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Artists Talk on Art records

Creator:
Artists Talk on Art  Search this
Names:
Barnet, Will, 1911-2012  Search this
Bourgeois, Louise, 1911-2010  Search this
Christo, 1935-  Search this
De Niro, Robert, Sr., 1922-1993  Search this
Denes, Agnes  Search this
Goldberg, Michael, 1924-2007  Search this
Jeanne-Claude, 1935-2009  Search this
Longo, Robert  Search this
Mendieta, Ana, 1948-1985  Search this
Morris, Robert, 1931-2018  Search this
Murray, Elizabeth, 1940-  Search this
Neel, Alice, 1900-1984  Search this
Pavia, Philip, 1915-2005  Search this
Sleigh, Sylvia  Search this
Wilke, Hannah  Search this
Wojnarowicz, David  Search this
Extent:
64.4 Linear feet
317.43 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Transcripts
Video recordings
Date:
circa 1974-2018
Summary:
The records of Artists Talk on Art (ATOA) measure 64.4 linear feet and 317.43 gigabytes and date from circa 1974-2018. The bulk of the records consist of extensive video and sound recordings of events organized by the group featuring artists, critics, historians, dealers, curators and writers discussing contemporary issues in the American art world in hundreds of panel discussions, open screenings, and dialogues held in New York City. Events began in 1975 and continue to the present; recordings in the collection date from 1977 and 2016. A smaller group of records include administrative files, panel flyers, three scrapbooks, as well as photographs, slides, and negatives of panel discussions and participants.
Scope and Contents:
The records of Artists Talk on Art (ATOA) measure 64.4 linear feet and 317.43 gigabytes and date from circa 1974-2018. The bulk of the records consist of extensive video and sound recordings of events organized by the group featuring artists, critics, historians, dealers, curators and writers discussing contemporary issues in the American art world in hundreds of panel discussions, open screenings, and dialogues held in New York City. Events began in 1975 and continue to the present; recordings in the collection date from 1977 and 2016. A smaller group of records include administrative files, panel flyers, three scrapbooks, as well as photographs, slides, and negatives of panel discussions and participants.

ATOA's recordings chronicle the American art world, covering critical discussions and significant art world issues over five decades. Thousands of artists such as Will Barnet, Louise Bourgeois, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Robert De Niro, Agnes Denes, Michael Goldberg, Robert Longo, Ana Mendieta, Robert Morris, Elizabeth Murray, Alice Neel, Philip Pavia, Howardena Pindell, Larry Rivers, Sylvia Sleigh, Kahinde Wiley, Hannah Wilke, David Wojnarowicz, and others speak about their work. The original recordings exist in a variety of formats, including U-Matic and VHS videotape, MiniDVs, sound cassettes and sound tape reels. ATOA digitized most of the video and sound recordings prior to donating the collection.

The collection also includes printed histories, board and program committee meeting minutes, financial statements, general correspondence files of the president and chair, attendance statistics, grant files, panel participant release forms, sixteen panel transcripts, a complete set of panel flyers (many are annotated) and other printed materials, three dismantled scrapbooks, as well as photographs, slides, and negatives of panels and panel participants.
Arrangement:
The records are arranged into nine series.

Series 1: Adminstrative Files, 1974-2013 (0.4 linear feet, Box 1)

Series 2: Director's and Chairman's Correspondence, 1977-2006 (0.4 linear feet, Box 1)

Series 3: Grant Files, 1977-2009 (1 linear foot, Boxes 1-2)

Series 4: Panel Release Forms, 1978-2012 (1 linear foot, Boxes 2-3)

Series 5: Panel Transcripts, 1981, 1986, 1988, 2017-2018 (1 folder, Box 3; 0.002 GB, ER01)

Series 6: Printed Materials, 1975-2015 (0.8 linear feet, Boxes 3-4; 0.434 GB, ER02)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1975-1989 (0.2 linear feet, Box 4)

Series 8: Photographic Materials, circa 1975-circa 2000 (1 linear foot, Boxes 4-5)

Series 9: Video and Sound Recordings of Events, 1977-2016 (59 linear feet, Boxes 6-65; 317.43 GB, ER03-ER04)
Biographical / Historical:
Established in 1974 and still active in New York, Artists Talk on Art is the art world's longest running and most prolific aesthetic panel discussion series organized by artists for artists. Founded by Lori Antonacci, Douglas I. Sheer, and Robert Wiegand, the forum has presented 6,000 artists in nearly 1,000 documented panels or dialogues. ATOA held its first panel, "Whatever Happened to Public Art," on January 10, 1975 and it drew a "crowd" of 77 people. In the decades that followed, ATOA presented dozens of panels or dialogues a year, tackling such diverse topics as "What is Happening with Conceptual Art," with Louise Lawler and Lawrence Weiner; "Painting and Photography: Defining the Difference," with Sarah Charlesworth, Jack Goldstein, Joseph Kosuth, Barbara Kruger, and Robert Mapplethorpe; "Organizing Arts Activism," with Lucy Lippard; "The Artist and the Epidemic—an information panel about AIDS"; "Cross-generational Views of Feminism"; and hundreds more.
Provenance:
The Artists Talk on Art (ATOA) records, including digital files of the video and sound recordings, were donated to the Archives in 2016 by Douglas Sheer, Chairman of ATOA.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact References Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Art critics  Search this
Art dealers  Search this
Art historians  Search this
Artists  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Historians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Transcripts
Video recordings
Citation:
Artists Talk on Art records, circa 1974-2018. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.artitalk
See more items in:
Artists Talk on Art records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c4de66ef-397b-4e6e-9fde-d6deca12fa3a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-artitalk
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Online Media:

