Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
16,070 documents - page 1 of 500Result pages are truncated to 500.

Women in Jazz | Toshiko Akiyoshi behind the poster

Creator:
National Museum of American History  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-04-10T17:10:01.000Z
YouTube Category:
Music  Search this
Topic:
American History  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianAmHistory
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianAmHistory
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_LfqyA3i9870

Truman Howe Bartlett scrapbook

Creator:
Bartlett, Truman Howe, 1835-1923  Search this
Names:
Bartlett, Paul Wayland, 1865-1925  Search this
Extent:
0.6 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Date:
circa 1880-1911
Scope and Contents:
A scrapbook, possibly two combined into one, containing photographs, correspondence, clippings, and printed material, most likely assembled and heavily annotated by Bartlett, documenting his career as a sculptor and teacher as well as his travels in Europe, in particular, Italy. A small portion of the scrapbook concerns the career of Bartlett's son, sculptor Paul Wayland Bartlett.
Biographical / Historical:
Truman Howe Bartlett (1835-1923) was a sculptor in Boston, Mass.
Provenance:
Donated 2009 by Gertrude (Trudy) Conroy, who inherited the scrapbooks from her father.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Art teachers -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Identifier:
AAA.barttrum
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw99ae14d45-d829-4e69-b666-db946c9e7e5e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-barttrum

Black Empire

Written by:
George Schuyler, American, 1897 - 1977  Search this
John A. Williams, American, 1925 - 2015  Search this
Published by:
Northeastern University Press, American, 1977 - 2004  Search this
Edited by:
Robert A. Hill, Jamaican American, born 1943  Search this
R. Kent Rasmussen, American, born 1943  Search this
Illustrated by:
Michael McCurdy, American, 1942 - 2016  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper (fiber product) with cardboard , book cloth (textile material) and acetate film
Dimensions:
H x W x D (2019.106.2): 9 5/8 × 6 7/16 × 1 7/16 in. (24.4 × 16.4 × 3.6 cm)
Type:
hardcover books
Place printed:
Boston, Massachusetts, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1936-1938; reprinted 1991
Topic:
African American  Search this
Africa  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Black power  Search this
Colonialism  Search this
Decolonization  Search this
Science fiction  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2019.106.2
Restrictions & Rights:
© George Schuyler Estate. Permission required for use.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Movement:
Afrofuturism
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5ddedf486-9136-4a68-a50c-c8dcd11e8574
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2019.106.2

Philip G. Freelon Architectural Archive

Creator:
Freelon, Philip G., 1953-2019  Search this
Names:
American Institute of Architects  Search this
Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup  Search this
Freelon Bond Architects  Search this
Freelon Group  Search this
Hampton University (Va.)  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. School of Architecture  Search this
National Museum of African American History and Culture  Search this
National Organization of Minority Architects (U.S.)  Search this
North Carolina Board of Architecture  Search this
NorthStar Church of the Arts  Search this
PPG Industries, Inc.  Search this
Perkins & Will  Search this
Adjaye, David, 1966-  Search this
Bond, J. Max, Jr.  Search this
Freelon, Allan Randall, 1895-1960  Search this
Extent:
5.1 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Place:
North Carolina -- United States
United States of America -- North Carolina -- Durham County -- Durham
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Suffolk County -- Boston
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia County -- Philadelphia
United States of America -- New York -- New York
Date:
bulk 1939-2017
Scope and Contents:
The Philip G. Freelon Architectural Archival Collection documents the life and career of architect, educator, cultural heritage preservation advocate and artist Philip G. Freelon. The collection highlights his distinguished career from its inception to his role as the "architect of record" for the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Freelon was one of the leading African American architects of his generation and he created a focus designing and constructing buildings that paid reverence to African Americans and other underrepresented communities. This collection is comprised of business records, photographic materials, ephemera, correspondence, architectural drawings, and clippings.
Arrangement:
The materials in this collection have been separated into seven series. The materials have been ordered and organized based on the content and chronology. Within each series and sub-series, the folders are organized as close to the collection's original order as when it was acquired.
Biographical / Historical:
Philip Goodwin Freelon was born March 26, 1953, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Allan Freelon, Jr. and Elizabeth Neal Freelon. Freelon was greatly influenced by his grandfather, Allan Freelon Sr., a notable Harlem Renaissance visual artist, educator, and civil rights activist. His grandfather's values and artistry inspired him to create a career that focused on creating historical and cultural spaces in African American communities. Freelon attended high school at the former predominantly white elite all-boys school, Central High School located in upper North Philadelphia from 1967 to 1971. His attendance at this school during of the Civil Rights Movement afforded him the unique experience that inspired him to attend a historically Black college (HBCU). Freelon selected Hampton Institute (Hampton University) to develop his veneration of the composition and design of the buildings that held cultural and artistic treasures. Located in the Tidewater area of Virginia, Hampton was renowned among HBCUs for its architecture program. His professor and mentor at Hampton, John Spencer, pushed Freelon academically as he moved easily through the school's curriculum. After two years at Hampton, Spencer helped Freelon transition to a more challenging program at North Carolina State University (NCSU) in Raleigh, North Carolina. Freelon graduated in 1975 with a bachelor's in environmental design in architecture.

Later in the fall of 1975, Freelon enrolled at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to pursue a master's in architecture. During the summers, Freelon worked with one of former his NC State professors at the architectural firm of John D. Latimer and Associates. After graduating from MIT in 1977, Freelon returned to North Carolina to take his Architecture Registration Examination (ARE), becoming the firm's youngest person to receive licensure. He also began teaching classes at his alma mater, NC State. It was there that Freelon met his future wife, Nnenna Pierce. Pierce, a Massachusetts native was attending Simmons College in Boston at the time. The connection was immediate, and the pair was married in 1979 and welcomed their first son, Deen in 1980. After a brief employment for a large Texas firm 3/D International, Freelon returned to Durham to join O'Brien Atkins Associates. He was the firm's youngest partner, eventually serving as principal and vice president of architecture. Freelon worked on a wide variety of projects throughout the state including learning centers, university buildings, churches, and parking garages. Along with Freelon's budding career, his family was expanding as well. Phil and Nnenna welcomed their daughter Maya in 1982 and their son, Pierce in 1983. During this time, Freelon was being highly recognized for his work. The American of Institute of Architects (AIA) awarded him the Honor Award for his design of Terminal 2 of the Raleigh-Durham International Airport, which has since been rebuilt.

