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General Conference 1

Collection Creator:
Rinzler, Ralph  Search this
Container:
Box 13 (Series 6)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1978
undated
Scope and Contents note:
File consists of two copies of memorandum from Gabriel Guerra-Mondragon to Ambassador Esteban Torres entitled "The U.S. and the UNESCO Cultural Program: The Look Ahead". Materials relate to Joseph Duffey and the twentieth general conference.
Collection Restrictions:
Large portions of this collection are digitized, and while these materials are being prepared for public access through this finding aid, researchers can request digital copies by contacting the Rinzler Archives at rinzlerarchives@si.edu or (202) 633-7322.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for information.
Collection Citation:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.RINZ, File RINZ_06_013_014
See more items in:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings / Series 6: Meetings and Organizations / 6.4: UNESCO
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-rinz-ref3624

Lomax, Alan

Collection Creator:
Rinzler, Ralph  Search this
Container:
Box 1 (Series 7)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1975, 1978
undated
Scope and Contents note:
File consists of promotional fliers, news clippings, chapter on Huddie "Leadbelly" Ledbetter, program for Tunisian Cultural Program, code sheet for The Musical Situation, draft materials for PBS American Patchwork series.
Collection Restrictions:
Large portions of this collection are digitized, and while these materials are being prepared for public access through this finding aid, researchers can request digital copies by contacting the Rinzler Archives at rinzlerarchives@si.edu or (202) 633-7322.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for information.
Collection Citation:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.RINZ, File RINZ_07_001_005
See more items in:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings / Series 7: Notable Figures / 7.1: Lomax Family
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-rinz-ref3829

Collected Texts

Collection Creator:
Rinzler, Ralph  Search this
Container:
Box 4 (Series 4)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
File consists of "On Tour: Old Ways in the New World and African Diaspora" and "A Proposal for continuing the initiatives of the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration in ethnic/racial and community cultural programming".
Collection Restrictions:
Large portions of this collection are digitized, and while these materials are being prepared for public access through this finding aid, researchers can request digital copies by contacting the Rinzler Archives at rinzlerarchives@si.edu or (202) 633-7322.
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for information.
Collection Citation:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.RINZ, File RINZ_04_004_028
See more items in:
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings
Ralph Rinzler papers and audio recordings / Series 4: Events / 4.3: Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-rinz-ref2246

Women in Blues

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 13, Folder 20
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1985 March 9
Scope and Contents:
Concert and colloquium held March 9, 1985, at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. Program examined and celebrated the lives and work of those women, who chose to ignore the standards and dictates of society during the 1920s, 30s, and 40s, and do the unusual, become performing artists. The women documented in this program and many others rejected the usual roles--wife, mother, homemaker for lifestyles they fashioned for themselves. Though they may have made homes, married, and had children, they were primarily artists, business women, and working women. They worked at night in the clubs and theater tours in the growing Black urban centers of the nation. The live entertainment these women offered was a break from the pressures of everyday life and became a part of the weekly diet and celebration. The program was organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.30.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1158

Black American Popular Music: Rhythm and Blues 1945-1955, A Symposium

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 14, Folder 19
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1986 February 7-8
Scope and Contents:
Symposium held Friday, February 7 and Saturday 8, 1986, at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. Friday included a welcome, a roundtable discussion "Black-Owned and Black-Oriented Radio: The Dissemination of Rhythm and Blues", and a concert in the Pendulum Hall. Saturday included a lecture "Rhythm and Blues: Overview of Music Styles", a roundtable discussion "Inside the Studio: Rhythm and Blues Record Production", and a panel "Record Companies and the Promotion of Rhythm and Blues" in Carmichael Auditorium and concert in the Pendulum Hall. Artists included Ruth Brown, The Orioles, Paul "Hucklebuck" Williams, and The Spaniels. Panelists were William "Hoss" Allen III, Dave Clark, David "Panama" Francis, Jack Gibson, Evelyn Johnson, Portia K. Maultsby, Joe Medlin, Albert "Diz" Russell, and Arnold Shaw. The events were made possible by Roger G. Kennedy, director, National Museum of American History; Lonn W. Taylor, Assistant Director for Public Programs, Department of Public Programs; and Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black American Culture. Program number AC408.38.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1175

International Women's Day: Fannie Lou Hamer: "This Little Light...": A Portrait by Billie Jean Young

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 15, Folder 8
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1986 March 8
Scope and Contents:
Fannie Lou Hamer: "This Little Light": A Portrait documented in the Program in African American Culture Collection highlighted the life of Fannie Lou Hamer, a sharecropper, determined voter registrant, and field worker for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). She was an orator, political activist, and founder of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In addition to these contributions, she is noted for her speeches and singing, which influenced many during the Civil Rights Movement. Her strong religious background was often expressed through a sacred hymn before each of her speeches. She opened many gatherings with "This Little Light of Mine", one of her favorite songs.