Oral history interview with Dennis Adrian

Interviewee:
Adrian, Dennis, 1937-  Search this
Interviewer:
Silverman, Lanny  Search this
Names:
Akron Art Museum  Search this
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Chicago Art and Artists: Oral History Project  Search this
Chicago's Art-Related Archival Materials: A Terra Foundation Resource  Search this
Madison Art Center  Search this
Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
New York University  Search this
Portland Art Museum (Or.)  Search this
University of Chicago -- Students  Search this
Acconci, Vito, 1940-  Search this
Achilles, Rolf  Search this
Alloway, Lawrence, 1926-1990  Search this
Anderson, Jeremy, 1921-1982  Search this
Artner, Alan G.  Search this
Barnes, Robert, 1934-  Search this
Baum, Don, 1922-  Search this
Botticelli, Sandro, 1444 or 1445-1510  Search this
Brown, Roger, 1941-1997  Search this
Carlson, Victor I.  Search this
Castelli, Leo  Search this
Conner, Bruce, 1933-2008  Search this
Coplans, John  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Dubuffet  Search this
Florsheim, Lillian H.  Search this
Frumkin, Allan  Search this
Garver, Thomas H.  Search this
Golub, Leon, 1922-2004  Search this
Guston, Philip, 1913-1980  Search this
Hanson, Philip, 1943-  Search this
Hoffman, Rhona, 1934-  Search this
Ito, Miyoko, 1918-1983  Search this
Kind, Phyllis, 1933-2018  Search this
Leaf, June, 1929-  Search this
Lee, Sherman E.  Search this
Maxon, John, 1916-  Search this
Mies van der Rohe, Ludwig, 1886-1969  Search this
Newman, Muriel Kallis Steinberg  Search this
Nicholson, Natasha, 1945-  Search this
Parker, Dorothy, 1893-1967  Search this
Pearlstein, Philip, 1924-  Search this
Petlin, Irving, 1934-2018  Search this
Ramberg, Christina  Search this
Rossi, Barbara, 1940-  Search this
Schulze, Franz, 1927-2019  Search this
Sleigh, Sylvia  Search this
Spero, Nancy, 1926-2009  Search this
Swinton, Tilda  Search this
Voulkos, Peter, 1924-2002  Search this
Warhol, Andy, 1928-1987  Search this
Westermann, H. C. (Horace Clifford), 1922-  Search this
Wilde, Oscar, 1854-1900  Search this
Wiles, Bertha Harris, 1896-  Search this
Extent:
4 Items (Sound recording: 4 sound files (4 hr., 18 min.), digital, wav)
173 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
2015 October 8-9
Scope and Contents:
An interview with Dennis Adrian conducted 2015 October 8-9, by Lanny Silverman, for the Archives of American Art's Chicago Art and Artists: Oral History Project, at Adrian's home in Seaside, Oregon.
Adrian speaks of growing up in Astoria; traveling to Chicago and New York; Cannon Beach; aging and getting older; his origins; curators and curating; visual sensibilities; the Portland Public Library; opera; his parents, grandparents, and family; Finnish sensibility and humor; Portland Art Museum and classes for children; curator as voyeur; credit and accomplishments; hands on experiences; Artforum; art history; attending University of Chicago; homosexuality and coming out; looted European masterworks; Botticelli; exposure to real art; connoisseurship; collectors and collecting; a Robert Louis Stevenson letter; violin making; growing into yourself; Chicago; war; New York University; Frumkin Gallery; New York; the art world; Madison Art Center; Akron Art Museum; friendship and role models; Art Institute of Chicago; meeting Mies van der Rohe; meeting idols; education; Oscar Wilde and Dorothy Parker; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Monster Roster; traveling; Chicago art politics; writing and critics; Eurocentric curators; Chicago as an undervalued city; Dog Day Afternoon; discovering art; New York sightings; and experiences running into artists. Adrian also recalls Roger Brown, Ruth Horwich, Gilda Buchbinder, Don Baum, Sherman Lee, Victor Carlson, Peter Voulkos, Lawrence Alloway, Rhona Hoffman, Allan Frumkin, June Leaf, Leon Golub, Jeremy Anderson, Robert Barnes, Tom Garver, Bruce Conner, Natasha Nicholson, H. C. Westermann, Franz Schulze, Bertha Harris Wiles, Muriel Newman, Aaron James Spire, Lillian Florsheim, John Maxon, Greg Knight, P.B. Maryan, Philip Pearlstein, Sylvia Sleigh, Nancy Spero, Irving Petlin, John Coplans, Alan Artner, Alice Shaddle, Phyllis Kind, Andy Warhol, Joseph Cornell, Tilda Swinton, Leo Castelli, Philip Guston, Dubuffet, Pussy Pepke, Bumpy Rogers, Barbara Rossi, Christina Ramberg, Philip Hanson, Miyoko Ito, Mark Jackson, Rolf Achilles, and Vito Acconci.
Biographical / Historical:
Dennis Adrian (1937- ) is an art critic, educator, and curator in Chicago, Illinois. Lanny Silverman (1947- ) is a curator at the Chicago Cultural Center in Chicago, Illinois.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Occupation:
Art critics -- Illinois -- Chicago -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art, American -- Illinois -- Chicago  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art -- History  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art thefts -- Europe  Search this
Curators -- Illinois -- Chicago -- Interviews  Search this
Educators -- Illinois -- Chicago -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.adrian15
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a4b4e01e-5985-41e2-9eac-996bf9e8d51e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-adrian15
Online Media:

Elizabeth Gordon Papers

Creator:
Gordon, Elizabeth, 1906-2000  Search this
Names:
Claiborne, Craig  Search this
Gordon, Elizabeth, 1906-2000  Search this
Leach, Bernard, 1887-1979  Search this
Extent:
3 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Periodicals
Photographs
Correspondence
Personal papers
Place:
Japan
Date:
1958-1987
Summary:
Papers, 1959-1987, of Elizabeth Gordon, editor of the periodical, House Beautiful from 1941-1964, mostly related to her research for the August and September 1960 issues of House Beautiful regarding the Japanese aesthetic concept of "shibui", and the subsequent travelling "shibui exhibition" from 1961-1964. Included are correspondence, some photocopies, 1959-1963; notes; drafts for articles and lectures; printed material including magazine and newspaper clippings, 1959-1987; 2 books, and exhibition announcements; drawings of paper and foil art; a photo album containing photos of exhibition installations; and photographs, slides, color transparencies, and lantern slides depicting people, sites, and objects reflecting the "shibui" aesthetic.
Scope and Contents:
The Elizabeth Gordon Papers measure 4.5 linear feet and span the years 1959-1987. The collection mainly documents Ms. Gordon's research for the August and September 1960 issues of House Beautiful regarding the Japanese aesthetic concept of "shibui", and the subsequent travelling "shibui exhibition" from 1961-1964. Included are correspondence, some photocopies, 1959-1963; research notes and materials; articles; lectures; printed material including magazine and newspaper clippings, 1959-1987; 2 books, and exhibition announcements; article materials; a photo album containing photos of exhibition installations; and photographs, slides, color transparencies, and lantern slides depicting people, sites, and objects reflecting the "shibui" aesthetic.
Arrangement note:
This collection is organized into eight series. 1. Biographical data, 2. Shibui research, 3. Shibui issues of, House Beautiful, 4. Correspondence, 5. Shibui promotion, 6. Exhibition files, 7. Printed materials, and 8. Photographs.
Biographical Information:
Born in Logansport, Indiana in 1906, Elizabeth Gordon served as editor of House Beautiful magazine 1941 to 1964. Ms. Gordon first became interested in Japanese aesthetics during the mid-1950s. As a result she began to read and study Japanese art, history and culture. In 1959, Gordon travelled to Japan with three staff people from, House Beautiful. In Kyoto she met Eiko Yuasa, a young woman then employed by the City of Kyoto to handle foreign V.I.P.s, who was assigned to assist Gordon during her stay there. It was Ms. Yuasa who, in the course of discussions of Japanese aesthetics, introduced the term "shibui." Around that term and its related concepts ("iki", "jimi", "hade") the theme for the issue began to crystallize. In August and September, 1960, House Beautiful, under the editorial control of Ms. Gordon, published two extremely popular issues devoted to the subject of "shibui". Due to the popularity of the issues, museum exhibits devoted to the concept of "shibui" travelled around the United States. Ms. Gordon died in Adamstown, Maryland in 2000.

Biographical Overview

1906 -- Born in Logansport, Indiana

1920s -- Attended the University of Chicago

1930s -- Moved to New York to work as a promotional copywriter for several newspapers

1930s -- Syndicated columnist on home maintenance for The New York Herald Tribune

1930s -- Editor at Good Housekeeping (here for 8 years)

1937 -- More House for your Money by Elizabeth Gordon and Dorothy Ducas published by W. Morrow and Company: New York.

