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German architects, theories, 19th century

Container:
Box 2 of 59
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 06-225, Smithsonian Institution. Office of Architectural History and Historic Preservation, Building Files
See more items in:
Building Files
Building Files / Box 2
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa06-225-refidd1e1569

German-Americans in Washington, D.C. - 19th century German architects

Container:
Box 10 of 59
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 06-225, Smithsonian Institution. Office of Architectural History and Historic Preservation, Building Files
See more items in:
Building Files
Building Files / Box 10
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa06-225-refidd1e8671

Correspondence, US Capitol

Creator:
Meigs, Montgomery C., 1816-1892  Search this
Vanderlyn, John, 1775-1852  Search this
Jarvis, Leonard, 1781-1854  Search this
Chapman, John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brumbaugh, Thomas B. (Thomas Brendle), 1921-  Search this
Extent:
3 Items (Letters, written in ink)
Type:
Archival materials
Correspondence
Place:
U. S. Capitol
Date:
1837-1853
Scope and Contents:
This folder houses a series of letters referencing the building and renovation of the United States Capitol Building, most of which are from architects who worked on the project. One of the contracts orders iron beams for use in extending the Capitol building in 1857, during the second remodeling.
Arrangement:
Organized chronologically.
Biographical / Historical:
General Montgomery Cunningham Meigs was Quartermaster General of the United States Army during and after the American Civil War. He was responsible for the purchase and distribution of supplies to the Union troops. Meigs was also an engineer and architect, and before and after the war, he supervised numerous projects throughout Washington, D.C. as part of the Army Corps of Engineers. He supervised the construction of wings and the dome of the Capitol building and the expansion of the General Post Office building. Meigs designed the Old Pension Office Building. His most amazing contribution to the city, however, was the Washington Aqueduct. Interestingly, it was Meigs who suggested to Abraham Lincoln that Arlington would be a good place for a cemetery. Meigs is buried there.
Leonard Jarvis was an American politician who served in Congress from 1829 to 1837. He was chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs for some time. This contract is signed by him.
John Vanderlyn was an American neoclassicist painter who painted portraits of politicians in the early 19th century. He was commissioned by Congress in 1842 to paint the landing of Columbus. This painting was later reproduced on a stamp. This painting was commissioned for the renovation of the rotunda in the Capitol Building.
John Chapman was an American congressman who represented Pennsylvania. He worked as a judge before being elected to the House of Representatives.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2009.06 7
Other Archival Materials:
Thomas B. Brumbaugh research material on Abbott Handerson Thayer and other artists, 1876-1994 (bulk 1960s-1994); Also located at Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Genre/Form:
Correspondence -- 19th century
Identifier:
FSA.A2009.06, Series FSA A2009.06 7
See more items in:
The Brumbaugh Collection of Artist Letters
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc3136a0efb-cf6a-4728-aa98-04f1bc16238a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2009-06-ref7
Online Media:

Correspondence, Palmer, Erastus - Widener, P.A.B

Creator:
Speicher, Eugene Edward, 1883-1962  Search this
Palmer, Erastus Dow, 1817-1904  Search this
Reid, Robert, 1862-1929  Search this
Robus, Hugo, 1885-1964  Search this
Rossiter, Thomas Prichard, 1818-1871  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Whittier, John Greenleaf, 1807-1892  Search this
Widener, P. A. B. (Peter Arrell Brown), 1834-1915  Search this
Names:
Houghton, Mifflin and Company  Search this
United States. National Park Service  Search this
Hayne, Paul Hamilton, 1830-1886  Search this
Kensett, John Frederick, 1816-1872  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brumbaugh, Thomas B. (Thomas Brendle), 1921-  Search this
Extent:
11 Items (Letters, written in ink, ball point, graphite)
1 Photograph
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Correspondence
Date:
1818-1847
Scope and Contents:
This folder is an amalgamation of letters written and recieved by prominent figures in 19th and 20th century American art. Included in the folder are letters by Robert Reid, Hugo Robus, Thomas Prichard Rossiter, Eugene Speicher, John Greenleaf Whittier and Peter A.B. Widener.
Arrangement:
Organized alphabetically by author.
Biographical / Historical:
Erastus D. Palmer was an American sculptor. He sculpted portrait busts and religious bas-reliefs in a style that combined neoclassical idealism and realism. His most famous sculpture is "The White Captive," which depicts a young girl who has been captured by Native Americans.
Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes was an American architect born into the wealthy Phelps Stokes family. He designed St-Paul's Chapel at Columbia University and some residential buildings in New York. Phelps Stokes also published The Iconography of Manhattan Island, a six volume work about New York City. He commissioned John Singer Sargent to paint a portrait with himself and his wife, Edith née Minturn.
Robert Reid was an American artist who studied in New England and Paris. He began by painting French peasants, but became known for his murals and stained glass designs. Some of his work can be found in the Congressional Library in Washington, D.C.
Hugo Robus was an American painter and sculpture from Ohio. He studied in the United States and Paris, and then taught at the Modern Art School in New York. He worked in a very lyrical cubist style, usually with people as his subject.
Thomas Prichard Rossiter was an American painter born in New Haven, Connecticut. He traveled throughout Europe, painting portraits along the way, and he kept a studio in Paris. He painted mostly portraits, but also completed a series of paintings depicting the life of Christ.
John Frederick Kensett was an American artist and engraver who worked in New Haven, Connecticut, and New York City.
Henry Rox was a German artist who studied in Berlin and Paris before settling in the United States in 1938, where he taught at many universities, including Mount Holyoke College. He is known for fruit and vegetable photo-sculptures.
Eugene Speicher was an American realist painter from Buffalo, New York. He attended the Art Students League, and then studied in Europe for a few years. He was considered a leading portrait artist in America at the time, favoring female subjects. Speicher won numerous awards for his work, and was appointed Director of the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1945.
Max Weber was a Russian-born Jewish-American cubist. He studied with Matisse, Rousseau, and Picasso in Paris. Weber helped introduce cubism to America.
John Greenleaf Whittier was an American Quaker poet. Whittier was an ardent abolitionist who was extremely influenced by the doctrines of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility found in Quakerism. He was a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society, and worked as a lobbyist. He is remembered today for his patriotic poetry, and his poems that were later turned into hymns.
Paul Hayne was an American poet who Whittier references in his letter to the publishers Houghton, Mifflin & Co. Hayne had just died, and his son, W.H. Hayne, wanted to edit his later poems for publication.
Widener (1834-1915) was an American businessman from Pennsylvania. During the Civil War, he supplied meat to the Union Army. By investing in trolley cars and public transit services, Widener became quite successful and wealthy. He was an avid art collector whose collection included works by Rembrandt, Edouard Manet, and Auguste Renoir. He is considered one of the top 100 wealthiest Americans of all time.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2009.06 6
Other Archival Materials:
Thomas B. Brumbaugh research material on Abbott Handerson Thayer and other artists, 1876-1994 (bulk 1960s-1994); Also located at Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence -- 19th century
Correspondence -- 20th century
Identifier:
FSA.A2009.06, Series FSA A2009.06 6
See more items in:
The Brumbaugh Collection of Artist Letters
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc3ab5429cd-d428-4427-b439-71f5316aec84
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2009-06-ref4