By the end of the decade, Freelon and his wife Nnenna needed a change of pace. Nnenna pursued a professional career in music while Phil took a break from his career to expand his skillset and reinforce his intellectual approach to design. In 1989, Freelon was granted the Loeb Fellowship for one year of independent study at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. He also pursued a longtime hobby of furniture design, calling the practice "small architecture". He received industry awards like first prize in the PPG Industries, Inc. Furniture Design Competition as well as AIA Honor Award for conference table designs. With a year away from the field to clarify his vision, Freelon opened his own firm, simply titled, the Freelon Group in 1990. Beginning as a one-man operation, the Freelon Group grew to become one of the largest African American owned architectural firms in the country with over 50 employees, forty percent of which were women, and thirty percent were people of color. With freedom within his own firm, Freelon focused on designing learning centers, libraries and museums and vowed to never build anything that did not bring cultural and intellectual value to a community.

Over the next twenty years, Freelon would assert himself as a force in designing notable cultural institutions and community-driven projects in and around the country including the Sonja Haynes Stone Center at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC), Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture (Baltimore, MD), Museum of African Diaspora (San Francisco, CA), Harvey B. Gantt for African American Arts and Culture (Charlotte, NC), the Anacostia and Tenley-Friendship branches of the District of Columbia Public Library , National Center for Civil Rights and Human Rights (Atlanta, GA), Mississippi Civil Rights Museum (Jackson, MS) and Emancipation Park (Houston, TX). Alongside his architectural career, Freelon served as a lecturer and adjunct professor at several colleges and universities including North Carolina State University, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), University of Maryland College Park, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Syracuse University, and the Florence, Italy program at Kent State University. Freelon was awarded a full-time appointment as professor of Professional Practice at MIT in 2008. The Professional Practice (4.222) course was a requirement for the master's in architecture and he used examples from his extensive career and personal experience to illustrate legal, ethical, and management concepts. Nnenna's music career was also thriving. She would go on to record twelve albums and be nominated for six Grammys. This fusion of education, the arts, and music inspired another generation of Freelons: their son, Pierce Freelon is a hip-hop artist, educator, and political activist; daughter Maya Freelon is a visual artist; and son Deen Freelon is a professor.

In 2001, George W. Bush established a commission to create a new museum on the National Mall. Freelon wanted to enter his firm to participate in the international design competition. Freelon would partner with famed African American New York City architect, J. Max Bond, Jr. and by 2006 the two officially formed the Freelon Bond Architects.The Freelon Bond group submitted their proposal and soon after were elected to create programming and pre-design work for the museum. When the official design competition for the museum was announced in 2008, UK-based architect David Adjaye joined the team as the lead designer, and along with the partnering firm SmithGroup, the new architectural team became Freelon Adjaye Bond/SmithGroup. The three black architects combined a variety of distinctive elements from Africa and the Americas to create the building's unique, historically significant design. The Freelon Group served as the "architect of record" and were responsible for ensuring that key design ideas were upheld. Freelon and key firm members such as Zena Howard were active as on-site project managers during the museum's construction process to certify that the building would be developed according to plan. Freelon, Adjaye, and Bond were tasked with taking the collective history of the African American experience-- generations of pain, triumph, and perseverance-- and forming it into a structure. The team looked to African sources, such as Yoruban architecture, for inspiration. They sought to connect the building's design to the geographic and cultural roots of African Americans. Their design choices also reference the contributions of enslaved and free black metalworkers made to the landscape of the American South. Their goal was to make the museum an extension of its contents, and an expression of the stories told inside. By the groundbreaking for NMAAHC in 2012, Freelon had been appointed to the U.S. Commission of the Fine Arts by President Barack Obama. In an effort to broaden his resources and expand his firm, The Freelon Group merged with Perkins & Will, a firm originating in Chicago that grew to have offices across the United States. Freelon was appointed the managing director and later lead design director at the firm's North Carolina offices in Charlotte and Durham in 2014. By the next year, Freelon understood that his work in architecture and education was a necessary voice to preserve, which he did through donation of the bulk of his personal papers to his alma mater, NC State University. The year 2016 proved to be a year of triumph for Freelon as NMAAHC opened its doors on September 24th to much jubilation and celebration. That same year, Freelon's legacy was further cemented as the Phil Freelon Fellowship Fund was established at Harvard University Graduate School of Design, a fellowship designed to broaden opportunities for African Americans and other underrepresented communities in architecture and design.

Unfortunately, this triumphant year was met with difficulty as Freelon was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive disease that affects the nervous system. He would continue to work and lecture for the next two years until it became too challenging. One of those projects was the renovation and opening of The NorthStar Church of the Arts in early 2019. A passion project with his wife and son, Pierce, a former church was renovated and repurposed as an arts and cultural space for all. This space was created in an effort to support the Durham cultural community as it began to feel the effects of gentrification. When Freelon lost his battle with ALS on July 9, 2019, in his home in Durham, North Carolina, the family requested that in lieu of flowers that donations be sent to the NorthStar Church to continue the center's mission and Phil's dream to give back to the Durham community.

Historical Timeline

1953 -- Philip Goodwin Freelon was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Allan Freelon Jr. and Elizabeth Neal Freelon.

1971 -- Freelon graduated from Central High School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and entered School of Architecture, Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia as a design student.

1973 -- Freelon transferred to College of Design at the North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

1975 -- Graduated with a Bachelor's in Environmental Design in Architecture from NC State University. He received the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Book Award for Outstanding Work in Architectural Design. In the fall, he began his master's program in architecture at MIT.

1976 -- Began working as aide for architectural firm, John D. Latimer and Associates.

1977 -- Graduated with a Master's in Architecture and Design from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT.)

1978 -- Freelon became youngest architect to pass the North Carolina Architecture Registration Exam. Freelon started teaching at North Carolina State University.

1979 -- Married Chinyere "Nnenna" Pierce. Freelon began working for, 3/D International in Houston, Texas.

1980 -- Son Deen Freelon was born.

1981 -- Freelon returned to Durham, NC to join O'Brien Atkins Associates as the firm's youngest partner.