Linda Reed. "Fannie Lou Hamer" in Black Women in America: An Historical Encyclopedia. Volume A-L. New York: Carlson Publishing Incorporated, 1993.

Program was a dramatic presentation Fannie Lou Hamer: "This Little Light" - A Portrait held March 8, 1986, at Carmichael Auditorium, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. The program was organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.40.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1184

Classic Gospel Song, The Music of Kenneth Morris: Dean of the Chicago Publishing Dynasty

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 15, Folder 14
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1986-10
Scope and Contents:
Concert and colloquium held Saturday, October 25, 1986, at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution as a tribute to one of gospel music's most distinguished composers and publishers. Kenneth Morris was born August 28, 1917, in New York City. While attending grammar school he began piano lessons, which he continued throughout high school. Morris had a profound interest in jazz and by the age of sixteen had decided to become a jazz musician. However, he studied piano, composition, arranging, and orchestration at the Manhattan Conservatory of Music. His career in the Chicago gospel movement began at the Bowles House of Music, owned by Lillian Bowles, a Chicago publisher. He arranged many songs that later would become gospel standards. In 1940, Morris joined with Roberta Martin, another noted gospel composer, to form the Martin and Morris Studio of Music. It is the oldest continuously operating Black gospel music publishing firm in the nation. Morris notated and arranged the music of other composers. He was also responsible for selling music at the studio. In the 1970s Morris became the sole black music distributor for all publishers of gospel music. He has distributed the music of such artists as Andrae Crouch, Edwin and Walter Hawkins, Sandi Patti, Amy Grant, and Bill Gaither. The program was organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black American Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.43.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1189

Black American Gospel Music Series, The Dynamics, Norvus Miller and Company

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 7, Folder 7
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1980 November 9
Scope and Contents:
Concert by Norvus Miller and Company, a band organized in 1976, and The Dynamics, a Black gospel group formed in 1968, held November 9, 1980, in the Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Norvus Miller and Company extended the concept of Black sacred instrumental and vocal music, using singers for both lead and back-up vocals and allowing a harmonica to carry the lead and back-up responsibility on various songs. The Dynamics represented a modern approach to Black gospel music, paying homage to the tradition of classic bass gospel singers. The members present for the performance included Jerry Caesar, piano and lead singer; Douglas Howell, tenor and lead singer; Melvin "Chip" Lowrey, first tenor and lead singer; Sherman "Blake" Clayborne, bass-baritone; and Len Baldwin, second tenor and lead singer. The concert was presented as part of the Black American Gospel Music Series by the Division of Performing Arts. The program and concert were organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.9.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1070

Black American Gospel Music Series, Roberta Martin and The Roberta Martin Singers: The Legacy of Music

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 7, Folder 8
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981 February 6-9
Scope and Contents:
Program held February 6-8, 1981, at Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. It explored the richness of black gospel music as one of this country's most powerful contemporary urban music forms. More importantly, the program highlighted Roberta Martin as one of the most significant pioneers and innovators of Black American gospel music in the 1930s. Roberta Martin, inspired by Thomas A. Dorsey and Sallie Martin, became a composer and arranger of gospel music. Martin's first church position was as a pianist for the Young Peoples' Choir of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Chicago. There she worked with Thomas A. Dorsey and Theodore Frye, both of whom helped guide her early career. In 1933, with the help of Dorsey and Frye, Roberta Martin organized the Martin Frye Quartet with Eugene Smith, James Lawrence, Robert Anderson, Willie Webb, and Norsalus McKissick. This group became the Roberta Martin Singers in 1936. In the mid-1940s, the group expanded with the addition of two females, Bessie Folk and Delois Barrett Campbell. The Roberta Martin Singers documented here are Delois Barrett Campbell, Lucy Smith Collier, Archie Dennis, Bessie Folk, Gloria Griffin, Louise McCord, Norsalus McKissick, Eugene Smith, Romance Watson. From Roberta Martin and the Roberta Martin Singers: Program Notes. See Program Notes for additional information on Roberta Martin and the Roberta Martin Singers. The Division of Performing Arts presented the concert as part of the Black American Gospel Music Series. The Black American Gospel Music Series and the Roberta Martin program were organized by Bernice Johnson Reagon, director of the Program in African American Culture (formerly known as the Program in Black Culture). Program number AC408.10.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1071