Correspondence, Andrews, Ambrose - Harding, Chester

Creator:
Beal, Gifford, 1879-1956  Search this
Andrews, Ambrose, 1805-1859  Search this
Bates, Edward, 1793-1869  Search this
Bohrod, Aaron  Search this
Cloar, Carroll  Search this
Colman, Samuel, 1832-1920  Search this
Bacon, Josephine Daskam, 1876-1961  Search this
Rogers, Daniel Denison, 1751-1825  Search this
Elliot, William Parker  Search this
Brush, George de Forest, 1855-1941  Search this
Harding, Chester, 1792-1866  Search this
Names:
Art Students League (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Beach, Ella  Search this
Thayer, Abbott Handerson, 1849-1921  Search this
Town, Ithiel, 1784-1844  Search this
Watson, Forbes, 1880-1960  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brumbaugh, Thomas B. (Thomas Brendle), 1921-  Search this
Extent:
14 Items (Letters, written in ink, ball point, graphite, typewritter)
Type:
Archival materials
Lithographs
Correspondence
Place:
New York (N.Y.)
Date:
1779-1981
Scope and Contents:
This folder is an amalgamation of letters written and recieved by prominent figures in 19th and 20th century American art. Included in the folder are letters by Ambrose Andrews, Edward Bates, Gifford Beal, Aaron Bohrod, Carroll Clear, Samuel Colman, Josephine Daskam, Daniel Denison Rogers, William Elliot, George de Forest Brush, and Chester Harding. The letters' subjects cover a wide range of topics, including the buying and selling of art, invitations to dinner, and general correspondence.
Arrangement:
Organized alphabetically by author.
Biographical / Historical:
Ambrose Andrews was a portrait, miniature, and landscape portrait who worked throughout New England and the United States. He was born in Stockbridge, Massachusetts in 1801 and studied at the National Academy of Design. He exhibited paintings at many different institutions, including his portraits of Henry Clay and Sam Houston. Andrews's work is now in the New York Historical Society.
Edward Bates was a representative for Missouri in the mid-1800s. He served in the War of 1812 as a sergeant in a volunteer brigade, studied and practiced law, attended the state constitutional convention, was district attorney from 1821 to 1826, and was a member of the state senate. He declined to serve as Secretary of War for President Fillmore, but was appointed Attorney General of the United States by President Lincoln, and served from March 5, 1861 to September 1864. Bates died on March 25, 1869.
Admiral Charles Henry Davis was born on January 16, 1807, and served as Chief of the Bureau of Navigation between 1862 and 1865. He then served as Superintendent of the Naval Observatory. He had three ships named after him.
Forbes Watson was an art critic, lecturer, and administrator in New York City in the early 20th century. He served as art critic for the New York Evening Post. In 1933 he was appointed Technical Director of the first New Deal art program, the Public Works of Art Project, which provided work for artists in the decoration of non-federal buildings. He later worked at the Treasury Department of Painting and Sculpture, which administered funding for decorating federal buildings. Watson finally served in the Treasury Department's War Finance Division, where he organized exhibitions and posters by combat artists to promote the sale of war bonds. Forbes Watson's papers are held in the Archives of American Art.
Gifford Beal was an American artist who worked with many organizations for the advancements of the arts, finding inspiration from a wide variety of sources, including holiday scenes, every-day life, and landscapes. Beal loved spontaneity and was influenced by French Impressionists. He was commissioned by the government to paint two murals: one on the post office in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and one in the Main Interior Building in Washington, D.C. Beal's papers are held in the Archives of American Art.
Aaron Bohrod was born in Chicago, Illinois on November 21, 1907, where he studied art at the Art Institute of Chicago. He worked for a while in the advertising art department at the Fair Department Store in Chicago, but eventually moved to New York City, where he joined the Art Students League. He died on April 3, 1992. During World War II, Bohrod worked as an artist for the United States Army Corps of Engineer and Life magazine in Europe.
