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Atelier of the living brochure

Creator:
Archives of American Art  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1949 Jan
Scope and Contents:
Brochure with 8 typewritten leaves, announcing the first meeting of the "Atelier of the living" on Jan. 29th, 1949 in Detroit. The Atelier is described as a group comprised of "painters, sculptors, designers, musicians, theatre folk, writers, photographers, dancers, craftsmen, art critics, [and] architects, amateur and professional" joined together in creating "a new joint adventure in shared creation and enthusiastic living."
General:
Handwritten note on first leaf reads "Jan 6 - 8pm, Belcrest." Three sets of names and addresses are penciled on back cover.
Woodcut of a man strewing seeds pasted on front cover.
Provenance:
Provenance unknown.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Topic:
Community arts projects -- Michigan -- Detroit  Search this
Identifier:
AAA.archiv96
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw94429e553-b7e1-4afc-ae76-f8b71992596d
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-archiv96

Grosse Pointe -- Grosse Pointe Garden Center

Former owner:
Alger, Russell A.  Search this
Alger, Marion J.  Search this
Architect:
Platt, Charles A. (Charles Adams), 1861-1933  Search this
Landscape architect:
Platt, Charles A. (Charles Adams), 1861-1933  Search this
Shipman, Ellen, 1869-1950  Search this
Gardener:
DePetris, Vincent  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Grosse Pointe War Memorial (Grosse Pointe, Michigan)
United States of America -- Michigan -- Wayne County -- Grosse Pointe
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes correspondence, pamphlets, articles, brief description of garden, and information sheet done by GCA researcher.
Former Title:
The Moorings
General:
"In 1910, Charles Platt designed an Italian Renaissance villa for Russell A. Alger. There are a pair of stone lions at the entrance to the circular courtyard. The courtyard has a reflecting pool with a fountain to offset the architecture of the house. The house is built from stone and stucco with a tile roof that blends into its setting."
"The Moorings was popular because of its frontage upon Lake St. Clair. The property was given to the Grosse Pointe community in 1949 by the Alger family. The Grosse Pointe Garden Center was organized for the purpose of providing the community with horticultural and gardening information and education."
"The property has two additions: the War Memorial Center and the William H. Fries Auditorium (for housing the dramatic arts). There is an art school and an exhibit area for art displays."
Persons and organizations associated with the property include: Mr. and Mrs. Russell A. Alger (former owners); Charles Adams Platt (architect, landscape architect); the Michigan Garden Club; Ellen Shipman (landscape architect); and Vincent DePetris (gardener).
Related Materials:
Grosse Pointe Garden Center related holdings consist of 1 folder (5 slides:, lantern, hand colored.)2 photonegatives (glass)6 slides (col.) (35 mm.)
See others in:
Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection, 1900-1966.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Michigan -- Grosse Pointe  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MI002
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Michigan
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6afdd8459-99dd-4694-abc4-f1a12e6af7a5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref8580

Delegate

Published by:
MelPat Associates, American, 1965 - 1986  Search this
Created by:
C. Melvin Patrick, American, died 1985  Search this
Subject of:
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, American, founded 1914  Search this
National Pan-Hellenic Council, American, founded 1930  Search this
Percy C. Ifill, American, 1914 - 1973  Search this
Arthur Courtney Logan, American, 1909 - 1973  Search this
National Association of Black Social Workers, American, founded 1968  Search this
The Girl Friends, Inc., American, founded 1927  Search this
Prince Hall Freemasonry, founded 1784  Search this
Chi Delta Mu Fraternity, Inc., American, founded 1913  Search this
National Newspaper Publishers Association, American, founded 1827  Search this
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, American, founded 1909  Search this
Lambda Kappa Mu Sorority, Inc., American, founded 1937  Search this
National Insurance Association, American, founded 1921  Search this
National Urban League, American, founded 1910  Search this
National United Church Ushers Association of America, Inc., American, founded 1919  Search this
National Medical Association, American, founded 1895  Search this
National Council of Negro Women, founded 1935  Search this
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, founded 1908  Search this
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., American, founded 1911  Search this
Eta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., American, founded 1943  Search this
National Funeral Directors and Morticians Association, Inc., American, founded 1924  Search this
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, American, founded 1920  Search this
National Association of University Women, American, founded 1910  Search this
National Dental Association, American, founded 1913  Search this
National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc., American, founded 1935  Search this
Shriners International, American, founded 1870  Search this
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc., founded 1922  Search this
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., American, founded 1906  Search this
American Bridge Association, American, founded 1932  Search this
Simeon Golar, American, 1929 - 2013  Search this
369th Veterans Association, American  Search this
National Alliance of Postal and Federal Employees, American, founded 1913  Search this
Alliance for Women in Media, American, founded 1951  Search this
Congressional Black Caucus, American, founded 1971  Search this
National Business League, American, founded 1900  Search this
Morehouse College, American, founded 1867  Search this
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., American, founded 1911  Search this
Daughters of Isis, American, founded 1910  Search this
Alvin Ailey, American, 1931 - 1989  Search this
Dr. Gloria Toote, American, 1931 - 2017  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 10 13/16 × 8 7/16 × 9/16 in. (27.5 × 21.4 × 1.4 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place made:
Harlem, New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, United States, North and Central America
Kenya, Africa
Barbados, Caribbean, North and Central America
Martha's Vineyard, Oak Bluffs, Dukes County, Massachusetts, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1974
Topic:
African American  Search this
Advertising  Search this
Associations and institutions  Search this
Black Press  Search this
Business  Search this
Communities  Search this
Fraternal organizations  Search this
Fraternities  Search this
Funeral customs and rites  Search this
Government  Search this
HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities)  Search this
Journalism  Search this
Labor  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Men  Search this
Political organizations  Search this
Politics  Search this
Professional organizations  Search this
Religion  Search this
Sororities  Search this
Travel  Search this
U.S. History, 1969-2001  Search this
Urban life  Search this
Women  Search this
Women's organizations  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Anne B. Patrick and the family of Hilda E. Stokely
Object number:
2012.167.8
Restrictions & Rights:
Public domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd596329946-b260-4d18-be3e-b5393a7ee34a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2012.167.8
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  • View <I>Delegate</I> digital asset number 1

Frederick Douglass Patterson papers

Creator:
Patterson, Frederick D. (Frederick Douglass), 1901-1988  Search this
Names:
Phelps-Stokes Fund  Search this
Tuskegee Institute  Search this
United Negro College Fund  Search this
Carver, George Washington, 1864?-1943  Search this
Moton, Robert Russa, 1867-1940  Search this
Patterson, Frederick D. (Frederick Douglass), 1901-1988  Search this
Extent:
18.66 Linear feet (21 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diplomas
Notebooks
Articles
Manuscripts
Photographic prints
Ephemera
Scrapbooks
Newsletters
Awards
Photographs
Invitations
Legal documents
Programs
Correspondence
Clippings
Date:
1882 - 1988
Summary:
President of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (later Tukegee Institute; now Tuskegee University) from 1935 - 1953 and founder of the United Negro College Fund (1944). Patterson was born on October 10, 1901. Orphaned at age two, he was raised by his eldest sister, Wilhelmina (Bess), a school teacher in Texas. He studied at Iowa State College, where he received a doctorate in veterinary medicine in 1923 and a master of science degree in 1927. Five years later, he was awarded a second doctorate degree from Cornell University. Patterson taught veterinary science for four years at Virginia State College, where he was also Director of Agriculture. His tenure at Tuskegee University started in 1928 and spanned almost 25 years, first as head of the veterinary division, then as the director of the School of Agriculture and finally as Tuskegee's third president. He married Catherine Elizabeth Moton, daughter of Tuskegee University's second president, Dr. Robert R. Moton. Patterson also founded the School of Veterinary Medicine at Tuskegee in 1944, the same year he founded the United Negro College Fund (UNCF). The UNCF continues today as a critical source of annual income for a consortium of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tuskegee University among them.
Scope and Content note:
The Frederick Douglass Patterson Collection comprises 18.66 linear feet of correspondence, manuscripts, research material, published writings, photographs, audiovisual material, scrapbooks, diplomas, awards, and other materials chronicling the personal life and professional career of Frederick D. Patterson.