1982 -- Daughter Maya Freelon was born.

1983 -- Son Pierce Freelon was born.

1989-1990 -- Received Loeb Fellowship for independent study at Harvard University. Freelon received AIA Honor Award for American Airlines Terminal 2 at Raleigh-Durham Airport, NC (RDU).

1990 -- Freelon left O'Brien Atkins Associates to open his own firm The Freelon Group.

1991 -- Won first prize in the PPG Furniture Design Competition.

1992 -- Won the AIA Honor Award for Conference Table Designs.

2001 -- Won the AIA Firm Award for The Freelon Group and the AIA Design Award for Parking Structure, RDU Airport. Began attending meetings of President George W. Bush's commission on new National Mall museum dedicated to African American history and culture.

2003 -- Freelon merged his firm with New York architect Max Bond to create Freelon Bond Architects.

2004 -- Sonja Haynes Stone Center at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Chapel Hill, NC) was completed.

2005 -- Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture (Baltimore, MD) and Museum of African Diaspora (San Francisco, CA) were both completed.

2008 -- UK-based architect David Adjaye and Washington, DC based architecture firm, Smithgroup joined the team, creating the Freelon Adjaye Bond Group/SmithGroup Freelon began teaching at MIT's school of Architecture and Design.

2009 -- Freelon Adjaye Bond/Smithgroup won the official design for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). Harvey B. Gantt for African American Arts and Culture (Charlotte, NC) was completed.

2010 -- Anacostia branch of the District of Columbia Public Library (Washington, DC) was completed.

2011 -- Tenley-Friendship branch of the District of Columbia Public Library (Washington, DC) was completed.

2012 -- Construction began on NMAAHC.

2014 -- The Freelon Group merged with Perkins & Will, a much larger architectural firm. Freelon became managing director and lead design director of the North Carolina branches in Durham and Charlotte. National Center for Civil Rights and Human Rights (Atlanta, GA) was completed.

2016 -- Freelon was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

2017 -- Mississippi Civil Rights Museum (Jackson, MS) and Emancipation Park (Houston, TX) were completed.

2019 -- Freelon died in his home in Durham, North Carolina at age 66 on July 9.
Related Materials:
Phil Freelon Papers, 1975-2019 at North Carolina State University Libraries.
Provenance:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Philip G. Freelon.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access to collection materials requires an appointment.
Rights:
The NMAAHC Archives can provide reproductions of some materials for research and educational use. Copyright and right to publicity restrictions apply and limit reproduction for other purposes.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Business  Search this
Construction  Search this
Entrepreneurship  Search this
Local and Regional  Search this
Design  Search this
Education  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Museums  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Citation:
Philip G. Freelon Archival Collection, 1939-2017. National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.A2017.51
See more items in:
Philip G. Freelon Architectural Archive
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/io3ba3ca2a2-5495-45cf-801c-f3d66a7002fd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-a2017-51

Miscellaneous art exhibition catalog collection

Creator:
Archives of American Art  Search this
Names:
Kuhn, Walt, 1877-1949  Search this
Extent:
4.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibition catalogs
Date:
1813-1953
bulk 1915-1925
Summary:
Primarily exhibition catalogs for modernist art exhibitions held in New York City during the first two decades of the twentieth century. Also included are catalogs for Boston exhibitions, mainly pre-1900, and a few other locales; exhibition announcements; gallery publications; and other printed material.
Scope and Content Note:
The collection comprises circa 770 items, dating from 1813-1953, the bulk of which are exhibition catalogs from New York City art galleries for the first two decades of the twentieth century, representing exhibitions of mainly modernist art. Catalogs for exhibitions held in Boston (mainly pre-1900) and a few other cities are also present. Included are several rare catalogs, notably one for the "Eight" held at Macbeth Gallery in 1908. Besides catalogs, the collection also contains exhibition announcements, gallery publications, and other printed material. The collection is especially relevant for the study of early American modernism, and is useful in understanding the role of art galleries, exhibitions, the art market, and the exhibition catalog itself, in American art.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series representing alphabetical groups. Catalogs are arranged within these groups according to name of the sponsoring gallery, or if no gallery is listed, by the name of the club or organization. Catalogs are arranged chronologically thereafter, with undated material first. Many catalogs are undated, list only a year, or are annotated with a date. No attempt has been made to date or verify these at this time. Catalogs which are annotated with a date are filed chronologically, and are indicated with brackets around the date.

Missing Title

Series 1: Art Exhibition Catalogs, A-C

Series 2: Art Exhibition Catalogs, D-F

Series 3: Art Exhibition Catalogs, G-I

Series 4: Art Exhibition Catalogs, J-L

Series 5: Art Exhibition Catalogs, M-O

Series 6: Art Exhibition Catalogs, P-R

Series 7: Art Exhibition Catalogs, S-T

Series 8: Art Exhibition Catalogs, U-Z
Historical Note:
In 1979, the American Antiquarian Society donated several hundred exhibition catalogs and art-related printed material to the Archives of American Art (AAA). The Society had received most of them over a long period of time, many of them addressed to the director, Charles Brigham. For several years subsequent to the donation, AAA sporadically added exhibition catalogs to the collection from various sources. Some of these additions are annotated in the hand of Walt Kuhn and are presumed to have been part of his papers in the Archives.
Related Material:
Researchers may find duplicate or related items in galleries' records held at the Archives of American Art. Additional or duplicate catalogs may appear in AAA's Catalog of Exhibition Catalogs (1979).
Provenance:
The bulk of the collection was donated 1979 by the American Antiquarian Society, who presumably assembled them from various sources. Others were received individually, while many are annotated in the hand of Walt Kuhn and are presumed to have originally been part of his papers in the Archives. In 2005, additional catalogs were integrated, some of which are presumed to have been removed from various collections over the years.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 19th century -- Massachusetts -- Exhibitions  Search this
Art, Modern -- 19th century -- New York (State) -- New York -- Exhibitions  Search this
Art, American -- Exhibitions  Search this
Artists -- United States -- Exhibitions  Search this
Modernism (Art)  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York -- Exhibitions  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- Massachusetts
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Exhibition catalogs
Citation:
Miscellaneous art exhibition catalog collection, 1813-1953, bulk 1915-1925. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.archamea
See more items in:
Miscellaneous art exhibition catalog collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw97cda1277-17cc-4295-abe9-729b895e1a28
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-archamea

Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, Boston, Mass.

