travel
California -- description and travel
China -- Description and Travel
Greece -- description and travel
Italy -- description and travel
Nepal -- Description and Travel
Date:
2007 May 5-16
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Cindy Kolodziejski conducted 2007 May 5-16, by Frank Lloyd, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the Frank Lloyd Gallery, in Santa Monica, California.
Kolodziejski speaks of moving in her early childhood from Germany to Arizona and finally to California; the divorce of her parents at a young age and her feelings of abandonment; her desire as a young child to be an artist; the early influence of her grandmother, an art teacher; teaching herself how to draw by copying images and creating still-lifes; an influential art teacher in high school who encouraged her to pursue college-level art classes and attend art school after graduation; her decision to enroll at Otis College of Art and Design; her foundation art classes at Otis and increasing interest in ceramics; choosing ceramics as a medium because of its flexibility and of form and potential for imagery; the value of her art education to her career; earning a Master of Fine Arts degree while teaching at California State University, Long Beach; the union of form, function, and imagery in her work, especially seen in a recent exhibition at the Frank Lloyd Gallery titled "Reversal of Fountain"; using the University of California, Los Angeles, libraries to find images at first, and later searching the internet for inspiration; creating pieces which play with and explore gender issues and sexuality; being reviewed and featured in articles which are especially concerned with issues of the body and femininity; the documentation of her art in various periodicals and texts, including a piece she wrote for Ceramics Monthly concerning her own work; gaining exposure through these articles, which helped to advance her career; the painstaking and technical process required to fashion her works of art; showing at the Garth Clark Gallery very quickly after graduation; traveling to Greece, China, Nepal, New York, and Italy, and being influenced by the exposure to the different art and cultures; recent travels with her daughter to Italy and feeling excited and humbled by the beauty of certain works; giving a talk at the Getty Museum about a show entitled "The Royal Menagerie" featuring the Meissen large-scale porcelain animals; participating in group shows in museums, particularly the "Color and Fire" exhibit which showcased important ceramicists from 1950 to 2000; being awarded various grants and feeling that applying for those awards is a very worthwhile experience for many artists; teaching first at the high school level and then in college; her teaching methods; forming friendships with fellow artists and art teachers; integrating the use of technology into her art-making process by finding and manipulating images on the computer; feeling motivated to produce in a positive way for exhibition deadlines; the support and friendships that developed through exhibiting with the Clark Garth and Frank Lloyd galleries; the encouragement and support she has been shown by her family throughout her career; and categorizing herself first and foremost as an artist rather than a craft artist or ceramicist. Kolodziejski recalls, Lita Albuquerque, Jill Giegerich, Peter Lodato, Barbara Thomason, Roy Dowell, Eugene Sturman, Carol Caroompas, Tony Marsh, Ralph Baccera, Adrian Saxe, Ron Nagle, Roseline Delisle, John Mason, Jo Lauria, David Pagel, Garth Clark, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Cindy Kolodziejski (1962- ) is a sculptor and painter from Venice, California. Frank Lloyd (1951- ) is a gallery owner from Santa Monica, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 7 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hr., 10 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Painters -- California -- Venice  Search this
Sculptors -- California -- Venice  Search this
Topic:
Ceramics  Search this
Self-taught artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.kolodz07
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9cec3e455-7879-43de-ba7b-9db80c22c835
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kolodz07
Online Media:

Lucile Lloyd papers

Creator:
Lloyd, Lucile  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project  Search this
Stickney Memorial Art School  Search this
Extent:
0.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Date:
circa 1880-1991
bulk 1920-1941
Summary:
The papers of muralist and educator Lucile Lloyd (1894-1941) measure 0.7 linear feet and date from circa 1880 to 1991, with the bulk of the material dating from 1920-1941. Papers document Lloyd's career through biographical material and a sketch, correspondence, negatives of works of art, printed material, a proposal, reproductions of works of art, and four scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of muralist and educator Lucile Lloyd (1894-1941) measure 0.7 linear feet and date from circa 1880 to 1991, with the bulk of the material dating from 1920-1941. Papers document Lloyd's career through biographical material and a sketch, correspondence, negatives of works of art, printed material, a proposal, reproductions of works of art, and four scrapbooks.
Arrangement:
Due to the small size of this collection the papers are arranged as one series.
Biographical / Historical:
Lucile Lloyd (1894-1941) was a muralist and educator in Los Angeles, California. Lloyd painted murals for the Works Progress Administration's Federal Art Project, including three murals in the assembly room in the state building in Los Angeles, California, and other murals throughout California at locations including Griffith Park Observatory, South Pasadena Junior High School, Queen of Angels Church, and the State Capitol in Sacramento. Lloyd also taught at the Stickney Memorial Art School in Pasadena.
Related Materials:
Additional papers of Lucile Lloyd can be found in the Architecture and Design Collection. Art, Design and Architecture Museum, University of California, Santa Barbara
Provenance:
Donated 1999 by the Norman Neuerberg Trust. Norman Neuerberg, an art historian and professor of art, specialized in the missions of North America and Southern California art, and received the papers from a friend of Lucile Lloyd.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Muralists -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women muralists  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Lucile Lloyd papers, circa 1880-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lloyluci
See more items in:
Lucile Lloyd papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c178629d-2bf7-4867-913e-a55d9a77d790
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lloyluci

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By