1937 -- Married Carl Hafey Norcross

1939 -- Appointed editor of House Beautiful

1964 -- Left the magazine world

1972 -- Published a special issue on Scandinavian design and awarded the insignia of a knight, first class, in the Finnish Order of the Lion

1987 -- American Institute of Architects made her an honorary member

1988 -- Carl Hafey Norcross died

September 3, 2000 -- Died in Adamstown, MD

(The following biography of Elizabeth Gordon comes courtesy of curator Louise Cort. Written in consultation with Elizabeth Gordon, October 23, 1987)

The research papers, memoranda, magazines, books, photographs and color transparencies and other materials in this archives are related to the publication by Elizabeth Gordon (Mrs. Carl Norcross), editor of House Beautiful from 1941 to 1964 and creator of the August, 1960 issue of the magazine on the special theme of the Japanese aesthetic concept of "shibui". The "shibui issue" was followed by the September, 1960, issue of the same publication on the theme, "How to be shibui with American things." As a by-product of the issues, a "Shibui Exhibition" travelled to eleven museums in the United States during 1961-1964. Each exhibition was opened with a slide lecture by Elizabeth Gordon.

Miss Gordon first became curious about Japanese aesthetics in the mid-1950s when she began to see Japanese objects being displayed and used in the homes of Americans who had spent time in Japan during the Occupation and Japanese influence began to appear in wholesale showrooms of home furnishings manufacturers. It was clear that the time had come: she HAD to go to Japan!

She read for five years before going to Japan - history, social mores, art history. (Many of the books on Japan that she collected during this time have been presented to the library at the University of Maryland, College Park.)

An important bit of advice came from Alice Spaulding Bowen, owner of Pacifica, the highest quality shop of Asian antiquities in Honolulu, who told her, "Be sure to read, The Tale of Genji - then you'll understand everything."

She made her first trip to Japan in April, 1959, accompanied by three staff people from, House Beautiful. In Kyoto she met Eiko Yuasa, a young woman then employed by the City of Kyoto to handle foreign V.I.P.s, who was assigned to assist Miss Gordon during her stay there. It was Ms. Yuasa who, in the course of discussions of Japanese aesthetics, introduced the term "shibui." Around that term and its related concepts ("iki", "jimi", "hade") the theme for the issue began to crystallize.

Miss Gordon came home, planning to spend the summer researching "shibui" with the aid of the Japan Society. But she found virtually nothing written in English on the concept. So she returned to Japan in December, 1959 together with staff member Marion Gough, to dig deeper and to work out details and get better educated with Eiko Yuasa. One of their devices was to walk through department stores and discuss with sales personnel whether objects for sale were "shibui", or were "jimi" or "hade", and why. Between themselves, they did the same for the costumes of women they saw on the streets.

Lacking printed sources for information on "shibui", Miss Gordon sought out and interviewed experts, including Douglas Overton, head of the Japan Society in New York. In Japan in December, 1959, she met Yanagi Soetsu, founder of Japan's Folk Craft Movement and head of the Craft Museum in Tokyo (with an introduction from Tonomura Kichinosuke, head of the Craft Museum in Kurashiki). She met the chef Tsuji Kaichi, who was commissioned to write an article on "kaiseki" (that could not be used because of an inadequate English translation) and Frances Blakemore. She met several times with Bernard Leach and attended his lecture at Bonnier's while he was in New York in March, 1960. (He would later write a "fan letter" for the issue)

As the concept of "the shibui issue" began to take shape, a third trip in the spring of 1960 focused on photography - to produce the shooting script decided on the preceding December. This was executed by the noted photographer Ezra Stoller of Rye, New York, and John DeKoven Hill, House Beautiful's Editorial Director. (Mr. Hill worked with Frank Lloyd Wright except for the ten years that he was a member of the House Beautiful editorial staff)

Miss Gordon was back in Japan in Mid-August 1960 as the "shibui issue" was causing a sensation. Altogether she spent sixteen months in Japan.

As one of the experiences that influenced her strong interest in Japanese costumes and textiles, Miss Gordon remembers a spectacularly thorough exhibition at the Tokyo National Museum in Ueno on, 1200 Years of Japanese Costume. She saw it on the last day of its exhibition (possibly 1964).

The August 1960 issue sold out quickly. Copies of the magazine, which sold for fifty cents, were sold on the "black market" for ten dollars.

The publication of the August 1960 issue was followed by an unprecedented avalanche of "fan mail". Many department heads in colleges and universities, including the Harvard-Yenching Institute and the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago (where Miss Gordon had worked as an undergraduate) wrote to comment on the issue. Many people in other fields of endeavor wrote: heads of firms concerned with interior design, landscape architecture, and related areas expressed their interest in the concept of "shibui" Other writers include Bernard Leach, Gertrude Natzler, Laura Gilpin, Mainbocher, the architect Yoshimura Junzo, the textile artist Marianne Strengell, Walter Kerr, Craig Claiborne, and Oliver Statler.

The "shibui issue" was followed immediately by the September issue dealing with the use of non-Japanese objects to express the concept of "shibui." (Miss Gordon convinced her advertisers, who had been skeptical about the potential success of the August issue, by promising the September issue dealing with American products.) Four American firms were involved in the production of an integrated line of paints, wallpaper, furniture and carpets expressive of the concept. Products were designed by the firms' designers following the clues offered by objects and fabrics purchased by Miss Gordon in Japan in December 1959 and spring 1960. Miss Gordon has expressed her dissatisfaction with the September issue, although public opinion was positive. She feels that some of the firms failed in the "shibui" project, though some "caught" the message: namely the paint company and the fabric/wallpaper company.

In response to strong public interest, the House Beautiful staff prepared a travelling exhibition to introduce the concept of "shibui" through a series of vignettes, mixing fabrics and objects, colors and textures. The museum installation was designed by John Hill of House Beautiful. Japan Air Lines underwrote shipping costs.

The exhibition began in Philadelphia in late 1961. Ezra Stoller was sent to photograph the installation in considerable detail at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts in January, 1962, so that his photographs cold serve as guidelines for installations at the other museums, which included the San Francisco Museum of Art (April 1962), the Newark Pubic Library, and the Honolulu Academy of Art. Miss Gordon presented a lecture on "shibui" at each of the museum installations.

In appreciation of her work to introduce Americans to the concept of "shibui", the city of Kyoto presented a bolt of especially "shibui" kimono fabric executed by a Living National Treasure textile artist. Miss Gordon eventually tailored the fabric into a dress and jacket. She received the 1961 Trail Blazer Award from the New York Chapter of the National Home Fashions League, Inc. In June, 1987, Miss Gordon was named an honorary member of the American Institute of Architects, with her introduction of the concept of "shibui" and her promotion of an understanding of other culture cited as her major contributions to American architecture.
Provenance:
Elizabeth Gordon donated her papers to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in 1988.
Elizabeth Gordon donated her papers to the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives in 1988.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
No restrictions on use.
Topic:
Interior decoration -- Periodicals  Search this
Landscape gardening  Search this
Art, Japanese  Search this
Aesthetics, Japanese  Search this
House funishings  Search this
Interior decoration  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Interior decorators  Search this
Gardens -- Japan  Search this
Genre/Form:
Periodicals -- 1940-1970
Photographs
Correspondence
Personal papers -- 1950-2000
Citation:
The Elizabeth Gordon Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Gift of Elizabeth Gordon, 1988
Identifier:
FSA.A1988.03
See more items in:
Elizabeth Gordon Papers
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc3bd5683e5-f956-4a04-9d0c-4565a6b761b7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1988-03
Online Media:

Curt Maury Papers

Creator:
Maury, Curt  Search this
Extent:
12.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Dye coupler transparencies
Place:
Gujarat (India)
Karnataka (India) -- Social life and customs
Kerala (India)
Maharashtra
Rajasthan (India)
India
Date:
1953-circa 1985
Summary:
The Curt Maury papers, dating from 1953 to circa 1985, measure 12.7 linear feet and include writings and notes for planned and published books; travel files and expense ledgers for trips to India; photograph ledgers; and extensive photographs and slides of India.
Scope and Contents:
The Curt Maury papers, dating from 1953 to circa 1985, measure 12.7 linear feet and consist of writings and notes for planned and published books; travel files and expense ledgers for trips to India; photograph ledgers; and extensive photographs and slides of India.