The collection is comprised of glimpses into the life of Dr. Patterson. The little correspondece that survived is located in Series 2: Career, Series 3: Correspondence, and Series 4: Organizations. Some of the correspondence takes the form of congratulatory notes from 1953 during Patterson's transfer from Tuskegee Institute to the Phelps-Stokes Fund, located in Series 2. There is also a personal note sent to Patterson's wife, Catherine Patterson, from George Washington Carver in which he describes peanut oil as a good massage oil.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged by series and chronologically therein:

1. Biography: This series provides insight into Patterson's family life through primary documents. It is comprised of family wills, insurance policies, and his autobiography. Sub-series are arranged alphabetically by title.

2. Career: This series contains materials from Patterson's long professional career in the field of higher education, including his tenure as present of both the Tuskegee Institute and the Phelps-Stokes Fund. Sub-series are arranged chronologically.

3. Correspondence: This series contains letters sent to Patterson (and his wife) of a personal and professional nature. Several letters relate to Patterson's personal business "Signs and Services," which was a small billboard advertising company. There are also letters from George Washington Carver. The series is arranged chronologically. 4. Organizations: This series contains material from the various foundations Patterson founded and to which he belonged, including the R.R. Moton Fund and the College Endowment Funding Plan. He is especially noted for developing the United Negro College Fund. The series is organized alphabetically by sub-series title.

5. Honors: This series contains the awards, citations, and resolutions Patterson received during his lifetime. Folders are organized chronologically. 6. Subject Files: This series comprises articles, employee vitas, and other documents collected and organized by Patterson. Among the subjects in the files are higher education, Negroes, segregation, civil rights, and employee records. There is no key to this system.

7. Photographs: The Photograph series mostly documents Patterson's tenure at Tuskegee University. The series includes images of Patterson and various other notable figures during formal functions at the university. Noteworthy personalities include George Washington Carver, Eleanor and Franklin D. Roosevelt, and President Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana.

8. Printed Materials: This series contains books, programs, and other documents from Patterson's personal collection. The series is organized alphabetically by author's last name.
Biographical note:
Frederick Douglass Patterson was born on October 10, 1901 to parents William and Mamie Brooks Patterson, in the Buena Vista Heights area of Anacostia in Washington, D.C. The youngest of six children, Patterson's parents died of tuberculosis before he reached the age of two years, his mother when he was eleven months old and his father a year later. Following his parents' death, the Patterson children were split up and sent to live in the homes of family and friends as stipulated in his father's last will and testament until he was seven years old, Patterson lived in the Anacostia area with a family friend he called "Aunt Julia."

When he was seven years old, Patterson's older sister Bess (a recent graduate of the Washington Conservatory of Music) decided to seek employment in Texas and took him with her. Many of their parents' family still lived in the state, which allowed Patterson the opportunity to spend months with various aunts and uncles, while his sister taught music throughout the South. After completing eighth grade, Patterson joined his sister at the Prairie View Normal School, where she taught music and directed the choir. Patterson attended the school for four years, during which time he developed an interest in veterinary medicine.

In 1920, Patterson enrolled at Iowa State College as a veterinary student. He graduated in 1923 and moved to Columbus, Ohio, to join his brother John. While there, he took the Ohio State Board exam for Veterinary Medicine. Although he became certified, a lack of money prevented him from practicing. Four years later he received a teaching offer from Virginia State College (VSC) in Petersburg, Virginia, which afforded him the opportunity to work within his profession. While at VSC Patterson took a leave of absence and returned to Iowa, in 1926, to pursue a Master's degree in veterinary medicine.

After five years at VSC, the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute offered Patterson a position running the veterinarian hospital and teaching veterinary science. He moved to Tuskegee, Alabama in 1928. While at Tuskegee, Patterson decided to pursue a Ph.D. in bacteriology at Cornell University. During his year and a half leave from Tuskegee, Patterson completed his coursework and wrote his dissertation. After he returned to Tuskegee, a serial killer murdered three people, including the head of the Department of Agriculture. Confronted with this tragedy, school officials quickly offered Patterson the vacant position, which he accepted in 1934.

Robert R. Moton, second president of Tuskegee, retired in 1935 and a search was soon commenced to find the next president for the school. Patterson, in the meantime, pursued more personal matters when he met and married Catherine Moton (with whom he would have a son) in June 1935. By then he was already hired to take his now, father-in-law's, position as President of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute.

As president of Tuskegee, Patterson made several changes and many additions to the institution. He increased faculty housing for professors; integrated the Board of Trustees' meeting meals and eventually arranged for both balck and white members to eat at one table; shortened the name to Tuskegee Institute; and established the Department of Commercial Dietetics in 1935, the veterinary medicine program in 1942, and the engineering program in 1948. While many considered Patterson's changes important achievements, it was his development of the Commercial/Military Aviation Program that would bring the school distinction and fame.

Patterson first attempted to develop the aviation program in 1939. The government fostered the development of such programs by subsiding the expenses. All a university had to do was present able-bodied instructors and willing pupils. Tuskegee had both. By 1940 the United States Air Force was interested in integrating its forces. In order to do this they needed trained black pilots. Tuskegee was the perfect place to provide the needed pilots since the school was situated in an all-black environment where students could concentrate on learning to fly without having to worry about racist reactions from their fellow classmates. To accommodate this program, the Tuskegee Army Air Base was created. Tuskegee pilots flew missions throughout World War II and would later be recognized for their bravery.

An important part of Patterson's duties as president was fund-raising. By 1943 he found it increasingly difficult to find ample sources of funds to run the Institute. He came to realize Tuskegee and similar black colleges would benefit if they pooled their funding resources and asked for larger amounts of money from philanthropic individuals and organizations as a collective. Working together would cut fund-raising expenses; this in turn would leave more money for the colleges to use as they wished. Patterson named his new creation the United Negro College Fund (UNCF); it would go on to raise millions of dollars for the nation's historically black colleges. He served as the first president of the organization.

During the fifteen years Patterson served as president of Tuskegee, he hosted many famous personalities, including W.E.B. DuBois, Mary McLeod Bethune, Eleanor Roosevelt, Duke Ellington, Paul Robeson, Pearl Buck, and Andre Segovia. He developed a lasting relationship with George Washington Carver, who had been a professor with Tuskegee since the days of Booker T. Washington.

Patterson served on many organizational boards in addition to his educational work. His involvement with the Phelps-Stokes Fund would ultimately lead Patterson to leave his beloved Tuskegee Institute to apply his educational philosophies on a broader scale. In 1953 the Fund approached Patterson and offered him the presidency of the organization. Patterson, feeling he needed a change, accepted the offer. He resigned from Tuskegee that same year and moved to New York to begin a new life.