Collection Creator:
Archives of American Art  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Miscellaneous art exhibition catalog collection, 1813-1953, bulk 1915-1925. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Miscellaneous art exhibition catalog collection
Miscellaneous art exhibition catalog collection / Series 5: Art Exhibition Catalogs: M-O
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw94ea66bc4-6e32-4f8b-8fcd-ffc489d14a32
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-archamea-ref601

Fourteenth Exhibition, Department of Fine Arts

Collection Creator:
Archives of American Art  Search this
Container:
Box 3, Folder 30, Item 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1881
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Collection Citation:
Miscellaneous art exhibition catalog collection, 1813-1953, bulk 1915-1925. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Miscellaneous art exhibition catalog collection
Miscellaneous art exhibition catalog collection / Series 5: Art Exhibition Catalogs: M-O / Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, Boston, Mass.
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ac9cb2a3-27dd-4fcb-8ae3-714eb2f94e67
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-archamea-ref602

E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers

Creator:
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Richardson, Constance, 1905-  Search this
Names:
Archives of American Art  Search this
Castano Galleries (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Detroit Institute of Arts  Search this
Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum  Search this
Historical Society of Pennsylvania  Search this
Macbeth Gallery  Search this
National Collection of Fine Arts (U.S.)  Search this
National Portrait Gallery (Smithsonian Institution)  Search this
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts  Search this
Philadelphia Museum of Art  Search this
White House (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Peale family  Search this
Allen, Joseph  Search this
Allston, Washington, 1779-1843  Search this
Andrews, Wayne  Search this
Aram, Siegfried F.  Search this
Bishop, Isabel, 1902-1988  Search this
Bostick, William A.  Search this
Bouché, Louis, 1896-1969  Search this
Boyd, Julian P. (Julian Parks), 1903-  Search this
Castano, Giovanni, 1896-1978  Search this
Cohn, Harold  Search this
Copeland, Lammot du Pont  Search this
Culver, Charles B. (Charles Beach), 1908-1967  Search this
Fleischman, Lawrence A. (Lawrence Arthur), 1925-1997  Search this
Flexner, James Thomas, 1908-2003  Search this
Frankenstein, Alfred V. (Alfred Victor), 1906-1981  Search this
Fredericks, Marshall M., 1908-1998  Search this
Freeman, Michael W.  Search this
Garrison, Eve Josephson, 1903-2003  Search this
Groce, George C., 1899-  Search this
Hardy, Jeremiah Pearson, 1800-1889  Search this
Heil, Walter, 1890-1973  Search this
Hopper, Edward, 1882-1967  Search this
Jungwirth, Irene G. (Irene Gayas), 1913-  Search this
Krentzin, Earl, 1929-  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo, 1889-1953  Search this
Lee-Smith, Hughie  Search this
Lewis, W. S. (Wilmarth Sheldon), 1895-1979  Search this
Lynes, Russell, 1910-1991  Search this
Marsh, Reginald, 1898-1954  Search this
Mast, Gerald, 1908-1971  Search this
McDermott, John Francis, 1902-  Search this
Middeldorf, Ulrich Alexander, 1901-  Search this
Morse, John D., 1906-  Search this
Moser, Liselotte, 1906-1983  Search this
O'Keeffe, Georgia, 1887-1986  Search this
Oliver, Andrew, 1906-  Search this
Peale, Charles Willson, 1741-1827  Search this
Pleasants, J. Hall (Jacob Hall), 1873-1957  Search this
Ripley, S. Dillon (Sidney Dillon), 1913-2001  Search this
Rockefeller, John D., 1906-  Search this
Rockefeller, Nelson A. (Nelson Aldrich), 1908-1979  Search this
Rutledge, Anna Wells  Search this
Sellers, Charles Coleman, 1903-  Search this
Sheeler, Charles, 1883-1965  Search this
Simper, Fred, 1914-  Search this
Simpson, Corelli C. W.  Search this
Soria, Regina, 1911-  Search this
Spark, Victor D. (Victor David), 1898-1991  Search this
Speck, Walter, 1895-  Search this
Stevens, William B.  Search this
Valentiner, Wilhelm Reinhold, 1880-1958  Search this
Vose, Robert C. (Robert Churchill), 1911-1998  Search this
Watkins, Franklin Chenault, 1894-1972  Search this
Wedda, John  Search this
Woolfenden, William E. (William Edward), 1918-1995  Search this
Wyeth, Andrew, 1917-2009  Search this
Extent:
28.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Manuscripts
Interviews
Diaries
Transcripts
Sketches
Lectures
Place:
Detroit (Mich.)
Date:
1814-1996
bulk 1921-1996
Summary:
The papers of art historian E. P. Richardson measure 28.7 linear feet and date from 1814-1996, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1921-1996. Within the papers are scattered biographical materials; acquisition files for Richardson's personal art collection; professional and personal correspondence with colleagues, art historians and critics, artists, museums, galleries, and dealers; numerous writings, including manuscripts and research files for his published books, articles, and lectures; general research notebooks and files compiled by Richardson on a wide variety of art-related topics and artists; professional and committee files; as well as a smaller amount of Constance C. Richardson's papers.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art historian E. P. Richardson measure 28.7 linear feet and date from 1814-1996, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1921-1996. Within the papers are scattered biographical materials; acquisition files for Richardson's personal art collection; professional and personal correspondence with colleagues, art historians and critics, artists, museums, galleries, and dealers; numerous writings, including manuscripts and research files for his published books, articles, and lectures; general research notebooks and files compiled by Richardson on a wide variety of art-related topics and artists; professional and committee files; as well as a smaller amount of Constance C. Richardson's papers.

Biographical materials include certificates, awards, and honorary degrees, membership information, personal and family photographs, a few sketches, and a transcript of an oral history Interview with E.P. Richardson conducted by the National Endowment for the Humanities in 1982.

There are acquisitions files for the Richardsons' personal art collection that invoices, photographs, correspondence with galleries and collectors, appraisals, price lists, and artwork examination forms.