Carroll Cloar was an American realist and surrealist who lived from 1913 to 1993. He grew up in Arkansas, but later moved to Tennessee, travelled Europe, and joined the Art Students League in New York City. During World War II, he joined the U.S. Army Air Corps, and although he did complete some artwork during this period, none of it survives. Cloar then settled in Memphis. One of his paintings was chosen to commemorate President Clinton's inauguration in 1993. Cloar died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound on April 10, 1993, after a long battle with cancer.
Samuel Colman was an American painter who belonged to the Hudson River School, and is most well-remembered for his landscapes. He was born in Portland, Maine, in 1832, and began exhibiting at the young age of 18. At 27 he was elected an associate of the National Academy, and later studied abroad in Paris and Spain. He was made a full Academician upon his return to the United States, and both founded and served as the first president of the American Water-color Society. He continued to both study in Europe and exhibit artwork, moving from New York to Rhode Island. Colman is represented in the metropolitan Museum, Chicago Art Institute, and many other collections. He died in New York City in 1920.
Josephine Daskam Bacon was an American writer known for writing about "women's issues" and using female protagonists. She wrote a series of juvenile mysteries and helped pioneer the Girl Scouts movement, writing a guidebook for the organization.
Daniel Denison Rogers is perhaps most widely remembered for the painting that John Singleton Copley completed of his wife, Abigail Bromfield.
Ithiel Town was an American architect and civil engineer who lived from October 3, 1784 to June 13, 1844. He worked in the Federal and revivalist Greek and Gothic styles, and was widely copied. He was born in Connecticut, and built both Center Church and Trinity Church in New Haven. Town patented a wooden lattice truss bridge, which made him quite wealthy. He formed a professional architecture firm with Alexander Jackson Davis. One of Town's most amazing feats was the construction of the Potomac Aqueduct in Washington, D.C., which allowed fully loaded canal boats to cross the Potomac River.
William Parker Elliot designed the old U.S. Patent Office, a very important Greek Revival building, with Ithiel Town.
George de Forest Brush was an American painter who grew up in Connecticut and is typified by his paintings and drawings of Native Americans. Even after moving from Wyoming, where he met the Native Americans, back to the East, Brush still occasionally enjoyed living in a teepee. Brush's artistic style later developed into Renaissance-inspired portraits. He was friends with Abbott H. Thayer, and along with Brush's wife, Mary, and son, Gerome, they all contributed to early camouflage designs. Brush died in New Hampshire in 1941.
Chester Harding was an American portrait painter born in Massachusetts in 1792. He worked in many different professions, finally becoming a self-taught itinerant portrait painter. Harding settled in Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts, in a building that now houses the Boston Bar Association (the Chester Harding House, a Historic National Landmark). He studied at the Philadelphia School of Design, later setting up a studio in London, where he befriended and painted for royalty and nobility. Harding finally returned to Boston, where he died in 1866.
Local Numbers:
FSA A2009.06 4
Other Archival Materials:
Thomas B. Brumbaugh research material on Abbott Handerson Thayer and other artists, 1876-1994 (bulk 1960s-1994); Also located at Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish, quote, or reproduce must be secured from the repository.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Real property  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lithographs -- 1950-2000
Correspondence -- 19th century
Correspondence -- 20th century
Identifier:
FSA.A2009.06, Series FSA A2009.06 4
See more items in:
The Brumbaugh Collection of Artist Letters
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dc3fe083cf2-c3ca-489b-b0ee-4f49e62444b0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-fsa-a2009-06-ref2