Organized in 1911, the Phelps-Stokes Fund supported African, African American, and Native American education and worked on solving housing problems in New York City. Patterson's interest in African education began before he joined Phelps-Stokes. In 1950 the World Bank/International Bank Commission to Nigeria hired him to "evaluate the resources of Nigeria and…to study the educational programs and the organizational structure of advanced education." Through his work with the Fund he continued his efforts to improve the educational opportunities for Africans and help them move beyond colonialism. Patterson traveled extensively throughout the west coast of Africa in support of these goals.

In addition to forming the UNCF, Patterson created two other organizations (the Robert R. Moton Institute and the College Endowment Funding Plan), during the mid 1960s and 1970s. Each was designed to improve funding efforts for historically black colleges. The Robert R. Moton institute began as an off-shoot of the Phelps-Stokes as a site for conferences to address the Fund's primary concerns. Patterson's idea for the Institute came from a desire to put to use a piece of property inherited after Moton's death. Empathy with the frustrations of college presidents regarding the restricted funding for institutional expenses led Patterson to create the College Endowment Funding Plan. The Endowment was designed to alleviate this situation by providing matching funds to eligible colleges. The Endowment made its first payment in 1978. Unfortunately, by the 1980s, the Moton Institute lost most of its government funding due to federal cutbacks. This resulted in reductions to the Institute's programming.

It was not until Patterson was well into his eighties that he began to retire from his life of public service. On June 23, 1987, President Ronald Reagan presented Dr. Patterson with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest possible honor that can be bestowed upon a civilian, for his service in higher education and his role in creating funding sources for the nation's historically black colleges. A year later Frederick Douglass Patterson died at the age of eighty-seven.

Honorary Degrees

undated -- Xavier University

1941 -- Virginia State College

1941 -- Wilberforce University

1953 -- Morehouse College

1956 -- Tuskegee Institute

1961 -- New York University

1966 -- Edward Waters College

1967 -- Atlanta University

1969 -- Franklin and Marshall College

1970 -- Virginia Union University

1975 -- Bishop College

1977 -- St. Augustine's College

1982 -- Brooklyn College of the City University of New York

1984 -- Stillman College

1985 -- Payne College

Distinctions

undated -- Association for the Study of Negro Life and History Carter

undated -- The Southern Education Foundation, Inc. Distinguished Service Citation

undated -- The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) and Texas Association of Developing Colleges Annual Leadership Awards

1950 -- Christian Education department, African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, Inc. Citation for Distinguished Service

1953 -- Bethune-Cookman College, the Mary McLeod Bethune Medallion

1953 -- John A. Andrew Clinical Society at Tuskegee Institute, Citation for Distinguished Service in the Cause of Humanity

1953 -- Tuskegee Institute, Certificate of Appreciation for 25 Years of Service

1957 -- Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Beta Lamda Sigma Chapter, Bigger and Better Business Award

1960 -- National Alumni Council of the UNCF, Inc. Award

1963 -- National Business League, Booker T. Washington Award

1965 -- Booker T. Washington Business Association, Certificate of Acknowledgement

1970 -- Moton Conference Center Award

1970 -- Tuskegee National Alumni Association, R.R. Moton Award

1972 -- American College Public Relations Association, 1972 Award for Distinguished Service to Higher Education

1972 -- UNCF F.D. Patterson 71st Birthday Award

1975 -- National Business League, Booker T. Washington Symbol of Service Award

1976 -- Phelps-Stokes Fund, Continuous Creative and Courageous Leadership in the Cause of Higher Education for Blacks

1977 -- Yale Alumni Associates of Afro-America, Distinguished Service Award

1979 -- Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation Inc., Distinguished Educator Award

1979 -- Tuskegee Institute Alumni Association Philadelphia Charter Award

1980 -- The Iowa State University Alumni Association, Distinguished Achievement Citation

1980 -- Gary Branch NAACP Life Membership Fight for Freedom Dinner 1980, Roy Wilkins Award

1980 -- State of Alabama Certificate of Appreciation

1982 -- St. Luke's United Methodist Church Achievement Award

1983 -- Tuskegee Airmen, Inc., Distinguished Service Award

1984 -- Booker T. Washington Foundation, Booker T. Washington Distinguished Service Award

1984 -- The Ohio State University Office of Minority Affairs, Distinguished Humanitarian and Service Award

1985 -- Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc, Eta Zeta Lamda Chapter Civic Award

1985 -- United States, Private Sector Initiative Commendation

1987 -- Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc of New York State, Founders Day Award

1987 -- Presidential Medal of Freedom

1987 -- Brag Business Achievement Award

1987 -- Phelps-Stokes Fund, Aggrey Medal

Public Service

1941-1971 -- Southern Educational Foundation, Inc., Board Member

1943-1988 -- United Negro College Fund, Founder, President, and Member

1960s-1988 -- Robert R. Moton Memorial Institute, Founder

1970s-1988 -- The College Endowment Funding Plan, Founder

undated -- American National Red Cross, Board of Governors Member

undated -- Boys Scouts of America, National Council Member

undated -- Citizens Committee for the Hoover Report on Reorganization of Federal Government, Board Member

undated -- Institute of International Education, Advisory committee Member

undated -- National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Life Member

undated -- National Business League, President and Board Member

undated -- National Urban League, National Committee Member

undated -- Phelps-Stokes Fund, Board of Trustees Member

undated -- President's Commission on Higher Education for Negroes

undated -- Southern Regional Education, Board of Control Member
Related Materials:
Additional biographical materials in the Dale/Patterson Collection of the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.

This collection contains artifacts catalogued in the ACM Objects Collection.
Provenance:
The Frederick Douglass Patterson papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 2001 by Frederick Douglass Patterson, Jr.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
The Frederick Douglass Patterson papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
Universities and colleges -- Administration  Search this
African Americans -- Education (Higher)  Search this
African American universities and colleges  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diplomas
Notebooks
Articles
Manuscripts
Photographic prints
Ephemera
Scrapbooks
Newsletters
Awards
Photographs
Invitations
Legal documents
Programs
Correspondence
Clippings
Citation:
Frederick Douglass Patterson papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Frederick Douglass Patterson, Jr.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-010
See more items in:
Frederick Douglass Patterson papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7da84300b-c608-41af-b59a-1f44dce53a26
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-010
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Frederick Douglass Patterson papers digital asset number 1
Online Media:

William H. Kessler papers on Michael Heizer sculpture project for Michigan State Capitol Complex, circa 1969-1981

Creator:
Kessler, William H., 1924-2002  Search this
Subject:
Heizer, Michael  Search this
Michigan. Special Commission on Art in State Buildings  Search this
Citation:
William H. Kessler papers on Michael Heizer sculpture project for Michigan State Capitol Complex, circa 1969-1981. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Sculptors  Search this
Theme:
Patronage  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)5621
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)208455
AAA_collcode_kesswill
Theme:
Patronage
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_208455

Paul Philippe Cret papers, 1919-1931

Creator:
Cret, Paul Philippe, 1876-1945  Search this
Bryant and Detwiler Co.  Search this
Subject:
Valentiner, Wilhelm Reinhold  Search this
Booth, Ralph H. (Ralph Harmon)  Search this
Burroughs, Clyde H. (Clyde Huntley)  Search this
Kahn, Albert  Search this
Detroit Institute of Arts  Search this
Detroit Arts Commission  Search this
Citation:
Paul Philippe Cret papers, 1919-1931. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Architecture -- Michigan -- Detroit  Search this
Theme:
Architecture & Design  Search this
Art instruction and services  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7548
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209708
AAA_collcode_cretpaul
Theme:
Architecture & Design
Art instruction and services
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209708