Correspondence is with colleagues, art dealers, collectors, museums and museum curators, foreign scholars, organizations, galleries, artists, art historians and critics, publishers, editors, librarians, friends, and family. Topics regard purchasing art for various collections, consultations about art and collecting including authentications and attributions, publishing, general art history, lectures, and personal matters, among other topics. There is correspondence with the Archives of American Art, Castano Galleries, Lawrence Fleischman, James Thomas Flexner, Alfred V. Frankenstein, George Croce, Walter Heil, Earl Krentzin, Wilmarth Lewis, Russel Lynes, John Francis McDermott, Philadelphia Museum of Art, J. Hall Pleasants, Anna Rutledge, Charles Sellers, Smithsonian Institution, Regina Soria, Victor Spark, William Stevens, Robert Vose, William Woolfenden, and many others. Scattered correspondence with artists is with Isabel Bishop, Louis Bouche, William Bostick, Eve Garrison, Edward Hopper, Irene Jungwirth, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Hughie Lee-Smith, Reginald Marsh, Gerald Mast, Georgia O'Keefe, Charles Sheeler, Walt Speck, and John Wedda, among many others. The greatest extent of correspondence is with Andrew Wyeth, Harold Cohn, and Frederick Simper. There is also personal correspondence with family and friends, and between E.P. and Constance Richardson.

E.P. Richardson's prominence as an art historian, writer, and expert on collecting is well documented through his prolific writings. Materials include drafts, notes, typescripts, and outlines for articles, exhibition catalog essays, and lectures. Also found are research files and publishing documentation for Richardson's books, including Washington Allston: A Study of the Romantic Artist in America (1948), Painting in America (1956), Charles Willson Peale and his World (1983), and American Romantic Painting (1944). There are also miscellaneous notes and four diaries. Two of the diaries comment on the social and cultural life of Detroit; the authenticity of paintings; Richardson's reflections on contemporary American painting, thoughts about museums, dealers, artists, and art historians (especially Wilhelm R. Valentiner); and travel.

Notebooks compiled by Richardson on a wide variety art-related topics cover nearly six decades. There are also numerous research files organized Richardson about individual artists and art history. And, the art collector files contain reference materials about art collectors and their collections including Lamont du Pont Copeland, Michael W. Freeman, Nelson Rockefeller, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Allen, and the Marquis de Somerlous. There are three index card file boxes containing bibliographic data on published books and articles.

Professional and committee files document Richardson's professional and consulting work for the Art Quarterly, Detroit Institute of Arts, National Collection of Fine Arts, the National Portrait Gallery, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, the John D. Rockefeller III collection, Winterthur Museum, the White House, and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

Constance C. Richardson's papers include business and professional correspondence with various institutions, most extensively with the Macbeth Gallery. In addition, there is a smaller amount of personal correspondence, photographs and slides of her artworks, printed materials, two illustrated notebooks on her work, and miscellaneous notes. Also included is Constance's artist palette.
Biographical / Historical:
Art historian, museum director, and writer E. P. (Edgar Preston) Richardson (1902-1985) served as director of the Detroit Institute of Arts (1945-1962) and Winterthur Museum (1963-1966). He was also a board member of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts from 1966-1977 and, in 1954, co-founded the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

E. P. Richardson was born in 1902 in Glens Falls, New York and died in Philadelphia in 1985. He graduated from Williams College in Massachusetts in 1925 and studied painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts for the three years following graduation. In 1930 he became educational secretary at the Detroit Institute of Arts, was quickly named assistant director in 1933, and served as director from 1945 to 1962. He left Detroit to take the position of director of the Winterthur Museum, where he remained until 1966. Richardson married Constance Coleman in 1931. Born in Berlin, Germany in 1905, Constance Coleman Richardson was an award-winning and widely exhibited realist style painter of American landscapes. She gave up painting in the 1960s and died in 2002.

While at the Detroit Institute of Arts, E. P. Richardson co-founded the Archives of American Art with Lawrence Fleischman, and served as the Archives' first director. Richardson was also art advisor to John D. Rockefeller III for over ten years, editor of Art Quarterly from 1938 to 1967, and a member of various boards, including the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the Smithsonian Arts Commission, and the National Portrait Gallery. He authored numerous books including ones on artists Washington Allston and Charles Willson Peale, and The Way of Western Art: American Romantic Painting (1939), Painting in America: The Story of Four Hundred and Fifty Years (1956), A Short History of Painting in America (1963), and American Art, an Exhibition of the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller, 3d (1976).
Related Materials:
Related collections among the holdings of the Archives of American Art include an interview with E.P. Richardson dated February 6, 1978 conducted by Linda Downs; and several miscellaneous manuscripts that include an E.P. Richardson Letter to Rockwell Kent, June 15 1959; E.P. Richardson letters to Lawrence Arthur Fleischman, May 13, 1962 and August 22 1954; and a Yasuo Kunioshi letter to E.P. Richardson, July 25 1948.

Additional E.P. Richardson papers are found at the Detroit Institute of Arts and in the archives of the Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel D46) including E.P. Richardson's research material on Jeremiah P. Hardy. These materials are housed at the Smithsonian American Art Museum Library and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Edith Wilkinson first donated a letter to E. P. Richardson from herself in 1957. E.P. Richardson donated papers to the Archives of American Art in 1958 and 1960 and lent materials for microfilming in 1961. Addition material was donated by Constance Richardson in 1985, and by Martha Fleischman in 2003.
Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Authors -- Michigan -- Detroit  Search this
Art historians -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Romanticism  Search this
Art -- History -- Study and teaching  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Manuscripts
Interviews
Diaries
Transcripts
Sketches
Lectures
Citation:
Edgar P. Richardson papers, 1814-1996, bulk 1921-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.richedga
See more items in:
E.P. (Edgar Preston) and Constance Richardson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9f0a154af-52ef-402b-b06d-60a290eec749
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-richedga
Online Media:

Connecting through Family Stories | Cultivating Learning

Creator:
Smithsonian Education  Search this
Type:
Lectures
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2021-11-29T22:12:26.000Z
YouTube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
Topic:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianEducation
Data Source:
Smithsonian Education
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianEducation
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_0-KCwiodyqA

Bust of a Man (Josep Fondevila)

