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Robinson and Via Family Papers

Collector:
Robinson, Franklin A., Jr., 1959- (actor)  Search this
Names:
Capital Transit Company (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Serenity Farm, Inc.  Search this
Howes, Grace Bourne, ?-1976  Search this
Robinson, Adina Theresa, 1963-  Search this
Robinson, Amanda Baden, 1849-1940  Search this
Robinson, Elizabeth Bourne, 1892-1976  Search this
Robinson, Frank A., 1883-1970  Search this
Robinson, Franklin A., 1841-1905  Search this
Robinson, Franklin A., Sr., 1932-  Search this
Robinson, Martha Walls, 1807-1897  Search this
Robinson, Robert David, 1962-  Search this
Robinson, Robert Henry, 1851-1937  Search this
Robinson, Thomas Wells, 1803-1869  Search this
Townshend, Martha Robinson, 1880-1961  Search this
Via, Adina Mae, 1937-1966  Search this
Via, Ida Virginia Woods, 1914-2010  Search this
Via, Robert Delano, 1933-  Search this
Via, Robert Milton, 1906-1983  Search this
Creator:
Conner, Mary Robinson, 1930-2009  Search this
Extent:
23.1 Cubic feet (71 boxes, 3 map-size folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion pictures (visual works)
Correspondence
Photographs
Postcards
Baby books
Phonograph records
Postcard albums
Ephemera
School yearbooks
Diaries
Albums
Housebooks
Snapshots
Home movies
Family papers
Scrapbooks
Funeral registers
Architectural drawings
Place:
Maryland -- Family farms
Washington (D.C.)
Prince George's County (Md.)
Arizona -- Motion pictures
Benedict (Md.)
Charles County (Md.) -- Family farms
Calvert County (Md.) -- Family farms
California -- Motion pictures
Bahamas -- Motion pictures
Yosemite National Park (Calif.)
Puerto Rico -- Motion pictures
Washington -- motion pictures
Oregon -- Motion pictures
Disneyland (California)
Brandywine (Md.)
St. Thomas, V.I. -- Motion pictures
Florida -- Motion pictures
United States of America -- Maryland -- Carroll County -- Westminster
United States of America -- Maryland -- Carroll County -- Marston
United States of America -- Maryland -- Carroll County -- New Windsor
Date:
1838-2023, undated
bulk 1872-1985
Summary:
Papers documenting the farming and family life of the Robinson family of Prince George's County and after 1975, Charles County, Maryland. Papers documenting the farming and family of the Via family of Greene County, Virginia, Washington, D.C., Prince George's and Calvert Counties, Maryland, by 1949.
Scope and Contents:
An extensive and comprehensive collection of papers relating to family, farming, and the Southern Maryland tobacco culture, the Robinson and Via Family Papers cover many aspects of family and farm life. The papers are particularly important in regard to the tobacco culture that defined Southern Maryland for generations. The papers concern two distinct family groups, the Robinson and Via families who are connected through the marriage of Franklin A. Robinson and Adina Mae Via. The papers consist of material generated by the Robinson and Via families in their personal and working lives and as farm owners and operators.

The papers are especially strong in 20th century material. They consist of various types of farm records: account books, bills, receipts, tenant farming agreements, ephemera, land rental and purchase agreements, insurance policies, photographs and 8mm and 16mm films of farming practices and procedures, equipment and landscapes, related to the farming of tobacco, small grains, and livestock. The personal records include diaries, letters both personal and business, greeting cards, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, high school yearbooks, baby books, house plans, recipe books, photographs and 8mm films of birthdays, holidays, weddings, baptisms, family occasions, and family travel, oral histories, and funeral ephemera including photographs, and transcription discs. Of particular interest are the "Serenity Farm Tobacco Production Photographs" documenting the crop year 1999-2000 and the films detailing agricultural practices. There is a memorandum book for Black Walnut Thicket, 1885-1901, the Baden farm in Baden, Prince George's County.

This collection includes a comprehensive range of 8mm and 16mm films and photographs documenting farming practices and landscapes as well as family gatherings, birthdays, holidays, and vacations. The researcher is alerted to the fact that in some cases with the memorandum and account books, books printed for a given year were often saved and used for subsequent years, some were dated, some were not.

The collection is divided into seven series arranged by subject and most often chronologically at folder level within each series.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into seven series:

Series 1: Ferndale Farm (Potomac Landing), Prince George's County, Maryland, 1861-1973, undated

Subseries 1.1: Farm papers, bill, and receipts, and publications, 1861-1973, undated

Subseries 1.2: Farm papers, bill, and receipts, 1945-1960, undated

Subseries 1.3: Farm papers, bills, and receipts, 1960-1965, undated

Series 2: Robinson Family, 1845-2017, undated

Subseries 2.1: Family Papers and Publications, 1845-1993, undated

Subseries 2.2: Townshend, Martha Robinson, 1896-1961, undated

Subseries 2.3: Robinson, Frank A., 1899-1970, undated

Subseries 2.4: Robinson, Elizabeth Bourne, 1841-1976, undated

Subseries 2.5: Conner, Mary Robinson, 1938-1985, undated

Subseries 2.6: Robinson, Franklin A., 1932-1997, undated

Subseries 2.6.1: Farming, 1948-1976, undated

Subseries 2.6.2: Financial, 1948-1988, undated

Subseries 2.6.3: 4-H and Future Farmers of America (FFA), 1945-1954, undated

Subseries 2.6.4: Travel, 1959-1970, undated

Subseries 2.7: Robinson, Jr., Franklin A., 1959-2001, undated

Series 3: Serenity Farm, Charles County, Maryland, 1962-2000, undated

Series 4: Via Farm, Calvert County, Maryland, 1954-1987, undated

Series 5: Via Family, 1932-2010, undated

Subseries 5.1: Family papers, 1941-1983, undated

Subseries 5.2: Via, Robert M., 1933-1987, undated

Subseries 5.3: Via, Ida Virginia, 1928-2010, undated

Subseries 5.4: Via, Robert D., 1933-1988, undated

Subseries 5.5: Robinson, Adina Via, 1937-1966, undated

Series 6: Photographs, Photographic Slides, and Photographic Negatives, 1860-2000, undated

Subseries 6.1: Photographs, 1872-2000, undated

Subseries 6.2: Photographic negatives, 1927--2000, undated

Subseries 6.3: Photographic Slides, 1955-1979, undated

Series 7: AudioVisual, 1943-1988
Biographical / Historical:
Robinson Family

The Robinson family is thought to be of Scottish origin and appear in the records of Prince George's County, Maryland by the early 18th century. The line has been definitively traced to James Robinson (?-1849). James' father was probably Benjamin Robinson (?-1810), of Prince George's County, Maryland. (Will Book TT1, pg. 15, Records of Prince George's County, Maryland, Maryland State Archives (MSA))

James Robinson and Sarah Wynn were issued a marriage license on February 28, 1802 in Prince George's County, Maryland. (Marriage Records of Prince George's County, Maryland) Eleven children lived to maturity (not listed in birth order); Thomas Wells (1803-1869), Ann, Priscilla, James Monroe, Benjamin (1813-1882), John C. (1819-1895), Mary Sophia, Thomas Stanley (1800-1874), Alfred, Sarah Ann, Matilda, and Rebecca Maria.

James worked as a farm manager for Benjamin Oden near Upper Marlborough, Prince George's County. (Oden Papers, Maryland Historical Society) The Robinsons and their children, moved to Wood County, Virginia (now West Virginia) by April 18, 1818 where James acted as Oden's land agent (Deed Book 6, pg. 123, Land Records of Wood County, West Virginia). They brought with them three enslaved described in the above reference as, "Kate a woman 45 years of age very black; Colonel a boy aged 8 years yellow complexion: and George a boy aged six years of a dark brown complexion." They settled on part of what was known as the "Burnt Mill" tract in the general area where the Hughes River meets the Little Kanawha River. (Deed Book 9, pg. 110 and Deed Book 14, pg. 40, Land Records of Wood County)

Thomas Wells Robinson may not have accompanied his family to Virginia as he has a presence in Prince George's County prior to 1822 and was employed as a farm manager for Benjamin Oden at least until 1832. He married Elizabeth J. Richards on December 15, 1829 (Robinson Family Bible). They had nine children; Richard Thomas (1831 1906), Rebecca Maria (1832-1895), Mary Wynn (1834-1916), James George (1835-1883), Virlinda Victoria (1837-1838), Elizabeth Ann (1839-1916), Sarah Ann Sophia (1840-1874), Franklin Alexander (1841-1905) and John Alfred (1843); seven lived to maturity. (Robinson Family Bible) Elizabeth died on August 17, 1843 from complications in childbirth. She was buried in the graveyard of Page's Chapel (later known as St. Thomas Episcopal Church), Croom, Prince George's County. In 1843, Thomas purchased the plantation of Dr. Benjamin B. Hodges for $10,000 or approximately $15 an acre. Hodges was a brother-in-law of Benjamin Oden. The deed dated September 7, 1843 describes the parcel as containing, "Six hundred and twenty nine acres of land more or less and constitute that plantation or Estate of the said Benjamin Oden heretofore commonly called "Brown's Quarter Place" being the Land tracts and parcels of land sold by the said Benjamin Oden to the said Benjamin B. Hodges and by deed bearing date the tenth day of December eighteen hundred and thirty five and recorded in Liber AB no. 10 folio 162 also one of the land Records of the County aforesaid". (JBB no. 3 pgs. 312 314, Land Records of Prince George's County) The land was level to rolling bordered on the north by a tributary of Piscataway Creek and generally termed "white oak land". Underlying the whole property was a large strata of gravel and sand. The entire parcel went by the name, Potomac Landing.

Thomas supplemented his land holdings with later purchases. With the exception of twenty acres purchased from Sarah Talbert in 1844, (JBB no. 3 pg. 475, Land Records of Prince George's County) and the purchase of lot #3 consisting of 195 acres, part of the estate of John Townshend in 1856, these purchases were not contiguous to Potomac Landing. By the time of his death in 1869 these non-contiguous parcels had been sold. Thomas sold eighty-six acres of Potomac Landing and Jeffries to Edward Eversfield in October of 1843. (JBB no. 3, pg. 198, Land Records of Prince George's County) On January 13, 1846 Thomas married the widow Martha Ann Walls, daughter of George and Martha Naylor Walls. They had two sons; Benjamin Wells (1848-1849) and Robert Henry (1851-1937).