Bruce M. Donaldson letters from Gari Melchers, 1928 May 9 and May 22

Creator:
Donaldson, Bruce M.  Search this
Melchers, Gari, 1860-1932  Search this
Citation:
Bruce M. Donaldson letters from Gari Melchers, 1928 May 9 and May 22. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Theme:
Research and writing about art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7579
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209741
AAA_collcode_donabruc
Theme:
Research and writing about art
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209741

John M. Donaldson papers, 1873-1938

Creator:
Donaldson, John M., 1854-1941  Search this
Subject:
Donaldson, Bruce M.  Search this
Beckwith, J. Carroll (James Carroll)  Search this
Duveneck, Frank  Search this
Melchers, Gari  Search this
Melchers, Corinne  Search this
Citation:
John M. Donaldson papers, 1873-1938. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Theme:
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7580
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209742
AAA_collcode_donajohn
Theme:
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209742
Online Media:

Albert Kahn papers, 1875-1970

Creator:
Kahn, Albert, 1869-1942  Search this
Subject:
Kahlo, Frida  Search this
Barlow, Myron  Search this
Bacon, Henry  Search this
Trowbridge, Alexander Buell  Search this
Toscanini, Arturo  Search this
Stoughton, Arthur A.  Search this
Rivera, Diego  Search this
Milles, Carl  Search this
Mason, George D.  Search this
Kahn, Ernestine Krolik  Search this
Type:
Diaries
Watercolors
Scrapbooks
Renderings
Lithographs
Photographs
Motion pictures (visual works)
Notebooks
Drawings
Sound recordings
Awards
Sketchbooks
Etchings
Notes
Typescripts
Lectures
Citation:
Albert Kahn papers, 1875-1970. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Architecture, American  Search this
Architects -- Michigan -- Detroit  Search this
Theme:
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7638
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209801
AAA_collcode_kahnalbp
Theme:
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209801
Online Media:

Sali Frantz autobiographical sketch, ca. 1940

Creator:
Frantz, Sali, 1895-1967  Search this
Citation:
Sali Frantz autobiographical sketch, ca. 1940. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women designers  Search this
Theme:
Women  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8126
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210297
AAA_collcode_fransali
Theme:
Women
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210297

Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974

Creator:
Jacques Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Subject:
Hauke, Cesar M. de (Cesar Mange)  Search this
Glaenzer, Eugene  Search this
Haardt, Georges  Search this
Seligman, Germain  Search this
Seligmann, Arnold  Search this
Parker, Theresa D.  Search this
Waegen, Rolf Hans  Search this
Trevor, Clyfford  Search this
Seligmann, René  Search this
Seligmann, Jacques  Search this
De Hauke & Co., Inc.  Search this
Jacques Seligmann & Co  Search this
Eugene Glaenzer & Co.  Search this
Germain Seligmann & Co.  Search this
Gersel  Search this
Type:
Gallery records
Citation:
Jacques Seligmann & Co. records, 1904-1978, bulk 1913-1974. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Mackay, Clarence Hungerford, 1874-1938 -- Art collections  Search this
Schiff, Mortimer L. -- Art collections  Search this
Arenberg, duc d' -- Art collections  Search this
Liechtenstein, House of -- Art collections  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- France -- Paris  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
La Fresnaye, Roger de, 1885-1925  Search this
Art, Renaissance  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
Art treasures in war  Search this
Art, European  Search this
Theme:
Art Gallery Records  Search this
Art Market  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)9936
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212486
AAA_collcode_jacqself
Theme:
Art Gallery Records
Art Market
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_212486
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Online Media:

Francis W. Robinson papers, 1934-1971

Creator:
Robinson, Francis W. (Francis Waring), 1907-1985  Search this
Subject:
Burnham, Thomas Mickell  Search this
Jones, Thomas David  Search this
Citation:
Francis W. Robinson papers, 1934-1971. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Art, American -- Michigan -- Detroit  Search this
Theme:
Research and writing about art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10157
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213140
AAA_collcode_robifran
Theme:
Research and writing about art
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_213140

Minoru Yamasaki lecture, 1959 Aug. 13

Creator:
Yamasaki, Minoru, 1912-1986  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Minoru Yamasaki lecture, 1959 Aug. 13. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American architects  Search this
Theme:
Asian American  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10742
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214353
AAA_collcode_yamamino
Theme:
Asian American
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_214353

Minoru Yamasaki interview, [ca. 1959 Aug.]

Creator:
Yamasaki, Minoru, 1912-1986  Search this
Harriman, Virginia  Search this
Subject:
Oberlin College. Conservatory of Music  Search this
Detroit Institute of Arts  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Minoru Yamasaki interview, [ca. 1959 Aug.]. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Architecture  Search this
Architecture, Japanese  Search this
Asian American art  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese American artists  Search this
Asian American architects  Search this
Architects -- Michigan -- Troy -- Interviews  Search this
Theme:
Asian American  Search this
Architecture & Design  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6235
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216543
AAA_collcode_yamamino2
Theme:
Asian American
Architecture & Design
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_216543

Atelier of the living brochure, 1949 Jan

Creator:
Archives of American Art  Search this
Citation:
Atelier of the living brochure, 1949 Jan. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Community arts projects -- Michigan -- Detroit  Search this
Theme:
Art organizations  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)21792
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)305981
AAA_collcode_archiv96
Theme:
Art organizations
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_305981

Masters of the Building Arts

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
From the soaring skyscrapers of New York City to the adobe churches of New Mexico, from the sturdy stone walls of New England to the majestic monuments of the nation's capital, master craftworkers in the building arts have brought enduring beauty to our built environment. Working in wood, stone, brick, and metal, in plaster, paint, glass, and clay, they transform designs on paper into three-dimensional works of art. Much depends on their workmanship and skill: on their deep understanding of raw materials, their careful selection and use of tools, their mastery of technique. The final product is the result not only of their knowledge and abilities, but also their creativity and care - their will to excellence.

Artisans in the building trades share a deep appreciation for the aesthetic value and expressive power of technical perfection. They delight in skill and find meaning and pleasure in the poetic qualities of workmanship - in their ability to craft objects of beauty and strength through their special touch. Their great pride and creative spirit, their love for their work, and their commitment to excellence are manifested in a lasting legacy of architectural achievement left behind for generations to come.

The 2000 Festival program celebrated the extraordinary artistry of craftspeople in the building arts and explored the many challenges they face today as they work to preserve our nation's past and build for the future. The Festival brought together a selection of master artisans - stone carvers, masons, carpenters, terra cotta artisans, plasterers, blacksmiths, stained glass artisans, and adobe builders - who have enriched our world with the work of their hands, and who educated and informed Festival visitors not only with their skills but also with their knowledge and lore.

Marjorie Hunt was Curator and James Deutsch was Program Coordinator; Betty Belanus was Education Specialist and Family Activity Guide Coordinator. An Advisory Committee included: J. Bryan Blundell, Kurt Dewhurst, William Dupont, Cynthia Field, Henry Glassie, Norman Koonce, Betty Monkman, Peter Nabokov, Joanna Reagan, Rex Scouten, William Seale, Chris Sturbaum, John Michael Vlach, and Ed Worthy.