Artist:
Pablo Picasso, Spanish, b. Málaga, 1881–1973  Search this
Medium:
Bronze
Dimensions:
6 5/8 X 9 X 4 5/8 IN. (16.8 X 22.9 X 11.7 CM.)
Type:
Sculpture
Date:
(1906)
Credit Line:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966
Accession Number:
66.4047
See more items in:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection
School:
Spanish Modernism
Data Source:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/py28943bda9-2640-4dcf-bf72-0109baf3664f
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:hmsg_66.4047

Botanical subjects

Designer:
Negus, Caroline  Search this
Graphic artist:
Sharp, William  Search this
Michelin, Francis  Search this
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
sheet: 47.5 cm x 30 cm; 18 11/16 in x 11 13/16 in
Object Name:
Print
print
lithograph
Object Type:
Lithograph
Other Terms:
Print; Lithograph
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Boston
Date made:
ca 1840-1841
Subject:
Plants  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of L. Prang & Company
ID Number:
GA.01236
Catalog number:
01236
Accession number:
20593
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Graphic Arts
Communications
Art
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a5-ec82-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_803296

Boston -- James P. Kelleher Rose Garden

Landscape architect:
Shurcliff, Arthur A. (Arthur Asahel), 1870-1957  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
James P. Kelleher Rose Garden (Boston, Massachusetts)
Emerald Necklace (Boston, Massachusetts)
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Suffolk County -- Boston
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, a photocopied photo of the garden, and a brochure with a generalized site and planting plan.
General:
As part of the transformation of the wetlands of the Back Bay Fens into urban parkland, in 1930 landscape architect Arthur A. Shurtleff (a.k.a. Shurcliff) designed a circular formal rose garden. Located opposite the Museum of Fine Arts, the garden was intended as a place for both the general public and rose enthusiasts to learn about and enjoy roses. The garden was expanded in 1933 and in 1975 was named the James P. Kelleher Rose Garden to honor the Boston Parks and Recreation Department's Superintendent of Horticulture. Prior to its formal naming in honor of Kelleher, the garden area was variously identified as "The Fenway," "Back Bay Fens," "The Riverway, "The Parkway," "The Emerald Necklace," and "Fenway Rose Garden." In 2001 the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, in concert with the Boston Parks and Recreation Department, developed a master plan for the garden's restoration and renewal. This project was completed in 2008. Currently the garden contains nearly 1,500 plants in over ten classes and 200 varieties of roses.
Persons associated with the garden include Arthur A. Shurtleff (landscape architect, 1930).
Related Materials:
James P. Kelleher Rose Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (9 photographic prints; 2 slides (photographs))
See others in:
J. Horace McFarland Collection, 1900-1961.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MA057
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Massachusetts
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb60b436627-b1bc-4a14-b818-aa913eeca01a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref17563

Manchester -- Garden at Plum Hill, The

Creator:
Randall, Priscilla  Search this
Architect:
Velleco, Jim  Search this
Sculptor:
Brizzolesi  Search this
Ditarando, Roger  Search this
Provenance:
North Shore Garden Club of Massachusetts  Search this
Photographer:
Bullen, Kate  Search this
Gibson, Laura  Search this
Beinecke, Gina  Search this
Runkle, Pauline  Search this
Garden designer:
Runkle, Pauline  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
The Garden at Plum Hill (Manchester, Massachusetts)
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Essex -- Manchester
Scope and Contents:
32 digital images and 2 folders. The folders includes worksheets, additional photographs and photocopies of articles.
General:
Located on 4 acres this flower garden was originally a pig farm. Sometime after 1981, a devastating fire destroyed the house and killed surrounding vegetation. All that remained was the barn. The current owners purchased the property in 1984 and a year later eight trailer loads of loam were brought in and hand-sifted for garden beds and borders that wrap around the property and its natural granite elements. The garden includes a full sun perennial garden, a shade garden, an antique rose garden, a meadow garden, and a small orchard of miniature fruit trees. These gardens feature flowering shrubs, perennials, bulbs and self-sowing biennials that are harvested regularly during eight months of the year to provide distinctive materials for the owner's floral design business located in the barn. Second generation woodlands lay beyond the developed spaces.
Roses, hydrangeas, peonies, astilbes, lady's mantle, Solomon's seal, catmint, tulips and hosta leaves may be grown for commercial floral arrangements but the gardens are designed to enhance the setting rather than traditional cutting gardens planted in rows. Inside the farmer's stone wall along the road there is a deep border of perennials and flowering shrubs. A curving pea stone driveway is bordered by birches, pines and dogwoods under planted with shade loving perennials. A formal oval rose garden with antique varieties as well as David Austin and other hybrids is protected by a lilac hedge, with boxwood globes and an antique gate at three entrances. More flower borders line the driveway up to the house culminating in a rose covered trellis. There is an herb garden with lavender that is nearly 30 years old, and thorn less blackberries and a fruit orchard nearby that contains apple, plum, peach and pear trees planted in 1986. Another shade garden with hydrangea edging the path leads to the woodlands and a dining terrace.
Roses, hydrangeas, peonies, astilbes, lady's mantle, Solomon's seal, catmint, tulips and hosta leaves may be grown for commercial floral arrangements but the gardens are designed to enhance the setting rather than traditional cutting gardens planted in rows. Inside the farmer's stone wall along the road there is a deep border of perennials and flowering shrubs. A curving pea stone driveway is bordered by birch, pine and dogwood under planted with shade loving perennials. A formal oval rose garden with antique varieties, David Austin roses and other hybrids is protected by a lilac hedge, with boxwood balls at three entrances and an antique gate. More flower borders line the driveway up to the house culminating in a rose covered trellis. There is an herb garden with lavender that is nearly 30 years old. A fruit orchard of apple, plum, peach and pear and thorn less blackberries was started in 1986. Another shade garden with hydrangea edging the path leads to the woodlands and a dining terrace.
A sculpture of a goat and birdbaths by Roger DiTarando are placed in the gardens. Another feature is a sculpture of Beatrice by Brizzolesi.
In 2016 a raised bed garden for vegetables, cutting flowers and herbs was designed and built on a sunny slope behind the barn. It is fenced with birch poles and patterned panels with mesh and wires to support espaliered apples and keep out predators. There is a brick and stone custom made compass rose outside the gate, brick walkways between raised beds, and a tuteur sunk in gravel.
Persons associated with the garden include Nathaniel Hildreth (former owner, before 1854); Albert J. Lucas and Grace A. Lucas (former owners until 1947); Carl and Florence Wentworth Wilson (former owners, 1947-1983); Judson Wilson (former owner, 1982-1983); Architects Development Corporation (former owner, 1983-1984); Brizzolesi (sculptor, circa 1929); Jim Velleco (architect, 1984-1985); Priscilla Randall (trellis designer); Roger DiTarando (sculptor); Pauline Runkle (garden designer, 2017- ); Ed Mota (built birch fence and compass rose, 2017).
The North Shore Garden Club facilitated the 2014 and 2019 submissions of this garden's documentation.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Massachusetts -- Manchester  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MA601
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Massachusetts
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb603740226-7bc7-41f5-9249-df9a8126cf06
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref17624