In addition to his sons, Thomas owned enslaved. The number varied from six in 1849 (JBB 6, folio 186, Land Records of Prince Georges' County) to eleven as noted in the census for 1850, and finally six as noted in the census of 1860. The 1867 Maryland Slave Statistics noted that, "at the time of the adoption of the Constitution of Maryland, in the year 1864, . . ." Thomas owned six enslaved, their names and ages being; Isaac Franklin age 31, Alfred West age 19, Susan West age 17, Margaret Franklin age 14, Fannie Franklin age 12, and Peter Franklin age 9. All were noted as being in good physical condition. (Prince Georges' County Slave Statistics 1867 1869, C 1307 1, MdHR:6198, page 185, MSA)

Thomas's financial problems began in the mid-1800s when Deeds of Trust appear in the county records securing outstanding loans. In 1856 and 1857 Thomas joined with others as bondsman for his son, Richard who was serving as "Collector of the State and County Taxes" for the 4th collection district, making he and the other signatories liable for any uncollected taxes. This, coupled with poor investments, led to his almost being "sold out" in 1859-1860 by J.W. & E. Reynolds of Baltimore to pay his debts. He executed three drafts on Penn & Mitchell, also of Baltimore, to pay off J.W. & E. Reynolds. (Equity Case #597, Prince Georges' County) Thomas was in poor health and his son James managed the farm in 1857 and 1858, and again from 1861 to October of 1862 (Equity Case #873, Prince Georges' County)

In October of 1862 Thomas' two sons, James and Franklin, traveled to Richmond to join the Confederate States Army. James enrolled in the 5th Battalion, Local Defense Arsenal and Franklin enrolled in the 5th Virginia Infantry, the Stonewall Brigade. (CSA Military Records, National Archives) James visited home frequently but was captured by the Union Army in St. Mary's County, Maryland on May 15, 1864 and spent the remainder of the war in Point Lookout Prison Camp. He was released on May 14, 1865. Franklin was not able to visit home at all during the war but survived to return home in 1865. In 1865, Thomas surveyed a parcel of 172 acres for his daughter Rebecca Maria. Rebecca had married her second cousin, William B. Robertson, on November 18, 1855. He made a gift of fifty acres, and Rebecca agreed to purchase the remainder. The Robertsons named this parcel Holly Grove. In Equity Case #849 (1872) filed after Thomas' death, his widow Martha and Samuel H. Berry, as executrix and executor, sought to recover payment for this land. At that time, William B. Robertson described this 172 acres of Potomac Landing: "There was no fences on the line which separated this land from the old gentleman's land, but he was to put a fence on it which he agreed to do before we agreed to come there. The land was thin, unimproved, with gullies and scrubby pine. If witness had been a judge of land he would not have given five dollars for it. All the improvements were one comfortable quarter the other indifferent with a poor oak shingle roof, worn out which made it not tenantable." Further along in his testimony, William gave an account of a conversation, "In a few days my father in law Thos. W. Robinson came to Washington and told me there his children had returned from the South, his two sons, that his debts were small and he was a happy man." Rebecca and William built a house on the property, a side-hall, double parlor plan that most likely her brother James was builder. They also built accompanying farm structures. (Records of Prince George's County, Maryland, Equity Case #849, MSA)

Thomas' son, Franklin, managed the farm after the War. In December 1868 Thomas entered into a sharecropping agreement with Edward Hanson, an African-American. After about a year-long illness, on May 16, 1869, Thomas died, deeply in debt. He was buried beside Elizabeth in the graveyard at St. Thomas' Church. He named as executrix his wife, Martha, and his friend and lawyer, Samuel H. Berry, as executor. His will divided the farm into thirds, one third going to his wife and their son Robert Henry, one third to his son James, and one third to his son Franklin. The land was surveyed according to the will. His personal property was sold but not enough profit was realized to pay off his creditors. The Commissioners of Prince George's County sued the estate on behalf of Thomas' creditors. The outcome was that in 1876 the property was sold at public auction. The Notice of Sale dated September 1, 1876 in the local county newspaper, The Prince Georgian, describes the farm as, "containing 514 2/3 acres More or less. The Improvements consist of a SMALL DWELLING, Three Barns, Stabling, and other necessary outbuildings. It is well wooded and watered, and the soil of fair quality. It has recently been divided into three lots and will be offered in lots, a description of which will be given at the time of sale." The sale was held on September 27, 1876, Lot No. 1 was purchased by Robert for $6.00 an acre, Lot #2 was purchased by Franklin for $5.00 an acre and Lot #3 was purchased by James for $4.00 per acre. Robert and Franklin eventually paid off their mortgage, but James defaulted on his purchase and later moved to St. Mary's County, Maryland. His portion later came to be owned by the Hawkins family, some members who had worked on the Robinson farm. (Equity Case #873, Prince Georges' County, MSA)

Lot #1, purchased by Robert from his fathers' estate, consisted of 177-1/3 acres, including the dwelling and farm buildings. On July 24, 1872, he married Amanda Malvina Baden (1849-1940), daughter of Robert W. G. and Margaret Caroline Early Baden. The Baden and Early families were both prominent south county families. Robert and Amanda had eight children; Caroline Early (1873 1967), Lucy Tennent (1875 1958), Albert Henry (1878 1914), Martha Perry (1880 1961), Robert Gover (1882 1882), Frank Alexander (1883 1970), Margaret Baden (1886 1956) and Grace Malvina (1889 1965).

By 1880 Robert had paid off his debt on the property and was fully engaged in farming. Unlike his father, or perhaps because of his father, Robert did not add to his land holdings, choosing to remain relatively debt free for his lifetime. The only land transactions he participated in were the sales of 79-3/4 acres in 1921 of Amanda's inheritance from her father and her interest in two smaller parcels of her father's land sold in 1894 and 1928 respectively. In 1928 he transferred 3.09 acres to his son Frank.

As late as the Federal census of 1880, Franklin was living with Robert and his household, both men engaged in farming. Sometime after 1880, Franklin took up residence on his part of Potomac Landing. His brother James most likely built the side-hall double parlor house that copied the main house at Potomac Landing. On February 18, 1897, Martha Robinson, died at the age of ninety. She was buried in the graveyyard of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Baden, Prince George's County. Robert continued cultivation of tobacco and small grains as his father before him. The first reference to the farm being named Ferndale is found in the "Communion Record" of Robert's daughter, Martha Perry "Pattie", dated 1896. (Robinson and Via Family Papers) The exact origin or reason for this new name is lost but perhaps the name Potomac Landing held such bitter memories of debt and hardship that, as a symbolic break with the past, a new name was found. It also may have simply been a way to distinguish this portion of Potomac Landing from the others. The farm continued to be listed on tax bills as Potomac Landing well into the 20th century, but was known to the general public and businesses as the Ferndale Farm. (Robinson and Via Family Papers)

Robert served as deputy inspector at the State Tobacco Warehouse in Baltimore for eight years under W.B. Bowie. He also served on the Board of Directors of the Bank of Brandywine. In July of 1905, Franklin died, a bachelor farmer. He was buried facing south in the graveyard of the Church of the Atonement, Cheltenham, (a chapel in St. Thomas' Episcopal Parish) where he had served as vestryman, treasurer, and cemetery custodian. Franklin died intestate and a lengthy process of dividing his estate began. This resulted in the sale of his part of Potomac Landing (Lot #2) in July 1908 to William E. Boswell. The court declared Robert ineligible for any inheritance due to his being " . . . a brother of the half blood." The Boswell family later sold the property to the Billingsley family of St. Mary's County. (Equity Case 3209, Prince George's County)

In 1910, after living in the farm's original home for approximately sixty seven years, the Robinson family built a new home. It was described in a 1956 insurance policy as, "2 story, frame, metal roof, 16x43, wing 14x28, 9 rooms." (Robinson and Via Family Papers) The house design was a simple Victorian with plastered walls, and lit by carbide gas. Electrical lighting was installed in 1951. The house was built with monies from Robert and Amanda, and their son Frank, who served as builder and contractor.

On Tuesday March 9, 1937, "During a celebration in honor of his wifes birthday anniversary, Mr. Robinson collapsed at the table and died immediately without a word or a sigh." (Robinson and Via Family Papers) Robert was buried beside his mother in the cemetery at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Baden.

At Robert's death, Ferndale Farm was valued at $30.00 an acre, the total acreage, 174 acres, being valued in the whole at $5,220.00. Robert died intestate, again the fate of the land was in question. He left eight heirs, his widow, Amanda, six of his children and his son Albert Henry's only surviving child, R. Henry Robinson. Rather than have the farm sold and his mother's life disrupted, Frank purchased the estate and personal property from the heirs. Before this could take place, a deed had to be granted the heirs for the property since one had never been recorded after the 1876 sale. Equity case 873 was reopened sixty-two years after its supposed resolution. Frank testified, "over a period of about thirty years I would on a number of occasions, talk about the fact that he had purchased and paid for this property and that a deed had never been executed to him and [he] kept saying he was going to have someone straighten this matter out for him." It was discovered that Robert had fully paid for his part of Potomac Landing. On February 14, 1938 the farm was deeded from Amanda along with Robert''s heirs to Frank. (Book 499, page 334, Land Records of Prince George's County) According to the deed and a 1937 fire insurance policy the farm consisted of 177 1/3 acres, "1 two story dwelling, one tenant house, 1 barrack, 1 tobacco barn, 1 corn house & cow stable, 1 Stable, and 1 Granary & Stable." (Robinson and Via Family Papers)

Frank A. Robinson, now the sole owner of Ferndale Farm, was born August 17, 1883. He learned farming and in addition took up the trade of builder and contractor. As a young man, he worked in the general store of his uncle Robert Baden. He was the contractor for the first Bank of Brandywine and many homes in and around the town of Brandywine, including the home of his cousin Robert E. Baden, DDS. He was secretary of the Building Committee for construction of the Chapel of the Incarnation in Brandywine, a mission chapel for St. Thomas' Episcopal Parish. His success in the building trade gave him disposable income that he invested in land. His first purchase was in August, 1915 of a 2-9/100 acre of land in Brandywine that was being sold by the Board of County School Commissioners; the purchase price was $300. In March 1916 he purchased 38.09 acres of his Uncle Franklin's farm. This property adjoined Ferndale Farm. Over the next fifty-four years of his life, Frank bought and sold many pieces of real estate. Perhaps his most significant purchases were: 18-1/3 acres purchased from The German American Colonization Land Company of Maryland in October 1915 (Book 115, pg. 140, Land Records of Prince George's County); 147.99 acres purchased from August and Wilhelmina Noltensmeir in December 1917 (Book 129, pg. 263, Land Records of Prince George's County) and 320 acres called the Vineyard purchased from William M. Wilson in March 1928. Frank used these three parcels as collateral for other purchases. Never once did he mortgage Ferndale Farm, insuring that no matter what financial stormy seas might blow, his home was secure. Over the course of his life, especially in the case of the Noltensmeir farm, when cash was needed a parcel of land would be surveyed off and sold. He inherited his grandfather Thomas' love of land but had fortunately developed a shrewd business sense to go along with it.

On November 20, 1929, he married Elizabeth Freeland Bourne, daughter of Joseph Blake and Maria Gantt Bourne of Calvert County, Maryland. They had three children: Mary Elizabeth (1930-2009), Franklin Alexander (1932-2023), and Robert Lee (1935-1997). In addition to his construction business he continued farming, raising tobacco, hay, and small grains. He engaged in sharecropping with tenants on his various properties. He was active in community affairs serving on the Board of The Maryland Tobacco Growers Association (MTGA), the Vestry of St. Thomas Parish, and as sheriff of Brandywine. On January 9, 1940 Amanda Baden Robinson died. She was buried next to her husband at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Baden. In February 1958, Frank and Elizabeth conveyed 1.57 acres of Ferndale Farm to son Franklin where he and his fiancée, Adina M. Via, were building their new home prior to their marriage in July of that same year.