The program was produced in collaboration with the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers and the International Masonry Institute, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the National Building Museum, the American Institute of Architects, and the Preservation Trades Network. Major funding was provided by Homestore.com, the Marble Institute of America, Allied Stone Industries, the Building Stone Institute, the Indiana Limestone Institute, and the National Building Granite Quarries Association. Major contributors included Target Stores, the Associated General Contractors of America, the National Association of Realtors, and the Smithsonian Women's Committee. Additional donors included the School of the Building Arts, Duron, Inc., the Brick Industry Association, the Laborers' International Union of North America, the Smithsonian Educational Outreach Fund, and the Copper Development Association, Inc.
Researchers:
Jane Beck, Betty Belanus, Ray Brassieur, Amanda Dargan, James Deutsch, Kurt Dewhurst, Karen Duffy, Lynn Martin Graton, Dwight Pauahi Kauahikaua, Winnie Lambrecht, Tim Lloyd, Gregory Sharrow, Gary Stanton, David Taylor, Elaine Thatcher, John Michael Vlach
Presenters:
Betty Belanus, Barry Bergey, Ray Brassieur, Olivia Cadaval, Amanda Dargan, William Dupont, Brian Finnegan, Lynn Martin Graton, Tim Lloyd, Philip "Pete" Pederson, Clift Seferlis, Peter Seitel, Gregory Sharrow, Angelo Simone, Nick Spitzer, Gary Stanton, David Taylor, Elaine Thatcher, Cynthia Vidaurri, John Michael Vlach
Participants:
David Adams, historic preservation specialist, Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Robert Alger, stone carver, sculptor, Spencerville, Maryland

Joseph Alonso, stone mason, Vienna, Virginia

Onofre Anguiano, terra cotta hand presser, mold maker, Lincoln, Calif.

Walter S. Arnold, stone carver, Skokie, Illinois

Sam Baca, program director, Cornerstones Community Partnerships, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Earl A. Barthe, 1932-2010, plasterer, historian and consultant, New Orleans, Louisiana

Hurchail Barthe, plasterer, New Orleans, Louisiana

Terry Barthe, plasterer, historic housing specialist, New Orleans, Louisiana

Nick Benson, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Johan Bjurman, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Anna Bowen, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Dan Boyle, timber framer, Dover, New Hampshire

Rory Brennan, historic plaster specialist, Putney, Vermont

Ron Brooks, decorative painter, Rockville, Maryland

John Canning, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Jacqueline Canning-Riccio, decorative painter, Cheshire, Connecticut

Jesus Cardenas, terra cotta modeler, mold maker, Lincoln, California

Charles Cardine, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Patrick Cardine, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Carson Christian, timber framer, Wooster, Ohio

Rudy Christian, timber framer, Burbank, Ohio

Peter "Billy" Cleland, 1921-2010, stone mason, Clinton, Maryland

William R. Cleland, Jr., stone mason, Dunkirk, Maryland

Rose Concha, -- enjarrodoro -- (adobe plasterer), Taos, New Mexico

Brian Cox, carpenter, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

John Drew, carpenter, St. Leonard, Maryland

William Dupont, Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Washington, D.C.

Cane Fields, Hawaiian dry stack mason, Kailua-Kana, Hawaii

Billy Fields, Hawaiian dry stack mason, Kailua-Kana, Hawaii

David Flaharty, ornamental plasterer, sculptor, Green Lane, Pennsylvania

lsidoro Flaim, stone mason, Camp Springs, Maryland

Tom Glynn, timber framer, South Berwick, Maine

Dieter Goldkuhle, 1938-2011, stained glass artisan, Reston, Virginia

Giles Harper, preservation carpenter, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

Adam Heller, stone carver, letterer, Newport, Rhode Island

Randy Herald, sheet metal craftsperson, Bethesda, Maryland

Randy Herald, Jr., sheet metal craftsperson, Bethesda, Maryland

Hans Herr, coppersmith, Holtwood, Pennsylvania

John Paul Huguley, president, School of the Building Arts, Charleston, South Carolina

Judy Jacob, architectural conservator, National Park Service, New York, New York

Raymond Johnson, terra cotta modeler, draftsman, Lincoln, California

Dean Kalomas, decorative painter, Washington, D.C.

Vikki Keys, deputy superintendent, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.

Rick King, dry stone wall mason, Holderness, New Hampshire

Scott King, dry stone wall mason, Holderness, New Hampshire

Naomi Kroll, architectural conservator, National Park Service, New York, New York

Wade Lawrence, assistant director, Drayton Hall, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Charleston, South Carolina

Elmo Leonardelli, scaffold erector, Baltimore, Maryland

Stephen Lorenzetti, chief of resource management, National Park Service, Washington, D.C.

Amber Lucero, -- enjarrodoro -- (adobe plasterer), Taos, New Mexico

Rick Lykins, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

George McDaniel, director, Drayton Hall, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Charleston, South Carolina

Richard Marks, architectural conservator, Charleston, South Carolina

Antonio Martinez, community leader, Upper Rociada, New Mexico

David Martinez, terra cotta draftsman, Roseville, California

David Mason, dry stone wall mason, Starksboro, Vermont

Rick Mason, dry stone wall mason, Hinesburg, Vermont

John O'Connor, engineer, Universal Builders Supply, Cheverly, Maryland

David Overholt, restoration project manager, Lyndhurst, National Trust for Historic Preservation, Tarrytown, New York

Albert D. Parra, adobe builder, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Theodore Pierre, Jr., brick mason, New Orleans, Louisiana

Konstantinos Pilarinos, Byzantine-style woodcarver, Astoria, New York

Panagiota Pylarinos, architect, Astoria, New York

Dennis Playdon, program manager, Cornerstones Community Partnerships, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Patrick Plunkett, stone carver, Takoma Park, Maryland

Joseph Pringle, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Nol Putnam, artist blacksmith, The Plains, Virginia

Clay Raley, restoration carpenter, Norman, Indiana

Brad Robinson, architectural blacksmith, Chantilly, Virginia

Steve Roy, historic preservation specialist, Portsmouth, New Hampshire

Brett Rugo, president, Rugo & Carosi, Woodbridge, Virginia

Laura Saeger, timber framer, Burbank, Ohio

George Salvador, restoration crew leader, Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico

Eduardo Seara, vice-president, Lorton Contracting Company, Lorton, Virginia

Manuel Seara, president, Lorton Contracting Company, Lorton, Virginia

Tony Segreti, architect, Bethesda, Maryland

Carlton Simmons, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Philip Simmons, 1912-2009, blacksmith, Charleston, South Carolina

Louis Soublet, plasterer, New Orleans, Louisiana

Larry E. Stearns, coppersmith, Westford, Vermont

Ben Sturbaum, restoration carpenter, Owensburg, Indiana

Chris Sturbaum, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

Arran Sturgis, timber framer, Eliot, Maine

Daniel Szwed, construction manager, Waldorf, Maryland

Mark Tamara, structural engineer, James Madison Cutts, Washington, D.C.

Lonn Taylor, historian, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Lloyd Tortalita, Adult, Higher Education director, former governor, Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico

Roman Troyer, timber framer, Wooster, Ohio

Dexter Trujillo, adobe builder, mud preserver, Abiquiu, New Mexico

Mark Tsirigos, president, Universal Builders Supply, Cheverly, Maryland

George Void, masonry crew, Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.