Worcester -- Steele-Stoddard-McDonough Garden

Landscape architect:
Steele, Fletcher, 1885-1971  Search this
Former owner:
Stoddard, Robert, 1906-1984  Search this
Stoddard, Helen, 1904-1998  Search this
Horticulturist:
Wheat, Isabel  Search this
Gardener:
Mattus, Matt  Search this
Documentation:
Karski, Robert, 2016  Search this
Provenance:
Worcester Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Steele-Stoddard-McDonough Garden (Worcester, Massachusetts).
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Worcester -- Worcester
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, photocopies of articles, and other information.
General:
Beginning work in 1949 the gardens on this five acre property were a collaboration between landscape architect Fletcher Steele (1855-1971) and owner Helen Stoddard, and most of Steele's design and plantings were maintained for the next 50 years. The site slopes down behind the house and has outcroppings of rock. Steele envisioned a descending cornucopia shape inspired by the illusion of the downward spiral he had observed in Titian's painting "Bacchus and Ariadne", and had the shape he wanted carved into the earth by bulldozers. Descending levels of lawn, flower beds, and a pond were bordered by a ribbon of bluestone planted with tufts of blue fescue. Dry stone walls planted with maiden hair ferns were built from a porous fossilized rock dug out of a dried-up lake bed in Castalia, Ohio. Two sets of steps, one from the bluestone terrace behind the house and another below a bank of roses were covered with moss. White birches were planted to draw the eye to perennial borders, and spires of arborvitae were another focal point. The Art Deco style of the garden brought together the exotic and native by blending into surrounding woodlands that had plantings of juniper, mountain laurel, azaleas, dogwood, hemlock, birch, and elm.
The current owners resolved to preserve Steele's innovative design and vision as much as possible while changing some deteriorating hardscape and plants. The dry Castalia stone wall and moss-covered steps were no longer safe and had to be replaced when the house was renovated. Bluestone was used to rebuild the terrace behind the house and for steps set on fieldstone risers, and a new low wall was built from cinder blocks with stone facing. A walkway of fieldstone set in the lawn recalled an original path. The blue fescue grass was dying off, possibly due to soggy feet, and is being replaced by Japanese hakone grass which is mostly yellow. The arborvitae had grown too tall and were out of scale, many were knocked over by a storm, and some are being replanted. However many of the perennials in the borders and beds, the white birches and the rose and azalea banks are still growing.
Persons associated with the garden include: Robert and Helen Stoddard (former owners, 1941-1999); Fletcher Steele (1885-1971) (landscape architect, 1946-1949); Matt Mattus (gardener, 1975-1980); Isabel Wheat (horticulturist, 1999- ); Robert Karski (documentation, 2016).
Related Materials:
Steele-Stoddard-McDonough Garden related holdings consist of 7 folders (119 35mm slides; 4 transparencies; 9 digital images)
See others in:
Eleanor Weller collection, circa 1978-2006.

Rudy J. Favretti collection, circa 1950-2010.

Ken Druse garden photography collection, 1978-2005.

Corliss Knapp Engle slide collection, 1969-2001.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Massachusetts -- Worcester  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MA244
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Massachusetts
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6d4fa84ed-1809-4ee8-9c20-adb7b947c86e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref17695

Cambridge -- Morse School Garden

Creator:
Metropolitan District Commission  Search this
City of Cambridge  Search this
Hirschi, Jane  Search this
Beggy, Patricia  Search this
Architect:
Koch, Carl  Search this
Renovation architect:
Design Partnership of Cambridge  Search this
Artist:
Kepes, Gyorgy, 1906-2001  Search this
Kepes, Juliet  Search this
Arai, Tomie  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Place:
Morse School Garden (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Middlesex County -- Cambridge
Scope and Contents:
1 folder and 25 digital images. The folder includes worksheets, photocopies of reference prints and other images.
General:
The Morse School is a Cambridge Modern style single-story modular structure with large windows and doors that open to the outdoors from individual classrooms, built in 1955. One-quarter acre of the schoolyard has gardens that are a major learning facility for the elementary school's students, and a resource for the neighborhood. The entry garden has a gravel path bordered on one side with raspberry bushes, with annual tomatoes, peppers, eggplants and cucumbers on the other side, and an open bed for digging dirt. A painted arbor opens to the main garden which features an alphabet garden along a chain link fence. Each year students plants annual flowers and vegetables for each letter, such as asters for "A" and zinnias for "Z". A pollinator garden attracts butterflies, other pollinating insects and birds with milkweed, Shasta daisies, geraniums, catmint, phlox, and grapevines growing on two trellises against the wall of the building. About ten beds of various sizes and shapes in the center of the main garden grow seasonal vegetables, beginning with leafy green vegetables, moving on to root crops such as carrots, potatoes and beets, followed by corn and peas and beans on a string trellis. There are two herb beds, more beds with strawberries, onions, sunflowers, cabbage, zucchini, chard, watermelon, and a companion planting of marigolds. Annual flowers are grown in two small whiskey barrels.
Other facilities include compost bins for food scraps and garden thinnings and a vibrantly painted shed for storing tools and supplies. A grassy gathering area has two fruit trees including an apple tree planted in the 1950's, and a large sycamore tree with six tree stumps nearby, seating for teaching, discussion, reading, singing and playing music. The community holds a Garden Expo in August and a cider pressing in October in the grassy gathering area. Age-appropriate curricula uses the gardens to teach urban children where food comes from, the life-cycle of growing plants, introductory botany and genetics. Other subject areas including art, math, food preparation and healthy eating derive from the students' gardening experiences.
CitySprouts, a local non-profit organization, partners with Morse School and provides workers, tools and garden supplies. CitySprouts has a plant list it recommends for garden-based learning along with suggestions for environmental subjects. Morse School had an empty front yard that was dug up and planted with red, white and blue spring bulbs in the shape of an American flag following September 11, 2001. The learning garden was developed afterwards.
Persons associated with the garden include Metropolitan District Commission (playground, Victory Garden, 1953- ); City of Cambridge (Morse School, 1953- ); Carl Koch (1912-1998) (architect, 1955); Design Partnership of Cambridge (renovation architects, 1999); Jane Hirschi, Director of City Sprouts (non-profit assisting in creating and maintaining school garden, 2001- ); Patricia Beggy (Morse school principal, 2004- ); Juliet and György Kepes (enamel panels artists, 1957); Tomie Arai (silk-screened mural artist, 1999).
Related Materials:
Additional materials also located in CitySprouts, 678 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MA638
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Massachusetts
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb61d0410ed-1591-4343-a5f3-be06c9c5bc05
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref32668