Black American Gospel Music Series, The Harmonizing Four

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981 April 12
Scope and Contents:
Concert held Sunday April 12, 1981 at Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. It paid tribute to the Harmonizing Four, an all-male gospel group from Richmond, Virginia, who have been singing together for more than fifty years. The group began singing together on October 27, 1927. The original quartet members were Joseph Williams, Thomas Johnson, Jr., Lawrence Hatchett, and Lawrence Longhorn (the latter two now deceased). The Harmonizing Four began as an informal a cappella group who sang spirituals, hymns, and classic gospel songs. Every member is a leader and soloist and they do all of their own arranging. The present group includes two original members. The Harmonizing Four documented here are Joseph Williams (lead, baritone, manager, and spokesman) Thomas Johnson, Jr. (lead, second tenor) Lonnie Smith Sr. (lead, first tenor) Thomas Ellis Johnson (bass) Rick Monroe (guitarist) From notes on the artists, program nNotes by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon. See program notes for additional information about the Harmonizing Four and the Black American Gospel Music Series. The Division of Performing Arts presented the concert as part of the Black American Gospel Music Series. The series and program were organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black American Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.11.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1112

Black American Gospel Music Series, Scott A. White Family Singers

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 10, Folder 11
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981 May 17
Scope and Contents:
Program in African American Culture Collection highlighted the exceptional talent of one of the nation's largest gospel singing family. The Scott A. White Family Singers consists of father and mother, fifteen children, fifty grandchildren and at least eight great-grandchildren. There are many other talents in the family. Nine family members are ministers, seven are missionaries, seven are piano players, one is a minister of music, one is an evangelist, seven are songwriters, and three are playwrights. The Scott A. White Family has been singing for more than twenty-five years, presided over by their father, elder Scott A. White, pastor of the New Hope Primitive Baptist Church in Steelton, Pennsylvania. (From unpublished program notes by Pearl Williams Jones. See notes for additional information about the Scott A. White Family). The concert by the Scott A. White Family was held on Sunday, May 17, 1981 at Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. The concert was presented as part of the Black Gospel Music Series by the Division of Performing Arts. The series and program were organized by Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.12.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1113

The Memphis Blues Tradition

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 11, Folder 8-9
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1983 April 29-30
Scope and Contents:
Concert and colloquium held April 29-30, 1983, at Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. Program highlighted the blues tradition that came out of Memphis, Tennessee, during the 1920s and 30s, a time when Memphis was thriving as the center of black American blues. The Memphis blues is a conglomeration of the crying vocal blues from western Tennessee, the rhythmic blues of northern Mississippi and the chanting style of the Mississippi Delta. The major cultural center for black American blues music in the mid-south was Beale Street. Vaudeville and blues performers like Ma Rainey and Bessie Smith appeared regularly. [From program guide by Bill Barlow. See program guide for additional information on the concert, colloquium and Memphis blues.] Program organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.18.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1123

Conference on Black American Culture and Scholarship: Contemporary Issues

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 11, Folder 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1983 July 8-9
Scope and Contents:
The program included two colloquiums, one on Friday, July 8, and one on Saturday July 9, 1983, in the Carmichael Auditorium, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. The Friday morning session included an opening and "Black American Cultural Programs and Projects: Public and Political Policy". The Friday afternoon sessions included "Researching, Teaching, and Practice: The State of the Field" and "Changing Definitions and Boundaries: Breaking Stereotypes". The Friday Cultural Presentation and Discussion was entitled Oh Death Have Mercy: Afro-American Death and Dying, was presented in six parts, and was followed by a discussion. A note of the presentation: "Easy Lawd" is a performance based song/narration delivered in folk speech and standard English, containing literary selection Jonah's Gourd Vine by Zora Neal Hurston, Jubilee by Margaret Wlker, Death and Burial on Yamacraw by Pat Conroy, and a sermon by James Weldon Johnson. The presentation was accentuated by hymns, gospels, blues ballads, and jubilees.