The collection was created by Maury primarily in preparation for an unpublished book to be titled, "India's Folk Tradition as the Mirror of Mankind's Religious History." Materials include manuscript and typescript drafts and notes for this book, as well as for published book, Folk Origins of Indian Art (1969). Travel files include printed maps of India, Maury's sketched map outlines of cities in India, and five travel expense ledgers. Photographic materials consist of black and white prints and slides depicting Indian folk art, including religious artifacts and structures, and Indian cultural activities and surroundings. Nine photograph ledgers describe images and locations of photographs and slides with roll and image number.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 3 series.

Series 1: Writings and Notes, circa 1960s-circa 1970s [3.7 linear feet; Boxes 1-5, 7-11]

Series 2: Travel Files, 1953-1975 [0.4 linear feet; Box 5, 1 OV Folder]

Series 3: Photographic Material, circa 1960-circa 1985 [8.5 linear feet; Boxes 6, 12-44]
Biographical note:
Curt Maury (1909-1989) was a writer, social services administrator, and scholar of Indian art. He was born in Germany, earned a PhD in German Literature from the University of Vienna in 1935, and immigrated to the United States in 1939. While pursuing a literary career through the publication of novels, plays, and poems, Maury developed an interest in India, which he visited many times from the 1950s through the 1970s. He conducted research on Indian folk art, and kept extensive photographic records.
Provenance:
The papers were donated to the Archives after Curt Maury's death in 1989 by his brother, Hans Tischler.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Due to cold storage requirements, digital surrogates are prefered for access. One week's notice is required prior to access originals.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce and publish an item from the Archives is coordinated through the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery's Rights and Reproductions Department. Please contact the Archives in order to initiate this process.
Topic:
Art, Hindu  Search this
Indian art  Search this
Cave temples  Search this
Taj Mahal (Agra, India)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1950-1960 -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin
Dye coupler transparencies
Citation:
Curt Maury Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Gift of Mr. Hans Tischler.
Identifier:
FSA.A1989.05
See more items in:
Curt Maury Papers
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc3fab29f43-0ae6-4370-b3ff-be6afcd35342
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a1989-05
Online Media:

James Marshall Plumer Collection

Creator:
Plumer, James Marshall  Search this
Extent:
1.6 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Correspondence
Printed material
Drawings
Maps
Place:
China
Date:
1935-1949
Scope and Contents:
Manuscripts, translations, correspondence, notes, maps, drawings, and black and white photographic prints and negatives related to James Marshall Plumer's work with Chinese ceramics, primarily concerning the location and excavation of a Yue ware kiln site.

Yüeh (sometimes Yueh) was the common romanization at the time of creation and is used extensively in this finding aid to reflect its usage in the original materials. Yue is preferred now. All other obsolete romanizations reflect usage in the original materials.
Arrangement:
Organized into two series: Series 1: Yüeh File Series 2: Photographs
Biographical / Historical:
James Marshall Plumer (1899-1960) , scholar of Asian art. After receiving his B.A. from Harvard, Plumer served as an administrative officer with the Chinese Government Service in Maritime Customs. From 1935 until his death, he taught art history at the University of Michigan while continuing to visit and work in China and Japan. In 1935 and 1937, Plumer discovered ancient kiln sites in the Chinese provinces of Fukien (Fujian) and Chekiang (Zhejiang). He wrote extensively on Chinese ceramics and edited the 'Far Eastern Ceramic Bulletin' from 1950 to 1958.
Related Materials:
James M. Plumer papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce and publish an item from the Archives is coordinated through the National Museum of Asian Art's Rights and Reproductions department. Please contact the Archives in order to initiate this process.
Topic:
Ceramics -- China  Search this
Ceramics -- Japan  Search this
Kilns -- China -- Fujian  Search this
Kilns -- China -- Zhejiang  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Correspondence
Printed material
Drawings
Maps
Citation:
James Marshall Plumer Collection, FSA.A.14. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Gift of Caroline I. Plumer.
Identifier:
FSA.A.14
See more items in:
James Marshall Plumer Collection
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc395f4d2fb-4ed5-472d-8410-b5f0ab3d55a3
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a-14
Online Media:

Felix V. DiGiovanni collection from Colombia

Creator:
DiGiovanni, Felix V.  Search this
Beer, Paul  Search this
Extent:
2 Film reels (16mm)
100 Photographic prints (13.5 x 10.5)
0.1 Linear feet
7 Videocassettes (VHS)
3 Videocassettes (U-matic)
Culture:
Guahibo  Search this
Piapoco (Piapoko)  Search this
Baniwa  Search this
Tukano (Tucano)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Film reels
Photographic prints
Videocassettes (vhs)
Videocassettes (u-matic)
Documentary films
Place:
Orinoco River Region (Venezuela and Colombia)
Date:
1935-1941
Summary:
This collection includes the original documentary film "Guahiboland: Indian Life in the Orinoco Plains of Colombia," produced and directed by Felix V. DiGiovanni in 1941. Also included are 100 photographic prints, shot by DiGiovanni and his cameraman Paul Beer, that document the daily life of Guahibo community members in the Vichada and Orinoco regions of Colombia between 1935-1941. Other indigenous communities photographed include the Piapoco (Piapoko), Baniwa, and Tukano (Tucano).
Scope and Contents:
Series 1: "Guahiboland: Indian Life in the Orinoco Plains of Colombia" film, 1941, includes the original 16mm film produced and directed by Felix V. DiGiovanni. Paul Beer served as the cameraman. The original film (approximately 1200 feet) came in two parts, a metal can with black and white film and a small, metal can with Kodachrome film. The NMAI film and video center made several viewing copies on VHS tapes. There are also three video recordings on U-Matic tapes which include the original black and white, original color, a first generation copy and a second generation copy.

Series 2: Photographs from the Colombian Plains, 1935-1941, includes 100 mounted black and white photographic prints (13 ½ x 10 ½) made by Felix DiGiovanni and Paul Beer. The majority of the photographs were shot during the making of DiGiovanni's documentary film and highlight the daily life and activities of Guahibo community members in the Orinoco and Vichada regions of Colombia. A smaller amount of photographs include other indigenous communities in the region including the Piapoco (Piapoko), Baniwa, and Tukano (Tucano). The captions and descriptions of the photographs were provided by the DiGiovanni family in 1992.

Catalog numbers: P25101-P25200.