Chuck Wagner, owner, Wagner Roofing Company, Hyattsville, Maryland

Sheila Wagner, owner, Wagner Roofing Company, Hyattsville, Maryland

Tom Weddle, restoration carpenter, Bloomington, Indiana

Bob Wooldridge, slater, Mercersburg, Pennsylvania

Jeff Wooldridge, slater, project manager, Bethesda, Maryland

Bill Yeingst, curator, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Pauli Zmolek, decorative painter, Takoma Park, Maryland

INTERNATIONAL UNION OF BRICKLAYERS AND ALLIED CRAFTWORKERS (BAC), INTERNATIONAL MASONRY INSTITUTE (IMI)

Frank Baiocchi, marble mason, Mt. Airy, Maryland

Ed Bellucci, IMI deputy director of Apprenticeship and Training, Jefferson, Maryland

Robert Bernardon, marble mason, Suitland, Maryland

Lewis Carrara, mosaic worker, Fortville, Indiana

Raoul Cervantes, bricklayer, Claremont, California

Kurt Colo, bricklayer, New Baltimore, Michigan

Laird Donaldson, IMI regional director, Auburn, Washington

James Farris, stone mason, Stafford, Virginia

Richard Francescon, marble mason, South Easton, Massachusetts

Greg Hartseil, IMI Job Corps regional director, Lorida, Florida

Dennis Holloway, IMI Scola Training Center director, West Babylon, New York

Mike Kassman, IMI pointing, cleaning, and caulking instructor, Waynesboro, Pennsylvania

Tony Kassman, IMI National Safety, pointing, cleaning, and caulking coordinator, Tonawanda, New York

John Kitchen, bricklayer apprentice, Dryden, New York

Frank Koletar, refractory bricklayer, Orchard Park, New York

Annette Ludwig, tile layer, Bellevue, Washington

Nelson McMath, BAC Local 9 Michigan field representative, Saline, Michigan

Tom McQuaid, BAC Local 1 DC, MONA secretary, treasurer, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Steve Martini, IMI Strategic Programs director, Cascade, Maryland

Steve Mason, terrazzo apprentice, Washington, D.C.

Antoine Matthews, bricklayer, Baltimore, Maryland

Michael Menegazzi, IMI terrazzo instructor, South Gate, California

Bob Mion, IMI tile, marble, and terrazzo instructor, Binghamton, New York

Guillermo Moreno, stone mason, Hyattsville, Maryland

Colleen Muldoon, coordinator of Education Programs, bricklayer, Baltimore, Maryland

Clarence Nichols, IMI deputy director of Apprenticeship and Training, Cumberland, Maryland

Angela Olszewski, tile layer, Jersey City, New Jersey

Lester Parnell, bricklayer, Detroit, Michigan

Bob Perry, IMI regional director, Culver City, California

Darren Raines, tile layer, Chicago, Illinois

Matthew Redabaugh, IMI coordinator of Special Projects, Cascade, Maryland

Butch Rovder, BAC stone craft director, South Riding, Virginia

Joe Stewart, BAC pointing, cleaning, and caulking craft director, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Gene Stinner, IMI director of Apprenticeship and Training, Cascade, Maryland

Dennis Studley, IMI Job Corps regional director, Yucaipa, California

Harold Sugg, refractory bricklayer, West Seneca, New York

Jimmy Ternent, marble mason, Westminster, Maryland

John Totten, IMI plaster instructor, Clintondale, New York

Drew Vecchione, IMI stone instructor, Flourtown, Pennsylvania

Battista Yon, bricklayer, Hyattsville, Maryland
Collection Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2001, Series 3
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2001 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk504922fdd-8abb-43a1-a132-41400c430cd8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2001-ref26

Pullman Palace Car Company Photographs

Creator:
Pullman Palace Car Co.  Search this
Donor:
Pullman-Standard  Search this
Names:
Lincoln, Robert Todd  Search this
Pullman, George M., 1831-1897  Search this
Extent:
128.5 Cubic feet (147 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Glass plate negatives
Photographs
Date:
circa 1882-1955
Summary:
Collection consists of approximately 13,500 images (original photographs, copy prints, and film and glass plate negatives) for freight, passenger, private, and street and rapid transit cars manufactured by the Pullman Palace Car Company. The collection contains primarily early railroad Americana, including interior and exterior views of private and business cars as well as passenger and street cars. The collection is an important part of the historical record of the railroad car-building industry as well as the history of architecture and interior design.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of approximately 13,500 images (original photographs, copy prints, and film and glass plate negatives) for freight, passenger, private, and street and rapid transit cars manufactured by the Pullman Palace Car Company. The collection contains primarily interior and exterior views of private and business cars as well as passenger and street cars. The collection is an important part of the historical record of the railroad car-building industry as well as the history of architecture and interior design. Historians, designers, railroad enthusiasts, model railroad hobbyists, scholars, and others will find this collection useful.

The glass plate negatives in this collection were produced using the wet collodion process, which was introduced to the United States in 1855 and used into the 1880s. The plates were coated with chemicals, sensitized, exposed and developed, all while the plate was wet. Later, Pullman photographers used the dry collodion process. This process involved using glass plates with a photographic emulsion of silver halides suspended in gelatin. This process had shorter exposure times.

George Pullman assembled a variety of photographers to document his company's work. The photography was primarily used as a record of work, especially for the Operating Department and Manufacturing Department at Pullman, as well as for prospective corporate customers.

Before establishing an in-plant photographic department in 1888, Pullman relied on local photographers. Some of the photographers included John Jex Bardwell, Wylie Dennison, Henry R. Koopman, J. W. Taylor, Thomas S. Johnson, Wylie Dennison, John P. Van Vorst, Clayton Ford Smith, Joseph McAllister, Melvin C. Horn, Ernie Stutkus, and Donald J. O'Barski. Many of the photographers signed the glass plates using their initials. For example, John P. Van Vorst signed his J.P.V.V.

Photography of Pullman activities began in the Detroit Shops (property of the Detroit Car & Manufacturing Co. which was purchased by Pullman in 1873 and operated as the Detroit Shops of Pullman) in the 1870s and expanded to include photographing the town of Pullman, steel car construction, shop accidents, workers, panoramic views, and in some instances, for company publications. In-plant photography was started with Wylie Dennison in 1888. Dennison was the first full-time Pullman photographer, and he created the Pullman Photographic Department. Dennison instituted the practice of recording each photograph, noting the negative number, description of the car, the type of view (typically one interior view and one exterior view) and lot number. All of Dennison's photography was done outside in the daylight.

The negative numbers assigned to the glass plates were identified with a "lot" number. The lot number identified the production order, and in later years, the plan number was added, designating the layout of the car. Photographing one car out of each new lot was the intital practice, but over-time, the Photographic Department began taking six or more views of the interior and exterior as well as end views.

Lot numbers include:

Lots 1 - 500 (Pullman Car Works - Chicago)

Lots 1 - 500 (Detroit Car Works)

Lots 500 plus (can be freight and passenger mixed)

Lots 1000 to 4999 (Pullman passenger equipment)

Lots 5000 to 5999 (Pullman freight equipment)

Lots 5000 + Haskell and Barker (Pullman overlap)

Lots 6000 to 7000+ (Pullman and P-S passenger)

Lots 8000 to 9999 (Pullman freight equipment)

Lots 10000+ (Pullman freight equipment)

Series 1, Original prints, circa 1880-1949, are arranged numerically by Pullman numbers. The original prints begin with number 7343 and end with number 33091. The photographs document Pullman cars, including freight, passenger, private, and street railway/rapid transit. Many of the images depict interior views of the cars, and there are some views of porters and passengers. There is some documentation of the workmen constructing the cars. The prints are primarily 8" by 10" black-and-white and were originally bound into books and backed on linen. The prints were unbound at some time. Many of the original prints bear an embossed stamp "Built by Pullman Car and Manufacturing Corporation Chicago." Some photographs are sepia-tone and there are no negatives for these prints.