The booming economy and suburbanization of the Washington metropolitan area in the early 1960's led to the high quality gravel lying beneath Ferndale into becoming a valuable commodity. In October 1962, Franklin and his parents granted a three-year lease to William C. Nolte for mining sand and gravel on the Ferndale Farm at .174 per yard. (Book 2747, pg. 11, Land Records of Prince George's County) From now until 1975 when the property was sold, gravel would be mined from under the farm by various companies. In November 1962, Elizabeth and Frank transferred to Franklin the 38.09 acres Frank had purchased from Fitzhugh Billingsley in 1916. (Book 2754, pg. 99, Land Records of Prince George's County) That same year they transferred 6.754 acres, part of the Vineyard, to son Robert and his wife Lois, (Book 2765, pg. 201, Land Records of Prince George's County)

On December 28, 1965, Frank and Elizabeth participated in a land exchange/purchase of the farm of Ralph W. and Cordelia H. Brown located along the Patuxent River in Benedict, Charles County, Maryland. Franklin had rented this farm the year before and was impressed enough by its location and arability to work out a purchase. Frank and Elizabeth traded 65.9920 acres that would eventually become Franklin's under Frank's will. On February 21, 1966 they deeded the Charles County farm to Franklin and Adina. Adina named this property Serenity Farm. The property consisted of 480.66 acres. (Liber 179, page 708 etc., Land Records of Charles County)

On February 5, 1970, after a short illness, Frank died at Cafritz Memorial Hospital. He was buried at St. Paul's Episcopal Church near his parents. In his will, probated March 4, 1970 he left thirty acres of the property purchased from the German American Land Company and A. Noltensmeir to Elizabeth. He willed forty acres of the same parcel to daughter Mary Robinson Conner. The remainder of Ferndale Farm was willed to Franklin and the remaining acreage of the Vineyard was left to Robert Lee. Franklin Alexander Robinson was born August 13, 1932 at the Garfield Hospital in Washington, D.C.. He received his schooling in the public school system of Prince George's County, graduating from Gwynn Park High School in June 1951. He was a charter member of Gwynn Park's chapter of The Future Farmers of America. He was extremely active in FFA, achieving the Degree of Maryland Farmer in 1950 and their highest award, the Degree of American Farmer at their convention in Kansas City, Missouri in October 1953. He obtained his private pilots license in 1954. He entered the United States Army in February 1955 and went through basic training at Camp Gordon, Augusta, Georgia. After basic training he was transferred to Camp Hanford, Washington State. There he worked part time on the farm of Dick and Theresa Laurent during his off duty hours and began a lifelong friendship with them. He returned home to farming on an agricultural discharge in October of 1956. On July 27, 1958 he married his high school sweetheart, Adina Mae Via, daughter of Robert Milton and Virginia Woods Via. They had three children: Franklin Alexander (1959), Robert David (1962), and Adina Theresa (1963).

Franklin continued expanding and improving the farming operation by modern methods and means. At times, he farmed over one thousand acres, both owned and rented. On February 21, 1966, his parents deeded their purchase of the Ralph W. and Cordelia H. Brown farm in Benedict to he and Adina, later known as Serenity Farm Franklin and Adina engaged an architect to draft house plans for an anticipated new residence. A small A frame vacation home was built on the property so the family could spend weekends there.

On December 14, 1966, after a long illness, Adina died from complications associated with Hodgkin's Disease. She was buried in Trinity Memorial Gardens, Waldorf, Charles County. Franklin married Margaret Walker Lennox (nee Tallen, known as Rita) on August 21, 1970 (Marriage Records of Prince George's County, Maryland). This marriage ended in divorce in 1977. There were no children from this marriage.

On July 14, 1975 the Robinson family, Franklin, his second wife, Margaret, her daughter Margaret W. Lennox, Franklin, Jr., R. David, A. Theresa and Elizabeth B. Robinson, moved to Serenity Farm. On July 17, 1975 Franklin and Elizabeth sold the remaining acreage of Ferndale Farm to Brandywine Sand and Gravel, thus ending 131 years of ownership by the Robinson family. Elizabeth Bourne Robinson died on July 15, 1976 and was buried beside her husband at St. Paul's Church, Baden. Franklin married Hiltrud (Ceddie) Harris (nee Sedlacek) on July 15, 1978. (Robinson Family Bible) This marriage ended in divorce in 1986. There were no children from this marriage. Franklin married Diedre Gale Merhiage on April 19, 1989; this marriage ended in divorce in 1997. There were no children from this marriage. He married Remelda Henega Buenavista on January 13, 2007.

The Robinson family continue day-to-day operations of Serenity Farm. The land is well suited to the growing of tobacco and small grains, which crops, (with the exception of tobacco) along with a flock of sheep, are cultivated there to the present time. After the crop year 2001 the Robinson family took the tobacco buyout program offered by the state of Maryland and ceased growing tobacco. Franklin is active in farming and community affairs having served on the vestry of St. Thomas Episcopal Parish, the Board of Directors of the Maryland Tobacco Growers Association (MTGA), the Board of the Production Credit Association, the Boards of three schools, Holy Trinity Day School, Queen Anne School, and Calverton School, and numerous other organizations. Currently the farm consists of approximately 275 acres. In 1981 a state agricultural land preservation district of 222.755 acres was created. This was the first such district in Charles County and one of the first in the state of Maryland.

Via Family

The Via family traces its origins to the colony of Virginia, where the probable progenitor of the line, Amer Via, a French Huguenot, settled in Manakin Town, Albemarle County between 1670-1700. It is impossible to trace the Via line definitively due to the loss of Virginia county records during the Civil War.

The Via family line covered in this collection can be definitively traced to William Via of Fredericksville Parish, Louisa (later Albemarle) County, Virginia. The William Via family lived west of the present day town of Whitehall at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains, an area commonly known as Sugar Hollow. William Via III served in the Virginia Line during the Revolutionary War. He married Mary Craig, daughter of Thomas Craig and Jane Jameson, on March 17, 1784. William died on June 27, 1836, in Albemarle County (Rev. War Pension Appl. 6363, National Archives). His son Thomas married Sally, widow Griffin, on January 1, 1811 (Albemarle County Marriage Records). Their son, Hiram Karl Via (1812-1893), married Harriet Ardenia Naylor by license dated March 7, 1836 (Albemarle County Marriage Records).

Hiram and Harriet's son, Robert St. Clair Via (1844-1925), served as a private in Company I, 7th Virginia Infantry of the Confederate States Army (CSA Military Service Records, National Archives). After the war he married his first cousin, Mary Frances Naylor, daughter of Samuel Chapman Naylor and Eliza Jane Gardner, on April 3, 1866 in Rockingham County (Rockingham County, Virginia, Marriage Records). Sometime between 1870 and 1872, they moved to Linn County, Missouri, and settled about seven miles from the town of Bucklin. Their son, Hiram Chapman Via (1872-1933), was born there. In 1893, the family returned to Virginia, and settled on a farm in Greene County near the town of Stanardsville.

Hiram Chapman Via operated a mill as well as a farm. On March 15, 1899, he married Adina Eleanor Eusebia Runkle, daughter of Milton D. L. Runkle and Roberta A. Beadles (Greene County, Virginia, Marriage Records). They had three children: Bernice Olive (1902-1999), Robert Milton (1906-1983), and Deward Daniel (1909-1977).

Robert moved to Washington, D.C.. In December 1927 he began employment with the Capitol Traction Company as a streetcar conductor (Robinson and Via Family Papers). During the early 1930s, Robert rented a townhouse at 715 A St., SE, where he lived with his sister Bernice V. McMullan and her son, William C. McMullan; his brother and sister in law, and his parents. Next door, at 717, lived the Moses Albright family, including Moses's stepdaughter Ida Virginia Woods (1914-2010), daughter of Jesse Lee Woods (1894-1918) and Donna Mae Barker (1896-1928) of Frederick County, Maryland. Robert and Virginia began a courtship and on September 3, 1932 were married in Frederick, Frederick County, Maryland (Frederick County, Maryland, Marriage Records).

After their marriage, Robert and Virginia lived in various locations in the Washington metropolitan area. Their first child, Robert Delano, was born on March 24, 1933, and their second child, Adina Mae, was born on April 12, 1937. Virginia was employed outside the home while her children were in school. Her first job before her marriage had been with Woolworth's in Martinsburg, WV working the candy counter and then before the birth of her son at The Hecht Company on F St. in Washington, D.C.. After her marriage she worked briefly for the United States Postal Service in Capitol Heights, Maryland. Beginning in the 1950s, she worked first at the Hecht Company department store on 7th Street in the District and later for Charles of the Ritz as a receptionist in their beauty salon located in Woodward & Lothrop's F Street store in Washington, D.C.. She also worked as salon manager at the Charles of the Ritz salons in the Woodward & Lothrop stores in Seven Corners, Virginia, and Chevy Chase, Maryland. She retired due to health reasons in 1973.

On September 10, 1941, Robert and Virginia purchased Lot #43 in Woodlane subdivision in Prince George's County. (Book 619, pg. 12, Land Records of Prince George's County) A house was designed for them for this lot by Clyde E. Phillips. They did not construct a home on this property due to the outbreak of World War II. Robert, due to his employment in public transportation, did not serve with the Armed Services in World War II. On October 18, 1946, they purchased approximately thirty acres bordering on Burch's Creek near the towns of Clinton, also know as Surrattsville, and T.B. in Prince George's County from Joseph H. and M. Pauline Blandford. (Book 873, pg. 483, Land Records of Prince George's County) Over the next three years, hiring private contractors, doing work themselves, and with the help of Robert's brother Deward, they built the two story house designed by Phillips in 1941. They moved to the farm from Capitol Heights in 1949. Robert raised hogs, small grains and a crop of tobacco yearly on this farm and also maintained his job with Capitol Transit (formerly Capitol Traction). In 1954, Robert and Virginia purchased a farm of approximately 150 acres in Island Creek, Calvert County, Maryland. The intention was for Robert and his son to enter into a full time farming operation on expanded acreage. Robert D. Via, known as Delano, graduated from Gwynn Park High School in June 1951. Delano was a part-time farmer and pursued a career as a country and western singer with Bashful Bob and the Rhythm Rangers, he being Bashful Bob. He was employed in various jobs, and began a tour in the Army in 1953. By the time the Via family moved to Calvert County in 1956, he decided to pursue careers other than farming. He eventually traveled and worked in various parts of the United States. He married first Delores Cooper, second Gloria J. Irick, and finally Candice Marinelli in December 1974, they had two children, Robert Marin (1975) and Kirstin Marin (1976).

On June 1, 1956 Robert resigned from his position at Capitol Transit due to health reasons. He and his family moved to the farm in Island Creek, Calvert County where he began full time farming. He and Virginia sold the thirty-acre farm in Prince George's County on June 21, 1956 to Melvin C. and Geraldine H. Rardia. (Book 2003, pg. 564, Land Records of Prince George's County) Virginia continued her employment with Charles of the Ritz. Adina, now a graduate of Gwynn Park High School, was employed by the USAF at Andrews Air Force Base in Camp Springs, Maryland. They both commuted daily from Calvert County to their places of employment.

Robert farmed in Calvert County, raising hogs, cattle, small grains and tobacco. Over the course of the next twenty-seven years, Robert and Virginia sold smaller parcels off the farm. In 1974, Robert and Virginia built a small retirement home designed for them by Calvert Masonry Contractors. Robert died on December 22, 1983. He was buried beside his daughter Adina in Trinity Memorial Gardens. At the time of Robert's death, the farm consisted of 28.694 acres. In 1998, Virginia deeded the remainder of the farm, then less than six acres, to her grandson, Franklin A. Robinson, Jr. who sold all but a one-acre lot in April 1999.

Virginia continued to live on the farm in Calvert County, maintaining a small herd of cattle. In the fall of 1989 Franklin, Jr. went to live with her. In 1993, the onset of Alzheimer's Disease required her to move to Serenity Farm and take up residence with her granddaughter A. Theresa. Virginia participated in various studies on Alzheimer's Disease conducted by the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland beginning in 1992. She was profiled in the September 1997 issue of Washingtonian Magazine. In October of 1998 she moved to All American Senior Care in Brandywine, Maryland and in 1999 she moved to Morningside, an elderly care facility in Waldorf, Maryland. In 2002, she moved to St. Mary's Nursing Center in Leonardtown, Maryland. The remainder of the farm was sold in 1999 and 2002. She died January 14, 2010 and was buried at Trinity Memorial Gardens in Waldorf.

Adina Mae Via was born April 12, 1937 at the Homeopathic Hospital in Washington, D.C.. Adina grew up in Washington, D.C. attending public schools. She moved with her family to the Burch's Creek farm, Prince George's County, in 1949. She enrolled in the Prince George's County school system, and graduated from Gwynn Park High School in June of 1955. After graduation, she was employed by the USAF at Andrews Air Force Base in Camp Springs.