Series 3: The Call of the Curassow and the Land of the Guahibo Indians, includes a copy of the manuscript written by Felix V.D. Giovanni and published posthumously by his wife Pauline in 1994. This was formerly in the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation records in Box 422, Folder 13.
Arrangement:
Arranged into series by format, the photographs are arranged by catalog number.
Biographical / Historical:
Felix V. DiGiovanni (ca. 1913-1990) was an American engineer, writer, photographer, and filmmaker. He was raised in the Bronx and graduated with an engineering degree from The City College of New York in 1933. As a young man, he traveled throughout Colombia, Venezuela, and Brazil, and later became interested in documenting the eastern plains of Colombia, known as Los Llanos, as well as its inhabitants. In the late 1930s, he returned to Colombia to film a documentary on the indigenous people of the Vaupés region. DiGiovanni's partner in the expedition was Paul Beer. Beer (1904-1979) was a German photographer active in Bogota, Colombia, in the late 1920s. By 1941, DiGiovanni's documentary film about the Guahibo, "Guahiboland" was completed. In 1944 he returned to Colombia to work with the U.S. Cinchona Mission, which comprised a team of scientists travelling to the Andes region to find cinchona trees, whose bark produces the alkaloid quinine, used for treating malaria. DiGiovanni met Tom Bellis during this time. Bellis (1907-1993) was an officer with the Food and Drug Administration. From October 1942 until December 1945, he worked for the Board of Economic Warfare in Bogota, Colombia at the Instituto Nacional de Higiene Samper-Martinez. Here, he directed a laboratory which analyzed cinchona bark. In November 1945, Bellis purchased this set of photographs, along with 28 Guahibo artifacts, from DiGiovanni. Felix DiGiovanni returned to New York in 1946 and became a mechanical engineer with a major oil company. In 1960, he completed a draft of a manuscript about his experiences with the Guahibo, titled The Call of the Curassow and the Land of the Guahibo Indians. He intended to publish it and also produce a Spanish translation, but he died December 31, 1990, before it could be finished. In 1994, Pauline DiGiovanni, DiGiovanni's widow, published 40 copies of the manuscript in English. After the expedition with DiGiovanni, Paul Beer's photography focused primarily on architectural and industrial themes. He lived in Bogota until his death in 1979.

Biographical note from: https://sova.si.edu/record/NAA.PhotoLot.1995-41
Related Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives (NAA) holds a collection of Felix DiGiovanni and Paul Beer photographs of the Guahibo and other indigenous tribes of eastern Colombia, Photo lot 1995-41. https://sova.si.edu/record/NAA.PhotoLot.1995-41
Separated Materials:
A collection of Guahibo ethnographic materials were also donated to the National Museum of the American Indian object collections with catalog numbers 25/4002-25/4047. See the Smithsonian Collections Search Center.
Provenance:
Gift of Felix V. and Pauline G. DiGiovanni, 1992.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Rights retrictions apply. Contact the NMAI Archives center (nmaiphotos@si.edu) for more information.
Genre/Form:
Documentary films
Photographic prints
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Felix V. DiGiovanni collection from Colombia, image #, NMAI.AC.300, National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.300
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv494ace419-bffa-4e6a-8381-7f50c028401e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-300

Terry Dintenfass, Inc. records

Creator:
Terry Dintenfass, Inc.  Search this
Names:
Art Dealers Association of America  Search this
Grace Borgenicht Gallery  Search this
Bloom, Hyman, 1913-  Search this
Cober, Alan E.  Search this
Dintenfass, Terry, 1920-  Search this
Dove, Arthur Garfield, 1880-1946  Search this
Evergood, Philip, 1901-1973  Search this
Fleischner, Richard, 1944-  Search this
Frasconi, Antonio  Search this
Goodman, Sidney  Search this
King, William, 1925-2015  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000  Search this
Merkin, Richard  Search this
Pippin, Horace, 1888-1946  Search this
Suttman, Paul, 1933-1993  Search this
Tovish, Harold, 1921-2008  Search this
Extent:
22.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Visitors' books
Date:
1947-1987
bulk 1961-1983
Summary:
The records of New York art gallery Terry Dintenfass, Inc. date from 1947 to 1987, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1961 to 1983, and measure 22.1 linear feet. The records are comprised of administrative files, correspondence, exhibition files, artists' files, and financial records.
Scope and Contents:
The records of New York art gallery Terry Dintenfass, Inc. date from 1947 to 1987, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1961 to 1983, and measure 22.1 linear feet. The records include administrative files, correspondence, exhibition files, artists' files, and financial records.

Administrative files include advertising and membership records, insurance documents, a guest book, resumes, and agreements with other corporations. Correspondence is with artists, galleries, museums, and arts organizations. There is a significant amount of correspondence regarding the Art Dealers Association of America. Exhibition files are found for numerous exhibitions to which Dintenfass either loaned art or helped to organize. There is extensive documentation of the 20 Galleries/20 Years exhibition held at the Grace Borgenicht Gallery and the Terry Dintenfass Gallery in 1982 and the "Machine Themed Shows" in 1974-1975.

Artists' files comprise the largest group of materials within the collection. Files for Hyman Bloom, Alan Cober, Arthur Dove, Philip Evergood, Richard Fleischner, Antonio Frasconi, Sidney Goodman, William King, Jacob Lawrence, Richard Merkin, Horace Pippin, Paul Suttman, and Harold Tovish bulk the largest.

Financial records contain artist expense and sales ledgers, consignment papers, invoices and receipts, as well as records for D Contemporary Paintings.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Administrative Files, 1961-1983 (1.0 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1961-1981 (1.0 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 3: Exhibition Files, 1962-1983 (4.5 linear feet; Boxes 2-7, OV 23)

Series 4: Artists' Files, 1947-1987 (8.5 linear feet; Boxes 7-15, OV 23)

Series 5: Financial Records, 1959-1981 (7.0 linear feet; Boxes 16-22, OV 23)
Biographical / Historical:
Terry Dintenfass, Inc. is a New York City art gallery founded in 1959 by Terry Dintenfass (1920-2004).

In 1954, Theresa "Terry" Dintenfass opened D Contemporary Paintings in Atlantic City, New Jersey. With financial backing from Armand Erpf, she moved the gallery to New York City in 1959 and changed the name to Terry Dintenfass Gallery. There, she became a protégé of Downtown Gallery owner Edith Halpert. Dintenfass was one of several notable female art dealers in the city during the 1940s-1980s among Edith Halpert, Betty Parsons, Grace Borgenicht, Antoinette Kraushaar, and others. She showed work on consignment from other dealers, and when Edith Halpert retired, Terry Dintenfass, Inc. began to represent the estate of Arthur Dove. Other notable artists represented by the gallery included social realists Philip Evergood and Robert Gwathmey, and African American painters Horace Pippin and Jacob Lawrence, whom she represented for 25 years. The gallery's stable also included William King, Sidney Goodman, Hyman Bloom, Antonio Frasconi, and others.