Elisabeth Commanday papers

Creator:
Commanday, Elisabeth, 1890-1994  Search this
Names:
Anrep, Alda  Search this
Berenson, Bernard, 1865-1959  Search this
Berenson, Elizabeth  Search this
Mariano, Nicky  Search this
Extent:
0.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1949-1975
Summary:
The scattered papers of art collector Elisabeth Commanday measure 0.4 linear feet and date from 1949 to 1974. The collection relates to longtime friendships between Commanday and art historian Bernard Berenson, his sister Elizabeth Berenson, his companion Nicky Mariano, and Mariano's sister Baroness Alda von Anrep. The papers include correspondence, notes, photographs, and printed material.
Scope and Contents:
The scattered papers of art collector Elisabeth Commanday measure 0.4 linear feet and date from 1949 to 1974. The collection relates to longtime friendships between Commanday and art historian Bernard Berenson, his sister Elizabeth Berenson, his companion Nicky Mariano and Mariano's sister Baroness Alda von Anrep. Found is correspondence, notes, photographs, and printed material.
Arrangement:
Due to the small size of this collection the papers are arranged as one series.
Biographical / Historical:
Art collector Elisabeth (Betty) Krieger Commanday (1891-1994) lived in New York City and Boston, Massachusetts. She travelled throughout Europe and maintained a correspondence with art historian Bernard Berenson.
Provenance:
Donated 1993 by Maurice Commanday, son of Elisabeth Commanday. Commanday corresponded with Berenson for nearly ten years. At his death in 1959, Berenson's companion Nicky Mariano returned to Commanday all of her letters, which she discarded, except for the earliest letter written in April 1949.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Collectors  Search this
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Citation:
Elisabeth Commanday papers, 1949-1975. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.commelis
See more items in:
Elisabeth Commanday papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9d68e80a5-94ce-4ebf-8e2c-e702d50ac5d2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-commelis

Emily and Jean Paul Selinger papers, 1882-1918

Creator:
Selinger, Emily Harris Mcgary, 1848-1927  Search this
Selinger, Jean Paul, 1850-1909  Search this
Citation:
Emily and Jean Paul Selinger papers, 1882-1918. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7044
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209177
AAA_collcode_seliemil
Theme:
Women
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209177

Stromberg Guitar, used by Irving Ashby

User:
Ashby, Irving  Search this
Maker:
Charles A. Stromberg and Son  Search this
Measurements:
overall: 43 1/4 in x 19 in x 4 1/2 in; 109.855 cm x 48.26 cm x 11.43 cm
Object Name:
guitar
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Boston
Date made:
1939-1941
Credit Line:
Gift of Pauline Randolph Ashby
ID Number:
1988.0421.01
Accession number:
1988.0421
Catalog number:
1988.0421.01
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Musical Instruments
Music & Musical Instruments
Guitars
Jazz
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746a4-4045-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_606740

Emily and Jean Paul Selinger papers

Creator:
Selinger, Emily, 1848-1927  Search this
Selinger, Jean Paul, 1850-1909  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1882-1918
Summary:
The papers of painters Emily and Jean Paul Selinger measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1882 to 1918. The collection provides scattered documentation of the lives and work of the Selingers through biographical materials, family correspondence, photographs, and printed material.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painters Emily and Jean Paul Selinger measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1882 to 1918. The collection provides scattered documentation of the lives and work of the Selingers through biographical materials, family correspondence, photographs, and printed material.
Arrangement:
Due to the small size of this collection the papers are arranged as one series.
Biographical / Historical:
Emily Harris Mcgary Selinger (1848-1927) was a painter, author, and poet in Boston, Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Emily was originally from Wilmington, North Carolina, and was instrumental in establishing the Normal Art School in Louisville, Kentucky. She was known for her still-life and floral paintings.

Emily's husband, Jean Paul Selinger (1850-1909), was a landscape and portrait painter in Boston, Massachusetts and New Hampshire. He opened a summer studio in Glen House, in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the mid-1880s.
Provenance:
A portion of the papers was donated in 1982 by Charles and Gloria Vogel when acquired through research on White Mountain artists. Additional material was donated in 1982 by Marion C. Keaney, through her grandparents, the D. H. Remingtons, who were neighbors of Emily Selinger's mother, Mrs. McGary.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Painters -- New Hampshire  Search this
Painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Authors -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Authors -- New Hampshire  Search this
Landscape painters -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Landscape painters -- New Hampshire  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Function:
Artists' studios -- Massachusetts
Citation:
Emily and Jean Paul Selinger papers, 1882-1918. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.seliemil
See more items in:
Emily and Jean Paul Selinger papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9703c0f9e-6b9f-470a-a3d0-dfb9c979beb8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-seliemil

Oral history interview with Mikyoung Kim, 2009 Oct. 14-15

Interviewee:
Kim, Mikyoung, 1967-  Search this
Interviewer:
Berman, Avis, 1949-  Search this
Subject:
United States. General Services Administration. Design Excellence and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Mikyoung Kim, 2009 Oct. 14-15. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Landscape architects -- Interviews  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Asian American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15728
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)285164
AAA_collcode_kim09
Theme:
Women
Asian American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_285164

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By