In July of 1956, she moved with her family to the Via farm in Island Creek, Calvert County. On July 27, 1958 she married Franklin A. Robinson at the Chapel of the Incarnation. They had three children: Franklin Alexander (1959), Robert David (1962) and Adina Theresa (1963). In the fall of 1958, she and Franklin took up residence in the home they had built on Ferndale Farm. She resigned from her position with the USAF in 1959.

On December 14, 1966, at Providence Hospital in Washington, DC, Adina died from complications due to Hodgkin's Disease. She had been battling this disease for many years prior to her death. She was buried in Trinity Memorial Gardens, Charles County.
Related Materials:
Materials at Other Organizations

The Maryland Historical Society holds items (costume, farming related implements) related to the Robinson and Via families.
Separated Materials:
Materials at the National Museum of American History

The Division of Work and Industry (Agriculture Collection) holds agricultural implements and artifacts associated with both the Robinson farms and the Via farm; the Division of Home and Community Life holds clothing, textiles (crib quilt), jewelry, cosmetics and Adina M. Robinson's sewing box and dress patterns; (Costume and Textiles Collection). See accession numbers: 1989.0688, 1990.0394, 1991.0010; 1991.0722, 1992.0184, 1992.0283, 1992.0321, 1992.0474, 1992.3106, 1994.0064, 1994.0304, 1997.0327, 1998.0038, 1998.0129, 2001.0196, 2002.0087, 2003.0015, 2005.0009.

Division of Armed Forces History (now Division of Olitical and Military History, National Numismatics Collection) holds the Robert M. Via Trolley Token Collection.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the National Museum of American History, Archives Center, by Franklin A. Robinson, Jr., in November 1993.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but negatives and audiovisuial materials are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Some papers of living persons are restricted. Access to restricted portions may be arranged by request to the donor. Gloves required for unprotected photographs. Viewing film portions of the collection and listening to LP recording requires special appointment. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
The Archives Center does not own exclusive rights to these materials. Copyright for all materials is retained by the donor, Franklin A. Robinson, Jr.; permission for commercial use and/or publication may be requested from the donor through the Archives Center. Military Records for Franklin A. Robinson (b. 1932) and correspondence from Richard I. Damalouji (1961-2014) are restricted; written permission is needed to research these files. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Farms -- Maryland  Search this
Holidays  Search this
Amusement parks -- California  Search this
Children's parties  Search this
Rural women  Search this
Sheep ranches  Search this
Parks -- California  Search this
Rural families  Search this
Tobacco -- Harvesting  Search this
Tobacco -- Storage  Search this
Street-railroads  Search this
Street-railroads -- Employees  Search this
Travel  Search this
Urban transportation  Search this
Work and family  Search this
Tobacco curing  Search this
Women in agriculture  Search this
Farm equipment  Search this
Farm buildings  Search this
Family recreation  Search this
Family festivals  Search this
Farm ownership  Search this
Farm life -- 20th century  Search this
Farm management  Search this
Illiterate persons  Search this
Christmas  Search this
Soldiers  Search this
Students  Search this
Family -- 20th century  Search this
Family farms  Search this
Easter  Search this
Electric railroads  Search this
Acting -- 1980-2000  Search this
Amateur films  Search this
Agricultural machinery  Search this
Agriculture -- 20th century -- Maryland  Search this
Tobacco farmers  Search this
Housewives -- United States  Search this
Weddings  Search this
Farmers  Search this
Dairy farms  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Correspondence -- 1930-1950
Photographs -- 20th century
Postcards
Baby books
Phonograph records
Postcard albums
Ephemera
School yearbooks
Diaries
Albums
Housebooks
Photographs -- 19th century
Snapshots
Home movies
Family papers
Scrapbooks
Funeral registers
Architectural drawings
Citation:
The Robinson and Via Family Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0475
See more items in:
Robinson and Via Family Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep86b1972cf-a789-45ec-8f3e-fb780d43456d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0475
Online Media:

[Robinson and Via family travel]

Collection Collector:
Robinson, Franklin A., Jr., 1959- (actor)  Search this
Extent:
1 Motion picture film (Duration: 22 minutes, 30 seconds, A compilation reel of smaller reels., Camera original; 8mm; Kodacrome reversal)
Container:
Box 26, Item OF475.12, Item See RV475.9
Type:
Archival materials
Motion picture films
Date:
1970-1979
Scope and Contents:
1. Tonto Park and Roosevelt Lake, Arizona, 1970

Persons: Franklin A. Robinson, Jr. and Sr., Robert D. Robinson, A. Theresa Robinson, Margaret T. Lennox, Margaret W. Lennox

Cinematographer: Franklin Robinson, Sr.

2. Disneyland, Anaheim, California, August 1970

Persons: Franklin A. Robinson, Jr. and Sr., Robert D. Robinson, A. Theresa Robinson, Margaret T. Lennox, Margaret W. Lennox

Cinematographer: Franklin Robinson, Sr.

3. Puerto Rico and St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, April 1971

Persons: Franklin A. Robinson, Sr. and Margaret W. Robinson

Cinematographer: Franklin Robinson, Sr., Margaret W. Robinson

4. Via trip to California; Emily Abbott, Glendale, California, December-January,1979-1980 (reel 1)

Persons: Robert M. Via, Ida Virginia Via, Emily Abbott

Cinematographer: Franklin Robinson, Jr.

5. Via trip to California; Emily Abbott, Glendale, California, December-January,1979-1980 (reel 2)

Persons: Robert M. Via, Ida Virginia Via, Emily Abbott

Cinematographer: Franklin Robinson, Jr.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but negatives and audiovisuial materials are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Some papers of living persons are restricted. Access to restricted portions may be arranged by request to the donor. Gloves required for unprotected photographs. Viewing film portions of the collection and listening to LP recording requires special appointment. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
The Archives Center does not own exclusive rights to these materials. Copyright for all materials is retained by the donor, Franklin A. Robinson, Jr.; permission for commercial use and/or publication may be requested from the donor through the Archives Center. Military Records for Franklin A. Robinson (b. 1932) and correspondence from Richard I. Damalouji (1961-2014) are restricted; written permission is needed to research these files. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
The Robinson and Via Family Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
See more items in:
Robinson and Via Family Papers
Robinson and Via Family Papers / Series 7: Audiovisual / 7.2: Travel
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8aca245c5-4683-4939-90fd-942b76c5efd5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0475-ref370

Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished

Creator:
Tamarin, Alfred H.  Search this
Extent:
425 Negatives (photographic) (black and white, 35mm, 120 film)
65 Photographic prints (black and white, 8x10)
Culture:
Passamaquoddy  Search this
Mashpee Wampanoag  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Cayuga [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)]  Search this
Mohawk [Akwesasne (St. Regis), Hogansburg, New York]  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Nanticoke [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)]  Search this
Pamunkey  Search this
Chickahominy  Search this
Eastern Band of Cherokee  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Southeast  Search this
Mid-Atlantic  Search this
Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Copy prints
Date:
1970-1971
Summary:
The Alfred Tamarin photograph collection consists of negatives and contact prints shot by Tamarin in 1971 during research for his publication We Have not Vanished: Eastern Indians of the United States. Tamarin made photographs among the Passamaquoddy, Mashpee Wampanoag, Narragansett, Cayuga [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)], Mohawk [Akwesasne (St. Regis), Hogansburg, New York], Seneca, Lenape (Delaware), Nanticoke, Pamunkey, Chickahominy and Eastern Band of Cherokee communities, capturing both events and craftspeople at work.
Scope and Contents:
The Alfred Tamarin photograph collection consists of negatives and contact prints shot by Tamarin during research for his publication We Have not Vanished: Eastern Indians of the United States. In addition to Tamarins own photographs there are also 8x10 black and white prints from other sources used in the same publication.

Series 1: Reasearch Negatives includes photographic negatives made by Tamarin which were shot on 35mm film and 120 (6x6) film and have accompanying contact sheets. Most of the negatives were shot in 1971 along the east coast of the United States in Maine, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia as well as in Ontario, Canada and at the Heard Fair in Phoenix, Arizona. Tamarin made photographs among the Passamaquoddy, Mashpee Wampanoag, Narragansett, Cayuga [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)], Mohawk [Akwesasne (St. Regis), Hogansburg, New York], Seneca, Lenape (Delaware), Nanticoke, Pamunkey, Chickahominy and Eastern Band of Cherokee communities, capturing both events and craftspeople at work.

Events of note photographed include--the Monroe Powwow sponsored by Lenape (Delaware) Chief Earl Two Bears and a Narragansett anniversary celebration. There are also several photographs featuring Chief Jake Thomas (Ha-da-jib-ghen-ta [Descending Cloud]/Jacob Ezra Thomas) and his daughter Donna Thomas during a mask making demonstration in Brantford, Ontario. At the time, Chief Thomas was a museum preparator at the Mohawk Indian Woodland Indian Cultural.

Series 2: Publication Prints includes 65 8x10 black and white photographic prints and copy prints. Subseries 2.1 includes 19 prints from Tamarin's negatives that can be found in Series 1. Subseries 2.2 includes copy prints requested from outside photographer and institutions for use in We Have Not Vanished. These include photographs from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Florida News Bureau, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Maine State Highway Commission, and National Anthropological Archives (Smithsonian Institution).
Arrangement:
Arranged in two series. Series 1: Research Negatives and Series 2: Publication Prints.
Biographical / Historical:
Alfred Tamarin (1913-1980) was born in New York to parents Abraham and Fannie. Tamarin worked in publicity and advertising for theatre and film until the 1960s. During that time he worked for the Theatre Guild, United Artists Corporation and was also a founder and vice president of In Flight Motion Pictures Inc. After marrying his second wife Shirley Glubok in 1968, Alfred began his second career as a photographer for a series of art books written by Shirley. Alfred also wrote several books himself including We Have not Vanished: Eastern Indians of the United States (1974). We Have not Vanished was illustrated with photographs taken by Alfred in 1970-1971 among several Native American communities along the East Coast of the United States. Other books written by the Tamarins include Ancient Indians of the Southwest (1975), The Art of the Plains Indians (1975), Voyaging to Cathay (1976), among many others. Shirley Glubok Tamarin donated Alfred's materials related to We Have not Vanished to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye foundation in 1985 following Alfred's death in 1980.
Provenance:
Gift of Shirley Glubok Tamarin, 1985.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.