Series 2, Copy prints, 1885-1955, consists of prints made from the glass plate negatives by the Smithsonian photographic services office. The copy prints were originally stored in loose binders but were re-housed into folders and arranged numerically according to the original Pullman Company number. The number is typically found in the lower right corner of the image. The copy prints are black-and-white and are either 5" x 7" or 8" x 10".

Series 3, Film negatives, 1917-1955, consists of film negatives (4" x 5" and 8" x 10") that are arranged numerically by Pullman numbers. In some instances, information on the enclosure includes the type of car (e.g. sleeper, freight), the name of the car if applicable, name of railroad company, geographical information, and date(s). In some instances, "repro," or "broken glass" are recorded. For negatives that did not conform to the Pullman numbering system, the container list provides additional information. For example, Haskell and Barker Car Company (Haskell and Barker merged with the Pullman Company in 1922) machine shop views, or Pullman cars in St. Paul, Minnesota are recorded in the collection inventory listing.

Series 4, Glass plate negatives, [circa 1882-1948], is divided into two subseries, Subseries 1, 6" x 8" negatives and Subseries 2, 8" x 10" negatives. The series consists of approximately 13,500 glass plate negatives arranged by Pullman Company negative number. The negatives document primarily Pullman cars, including freight, passenger, private and street railway/rapid transit. Many of the images depict interior and exterior views of the cars and some views of porters and passengers. The interior views include details such as seating, window treatments, lighting fixtures, bathroom fixtures, wood paneling, marquetry work, fabrics, floor treatments, and other furnishings. There is some documentation of the construction of the cars by workmen in the factory.

The negative numbers and lot numbers are etched on the glass plates. Overall the series is in good condition, although there are some broken plates which have been separated. The negatives are not inclusive and some plates are missing, or there are two copies. If plates are missing or additional copies exist, this is noted in the collection inventory. In some instances, plates are labeled 3937 and then 3937-A. This numbering distinguished two different views/angles of the same car.

Many of the envelope enclosures contain the negative number, sometimes preceed by the letter "P" (e.g. P9597), lot number (L4700), and in some instances, text describing the negative. Text typically includes the type of car (sleeper, freight), the name of the car if applicable, name of railroad company, geographical information, and date(s). If a copy print was created from the negative plate, the enclosure is stamped "printed." However, this practice was not consistent. Plates that were not printed are occasionally noted, but not with any consistency.

The 6" by 8" glass plates numbered 82-4130 to 82-4167, represent numbers assigned by the Office of Photographic Services, Smithsonian Institution. Previously labeled "Pullman" on the enclosures, the plates primarily document engines and passenger cars for the New York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, 1870-1890 and undated. The plates do not have Pullman negative numbers etched in the lower left or right corners and it is unclear if these plates belong to this collection.

Series 5, Indices, 1990 and undated include bound, typescript indices to the Pullman negatives. Created by the National Museum of American History, Division of Transportation (now known as the Division of Work and Industry), the indices include listings by railroad, private cars, freight cars, street cars and rapid transit, and Pullman negatives. The indices provide the name of the railroad/railway (e.g. Chicago & Alton), type of car (e.g. coal car or box car), number, lot, remarks (e.g. baggage area), year, type of view (e.g. exterior or interior) and frame number (for the laser disc).

One index is a supplemental guide listing sepia tone prints for which no negative exists in our collection. The indices for the negative listings on laser discs one and two are available. However, the actual lasers discs are missing.

References

Horn, Don. "The Pullman Photographers," Railroad Heritage, No. 7, 2003, pp. 5-13.

Arnold, Rus. "This Negative File was a Sleeper." Technical Photography. May 1970, pp. 21-XX.

Pullman State Historic Site, http://www.pullman-museum.org/theCompany/timeline.html (last accessed April 18, 2011)
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into five series.

Series 1, Original prints, 1904-1949

Series 2, Copy prints, 1885-1955

Series 3, Film negatives, undated

Series 4, Glass plate negatives, circa 1882-1948

Series 5, Indices, 1990 and undated
Biographical / Historical:
Recognizing a market for luxurious rail travel, George M. Pullman, who had earlier experimented with sleeping car construction and was wealthy from the provisioning and transporting of Colorado miners in the early 1860s, incorporated the Pullman's Palace Car Company in 1867. By the 1870s his operations were already national and included the operation of sleeping cars under contract with the nation's railroads, the manufacture of cars at the Detroit Works, and the creation of subsidiary firms serving Great Britain and Europe. In the three decades before the turn of the century, the prosperous company grew enormously and included a much heralded model company town adjacent to the new car works at Pullman, Illinois. Acclaim turned to condemnation following the nationwide strike that originated at the Pullman Car Works in 1894. Pullman died in 1897, two years before his company absorbed its last major competitor, the Wagner Palace Car Company, which had been financed by the Vanderbilts.

The Pullman's Palace Car Company entered the twentieth century with a new name, the Pullman Company, and a new president, Robert Todd Lincoln. An extremely profitable virtual monopoly, the Pullman Company began replacing its wood cars with safer all steel bodied models (heavyweights) in its newly segregated manufacturing department and at the same time (1906) came under the regulation of the Interstate Commerce Commission. From 1918 to 1920, the United States Railroad Administration, citing the war emergency, assumed control of the operating arm of the firm, renamed the Pullman Car Lines for the duration of federal control.

The Pullman Company reached its peak during the 1920s, manufacturing new heavyweight cars at a rapid pace. Seeking to expand its freight car production, Pullman merged with the Haskell and Barker Car Company in 1922. Edward F. Carry and his Haskell and Barker associates assumed the presidency and other executive positions in the enlarged Pullman Company. More reorganization took place in 1924, when the Pullman Company Manufacturing Department became a distinct firm, the Pullman Car and Manufacturing Corporation, and in 1927, when a parent or holding company, Pullman Incorporated, was created to oversee the two subsidiary firms. In 1929, following Carry's death, President David A. Crawford engineered the merger of the Pullman Car and Manufacturing Corporation with the Standard Steel Car Company, forming the Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Company.

During the first three decades of the twentieth century Pullman sought to impede the unionization of its workers by offering new benefits, including a pension plan in 1914, a death benefit plan in 1922, and a plan of group insurance in 1929. F. L. Simmons' Industrial Relations Department, created in 1920, also directed the formation of company-sponsored occupationally-based unions under the plan of employee representation. A. Philip Randolph's Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and other unions would not successfully organize company workers until the New Deal Railway Labor Act of 1934 forbade corporate interference in union matters. The Depression marked the end of Pullman prosperity. Both the number of car orders and sleeping car passengers declined precipitously. The firm laid off car plant and service workers, reduced fares, and introduced such innovations as the single occupancy section in an effort to fill its cars. During this decade the firm built fewer new cars, but it added air conditioning to its existing heavyweights and remodeled many into compartment sleepers.

In 1940, just as orders for lightweight cars were increasing and sleeping car traffic was growing, the United States Department of Justice filed an anti-trust complaint against Pullman Incorporated in the U. S. District Court at Philadelphia (Civil Action No. 994). The government sought to separate the company's sleeping car operations from its manufacturing activities. In 1944 the court concurred, ordering Pullman Incorporated to divest itself of either the Pullman Company (operating) or the Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Company (manufacturing). After three years of negotiations, the Pullman Company was sold to a consortium of fifty-seven railroads for around forty million dollars. Carroll R. Harding was named president of this new Pullman Company. The new Pullman Company started out optimistically in 1947 with good passenger traffic figures, but the years following brought steady and marked decline. Regularly scheduled lines were cancelled; all shops except St. Louis and Chicago were closed; employees were furloughed, and major railroad owners such as the New York Central and Pennsylvania Railroad totally or partially withdrew from service. On January 1, 1969, at the age of 102, the Pullman Company ceased operation, though it maintained a small central office staff to wind up affairs and handle an equal pay-for-equal-work lawsuit (Denver Case) that continued in the courts until 1981.