Manchester -- Glebelands

Former owner:
Carver, Benjamin  Search this
Carver, Benjamin, Mrs.  Search this
Prettyman, William Mr. Mrs.  Search this
Powers, William  Search this
Powers, William, Mrs.  Search this
Hardy, George, Mrs.  Search this
Hardy, George  Search this
Hardy, Anton  Search this
Hardy, Anton, Mrs.  Search this
Trustee:
Leiter, Joseph  Search this
Remington, Franklin  Search this
Architect:
Olcott, Richard M.  Search this
Provenance:
Bennington Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Glebelands (Manchester, Vermont)
United States of America -- Vermont -- Bennington County -- Manchester
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet, narrative description of the garden, and a garden plan.
General:
The term "glebe land," from which this garden takes its name, means land owned by a church, and the owner of this property pays a yearly glebe rent to Zion Episcopal Church. Pockets of glebe land (many of which still exist) throughout the village of Manchester and on nearby Mt. Equinox, when rented out in the 18th and 19th centuries for grazing, provided revenue for the church. A focal point for the property today is a 100-yard long marble dam, which dates from the 1840s when the property was a marble mill. It now provides water for the lower swimming pond. The hillside across the upper pond is all marble chips and displays a host of daffodils in the spring. The shell fountain in the secret garden is fed by the waterfall from the dam. The formal garden was started in the 1930s and is entered through the orchard, which is underplanted with naturalized narcissus. Ornaments of diverse origin are encountered, including marble balls that were the tops of gateposts at "Avalon," the Princeton, New Jersey, home of the theologian and hymn-writer Henry Van Dyck, and which were liberated by the owner's mother when that property was torn down. An Italian marble table and wrought iron gates and grilles came from New Orleans, while a wrought iron arc, originally a fanlight, was salvaged from a demolished bank in New York City. The small pool of Portuguese tile at the end of the peony allee is known as "Polly's bathtub," and is where the owner's mother cooled herself after gardening. Flower beds are edged with bricks removed from a heart-shaped patio once found in front of a large rock. The succulents in the patio were put on the rock and compete with moss for survival. The marble walls which contain the formal beds were built in the 1950s. The caisson housing the bubble fountain is what remained after a marble column had been extracted. The caissons were used as culverts on local roads and here have been cut in half to make garden seats. Richard Olcott, F.A.I.A., designed the reflecting pool in 1995.
Persons associated with the garden include: Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Carver (former owners, 1892-1913); Mr. and Mrs. William Prettyman (former owners, 1913-1921); Joseph Leiter and Franklin Remington (Carver trustees, 1921-1923); Mr. and Mrs. William Powers (former owners, 1923-1929); Mr. and Mrs. George Hardy (former owners, 1929-1931); Mr. and Mrs. Anton G. Hardy (former owners, 1931-1985); and Richard M. Olcott (architect, 1995).
Related Materials:
Glebelands related holdings consist of 1 folder (19 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Vermont -- Manchester  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VT007
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Vermont
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6a6447cb4-f247-48f2-b707-598e1dbd55b7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11357

Osprey -- Historic Spanish Point

Former owner:
Webb, John  Search this
Webb, Elizabeth  Search this
Guptill, Frank  Search this
Guptill, Lizzie Webb  Search this
Palmer, Bertha Honoré, 1849-1918  Search this
Palmer family  Search this
Landscape designer:
Duchêne, Achille, 1866-1947  Search this
Favretti, Rudy J.  Search this
Grounds supervisor:
Prentiss, William  Search this
Architect:
Shepard, Herschel  Search this
Historian:
Matthews, Janet Snyder  Search this
Archaeologist:
Almy, Marion  Search this
Conservator:
Maseman, John  Search this
Horticulturist:
Lichtenstein, Nancy  Search this
Groundskeeper:
Lichtenstein, Nancy  Search this
Provenance:
Founders Garden Club of Sarasota  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Historic Spanish Point (Osprey, Florida)
United States of America -- Florida -- Sarasota County -- Osprey
Scope and Contents:
The folders include worksheets, brochures, booklets, maps, plant lists, copies of correspondence, and additional information about the history of the site, the gardens and the Palmer family.
General:
This 30-acre site is a unique environmental, archaeological, and historic preserve on the shores of Little Sarasota Bay. It was inhabited by Native Americans for 5,000 years, then briefly by the Spanish, and then by pioneers in the mid-19th century. Between 1910 and 1918 it was the home of Mrs. Potter Palmer of Chicago, who developed the gardens between 1912 and 1918 (the property remained in the Palmer family until 1980 when the site was donated to the Gulf Coast Heritage Association, Inc.). The Palmer-era gardens are one focus of the property today, along with historic and environmental preservation. Mrs. Palmer made "Osprey Point" her winter retreat and a self-sufficient plantation, adding and restoring buildings, walkways, an aqueduct, gardens, and more with architectural features typical of her era. In addition, she bought hundreds of additional acres for farming and investment. She preserved the lovely natural setting of native trees and lush greenery, while adding exotic ornamentals, fruits, and vegetables so capably that new plantings have been basically unnecessary since.
Persons associated with the garden include: John and Elizabeth Webb (former owners, 1867-1911); Frank and Lizzie Webb Guptill (former owners, 1901-1911); Mrs. Potter Palmer (former owner, 1910-1918); the Palmer family (former owners, 1918-1980); Achille Duchêne (landscape designer, 1912-1918); William Prentiss (grounds supervisor, 1917); Rudy J. Favretti (landscape designer, 1990); Herschel Shepard (project restoration architect, late 1980s); Janet Snyder Matthews (project historian, late 1980s); Marion Almy (project archaeologist, late 1980s); John Maseman (conservator, late 1980s); and Nancy Lichtenstein (horticulturist and groundskeeper, 1997 to date).
Related Materials:
Historic Spanish Point related holdings consist of 2 folders (13 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Florida -- Osprey.  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File FL095
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Florida
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6343767fb-bcd9-4763-9e20-6252fdf8af9f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref11971