After Dintenfass retired in 1999, her son Andrew took over the business and continues to run the gallery today. Terry Dintenfass died in 2004 in Manhattan.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Terry Dintenfass conducted by Paul Cummings on December 2, 1974-January 13, 1975 for the Archives of American Art.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 1995 by Terry Dintenfass.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State)
Genre/Form:
Visitors' books
Citation:
Terry Dintenfass, Inc. records, 1947-1987, bulk 1961-1983. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.terrdint
See more items in:
Terry Dintenfass, Inc. records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e485640b-ef7f-49bb-8964-fed4c50e6438
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-terrdint
Online Media:

Dale-Patterson Family collection

Creator:
Dale, Dianne  Search this
Polk, P. H., 1898-1985  Search this
Names:
Barry, Marion, 1936-2014  Search this
Dale, Almore M., 1911-1984  Search this
Dale, Dianne  Search this
Dale, John Henry, Jr., 1888-1973  Search this
Dale, Lucille Emma Patterson, 1889-1973  Search this
Dale, Marie Howard, 1914-2011  Search this
Dale, Norman Edward, 1908-1991  Search this
Garner, Araminta Dale, 1913-1987  Search this
Patterson, Frederick D. (Frederick Douglass), 1901-1988  Search this
Patterson, Wilhelmina Bessie, 1888-1962  Search this
Extent:
6 Linear feet (9 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Programs
Clippings
Correspondence
Ephemera
Postcards
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1866 - 1990.
Summary:
The Dale-Patterson family papers, which date from 1866 to 2010 and measure 6 linear feet, document the personal and professional lives of the Dale-Patterson family who came to live in Hillsdale, Anacostia, area of Washington, D.C., in 1892.
Scope and Contents note:
The Dale-Patterson family papers, which date from 1866 to 1990 and measure 6 linear feet, document the personal and professional lives of the Dale-Patterson family who came to live in Hillsdale, Anacostia, area of Washington, D.C., in 1892. The collection is comprised of correspondence, photographs, clippings, and ephemera.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged in four series:

Series 1: Dale-Patterson Family papers Series 2: Charles Qualls papers Series 3: Community Organizations Series 4: Subject Files
Biographical/Historical note:
The Dale family came to Washington, DC in 1886 when John Henry Dale, Sr., a gifted self-taught man, obtained a position as clerk in the newly contracted Pension Bureau building at 5th and G Streets, NW. First they lived near 13th Street and Florida Avenue, NW, then moved to Howard Road in Anacostia. Dale built a house at 2619 Nichols Avenue, now Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, drawing the plans and supervising the construction. The Dales and only one other family lived in this solidly built house for 100 years before it was sold to a church group and demolished.
General Note:
Finding Aid Note: This finding aid is associated with a MARC collection-level record.361883
Provenance:
The Dale-Patterson Family collection was donated to the Anacostia Community Museum on April 07, 2013.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
The Dale-Patterson Family collection is the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American families  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Programs
Clippings
Correspondence
Ephemera
Postcards
Citation:
Dale-Patterson Family collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Dianne Dale.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-074
See more items in:
Dale-Patterson Family collection
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c29572e9-2bd6-4b2a-8982-b527693b7885
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-074
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Online Media:

Arwin Galleries records

Creator:
Arwin Galleries (Detroit, Mich.)  Search this
Names:
Arwin, Kathleen G.  Search this
Arwin, Lester B.  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Extent:
8.7 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Drawings
Motion pictures
Date:
1948-1981
Summary:
The records of Detroit art gallery Arwin Galleries measure 8.7 linear feet and date from 1948 to 1981. The collection comprises administrative records including sales, a financial ledger of artists' account consignment and loan records; personal and professional correspondence; artist files for Chuang Chi, Richard Kozlow, Ben and Bernarda Bryson Shahn, Jo Snyder, Russel Thayer, Adja Yunkers, and others; printed materials documenting the 1963 fire at the gallery, exhibitions, and other activities related to the gallery; artwork by Frederick Simper, Donald Snydor, and a few others; and photographic materials and moving images including photos of the Arwins, gallery artists, and exhibitions, and two film reels relating to the gallery fire.
Scope and Contents:
The records of Detroit art gallery Arwin Galleries measure 8.7 linear feet and date from 1948 to 1981. The collection comprises administrative records containing sales records, consignment and loan records, appraisals, framing and graphics orders, a financial ledger of artists' accounts, and other administrative documents; personal and professional correspondence; artist's files for Chuang Chi, Richard Kozlow, Ben and Bernarda Bryson Shahn, Jo Snyder, Russel Thayer, Adja Yunkers, and others; printed materials documenting the 1963 fire at the gallery, exhibitions, and other articles related to the gallery; artwork by Frederick Simper, Donald Snydor, and a few others; and photographic materials and moving images include portraits and candid shots of the Arwins, gallery installations and openings, artists, works of art, and two film reels relating to the fire at the gallery.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as six series.

Series 1: Administrative Records, 1959-1981 (2.5 linear feet; Boxes 1-3, 13, OV 11)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1958-1981 (0.4 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 3: Artist's Files, 1948-1981 (4.0 linear feet; Boxes 3-7, 13, OV 11)

Series 4: Printed Materials, 1956-1981 (0.4 linear feet; Boxes 7-8, OV 11)

Series 5: Artwork, circa 1970s (0.2 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 6: Photographic Materials and Moving Images, circa 1950-1981 (0.8 linear feet; Box 3, FC 12)
Biographical / Historical:
The Arwin Galleries (est. 1963-1981) was founded by Lester and Kathleen (Kitty) Arwin in Detroit, Michigan.

Although intending to move to Chicago in the 1930s, Lester Arwin found himself remaining in Detroit due to lack of funds. There he spent time observing Diego Rivera painting the murals at the Detroit Institute of Art. He also visited Rivera's studio and purchased his first piece of artwork, thus beginning his career as an art collector and dealer. Arwin served as director of Grinnell Art Galleries prior to opening his own business.

In 1963, Lester and his wife Kitty opened the Arwin Galleries, specializing in contemporary art, in Robinsons Furniture Store on Washington Boulevard. A fire at the gallery in 1963 destroyed approximately $300,000 worth of artwork, including works by Picasso with an estimated value of $150,000. The Arwin Galleries reopened at W. Grand River in 1965. The Arwins worked closely with many renowned artists such as Richard Kozlow, Ben Shahn, and numerous others.

Lester and Kitty Arwin died in 1981.
Provenance:
The Arwin Galleries records were donated in 1981, 1984 and 2021 by Melanie Arwin, the daughter of Lester and Kathleen Arwin.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center.

Researchers interested in accessing audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Women art dealers  Search this
Function:
Art galleries, Commercial -- Michigan
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Motion pictures
Citation:
Arwin Galleries records, 1948-1981. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.arwigall
See more items in:
Arwin Galleries records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9cf38970b-0287-482f-9a00-39cc5ea2f2d4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-arwigall

Oral history interview with Walker Evans

Interviewee:
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975  Search this
Interviewer:
Cummings, Paul  Search this
Names:
United States. Farm Security Administration  Search this
Kirstein, Lincoln, 1907-  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Stryker, Roy Emerson, 1893-1975  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound tape reels (Sound recording, 5 in.)
46 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1971 Oct. 13-Dec. 23
Scope and Contents:
Interview of Walker Evans conducted 1971 Oct. 13-Dec. 23, by Paul Cummings, for the Archives of American Art. Evans discusses his early life and education; his early desire to become a writer; living for two years in Paris; teaching himself photography; taking pictures for the Farm Security Administration; his later work with FORTUNE and TIME magazines; photographing celebrities; his "Subway" series; teaching at Yale; influences on his work. He recalls Lincoln Kirstein, Roy Stryker and Ben Shahn.
Biographical / Historical:
Walker Evans (1903-1975) was a photographer.
General:
Originally recorded as 2 audio reels. Duration is 2 hr., 33 min.
Provenance:
These interviews are part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Photography  Search this
Photographers -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.evans71
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a5b4f5dd-861c-4e0a-90a9-8f9eac52834a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-evans71
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight

Interviewee:
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000  Search this
Knight, Gwendolyn  Search this
Interviewer:
Karlstrom, Paul J.  Search this
Extent:
82 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1998 November 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight conducted 1998 November 18, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art, in the artists' home in Seatle, Washington.
Biographical / Historical:
Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000) was a painter and educator in Seattle, Washington and New York, New York. Gwendolyn Knight (1914-2005) was the wife of Lawrence, as well as an artist, herself and lived in New York, New York and Seattle Washington.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Use requires an appointment.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
African American painters  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.lawren98
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9c4cfd632-d284-4160-826b-182cd12bfc23
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lawren98

Oral history interview with Inslee Hopper

Creator:
Hopper, Inslee  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Names:
Bruce, Edward, 1879-1943  Search this
Force, Juliana, 1876-1948  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Watson, Forbes, 1880-1960  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recording, 5 in.)
44 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1981 July 28
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Inslee Hopper conducted 1981 July 28, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art.
Hopper speaks of his education in art history at Princeton University; his work as editor of THE ARTS under Forbes Watson, 1933-1934; a survey of sculptors for Juliana Force of the Whitney Museum of American Art, 1934-1935; his involvement in the Painting and Sculpture section of the Treasury Department under Edward Bruce, 1935-1938; supervising the decoration for the Federal Building at the World's Fair, 1938-1939; his work with Ben Shahn on the documentation of a resettlement project in West Virginia; the Smithsonian Gallery of Art project, 1938-1940; and his work as Edward Bruce's aide.
Biographical / Historical:
Inslee Hopperis an art administrator and preservationist.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and others.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art and state  Search this
Preservationists -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.hopper81
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9f78d7a86-5d09-4d2a-8513-0441342309ac
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hopper81
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Ben Shahn

Interviewee:
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Interviewer:
Doud, Richard Keith  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
United States. Farm Security Administration. Historical Section  Search this
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975  Search this
Lange, Dorothea  Search this
Rosskam, Edwin, 1903-1985  Search this
Rothstein, Arthur, 1915-1985  Search this
Stryker, Roy Emerson, 1893-1975  Search this
Extent:
29 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 April 14
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Ben Shahn conducted 1964 April 14, by Richard K. Doud, for the Archives of American Art New Deal and the Arts Project.
Shahn speaks of his travels and work for the Farm Security Administration (FSA); the American image as portrayed by FSA photographs; techniques and materials; exhibitions and publications of his work; and the effectiveness of the FSA project overall. He recalls Roy Stryker, Walker Evans, Arthur Rothstein, Edwin Rosskam and Dorothea Lange.
Biographical / Historical:
Ben Shahn (1898-1969) was a painter and photographer from Roosevelt, N.J.
General:
Originally recorded 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 23 min.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Painters -- New Jersey -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Documentary photography  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Photographers -- New Jersey -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.shahn64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw988bc9cc3-2f76-4e17-a315-11bcef420595
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-shahn64
Online Media:

Farm Security Administration (FSA) selected records and photographs

Creator:
United States. Farm Security Administration. Historical Section  Search this
Names:
Collier, John, Jr., 1913-1992  Search this
Delano, Jack  Search this
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975  Search this
Lange, Dorothea  Search this
Lee, Russell, 1903-1986  Search this
Mydans, Carl  Search this
Rosskam, Edwin, 1903-1985  Search this
Rothstein, Arthur, 1915-1985  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Stryker, Roy Emerson, 1893-1975  Search this
Vachon, John, 1914-1975  Search this
Wolcott, Marion Post, 1910-1990  Search this
Extent:
2 Items (Textual records: 2 partial microfilm reels)
218 Items (Photographs)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1935-1942
Scope and Contents:
Scattered textual records selected from the Farm Security Administration, Historical Section records at the Library of Congress and the Farmers Home Administration records at the National Archives primarily revolving around activities of Roy Stryker. Included are personnel and travel records, typescripts of photograph captions, correspondence, memoranda, files on public relations and exhibits, and printed material.
218 copy prints of photographs of America taken for the FSA, including landscapes, people, homes and other architecture, rural scenes, urban scenes, workers, products of farm and industry, transportation, entertainment, and the Quarter Circle U Ranch, Birney, Montana. Photographers include: Arthur Rothstein, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, John Collier, Marion Post Wolcott, Jack Delano, Russell Lee, John Vachon, Ben Shahn, Carl Mydans, and Edwin Rosskam.
Biographical / Historical:
Established 1935 in the Resettlement Administration Historical Section's photographic project to document poverty stricken rural America under the direction of Roy E. Stryker. In 1937, Roosevelt established the FSA, and the Resettlement Administration and its programs fell under its auspices. The Historical Section of the Resettlement Administration remained intact under the FSA, and continued its photographic survey and historical documentation under Stryker's direction.
After 1942, the photographs project was transplanted to the Office War Information, and the emphasis of the project shifted from rural and urban conditions throughout Depression-era U.S. to the domestic impact of the war. In 1946, Congress created the Farmers Home Administration (FHA) which absorbed the FSA and its programs.
Related Materials:
Additional FSA-OWI records located at: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division (microfilm available at LC)
Additional Stryker papers located at: Photographic Archives University of Louisville, Louisville, Ky. 40208
Provenance:
Microfilm and copy prints donated by the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, 1965.
Reel FSA/WDC2: Record Group 96, textual records of the Farmers Home Administration include the records of the FSA, predecessor to the FHA.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Photography -- United States -- Landscape -- Photographs  Search this
Photography -- United States -- Portraits -- Photographs  Search this
Architectural photography -- United States -- Photographs  Search this
Federal aid to the public welfare -- Photographs  Search this
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
New Deal, 1933-1939  Search this
Function:
Agencies
Identifier:
AAA.unstfsad
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw93760d8ca-0e22-4f9b-8bfb-c9d6ba0078c4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-unstfsad

Oral history interview with Peter Paone

Interviewee:
Paone, Peter, 1936-  Search this
Interviewer:
Veloric, Cynthia  Search this
Names:
Pratt Institute  Search this
Print Club (Philadelphia, Pa.)  Search this
Castellón, Federico, 1914-1971  Search this
Rodman, Selden, 1909-  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Spruance, Benton, 1904-1967  Search this
Extent:
202 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1991 Sept. 27
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Peter Paone conducted 1991 Sept. 27, by Cynthia Veloric, for the Archives of American Art Philadelphia Project.
Paone discusses his family and early education; art classes at the Fleisher Art Memorial and the Philadelphia College of Art; studying with Benton Spruance; exhibiting at the Print Club of Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Museum of Art; teaching at Pratt Institute; working with Ben Shahn in the late 1950s as a studio assistant; being included in Selden Rodman's book "The Insiders"; his galleries in New York and Houston; receiving a Tiffany and Guggenheim grant to study in London; his relationship with Federico Castellon; and the development of his style, subject matter and technique.
Biographical / Historical:
Peter Paone (1936- ) is a printmaker from Philadelphia, Pa.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 56 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript: Patrons must microfilm copy.
Topic:
Prints -- Technique -- United States  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Printmakers -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.paone91
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw96fea9828-a058-4ff9-addf-ad5fd8d8be05
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-paone91
Online Media:

Anne Bowen Parsons collection of interviews on art

Interviewer:
Parsons, Anne Bowen  Search this
Names:
Artists' Union (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Club (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Federal Art Project  Search this
Baker, Mildred, 1905-  Search this
Barnet, Will, 1911-2012  Search this
Benson, Emanuel, 1904-1971  Search this
Brooks, James, 1906-1992  Search this
Burlin, Paul, 1886-1969  Search this
Cavallon, Giorgio, 1904-1989  Search this
De Kooning, Willem, 1904-1997  Search this
Ernst, Jimmy, 1920-1984  Search this
Geist, Sidney  Search this
Gottlieb, Adolph, 1903-1974  Search this
Greene, Balcomb, 1904-1990  Search this
Gwathmey, Robert, 1903-1988  Search this
Hacker, Seymour  Search this
Holty, Carl, 1900-1973  Search this
Holtzman, Harry  Search this
Kadish, Reuben, 1913-1992  Search this
Krasner, Lee, 1908-1984  Search this
Lasker, Joe  Search this
Lassaw, Ibram, 1913-2003  Search this
Levine, Jack, 1915-2010  Search this
Marca-Relli, Conrad, 1913-2000  Search this
McNeil, George, 1908-1995  Search this
Miller, Dorothy Canning, 1904-2003  Search this
Morris, George L. K., 1905-1975  Search this
Nakian, Reuben, 1897-1986  Search this
Pavia, Philip, 1915-2005  Search this
Schanker, Louis, 1903-1981  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Stamos, Theodoros, 1922-1997  Search this
Thaw, Eugene Victor  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Vicente, Esteban, 1903-2001  Search this
Extent:
30 Items (transcripts)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Interviews
Date:
1967-1968
Scope and Contents:
The interviews are of artists, educators, art administrators, and dealers. Topics covered include the Federal Art Project, the Artists' Union, the Club, the influence of French emigre artists, and political activism among artists. The transcripts range from 1 to 4 pages in length.
Interviewees include: Mildred Baker, Will Barnet, Emanuel Benson, James Brooks, Paul Burlin, Giorgio Cavallon, Willem de Kooning, Jimmy Ernst, Sidney Geist, Adolph Gottlieb, Balcomb Greene, Robert Gwathmey, Seymour Hacker, Carl Holty, Harry Holtzman, Reuben Kadish, Lee Krasner, Joe Lasker, Ibram Lassaw, Jack Levine, Conrad Marca-Relli, George McNeil, Dorothy Canning Miller, George L.K. Morris, Reuben Nakian, Phillip Pavia, Louis Schanker, Ben Shahn, Theodoros Stamos, Eugene Victor Thaw, Jack Tworkov, and Esteban Vincente.
Provenance:
Donated in 1985 by Anne Bowen Parsons' son, Randall T. Parsons.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Artists -- Interviews  Search this
Art dealers -- Interviews  Search this
Art teachers -- Interviews  Search this
Painters -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Art and state  Search this
Museum curators -- Interviews  Search this
Museum directors -- Interviews  Search this
Printmakers -- Interviews  Search this
Publishers -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.parsanne
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9cebc01b2-2b58-431a-ad17-ddb4c9da09fe
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-parsanne

Oral history interview with John Collier

Interviewee:
Collier, John, Jr., 1913-1992  Search this
Interviewer:
Doud, Richard Keith  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
United States. Farm Security Administration  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Stryker, Roy Emerson, 1893-1975  Search this
Vanderbilt, Paul  Search this
Extent:
33 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1965 January 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of John Collier conducted 1965 January 18, by Richard K. Doud, for the Archives of American Art.
Collier describes the Farm Security Administration as an experiment in group dynamics; he speaks of the difference in viewpoint between officials and photographers; Collier's New England and New Mexico work; and he appraises the value of the group effort in the FSA. He recalls Paul Vanderbilt, Roy Stryker, and Ben Shahn.
Biographical / Historical:
John Collier (1913-1992) was a photographer.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 26 min.
Provenance:
Conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Photographers -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.collie65
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw91b8f4b12-78f1-4276-ac02-af2a4c7e7fbd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-collie65
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Kathryn Burch Greywacz

Interviewee:
Greywacz, Kathryn Burch, b. 1893  Search this
Interviewer:
Doud, Richard Keith  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
Index of American Design  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
New Jersey State Museum  Search this
Public Works of Art Project  Search this
Baker, Mildred, 1905-  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recordings: (50 min.), 7 in.)
21 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 Mar. 24
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Kathryn Greywacz conducted 1964 Mar. 24, by Richard Doud, for the Archives of American Art.
Greywacz speaks of her position as curator of the New Jersey State Museum; her work with the New Jersey Public Works of Art Project; and the Index of American Design. She recalls Mildred Baker and Ben Shahn.
Biographical / Historical:
Kathryn Burch Greywacz (b. 1893) was an art administrator from New Jersey.
Provenance:
Conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
This interview is open for research. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- New Jersey -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.greywa64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw96d89d4b2-390a-4430-9547-5dfdb9c708b9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-greywa64
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Arthur Rothstein

Interviewee:
Rothstein, Arthur, 1915-1985  Search this
Interviewer:
Doud, Richard Keith  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
United States. Farm Security Administration.Historical Section.Photographs  Search this
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975  Search this
Lee, Russell, 1903-1986  Search this
Mydans, Carl  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Stryker, Roy Emerson, 1893-1975  Search this
Extent:
31 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1964 May 25
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Arthur Rothstein conducted in New York, N.Y., 1964 May 25, by Richard Doud, for the Archives of American Art.
Rothstein speaks of the development of his interest in photography as a hobby while in pre-medical school during the Depression; meeting Roy Stryker and his early impressions of Stryker; the Resettlement Administration and its growth into the Farm Security Administration (FSA); the educational experience of working under Stryker's guidance; the influence of Ben Shahn and Walker Evans; the traveling experience and its influence on him; early assignments; developing as a photographer; documenting the Dust Bowl; the "skull" series and the controversy surrounding it; usage of the FSA works; the FSA's contribution to Rothstein's life and personal development; and going to work for LOOK magazine. He recalls Carl Mydans and Russell Lee.
Biographical / Historical:
Arthur Rothstein (1915-1985) was a photographer from New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 1 sound tape reel. Reformatted in 2010 as 2 digital wav files. Duration is 1 hr., 11 min.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Topic:
Documentary photography -- United States  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.rothst64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9bf7545fb-dd5d-44c4-953c-274df0133fea
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-rothst64
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Boris Gorelick

Topic:
Art front
Interviewee:
Gorelick, Boris, 1912-  Search this
Interviewer:
McGlynn, Betty Hoag  Search this
Creator:
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Names:
American Artists' Congress  Search this
Artists' Union (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Federal Art Project  Search this
New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project  Search this
Gorky, Arshile, 1904-1948  Search this
Shahn, Ben, 1898-1969  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound tape reel (Sound recording: (45 min.), 5 in.)
18 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound tape reels
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
1964 May 20
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Boris Gorelick conducted 1964 May 20, by Betty Hoag for the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts Oral History Project.
Gorelick speaks of his background in Russia and New York; attending the Art Students League; the formation of the Artists' Union; working on murals and stained glass for the WPA Federal Art Project; the influence of the Mexican muralists on FAP murals; Art Front magazine, and the American Artists' Congress. He recalls Ben Shahn and Arshile Gorky.
Biographical / Historical:
Designer, mural painter; Los Angeles, Calif.
General:
Sound quality is poor.
Provenance:
This interview conducted as part of the Archives of American Art's New Deal and the Arts project, which includes over 400 interviews of artists, administrators, historians, and others involved with the federal government's art programs and the activities of the Farm Security Administration in the 1930s and early 1940s.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Muralists -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Mural painting and decoration  Search this
Designers -- California -- Los Angeles -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.goreli64
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a5549e87-34ea-422a-a526-f3fa5dfce5d7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-goreli64
Online Media:

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