John H. White (1933-), historian and curator, collected the Pullman photographs in 1969. White was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and graduated with a bachelors of arts in history from Miami University Ohio in 1958. Shortly after receiving his degree, He joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution as Assistant Curator of the Division of Transportation, Department of Science and Technology, Museum of History and Technology. White later became Associate Curator of the Division, 1961-1966, Curator, 1967-1985, and Senior Historian, 1986-1989. White specialized in land transportation, particularly the history of railroads.

White worked closely with Arthur Detmers Dubin (1923-) to acquire the Pullman photographs for the museum. Dubin was an avid train enthusiast and collector, and he frequently used the Pullman "archives" for his own research on railroads. Dubin was born in Chicago, Illinois and began his architectural education at the University of Michigan in 1941 but his education was interrupted by World War II, and he served with distinction in the United States Army until 1946. After completing his studies in 1949, Dubin joined his father's and uncle's architectural firm, Dubin and Dubin, as a second--eneration architect. The leadership of the firm soon passed to Arthur and his brother, Martin David, and in 1965 they were joined by John Black and in 1966 by John Moutoussamy. Arthur's life--ong interest in trains and transportation and their implications for architecture is evident in transit stations commissions and service on transportation--elated advisory boards (Dubin was a member of the Illinois Railroad Commission), as well as in his writings and personal collections.

In July, 1966, Dubin contacted then Vice President of Public Relations at Pullman-Standard E. Preston Calvert about the history and future of the photographic negative plates. Dubin appealed to Calvert to preserve these materials. Dubin and White were also in contact by correspondence and in June, 1967, White contacted Calvert also, stating that the Chicago Historical Society or Illinois State Historical Society should be offered the plates as a first option. Failing a local Illinois repository accepting the materials, White indicated that the Smithsonian would accept the negatives.

During the spring of 1968, White, working with Dubin and Nora Wilson, editor of the company's publications, coordinated a visit by White to Chicago to examine the photographic negatives at the Pullman Car Works factory in south Chicago. In April 1968, White examined the vast collection of glass plate negatives (approximately 20,000). From April, 1968 to August, 1969, Pullman-Standard and the Smithsonian negotiated acquisition details, including shipping and related costs. In August, 1969, White returned to complete the task of sorting the glass plates, discarding broken plates, and weeding repetitive views. He selected approximately 13,500 glass plates. Views of Pullman towns were donated to the Chicago Historical Society. Dubin appraised the photographic plates and film negatives, presumably on behalf of Pullman-Standard, and estimated the plates to be worth between $54,000 and $67,500 dollars.

References

Historical note courtesy Martha T. Briggs and Cynthia H. Peters, Guide to Pullman Company Archives, The Newberry Library, Chicago, 1995.

Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Area Architects Oral History Project http://www.artic.edu/aic/resources/resource/734?search_id=1 (last accessed on February 23, 2011)

John H. White papers, 1959-1989, Record Unit 007384, Smithsonian Institution Archives, Washington, D.C.

Telephone conversation of Alison Oswald, archivist, with John H. White, April 14, 2011.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Pullman Palace Car Company Materials, 1867-1979 (AC0181)

John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection, 1880s-1990 (AC0523)

Materials in Other Organizations

•Art Institute of Chicago

•Bombardier Corporation

•California State Railroad Museum

•Chicago History Museum

•Arthur Dubin Collection at Lake Forest College

•Illinois Railway Museum

•Indiana University Northwest's Calumet Regional Archives

Pullman-Standard Railroad Car Manufacturing Company Personnel Records—Personnel Record Series CRA 314 This index of employee names was created from the original personnel cards housed at Indiana University Northwest's Calumet Regional Archives from the Indiana locations. Although the records are not complete from the Michigan City plant for the entire period from 1912 to the 1970's, there may be information that will assist researchers with finding key details of a family member. The Hammond Pullman plant was merged with the Haskell Barker Company of Michigan City in 1922.

•Newberry Library, Chicago

The Pullman Company archives at the Newberry Library consists of 2,500 cubic feet of records from the Pullman Company and Pullman heirs. The collection is comprised of business archives of the Pullman Palace Car Company from 1867 and includes records of the entire firm up to the 1924 split into operating (sleeping car operation, service, and repair) and manufacturing companies. From 1924 to 1981 the records chronicle the activities of the operating company only.

•Pennsylvania State Archives

•Pullman State Historic Site

•Pullman Technology (Harvey, Illinois)

•Smithsonian Institution Archives

•South Suburban Genealogical & Historical Society (South Holland, Illinois)
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Pullman-Standard Company, through Nora Wilson, editor of employee publications for the Department of Public Relations and Advertising, on October 8, 1969.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the negatives are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Special arrangements required to view original glass plate and film negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Copyright held by the Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Freight cars  Search this
Railroads -- Dining-car service  Search this
Roomette car  Search this
Hospital cars  Search this
Dining cars  Search this
Hotel car  Search this
Sleeping cars (Railroads)  Search this
Local transit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass plate negatives
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film -- 1890-1900
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film -- 1900-1950
Citation:
Pullman Palace Car Company Photographs, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1175
See more items in:
Pullman Palace Car Company Photographs
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep85e54d13d-eb5a-4971-8e39-ecfe85039ed4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1175
Online Media:

Detroit -- Wendell Garden

Collection Creator:
Sears, Thomas Warren, 1880-1966  Search this
Sears & Wendell  Search this
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection.
Identifier:
AAG.SRS, File MI019
See more items in:
Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection
Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection / Series 1: Photographic Images / United States / Michigan
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6afcb3fb8-a623-4124-a513-4d05d8d123fe
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-srs-ref4156

Detroit -- J. B. Ford Garden

Collection Creator:
Sears, Thomas Warren, 1880-1966  Search this
Sears & Wendell  Search this
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection.
Identifier:
AAG.SRS, File MI027
See more items in:
Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection
Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection / Series 1: Photographic Images / United States / Michigan
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6d69ee636-8216-4ca5-80fe-80ec0ebb194b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-srs-ref4157

Wendell Garden

Photographer:
Sears, Thomas Warren, 1880-1966  Search this
Landscape architect:
Sears, Thomas Warren, 1880-1966  Search this
Creator:
Wendell, Mrs. John H.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sears, Thomas Warren, 1880-1966  Search this
Sears & Wendell  Search this
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Harvard University  Search this
American Society of Landscape Architects  Search this
Extent:
1 Glass negative (black-and-white, 8 X 10 in.)
Type:
Archival materials
Glass negatives
Place:
Michigan -- Detroit
United States of America -- Michigan -- Wayne County -- Detroit
Date:
[between 1900 and 1929]
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Perspective drawings  Search this
Driveways  Search this
Houses  Search this
Genre/Form:
Glass negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection.
Identifier:
AAG.SRS, Item MI019001
See more items in:
Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection
Thomas Warren Sears photograph collection / Series 1: Photographic Images / United States / Michigan / MI019: Detroit -- Wendell Garden
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6af6a9e9e-ba2f-416b-9d06-d0ae535aa28e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-srs-ref5450

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