Charleston -- William Gibbes Garden

Provenance:
The Palmetto Garden Club of South Carolina  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Charleston -- Charleston
William Gibbes House (Charleston, South Carolina)
Scope and Contents:
31 digital images (2011, 2018), 1 lantern slide, and 1 35mm slide and 3 file folders. Other documents about the property and garden design plans are included in folder 3.
General:
In 1928 Cornelia Roebling commissioned landscape architect Loutrel Briggs to design formal gardens for her late 18th century Georgian-style home that would incorporate the spirit of the past and utilize local plant and hardscape materials. His design for this one acre property came to be known as the Charleston Garden Style that he replicated successfully many times. The current owner is restoring and enhancing Briggs' design with eleven distinct rooms, all behind screens formed by 19th century high brick walls and tall plants. The rooms are linked by shell flagstone or brick axial walkways with repeated colors, plant materials and shapes creating harmony. Magnolias, cedars, live oaks, crepe myrtles, palms, hollies, cypress, pittosporum, yew, boxwood, camellias, azaleas, liriope, mondo grass and ferns are repeated in many garden rooms, with pink, purple or white flowers predominating. The lawn garden to one side of the main residence is surrounded by shell walkways edged in brick with borders planted with conifers, hydrangeas, azaleas, boxwood, privet, tall hollies, and a large magnolia. The restored old garden that predates Briggs has four boxwood parterres planted with roses with a birdbath in the center. The three-foot pond with ogee corners has a pyramid-shaped boxwood in each corner, seasonal beds inside the wall with boxwood edging, island beds planted with camellias and mondo grass, and a small terrace with a bench off to one side shaded by wisteria. Cedars and crepe myrtles also provide shade in warm weather. A brick, unroofed summer house built in the 19th century by owner John Grimke Drayton has an 18th century marble entablature and is draped with white roses.