The Saturday morning session included an opening and "Black American Culture and Media: Positive and Negative Intervention". The Saturday afternoon sessions included "Continuing and Creating Traditions" and "Black American Culture: Theory and Analysis". Panelists and performers included Horace Boyer, Avery Brooks, Archie L. Buffkins, June Dobbs, Edward Cabbell, John Cephas, Gerald Davis, Jeff Donaldson, James Early, Sharon Farmer, Dennis Folly, Leonard Goines, Linda Goss, John Gwaltney, Kings of Harmony of the United House of Prayer for All People, Richard long, Portia Maultsby, Ethelbert Miller, Flora Molton, Antonia Pantoja, Bernice Johnson Reagon, Sterling Stuckey, Sweet Honey in the Rock, Eleanor W. Traylor, Pearl Williams-Jones, and Kalamu ya Salaam.

The conference was made possible through the Smithsonian's Educational Outreach Program and the following individuals: S. Dillon Ripley, secretary; Roger Kennedy, director, National Museum of American History; Josiah Hatch, director, Office of Public and Academic Programs; Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black American Culture; Fatimah Proctor, conference production coordinator; Niani Kilkenny, production assistant; and Harold A. Closter, technical director. Program number AC408.19.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1124

The Songs of Lucie E. Campbell: Gospel Music Composer

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 12, Folder 13-14
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1983 December 17
Scope and Contents:
Concert and colloquium on Lucie Elizabeth Campbell held on Saturday, December 17, 1983, at Carmichael Auditorium, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. Program highlighted the life of Lucie Elizabeth Campbell, the first Black female gospel music composer. Campbell was an active worker and organizer with the National Baptist Convention. She was one of the original organizers in 1916. She sat on National Convention music committees, and was Music Director for the Baptist Congress, where she selected compositions for publication. Campbell composed over eighty gospel music classics, including: "In the Upper Room with Jesus", made famous by Mahalia Jackson; "He Understands, He'll Say, Well Done", and "Something Within." From notes in the program guide. See program guide for additional information about Lucie Elizabeth Campbell. The concert and colloquium were sponsored by the Office of Public and Academic Programs. The program was organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, Director of the Program in Black American Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.21.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1141

Black Aesthetics: Historical and Contemporary Issues

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 13, Folder 10
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1984 April 27
Scope and Contents:
Program held on Friday April 27, 1984, at the National Museum of American History, fourth floor West conference Room, Smithsonian Institution. It was designed to unite a small group of scholars in an interdisciplinary discussion to explore historical and contemporary issues of Black aesthetics. The scholars also hoped to address major issues in the development of a conceptual database on aesthetics and to establish a framework for the validity of work done in African American culture. This program was organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, Director of the Program in Black American Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.24.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1150

March On Washington

Collection Collector:
Maltsby, Portia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Program in African American Culture  Search this
Container:
Box 84, Reel 7-14
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Date:
1983 August 26-27
Scope and Contents:
Concert and colloquium celebrated the songs and people who were a significant force in the Civil Rights Movement and in the organization of the March on Washington. Program held August 26-27, 1983, at Howard University in Washington, DC. It was organized by Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon, director, Program in Black American Culture (later known as the Program in African American Culture). Program number AC408.20.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access and use of audiovisual materials available in the Archives Center reading room or by requesting copies of audiovisual materials at RightsReproductions@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Copyright restrictions exist. Collection items available for reproduction Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Program in African American Culture Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Program in African American Culture Collection
Program in African American Culture Collection / Series 1: Program Files
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0408-ref1606

American Indian Culture Program - Los Angelos, CA

Collection Creator:
National Congress of American Indians  Search this
Container:
Box 144
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadbast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Collection Title, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
National Congress of American Indians records
National Congress of American Indians records / Series 5: Records of Indian Interest Organizations / 5.5: Other Indian Organizations
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-010-ref1800