Images in Subseries 2.2: Copy prints from other sources are not owned by the National Museum of the American Indian.
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Negatives
Copy prints
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished, image #, NMAI.AC.376; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.376
See more items in:
Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4e3e6f8d7-c04d-46c3-989e-ccf7043e6b93
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-376

Odetta

Artist:
Otto Hagel, 12 Mar 1909 - 18 Jan 1973  Search this
Sitter:
Odetta, 31 Dec 1930 - 2 Dec 2008  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
Image/Sheet: 34 × 26.4 cm (13 3/8 × 10 3/8")
Mount: 50.9 × 40.7 cm (20 1/16 × 16")
Mat: 71.1 × 55.9 cm (28 × 22")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
1964
Topic:
Costume\Jewelry\Earring  Search this
Interior  Search this
Costume\Jewelry\Ring  Search this
Music\Musical instrument\Guitar  Search this
Odetta: Female  Search this
Odetta: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Composer  Search this
Odetta: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Activist\Civil rights activist  Search this
Odetta: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Odetta: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Guitarist  Search this
Odetta: Performing Arts\Performer\Musician\Singer\Folk  Search this
Odetta: Grammy  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.89.188
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
20th Century Americans: 1930-1960
On View:
NPG, South Gallery 321
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm441432686-b5af-4b30-9ec2-664c27ff0477
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.89.188

Esta Nesbitt papers

Topic:
Everyman (motion picture)
Creator:
Nesbitt, Esta  Search this
Names:
Parsons School of Design -- Faculty  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Xerox Corporation  Search this
Ambert, Anibal  Search this
Beckett, Samuel, 1906-1989  Search this
Einstein, Albert, 1879-1955  Search this
English, Merle  Search this
Ginsberg, Allen, 1926-  Search this
Leder, Alan J.  Search this
Lyle, David  Search this
Wood, R. F.  Search this
Extent:
10.05 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sketches
Transcripts
Diaries
Sound recordings
Photographs
Date:
circa 1942-1981
bulk 1964-1975
Summary:
The papers of illustrator, xerography artist, filmmaker, and educator Esta Nesbitt measure 10.05 linear feet and date from circa 1942-1981. Found within the papers are biographical material, correspondence, writings, xerography research files, project and exhibition files, and printed material. Much of the collection relates to Nesbitt's xerography art work. Additionally, the collection includes motion picture film and sound recordings related to her film and performance work.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of illustrator, xerography artist, filmmaker, and educator Esta Nesbitt measure 10.05 linear feet and date from circa 1942-1981. Found within the papers are biographical material, correspondence, writings, xerography research files, project and exhibition files, and printed material. Much of the collection relates to Nesbitt's xerography art work. Additionally, the collection includes motion picture film and sound recordings related to her film and performance work.

Nesbitt's primary collaborators, correspondents, and subjects of investigation are not concentrated in any one series but rather recur throughout the collection. Nesbitt worked closely with Anibal Ambert, Merle English at Xerox Corporation, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. She read and wrote about the accrual of information, Albert Einstein, Asian religion and philosophy, communication, computer technology, documentation practices, energy, psychology, Samuel Beckett, and states of consciousness. Chinese characters and an image of Allen Ginsberg appear repeatedly in Nesbitt's works. Subjects of study and experimentation include 3M and Kodak technologies, color, film, morphology, participatory and performance art, shadows, sound, street works, xerography, and Xerox machines.

Biographical material revolves mostly around Nesbitt's work as a professor at Parsons School of Design. Records include Nesbitt's resumé, an exhibition history, motion picture film of the inside of her studio, and teaching files.

Correspondence contains personal letters from family members, and professional correspondence with fellow artists and employees of Xerox Corporation. Much of the series is correspondence between Nesbitt and fellow artists Alan Leder, David Lyle, and R.E. Wood, and is philosophical in nature. Correspondence with Xerox Corporation documents her relationship with the corporation between 1970 and 1972, when they underwrote her experiments in xerography.

Writings include illustrated journals, journals, notebooks, loose notes, and transcripts. The content of the writings varies widely throughout the series and includes artwork, sketches, diagrams, annotated clippings, transcripts of conversations, Nesbitt's writings about her dreams and family, details about her daily life, and notes about artists' materials, film, and sound.

Xerography Research Files document Nesbitt's experiments with xerography, which she often refers to in her papers as "Xerox Xplore." Contents include Nesbitt's definitions of xerography terms; Xerox equipment brochures; clippings; xerography studies; notebooks about Nesbitt's plans, work with color, and xerography study details; and slides and transparencies of completed xerography prints.

Project and Exhibition Files consist of a variety of documentation related to Nesbitt's books, exhibitions, films, performance and participatory art, and other projects. This series contains the bulk of the collection's motion picture films and sound recordings. The film and sound performance piece titled "Everyman as Anyman, or Putting On, On, On, On, On," the piece Walk Up --Tape On, the film "Light Times 499," and exhibitions of Nesbitt's xerography work and her series of work called Shadow Paintings are the most prominent subjects of the series.

Printed Material includes books, clippings, magazines, exhibition announcements, catalogs, and press releases about Nesbitt's interests, artwork, exhibitions, and galleries that exhibited her work. Some of the material is annotated.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 6 series:

Missing Title

Biographical Materials, 1964-circa 1981 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1, 11)

Correspondence, 1942, 1964-1976 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1, OV 14)

Writings, 1959-circa 1973 (1.3 linear feet; Box 1-2, 12, OV 15)

Xerography Research Files, circa 1966-1974 (2.5 linear feet; Box 2-4, 11, OV 16)

Project and Exhibition Files, circa 1966-1981 (5.2 linear feet, Box 4-8, 11, 13, OV 17-19, 21, FC 22-23)

Printed Material, 1942-circa 1944, circa 1963-1977 (0.9 linear feet; Box 9-10, OV 20)
Biographical / Historical:
Esta Nesbitt (1918-1975) was an illustrator, xerography artist, filmmaker, and educator who lived and worked in New York City. She was a fashion illustrator for about two decades before becoming a children's book illustrator, performance artist, xerography artist, and filmmaker.

Nesbitt taught at Parsons School of Design from 1964 to 1974. Around 1970, Nesbitt created the piece Walk Up --Tape On with her Parsons students. The piece involved documenting social interaction by taping themselves to each other and then others as they walked through New York City, creating what Nesbitt called a "living organism," before presenting themselves to the Whitney Museum of American Art. The event was documented with film, photography, and audio recordings.

In 1970, Nesbitt contacted Xerox Corporation about creating experimental art investigations of the Walk Up --Tape On documentation using Xerox machines in their New York City office. During Nesbitt's time at Xerox, she experimented with many different copying machines, materials, and techniques to create what came to be known as xerographic artworks. She invented three xerography techniques: transcapsa, photo-transcapsa, and chromacapsa. A transcapsa work is created by moving a piece of material over the copier's window during the printing cycle. A photo-transcapsa work is created by moving a photographic image over the copier's window during the printing cycle. Chromacapsa is a process of adding color to xerographic works using Xerox copiers. Nesbitt referred to her work at Xerox as "Xerox Xplore," which culminated with the exhibition "Xerography - Extensions in Art" (1971-1972) and the commission of the print All the Lines are Nines.

To demonstrate "the media bombardment surrounding 'everyman' today," Nesbitt created a film and sound performance piece titled "Everyman as Anyman, or Putting On, On, On, On, On" in 1969. The performance consisted of five Super 8 film projectors and a multi-layered soundtrack. Nesbitt further experimented with filmmaking and xerography with the films "Folding/Struck" and "Light Times 499," which was created with Anibal Ambert. Her interest in xerography is further illustrated in the exhibition "Electrostatic Structures: 'New Morphs'" (1972-1973). The exhibition "1000 Empty 49.3 Grams: A participatory environment" was a culmination of her interest in participatory art.

Nesbitt died November 30, 1975 in New York City. Three posthumous exhibitions include "Esta Nesbitt: Xerography Prints" (1976) at The Art Center of Waco, "Memorial Exhibition of Drawing and Illustrations by Esta Nesbitt" (1977) at Parsons School of Design, and "Electroworks" (1979-1981) at the George Eastman House.
Related Materials:
The Esta Nesbitt papers at Center for Creative Photography at University of Arizona contain 3 linear feet related to her xerography artwork and exhibitions, dated 1966-1983.

Papers related to Nesbitt's fashion illustrations are found at the Kellen Design Archives at The New School in New York City. T

he Esta Nesbitt papers at the University of Minnesota Libraries Children's Literature Research Collections are related to Nesbitt's children's book illustrations, dated 1964-1969.
Provenance:
The Esta Nesbitt papers were donated by Saul Nesbitt, her husband, to the Archives of American Art in 1981.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Motion pictures (visual works)  Search this
Filmmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Xerography  Search this
Copy art  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women filmmakers  Search this
Women illustrators  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Transcripts
Diaries
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Esta Nesbitt papers, circa 1942-circa 1981, bulk 1964-1975. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.nesbesta
See more items in:
Esta Nesbitt papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c57916c9-f891-4116-a32d-d1f4e83c624f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-nesbesta
Online Media:

Phil Lucas videotape collection

Creator:
Lucas, Phil, 1942-2007  Search this
Producer:
Phil Lucas Productions  Search this
Donor:
Lucas, Mary Lou, Mrs.  Search this
Extent:
710 Items (312 Betacams, 135 BetacamSPs, 146 Umatics, 50 1inch open reels, 39 MiniDVs, 9 16 mms, 6 DVCams 3 Digibetas 3 16 mm mag tracks 1 2 inch quad, 1 D2, 1 Video8, 2 archival boxes of production materials )
Additional Preservation of film required.
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1977-2006
Summary:
The Phil Lucas collection contains film and video from Lucas's prolific career as a Native American filmaker. Spanning from the late 1970's until 2006, this collection mostly contains videotapes of various formats as well as a small amount of film and manuscript material.
Scope and Contents:
The Phil Lucas Collection consists of recordings made by Phil Lucas Productions, Inc. These include Umatic, Betacam, Digital Betacam, DVCam, MiniDV, 1-inch Type C, and 2-inch Quad video formats, as well as 16mm and 16mm mag-track motion picture film. The collection also includes one archival box of containing related production materials from Looking Good, Walking with Grandfather, Hamilton's Quest, and other works, and ten floppy disks, and a notebook of production materials from Restoring the Sacred Circle.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into seventy series, based on specific productions or bodies of work. Some series are further divided into subseries. The series are arranged alphabetically with the miscellaneous videos and manuscript material at the end of the collection.
Biographical / Historical:
Phil Lucas (Choctaw) is known as a leading Native American filmmaker, and has over 100 films to his credit, playing the roles of writer, director, producer, actor, and cultural content advisor. Born in Phoenix, Arizona in 1942, Lucas was a musician in New York in the early 1960's before attending Western Washington University in 1967, graduating in 1970 with his degree in visual communications. In 1980, he formed Phil Lucas Productions, beginning a prolific film career.

Lucas's films have been honored with multiple awards and honored at several film festivals. Images of Indians, a five-part PBS series hosted by Will Sampson that explores Indian stereotypes portrayed in Hollywood westerns, won the Special Achievement Award in Documentary Film in 1980 from the American Indian Film Institute, and the Prix Italia Award in 1981. His documentaries Allan Houser/Haozous: The Lifetime Works of an American Master, an hour-long documentary on the life and work of Apache artist Allan Houser, and The Honour of All, a two part documentary on the successful rehabilitation from alcoholism by the Alkali Lake Band of British Columbia, were both official selections of the Sundance Film Festival's Native Forum in 1999, where he was also honored for his body of work. The Houser documentary was also awarded the Best Documentary Award at the Santa Fe Film Festival, the Taos Mountain Award at the Taos Talking Pictures Film Festival in 1999, and the Red Earth Film Festival's Best Long-Form Documentary award in 1998. In 1993, American Indian Dance Theatre: Dances for the New Generation, a one-hour documentary part of WNET's Great Performances Series, won the Red Earth Film Festival's "Best of Show" award, and received a National Emmy nomination. The following year, Lucas directed a two-hour episode of the three-part The Native American Series for Turner Broadcasting System, which was awarded the National Emmy for Series. In 1999, Lucas was given the Taos Mountain Award for Lifetime Achievement by the Taos Talking Picture Festival.

His other awards include Best Animated Short Subject Award from the American Indian Film Institute for The Great Wolf and Little Mouse Sister and Walking with Grandfather (1984), Best Short Documentary from the Two Rivers Film Festival for I'm Not Afraid of Me (1990), Best Long Documentary from the Two Rivers Film Festival for Voyage of Rediscovery (1990), Best of Festival Award from the Dream Speakers International Film Festival for Story Tellers of the Pacific (1996), and Best Public Service Award from the American Indian Film Festival in San Francisco for Restoring the Sacred Circle (2002).