Next to the summer house along the brick wall there is a new garden with two formal diamond- shaped beds planted in purple and white and two beds with magnolias. The east-west axial long walk behind the house was broken up by a later 25-foot square swimming pool; it is bordered by brick columns connected by chains draped with yellow roses and a pittosporum hedge clipped like waves. In the pool garden there are Meyer lemon standards, yoshino cherries, and verbenas. The court garden terrace behind the house is bordered by beds with camellias, ferns, liriope, aspidistra, mondo grass and ferns growing in brick walls. Beds alongside the drive and around the parking area feature a mature live oak, azaleas, roses, crepe myrtles and seasonal plantings that complement the pink stucco walls of the guest house. The old brick privy court is used for storage and for growing tomatoes, with a white picket fence atop a low brick wall. A trellis planted with confederate jasmine and a row of Italian cypress mark the transition to the citrus garden on the site of the old drying yard. There are grapefruit, kumquat, orange and lemon trees planted in two rows of octagonal beds, repeating the formal design of the parterre gardens. The property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Persons associated with the garden include: William Gibbes and family (former owners, 1772-1794); Sarah Moore Smith family and descendants (former owners, 1794-circa 1885); J.B.E. Sloan family and descendants (former owners, 1885-circa 1928); Cornelia W. Roebling family and descendants (former owners, 1926-1984); Historic Charleston Foundation (former owner, 1984-1986); Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson Leath (former owners, 1986-1996); Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Trainer (former owners, 1996-circa 2006); Loutrel Winslow Briggs (1893-1977) (landscape architect, 1928); Dr. Eugene Johnson (landscape designer, 2018).
Related Materials:
See also the Eleanor Weller Collection for a 35mm reproduction of SC074001.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Charleston  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File SC074
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / South Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb69bff1ee8-82ed-4a32-9e6f-148ecf66f00f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12460

Columbia -- Hampton-Preston House and Garden

Former owner:
Hall, Ainsley  Search this
Hampton, Wade General, 1818-1902  Search this
Hampton, Mary Cantey  Search this
Preston, John  Search this
Moses, Emma  Search this
Moses, Franklin J.  Search this
Ursuline Convent (Columbia, South Carolina)  Search this
Chicora College for Women  Search this
Presbyterian Institute for Women (Columbia, South Carolina)  Search this
Westerveldt Children's Academy  Search this
Landscape designer:
Hampton, Mary Cantey  Search this
Landscape architect:
Dargan, Hugh  Search this
Architect:
Yates & Phillips  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Hampton-Preston House and Garden (Columbia, South Carolina)
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Richland County -- Columbia
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet, garden designs, narrative histories of the house and garden and its restoration, photocopies of publications featuring the garden, and other information.
General:
Originally built in 1818, the Hampton-Preston House has been restored to reflect the years 1835-1855. Likewise, the gardens have been restored to reflect the ante-bellum period. During the 19th century the garden was described as one of the most extensive and elaborate town gardens in the United States, and included rare plants, shrubs, trees, fountains, and arbors. Plantings included magnolias and cedars. Destroyed in the 1940s, the garden was restored in the 1980s; landscape architect Hugh Dargan spent three years on the project. Plant material known to have been used during the residency of Mary Cantey Hampton in the 19th century dominates the landscape.
Persons and organizations associated with the property include: Ainsley Hall (former owner, 1820-1823); General Wade Hampton (former owner, 1823-1848); Mary Cantey Hampton (former owner and landscape designer, 1823-1848); John Preston (former owner, ca. 1848); Franklin J. and Emma Moses (former owners, ca. 1870); Hugh Dargan (landscape architect, 1980s); Yates & Phillips (architects); the Ursuline Convent (former owners, 1890-1915); the Presbyterian Institute for Women (former owner); Chicora College for Women (former owner); and Westerveldt Children's Academy (former owner).
Related Materials:
Hampton-Preston House and Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (13 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Columbia  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File SC032
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / South Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6e2d978f5-170a-4fe2-a53a-951e0ed768e1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12467