New York Community Trust, Arts and Culture Program Evaluation

Collection Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Collection Collector:
Johnson, Frederick, 1904-1994  Search this
Churchill, Frank C. (Frank Carroll), 1850-1912  Search this
Davis, Edward H., b. 1862  Search this
Churchill, Clara G.  Search this
Harrington, M. R. (Mark Raymond), 1882-1971  Search this
Harvey, Byron  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
Gridley, Marion E. (Marion Eleanor), 1906-1974  Search this
Wildschut, William  Search this
Stiles, William F., 1912-1980  Search this
Verrill, A. Hyatt (Alpheus Hyatt), 1871-1954  Search this
Skinner, Alanson, 1886-1925  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), 1885-1936  Search this
Harvey, Fred  Search this
Keppler, Udo J., 1872-1956  Search this
Lothrop, S. K. (Samuel Kirkland), 1892-1965  Search this
Barrett, S. A. (Samuel Alfred), 1879-1965  Search this
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Hodge, Frederick Webb, 1864-1956  Search this
Collection Director:
Dockstader, Frederick J.  Search this
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Collection Source:
Force, Roland W.  Search this
Burnett, Edwin K.  Search this
Container:
Box 472, Folder 14
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1981 - 1985
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records / Series 14: Development / 14.2: Donors
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-001-ref2181

Festival Recordings: Hopi Dictionary Stage: Land & Trade. Knowledge continued; Dictionary. & Language Recovery; Tales of the Sea

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Quincentenary Program 1991 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Artist:
Churchill, Holly J., 1955-  Search this
Kootswytewa, Pearl, 1927-  Search this
Paniagua, Vincente K'in  Search this
Performer:
Churchill, Holly J., 1955-  Search this
Kootswytewa, Pearl, 1927-  Search this
Paniagua, Vincente K'in  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Bolivians  Search this
Americans  Search this
Mexicans  Search this
Tiahuanacu (Bolivia)  Search this
Tlingit Indians  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Lacandon Indians  Search this
Haida Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Bolivia
Alaska
Arizona
Mexico
Date:
1991 July 7
Track Information:
101 Cross Cultural Program: Comparative Basketry / Holly J. Churchill, Pearl Kootswytewa, Vincente K'in Paniagua.
Local Numbers:
FP-1991-CT-0179
General:
tape /
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 7, 1991.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Hopi materials are in-house research only, No duplication.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Discussion  Search this
Storytelling  Search this
language  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Crafts & decorating  Search this
Basket making  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1991, Item FP-1991-CT-0179
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Land in Native American Cultures / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1991-ref1018

Festival Recordings: Rainforest Stage: Mask Carving - Cross Cultural Workshop; Access to Resources; S.E. Alaska Dance

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Quincentenary Program 1991 Washington, D.C.  Search this
Performer:
Hudson, Jack, 1936-  Search this
Jackson, Nathan, 1938-  Search this
Beng, Yonas Wang, 1961-  Search this
Hanlon, Ernestine, 1951-  Search this
Mills, Katherine, 1915-1993  Search this
Jacobs, Mark, 1923-2005  Search this
Marvin, Amy, 1912-2001  Search this
Jackson, Steven  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (compact audio cassette)
1 Sound cassette (analog.)
Culture:
Americans  Search this
Indonesian  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Tsimshian Indians  Search this
Tlingit Indians  Search this
Haida Indians  Search this
Shuar Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound cassettes
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Indonesia
Alaska
Java (Indonesia)
Kalimantan (Indonesia)
Date:
1991 July 7
Track Information:
101 Cross Cultural Program: Mask Carving / Jack Hudson, Nathan Jackson, Yonas Wang Beng.

101 Access to Resources/Shuar Crafts / Ernestine Hanlon, Katherine Mills, Mark Jacobs.

101 S.E. Alaska Friendship Dance / Nathan Jackson, Amy Marvin, Steven Jackson.
Local Numbers:
FP-1991-CT-0201
Date/Time and Place of an Event Note:
Recorded in: Washington (D.C.), United States, July 7, 1991.
Restrictions:
Restrictions on access. Some duplication is allowed. Use of materials needs permission of the Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Oral history  Search this
Dance  Search this
Songs  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Hunting  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Costumes  Search this
Manners and customs  Search this
Masks  Search this
Tools -- Design and construction  Search this
Mask making  Search this
Crafts & decorating  Search this
Carving  Search this
Materials  Search this
Cultural conservation  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1991, Item FP-1991-CT-0201
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife / Series 4: Land in Native American Cultures / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1991-ref1040

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