In addition to his success as a producer and a director of documentaries, Lucas also worked as a producer, writer, advisor, and actor for several television and stage productions. In 1984 he co-wrote Night of the First Americans, a stage presentation by the Council of Energy Resource Tribes, which was performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. In 1993, he co-produced Broken Chain, a feature-length film for Turner Network Television based on the history of the Iroquois Confederacy starring Graham Green, Buffy St. Marie, and Pierce Brosnan, a film which he also appeared in as an actor in the role of Iroquois Sachem. He also served as an advisor of cultural content on television shows such as MacGyver and Northern Exposure, on which he appeared in small roles in the early 1990's.

Lucas also taught throughout much of his career. He has taught at the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation in Seattle, WA; the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, NM, where he also served as the head of the Department of Communication Arts; the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada; and Bellevue Community College in Bellevue, WA, where he was the driving force in coordinating an American Indian Film Festival in 2003, and continued to teach until his death in 2007.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Mrs. Mary Lou Lucas in 2010.
Restrictions:
This collection is closed to researchers until the films have been digitized.
Rights:
Researchers must contact copyright holders directly for permission to reproduce published materials. The National Museum of the American Indian cannot grant permission to use or reproduce copyrighted materials.
Topic:
Indians in motion pictures -- Social conditions  Search this
Motion pictures  Search this
Indian motion picture producers and directors -- United States  Search this
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.020
See more items in:
Phil Lucas videotape collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4eaa2eb6e-3147-4523-8db3-c59f03c72262
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-020

Spencer Tracy

Artist:
Louise Dahl-Wolfe, 19 Nov 1895 - 11 Dec 1989  Search this
Sitter:
Spencer Bonaventure Tracy, 5 Apr 1900 - 10 Jun 1967  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
Image: 34.3cm x 27cm (13 1/2" x 10 5/8"), Accurate
Sheet: 35.3cm x 28.1cm (13 7/8" x 11 1/16"), Accurate
Type:
Photograph
Place:
United States\California\Los Angeles\Los Angeles\Hollywood
Date:
1942
Topic:
Costume\Dress Accessory\Neckwear\Tie\Necktie  Search this
Spencer Bonaventure Tracy: Male  Search this
Spencer Bonaventure Tracy: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor  Search this
Spencer Bonaventure Tracy: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
Spencer Bonaventure Tracy: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Spencer Bonaventure Tracy: Oscar  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.93.351
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm44f53bb25-b06e-4ffd-9024-83edfe4d5907
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.93.351

Episode 312

Collection Producer:
Lodge, Arthur  Search this
Arthur Lodge Productions.  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Association of Manufacturers  Search this
Extent:
1 Motion picture film
Container:
Reel AC0507-OF0312
Type:
Archival materials
Moving Images
Motion picture films
Date:
1956 October 6
Scope and Contents:
Michigan Studying chickens helps defeat some human ailments due to faulty diet. Finds that cholesterol is bad for the heart. Poultry; health. UpJohn Co., Kalamazoo, MI.

Kentucky Manufacturing, assembling, and inspecting protective domes for airplane hangars. Irving Air Chute Co., Lexington, KY.

Arizona Cactus craft of Arizona uses dead cactus. Furniture shaped like covered wagons made from cactus; horticulture. Cactus Craft Co., Tucson, AZ.

New York Company moves without stopping production. Neptune Storage, New York, NY.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the films are stored off-site. Special arrangements must be made directly with the Archives Center staff to view episodes for which no reference copy exists. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees will be charged for reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Industry on Parade Film Collection, 1950-1959, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Industry on Parade Film Collection
Industry on Parade Film Collection / Series 1: Motion Picture Films
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep838876603-5f8f-4b10-b57e-187ad3db5a79
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0507-ref599

Episode 313

Collection Producer:
Lodge, Arthur  Search this
Arthur Lodge Productions.  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Association of Manufacturers  Search this
Extent:
1 Motion picture film
Container:
Reel AC0507-OF0313
Type:
Archival materials
Moving Images
Motion picture films
Date:
1956 October 13
Scope and Contents:
New Jersey Magnesium and iron mixed together make virtually new metal. Using photomicrographs to study the metal and its strength. International Nickel Co., Bayonne, NJ.

Arizona Charcoal made from mesquite trees. Horticulture; food industry. Southwest Chemical Co., Tucson, AZ.

Kansas Frozen food in natural icebox costs less to operate because it is naturally cold. Inland Cold Storage Co., Kansas City, KS.

Ohio A ship can be operated with radio waves by using remote-controlled transmitter. Hobby Harbor, Columbus, OH.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the films are stored off-site. Special arrangements must be made directly with the Archives Center staff to view episodes for which no reference copy exists. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees will be charged for reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Industry on Parade Film Collection, 1950-1959, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Industry on Parade Film Collection
Industry on Parade Film Collection / Series 1: Motion Picture Films
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8a989f8c8-a154-4528-926c-03bcaffad895
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0507-ref601

Episode 314

Collection Producer:
Lodge, Arthur  Search this
Arthur Lodge Productions.  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Association of Manufacturers  Search this
Extent:
1 Motion picture film
Container:
Reel AC0507-OF0314
Box 6, Tape AC0507-MV0314
Type:
Archival materials
Moving Images
Motion picture films
Date:
1956
Scope and Contents:
Indiana Company makes components of a house. New mass production home-building techniques; construction industry. National Homes Corporation, Lafayette, IN.

Ohio Making a crate which can stretch, hold liquid. Used in washing surfaces. Cincinnati Industries, Inc., Cincinnati, OH.

Arizona Producing air coolers cheaper and easier than air-conditioners. Wright Manufacturing Co., Phoenix, AZ.

New York Company makes weather seals for windows. Company first produced fringe for women's skirts. As skirts shortened, company changed products. Schlegel Co., Rochester, NY.

Reference video, Box 12
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the films are stored off-site. Special arrangements must be made directly with the Archives Center staff to view episodes for which no reference copy exists. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees will be charged for reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Industry on Parade Film Collection, 1950-1959, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Industry on Parade Film Collection
Industry on Parade Film Collection / Series 1: Motion Picture Films
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8b7654d95-4e2b-45a8-88bb-b3f5521cf7c4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0507-ref603

Episode 334

Collection Producer:
Lodge, Arthur  Search this
Arthur Lodge Productions.  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Association of Manufacturers  Search this
Extent:
1 Motion picture film
Container:
Reel AC0507-OF0334
Type:
Archival materials
Moving Images
Motion picture films
Date:
1957 March 9
Scope and Contents:
Massachusetts Henry Ellis Warren invented synchronous electric clock. Regulated by pulsations from electric current without connecting cord. General Electric Telechron, Ashland, MA.

Oregon Raising, pruning, and packaging holly. Brownell Farms, Milwaukie, OR.

New York Making dies from which castings are formed. Training die-makers. Precision Castings Division, Harsco Corp., Fayetteville, NY.

Arizona Modified "Kaibabs" (shoes made by Hopi Indians from Spanish conquistador design) used as modern sportswear. Tucson, AR.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the films are stored off-site. Special arrangements must be made directly with the Archives Center staff to view episodes for which no reference copy exists. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees will be charged for reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Industry on Parade Film Collection, 1950-1959, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Industry on Parade Film Collection
Industry on Parade Film Collection / Series 1: Motion Picture Films
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep894188eea-9272-4940-a956-adc0837669a9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0507-ref643

Episode 368

Collection Producer:
Lodge, Arthur  Search this
Arthur Lodge Productions.  Search this
Collection Creator:
National Association of Manufacturers  Search this
Extent:
1 Motion picture film
Container:
Reel AC0507-OF0368
Type:
Archival materials
Moving Images
Motion picture films
Date:
1957 November 2
Scope and Contents:
Arizona Developing an air motor powered by jet exhaust to reduce jet speed after landing. Airsearch Division, Garrett Corp., Phoenix, AZ.

South Carolina A cafeteria on wheels, a "Mobilteria," used to deliver meals to hospital patients. Developed by staff of McLeod Infirmary. Hood Gardner Hotel Supply Corp., Florence, SC.

Minnesota Assembling fishing rods using parts manufactured by other firms. Subcontracting to other small businesses. Denison-Johnson, Mankato, MN.

Connecticut Welcoming families to new community and company. Company hostesses greet wives and help locate babysitters and Laundromats. Electric Boat Division, General Dynamics Corp., Groton, CT.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the films are stored off-site. Special arrangements must be made directly with the Archives Center staff to view episodes for which no reference copy exists. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees will be charged for reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Industry on Parade Film Collection, 1950-1959, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Industry on Parade Film Collection
Industry on Parade Film Collection / Series 1: Motion Picture Films
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8c7c82503-a322-41b9-82cf-425766028fc3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0507-ref707

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Contracts
Photographic prints
Audiocassettes
Negatives
Video recordings
Notes
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Correspondence
Videotapes
Digital images
Date:
July 1-4, 1967
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1967 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Fieldwork

Series 3: Photographs

Series 4: Audio

Series 5: Video
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1967 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Division of Performing Arts.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
In 1966, Smithsonian Secretary S. Dillon Ripley engaged James R. Morris to serve as Director of Museum Services, soon to become a new Division of Performing Arts. Ripley charged Morris to develop a full program of performances on the National Mall - sound and light show, readings and concerts, films, live demonstrations, and special exhibitions. Morris, who had previously organized the American Folk Festival in Asheville, North Carolina, in 1963, proposed that the Smithsonian host a folk festival as the centerpiece of the outdoors activities. Through the Asheville festival, Morris had come into contact with key people involved in the Newport Folk Festival, among them Alan Lomax. It was Lomax who suggested that the Smithsonian hire Newport's then-director of field programs, Ralph C. Rinzler, to help plan a Smithsonian festival. The term "folklife", drawn from Scandinavian usage, was chosen over "folk" as the name of the new Festival.

The first Festival of American Folklife was held July 1-4, 1967 in two tents - one for crafts and one for sales - a music stage, and a performance area on the terrace of the Museum of History and Technology (later, the National Museum of American History). Fifty-eight traditional craftspeople and thirty-two musical and dance groups from throughout the United States demonstrated and performed at the first open-air event. Mountain banjo-pickers and ballad singers, Chinese lion dancers, Indian sand painters, basket and rug weavers, New Orleans jazz bands and a Bohemian hammer dulcimer band from east Texas combined with the host of participants from many rural and urban areas of the U.S. The entire event was free to the public, the expense of the production having been borne by the Smithsonian aided by numerous civic and cultural organizations, business enterprises and State Arts Councils.

The 1967 Festival drew a huge crowd - estimated at more than 400,000 - and strong interest from the press, Members of Congress, and Smithsonian leadership. In the Smithsonian's annual report for 1967, Ripley reflected on the success of the Festival:

Within - in the Museum - the tools, the products of craft work, the musical instruments hang suspended in cases, caught in beautifully petrified isolation. Without, for the space of a few hours they came alive in the hands of specialists from all over America.... It was a moving spectacle and one that underscored the principle that a museum, to be a museum in the best sense of the word, must live and breathe both within and without.

The 1967 Festival marked the inception of a fresh attempt at the evaluation, documentation and celebration of a hitherto unrecognized area of vigorous American expression. Concurrent with the first Festival, an American Folklife Conference was organized (with assistance from Henry Glassie) to address topics of American and international folklife studies, the relationship between folklife and history, applied folklife, and folklife in schools, museums, communities, and government agencies.

The Festival was organized by the Division of Performing Arts, under the direction of James R. Morris. Ralph Rinzler was the Applied Folklore Consultant and Festival Artistic Director, and Marian A. Hope was Project Assistant. No program book or schedule was published, but news articles, congressional remarks, letters from the public, and a list of participants were later compiled in lieu of a program book. That document can be viewed in Series 1.
Participants:
Crafts

Harry Belone, 1912-1986, Navajo sand painter, Arizona

Herman Benton, 1914-1994, scoop maker, New York

Mary Bowers, 1922-2002, Seminole patchwork, needlework, Florida

Marie Z. Chino, 1907-1982, Acoma pottery, New Mexico

Mildred Cleghorn, 1910-1997, Indian cloth dolls, Oklahoma

Maisy Coburn, apple face and corncob dolls, Arkansas

Margaret Coochwytewa, 1923-1995, Hopi, coil and yucca leaves basket maker, Arizona

Victor Coochwytewa, 1922-2011, Hopi silversmith, Arizona

Freedom Quilting Bee, Alabama

Taft Greer, 1908-1986, weaver, Tennessee

Joseph Grismayer, 1888-1970, willow basket maker, Pennsylvania

Dewey Harmon, 1900-1972, whittler, North Carolina

Bea Hensley, 1919-2013, blacksmith, North Carolina

Louise Jones, 1910-1973, coil basket making, South Carolina

Robert Keith, chair maker, North Carolina

Mrs. Robert Keith, chair maker, North Carolina

Norman Kennedy, 1934-, carder, spinner, weaver, Massachusetts

Clifford Lucas, Indian dolls, New Mexico

Lila Suzanne Marshall, 1908-1994, corn shuck dolls, North Carolina

Charles Mayac, 1906-1971, ivory carver, Alaska

Leo J. Meyer, scrimshaw carver, Maryland

Alice Merryman, 1906-2007, corn shuck dolls, Arkansas

Norman Miller, 1905-1972, southern pottery, Alabama

Mrs. Norman Miller, southern pottery, Alabama

Hazel Miracle, 1915-2001, apple face, corn shuck dolls, Kentucky

Homer Miracle, 1910-1980, hand-hewn bowls, carver, Kentucky

Ann Mitchell, corn shuck dolls, Maryland

Golda Porter, spinner, North Carolina

Edd Presnell, 1916-1994, dulcimer maker, North Carolina

Ambrose Roanhorse, 1904-1982, Navajo silversmith, Arizona

Garnet Claw Roanhorse, 1911-1999, Navajo rug weaver, Arizona

Georgianne Robinson, 1917-1985, Osage ribbon work, needlework, Oklahoma

Lou Sesher, 1915-1989, model boat builder, Pennsylvania

Genevieve Tomey, Osage ribbon work, needlework, Oklahoma

Elisia Trivett, rug hooker, North Carolina

Ora Watson, 1909-2004, quilting, North Carolina

Willard Watson, 1905-1994, toy maker, North Carolina

Music

The Baca Family Band, Czech-American polka music, Texas

Libba Cotten, Country guitarist, North Carolina, Washington, D.C.

Dejan's Olympia Brass Brand, New Orleans marching band, Louisiana

Jimmie Driftwood, Ozark ballad singer, Arkansas

First Maryland Regiment Fife and Drum Corps, martial music, Maryland

John Jackson, Songster and blues singer, Virginia

Bessie Jones (1902-1984) and the Georgia Sea Island Singers, shouts, jubilees, spirituals, and ring games, Georgia

Norman Kennedy, Scots ballad singer, Massachusetts

Clark Kessinger, 1896-1975, mountain fiddler, West Virginia

Vinice Lejeune (1919-1993) Group, Cajun band, Louisiana

The McGee Brothers with Sid Harkreader, String band, Tennessee

Sam McGee, 1894-1975

Kirk McGee, 1899-1983

Gene Meade, West Virginia

The Moving Star Hall Singers, shouts, jubilees, spirituals, and ring games, South Carolina

Glenn Ohrlin, cowboy singer, Arkansas

Grace Papakee, 1907-1982, Mesquakie Indian music, Iowa

John Papakee, 1895-1981, Mesquakie Indian music, Iowa

Billie Pierce (1907-1974) and De De Pierce (1904-1973) and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, New Orleans jazz, Louisiana

Almeda Riddle, Ozark ballad singer, Arkansas

Scottish Pipe Band, highland marching music, Washington, D.C.

Wade Ward (1892-1971) and the Buck Mountain Band, mountain string band, Virginia

Yomo Toro Band, Puerto Rican music, New York

Ed Young (1910-1972), G.D. Young and Lonnie Young (1903-1976), African American fife and drum group, Mississippi

Young People's Chorus from the Scripture of Church of Christ, gospel, Virginia

Dance

Blue Ridge Mountain Dancers, cloggers, North Carolina

Chinese Lion Group, Washington, D.C.

Maurice Flowers, square dance caller, Maryland

Los Gallegos d'Espana, Galician dance, New York

Glinka Dancers, Russian dance group, New Jersey

Jochim Koyuk, King Island Eskimo dancer, Alaska

Mrs. Jochim Koyuk, King Island Eskimo dancer, Alaska

McNeff Dancers, Irish dancing with Ceilidh band, New York

Henry Paterick, square dance caller, Virginia

St. Andrews Society Group, Scottish dancing, Washington, D.C.
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Folklore  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Food habits  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk music  Search this
World music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Contracts
Photographic prints
Audiocassettes
Negatives
Video recordings
Notes
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Correspondence
Videotapes
Digital images
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections , Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1967
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1967 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk529e94ea3-000d-4513-b130-8a8ea3e935bd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1967

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Audiotapes
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Memorandums
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Videotapes
Audiocassettes
Business records
Negatives
Sound recordings
Slides (photographs)
Contracts
Video recordings
Date:
June 28-July 7, 1991
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1991 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: Family Farming in the Heartland

Series 3: Forest, Field and Sea: Folklife in Indonesia

Series 4: Land in Native American Cultures

Series 5: Roots of Rhythm and Blues: The Robert Johnson Era
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1991 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Office of Folklife Programs and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 1991 Festival programs were largely about human relationships to land. Indonesian land punctuates sea and ocean to form some 13,000 volcanic islands. On these islands is an amazing diversity of environments, ranging from the sandy beaches of Sumatra to snowcapped mountains that rise above the rainforests in Irian Jaya on New Guinea. To sample this diversity, the Festival presented cultural traditions from three particular environments - the forests of Kalimantan, the fields of Java, and the sea coast of Sulawesi. Half a world away from Indonesia and much closer to home is the American "heartland." American culture embodies a few elemental self-images with mythic stature - the frontier is surely one; the family farm is surely another. The idea of the family farm also entails some of our strongest values - hard work, self-reliance, family solidarity, and community life, all on view to Festival visitors.

For millennia before Columbus's arrival in the New World, native peoples gathered and cultivated its bounty, bred new crops, derived medicines to cure sickness, mined ores for making tools and ornaments, used its earth, stone and wood for building homes, made dyes for cloth, and invented ways of preparing and cooking food. Land and its use informed social, moral, religious, and cosmological beliefs, and sacred and secular practices. Some of this knowledge and practice of land use and its symbolic elaboration in artistic forms are continued among many Native American groups. At the Festival, culture bearers from the Haida, Tlingit, and Tsimshian people from Alaska; Hopi from Arizona; Maya and Lacandón from Chiapas, Mexico; Zapotec and Ikood from Oaxaca, Mexico; Shuar and Achuar from Ecuador; Jalq'a and Tiwanaku from Bolivia; and Taquile from Peru illustrated how the land in many varied environments is cared for and thought about, and how, almost five hundred years after Columbus, the wise and humane use, the knowledge and power of land must be re-"discovered."

The 1991 Festival, which also featured a program on the roots of rhythm and blues, took place for two four-day weeks (June 28-July 1 and July 4-7) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

The 1991 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays on each of the four programs were supplemented by shorter pieces focusing on particular topics.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Office of Folklife Programs.

Office of Folklife Programs

Richard Kurin, Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Director, Folkways Records; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Olivia Cadaval, Director, Quincentenary Projects; Richard Kennedy, Program Analyst; Betty Belanus, Vivian Chen, Diana N'Diaye, Folklorists; Marjorie Hunt, Ed O'Reilly, Frank Proschan, Nicholas Spitzer, Research Associates; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Jeffrey Place, Archivist

Folklife Advisory Council

Roger Abrahams, Richard Bauman, Henry Glassie, Rayna Green, John Gwaltney, Charlotte Heth, Adrienne Kaeppler, Ivan Karp, Bernice Reagon, John Tchen, Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez

National Park Service

James M. Ridenour, Director; Robert G. Stanton, Regional Director, National Capital Region
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk art  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Memorandums
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Digital images
Videotapes
Audiocassettes
Business records
Negatives
Sound recordings
Slides (photographs)
Contracts
Video recordings
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1991
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5d98aecba-6aa1-482c-ac66-da49e3e1f4e8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1991

Esta Nesbitt papers, circa 1942-1981, bulk 1964-1975

Creator:
Nesbitt, Esta, 1918-1975  Search this
Subject:
Leder, Alan J.  Search this
Lyle, David  Search this
Beckett, Samuel  Search this
Einstein, Albert  Search this
Wood, R. F.  Search this
English, Merle  Search this
Ambert, Anibal  Search this
Ginsberg, Allen  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Parsons School of Design  Search this
Xerox Corporation  Search this
Type:
Sketches
Transcripts
Diaries
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Esta Nesbitt papers, circa 1942-1981, bulk 1964-1975. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Everyman (motion picture)  Search this
Motion pictures (visual works)  Search this
Filmmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Xerography  Search this
Copy art  Search this
Illustrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Women filmmakers  Search this
Women illustrators  Search this
Women educators  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8079
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210250
AAA_collcode_nesbesta
Theme:
Women
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210250
Online Media:

Audiovisual materials relating to the documentary Beatrice Wood: Mama of Dada, 1990-1993

Creator:
Neff, Tom, 1953-  Search this
Subject:
Clark, Garth  Search this
Del Vecchio, Mark  Search this
D'Harnoncourt, Anne  Search this
Huglin, Hugh  Search this
Naumann, Francis M.  Search this
Perreault, John  Search this
Pole, Rupert  Search this
Singh, R.P.  Search this
Waisler, Lee  Search this
Watson, Steve  Search this
Wood, Beatrice  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Video recordings
Citation:
Audiovisual materials relating to the documentary Beatrice Wood: Mama of Dada, 1990-1993. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Beatrice Wood: Mama of Dada -- motion picture  Search this
Dadaism  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Motion pictures (visual works)  Search this
Women ceramicists  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Research and writing about art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6397
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)215368
AAA_collcode_nefftom
Theme:
Women
Research and writing about art
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_215368

Fulton Airphibian FA-3-101

Manufacturer:
Continental, Inc.  Search this
Designer:
Robert E. Fulton, Jr.  Search this
Materials:
Fuselage: steel tube with fabric covering
Dimensions:
Aircraft Car
Wingspan: 10.2 m (34 ft.) Wheel Base: 1.8m (72in)
Height: 2.34 m (7 ft. 8 in.) 1.5m (5ft)
Length: 6.76 m (22 ft. 2 in.) 3.8m (11 ft 6 in)
Weight: Empty 680.4 kg (1,500 lb) 496 kg (1100 lb)
Gross: 947 kg (2,100lb) 510 kg (1700 lb)
Type:
CRAFT
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Date:
1947-1953
Credit Line:
Gift of Joseph J. Ryan
Inventory Number:
A19600127000
Restrictions & Rights:
CC0
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Thomas W. Haas We All Fly
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nv9a66335e2-bb5b-42ba-bf3a-9b7b1e9979c7
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19600127000

Carole Lombard

Artist:
Louise Dahl-Wolfe, 19 Nov 1895 - 11 Dec 1989  Search this
Sitter:
Carole Lombard, 6 Oct 1908 - 16 Jan 1942  Search this
Medium:
Gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
Image/Sheet: 20.6 x 19.6cm (8 1/8 x 7 11/16")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
1938
Topic:
Nature & Environment\Animal\Dog  Search this
Sign  Search this
Exterior\Theatrical\Movie set  Search this
Carole Lombard: Female  Search this
Carole Lombard: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.2003.57
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm45e53368a-2648-4f7d-ab28-51e399096d4e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.2003.57

Henry A. "Buddy" Graf and George Cahill Vaudeville and Burlesque Collections

Donor:
Cahill, George N. , b. 1959  Search this
Actor:
Graf, Carol A, 1945-2013  Search this
Graf, Henry "Buddy", 1929-2000  Search this
Extent:
32.2 Cubic feet (98 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1844-2000
bulk 1921-2000, undated
Summary:
Collection consists of vaudeville and burlesque materials including original scripts for comedic bits, blackouts, scenes, skits and sketches, joke files, promotional materials, photographs, business records, and press clippings dating from the 19th century to the late 20th century.
Scope and Contents:
Collection provides a comprehensive overview of vaudeville and burlesque performance material rather than documenting individual acts or performers. The materials were collected by Henry "Buddy" Arnold Graf Jr. and primarily include original scripts for comedic skits and sketches not only written by Graf but by other performers and writers.

The collection documents the career of Henry "Buddy" Graf, an actor, producer, director, and business manager. Graf wrote a sizeable amount of his own material but also pulled from the collected scripts of other vaudeville and burlesque comics. Graf and his company performed mostly in Florida and the mid-west and had a long term performing relationship with Bearcreek Farms in Indiana. Graf's material is a window into the non-professional world of theater (non-union) in the late 20th century.

The scripts in this collection collected by Graf and George Cahill were created and performed by early vaudeville and burlesque actors, writers, and booking agents including Gus Flaig, Billy Foster, Leo Stevens, and Izzy Hirst, and others. The scripts date from 1844 with the bulk of scripts being written and performed from the 1910s through the 1940s. The material was performed in venues across the United States.

Graf also collected a sizeable amount of scripts by vaudeville actor and booking agent Jess Mack dating from the 1940s-1980s. Many of the scripts were written on whatever material was available, such as hotel stationery, scraps of paper, or in notebooks, documenting the creative and constantly changing nature of the life of a travelling vaudevillian and changes in performance from venue to venue, year to year.

Each foldered script may include plot synopses, written dialogue, cues for movement, alternate versions, lists of props, copies of song sheets, and musical scores. Many are bound in hand-stitched volumes. The format of the volumes varies because they were the personal copies of different actors and agents. Some volumes are indexed by title while others are indexed by topic.

Additional material includes joke files, promotional materials, photographs, and press clippings. The collection is arranged into thirty-two series; each series is keyed to the collector of the scripts and materials in that series. These collectors may have also been the writers, actors, or producers of the scripts in their series.

"This is a collection of approximately twenty-four (24) cubic feet of vaudeville materials. About 90% of it consists of original scripts for a wide variety of comedic skits and sketches. Additional material includes joke files, promotional materials, photographs, and press clippings. The scripts were created by early (1910s-1940s) vaudeville actors and booking agents such as Gus Flaig, Billy Foster, Leo Stevens, and Izzy Hirst; additional scripts were added by vaudeville actor and booking agent Jess Mack (1940s-1980s). Like more "respectable" plays -- and despite their relatively short length -- vaudeville skits and sketches had titles, like "The Presentation Scene," which were very familiar to performers and theatergoers alike. Most of the scripts in this collection have been bound into hand-made volumes. These are rare, ephemeral items, reflecting the creative and constantly-changing nature of the performances – many scripts were written on whatever material was available, such as hotel stationery, and some volumes are hand-stitched together. Each script includes all of its elements -- plot synopses, written dialogue, cues for movement, alternate versions, lists of props, copies of song sheets and musical scores, and so on. The format of the volumes varies because these were the personal copies of a number of different actors and agents. Some volumes are indexed by title, for example, and some are indexed by topic, such as "animals," "flirtation," "golf," and so on. Non-script material includes joke books, "A Complete List of Scenes and Black-outs," and an unknown amount of photos, clippings, and promotional materials.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged into thirty-two series:

Series 1: Henry "Buddy" Graf, 1844-2000, undated

Series 2: Arliss, Jules, undated

Series 3: Berry, Bert, undated

Series 4: Binder, F.F. (Fred "Falls"), undated

Series 5: Bronson, Milt, undated

Series 6: Brown, Ernie (Toby), undated

Series 7: Burke, Herbie, undated

Series 8: Clas, Irvin V., undated

Series 9: Clexx, Harry (Henry Thomas), undated

Series 10: Cook, Johnny (John S.) and Bohn, Charles ("Peanuts"), 1936-07

Series 11: Dew, I., undated

Series 12: Flaig, Gus and Beall, Howard, undated

Series 13: Flaig, Gus, 1921-1954, undated

Series 14: Foster, Billy, 1929, undated

Series 15: Hagen, Billy, undated

Series 16: Hayes, Jack, undated

Series 17: Hill, G.B., undated

Series 18: Hill, Joe, undated

Series 19: Hirst, Isadore, 1927-1928, undated

Series 20: Kane, Johnny, undated

Series 21: Kaplan, Eddie, undated

Series 22: Leason, Jess, undated

Series 23: Lewis, Freddie, undated

Series 24: Mack, Jess, 1937-1969, undated

Series 25: Plant, Vic, 1921-1925, undated

Series 26: Romig, Jack, undated

Series 27: Sherman, Robert, undated

Series 28: Stanley, Joe B., undated

Series 29: Taylor, Bob, undated

Series 30: Van, Earl, undated

Series 31: Wilton, Joe, 1920, undated

Series 32: Unattributed, 1945-1952, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Henry Arnold "Buddy" Graf was born 1929 August 30 in Chicago, Illinois at the Norwegian-American Hospital to Henry A. Graf and Evelyn Warner. His father was an electrician at the time of Graf's birth but Graf claimed he grew up in the theatre. As a child in vaudeville he played with the children of some of the vaudeville families such as Donald O'Connor and Sammy David, Jr. He received formal schooling up to the tenth grade.

Graf served in the United States Air Force from January 1949 to October 1952. He was stationed at Sheppard AFB, Texas and then later at Chanute AFB, Illinois. He served as a "Basic Airman" with a mechanic and engineering specialty, and recived a Good Conduct Medal. The most significant assignment during his enlistment was with the 9th Periodic Maintenance Squadron. He was discharged at Travis AFB, California in 1952.

In later life he became a comic, writer, and producer, his style being primarily burlesque with a touch of vaudeville.

Graf met his wife, Carol, in St. Louis, Missouri. A program biography from the 1980s states, "Buddy started his career in show business when he was seven years old. His father put his name on the callboard and he was in business running errands for the acts that appeared at the Stratford Theatre in Chicago, Illinois. Buddy's father was the stage manager, Bob Hope was the Master of Ceremonies. His playmates were Donald O'Conner and Sammy David, Jr. They became friends while they and their families were playing at the Stratford. As time went on Buddy gained experience from the management side of show business as well as the technical and artistic side, the latter as a scene comic. Buddy soon became involved with the rebirth of vaudeville with his own creation, "Giggles Galore". The show ran for five years and did over 2000 performances. He was with Will B. Able's 'Baggy Pants and Company', and performed with 'The Best of Burlesque'. In 1990, he completed a six year run at the Goodtimes Theatre at Bearcreek Farms in Indiana, where he starred in 22 new productions and over 2500 performances. Buddy's wife Carol is the buisness manager for Monkey Biz Productions, and she is the technical director for the show. Buddy and Carol invite you to let your hair down, forget your problems, and let's have some fun the old fashioned way . . . with 'Monkey Business'.

Graf suffered a heart attack on stage but survived after being fitted with a pacemaker, leading him to dub himself the "Bionic Comic." Graf died on 2000 August 20 and was buried in Valhalla Cemetery, St. Louis County, Missouri. Carol died 2013 May 20 and is buried beside her husband in Valhalla. Their shared gravemarker reads, "And in my final moment, may I hear You whisper: 'When you made My people smile, you made Me smile.'"
Related Materials:
Materials at the Archives Center, National Museum of American History

George E. "Mello" and Neva Satterlee McNally Vaudeville Collection, NMAH.AC.0760

Boudini Brothers Vaudeville Collection, NMAH.AC.1426

Falcon Trio Vaudeville Collection, NMAH.AC.0160

Billings-Merriam Family Vaudeville Scrapbooks, NMAH.AC.0079

Ed Hayes and His Banjo Girls Records, NMAH.AC.1333

Thomas Currier Vaudeville Collection, NMAH.AC.1120

W. Oscar Sullivan Papers, NMAH.AC.0072

Sam DeVincent Collection of Illustrated American Sheet Music, Series 4, NMAH.AC.0300

Groucho Marx Collection, NMAH.AC.0260

Donald J. Stubblebine Collection of Theater and Motion Picture Music and Ephemera, NMAH.AC.1211

Bobby Short Papers, NMAH.AC.0946

Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: James Madison, NMAH.AC.0060

Duncan P. Schiedt Photograph Collection, NMAH.AC.1323

Enoch Steen Collection, NMAH.AC.0206

Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Theater, NMAH.AC.0060

Harpo Marx Papers, NMAH.AC.1290

St. Felix Sisters' Scrapbook, NMAH.AC.0294

Materials at Other Repositories

University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Special Collections and Archives, Gaming Studies, collection focusing primarily on gambling and casinos and includes material related to entertainment and vaudeville

University of Arizona Libraries, Special Collections, American Vaudeville Museum Collection

University of California, Santa Barbara Library, Milt Larsen Variety Theater Collection

University of Pittsburgh, Hillman Library, Curtis Theatre Collection includes about hundred skits and bits from comics, including Billy Foster, some of whose scripts are in the Graf collection.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by George N. Cahill to the Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution in 2019.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Burlesque (Theater)  Search this
Vaudeville  Search this
Citation:
Henry "Buddy" Graf and George Cahill Vaudeville and Burlesque Collections, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1484
See more items in:
Henry A. "Buddy" Graf and George Cahill Vaudeville and Burlesque Collections
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8e1c8cfb3-3fac-4f6d-a987-71562c7a0b66
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1484

Ginger Rogers

Artist:
Isamu Noguchi, 17 Nov 1904 - 30 Dec 1988  Search this
Sitter:
Ginger Rogers, 16 Jul 1911 - 25 Apr 1995  Search this
Medium:
Pink Georgia marble
Dimensions:
With Base: 50.8 x 18.7 x 26.7cm (20 x 7 3/8 x 10 1/2")
Without Base: 37.5 x 18.7 x 26.7cm (14 3/4 x 7 3/8 x 10 1/2")
Base: 13.3 x 18.7 x 20.3cm (5 1/4 x 7 3/8 x 8")
Type:
Sculpture
Place:
United States\Arizona
Date:
1942
Topic:
Ginger Rogers: Female  Search this
Ginger Rogers: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Theater  Search this
Ginger Rogers: Performing Arts\Performer\Actor\Movie  Search this
Ginger Rogers: Performing Arts\Performer\Vaudeville  Search this
Ginger Rogers: Performing Arts\Performer\Dancer\Tap  Search this
Ginger Rogers: Oscar  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution Conserved with funds from the Smithsonian Women's Committee
Object number:
NPG.96.103
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Estate of Isamu Noguchi / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
Bravo!
On View:
NPG, South Gallery 321 Mezzanine
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm48dc8fd80-0969-4905-bc0d-4f896aebc46c
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.96.103
Online Media:

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