Moncks Corner -- Mulberry Plantation

Landscape architect:
Briggs, Loutrel W.  Search this
Owner:
Chapman, Clarence  Search this
Provenance:
Little Garden Club of Rye  Search this
Creator:
Broughton, Thomas Col  Search this
Collection, John, Sir  Search this
Barker, Theodore G., Major  Search this
Chapman, Clarence  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Mulberry Plantation (Moncks Corner, South Carolina)
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Berkeley County -- Moncks Corner
Mulberry Plantation (Moncks Corner, South Carolina)
United States of America -- South Carolina -- Berkeley County -- Moncks Corner
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, and photocopies of book excerpts and articles.
General:
The brick house at Mulberry Plantation was built on a bluff by the first owner, Thomas Broughton in 1714, the date inscribed in iron on the four weathervanes atop the four pavilions at the corners of the house. Situated along the Cooper River the current property comprises 805 acres and includes gardens on three levels: a formal boxwood parterre garden next to the house, a descending camellia walk, and a formal circle garden, all designed by Loutrel W. Briggs (b.1893-d.1977) circa 1930. Other features include a parterre kitchen garden, a Live oak allée, lagoon, rolling lawns and the oldest mulberry tree in the country. The plantation grew rice at various times in its history, as well as indigo and forest products. Another 19th century commercial project that did not succeed was breeding silk worms to produce domestic silk, with mulberry trees planted to house the worms. By the early 20th century the property was in decline and was sold out of the Broughton family to Mr. and Mrs. Clarence E. Chapman as a winter retreat. The Chapmans restored the house and brought in Briggs, known for developing the Charleston style for the many small gardens he designed in the city and at other Cooper River plantations.
Mulberry Plantation was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1966. The style of the house has been described as Jacobean and French, with a mansard roof, rather than a typical low-country wooden structure. The brick house may have been used as a fortress against attacks during the Yamesse War in 1715, between settlers and Native Americans. At one time there were many slave cabins on the property but now only one remains that has been used as a hunting lodge.
Persons associated with the garden include Thomas Broughton and descendents (former owners, 1714-1914); Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Chapman (former owners, 1915-1981); Historic Charleston Foundation (former owners, 1981-1987); Loutrel Winslow Briggs (December 12, 1893-May, 1977) (landscape designer, circa 1930)
Related Materials:
Mulberry Plantation related holdings consist of 2 folders (2 35mm slides (photographs) + 27 digital images)
Mulberry Plantation related holdings consist of 1 slide (photograph) (col., 35mm.)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Moncks Corner  Search this
Plantations  Search this
Spring  Search this
Box  Search this
Formal gardens  Search this
Sundials  Search this
Gardens -- South Carolina -- Moncks Corner  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File SC061
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / South Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb60ba6e02c-2caf-4c96-88a7-9520448a1b9b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12489

Asheville -- W. K. Symmes Residence

Architect:
Adams, Junius  Search this
Former owner:
Adams, Junius  Search this
Adams, Junius, Mrs.  Search this
Provenance:
The French Broad River Garden Club Foundation  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Symmes, W. K., Residence (Asheville, North Carolina)
United States of America -- North Carolina -- Buncombe County -- Asheville
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes a worksheet, a copy of the property plat, a photocopy of a published photograph of the potting shed, and other information.
General:
This two-and-a-half acre garden is located at 2,200 feet altitude in Biltmore Forest, a residential suburb of Asheville in the mountains of western North Carolina. The placement of house and garden take full advantage of the privacy afforded by backing to the 8,000-acre Biltmore estate. The house is approached by a rhododendron-lined lane off the main road and is not visible from the street. A full acre of roadside property remains a mature woods of pine and hardwood, providing it a rural setting. A rock garden is nestled on a slope behind the house and can be viewed from the breakfast room and bedrooms; it also serves as an entrance garden to the guest cottage. Off the living room a circular terrace overlooks three levels of lawn which slope to the vast woods adjoining. An herb garden surrounds the terrace and a rhododendron thicket borders the upper level of the lawn, which is often used as an outdoor dining room. Outbuildings include a 19th century-style, octagon-shaped well house used as a potting shed and a "play house" at the end of a secluded path through the thicket.
Persons associated with the property include Mr. and Mrs. Junius Adams (architect and former owners, 1939-1988).
Related Materials:
W. K. Symmes Residence related holdings consist of 1 folder (6 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- North Carolina -- Asheville  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NC042
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / North Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb678696687-3716-4a14-b4f2-30ab6ca17c1b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12946

Wilmington -- Airlie (NC)

Former owner:
Jones, Pembroke  Search this
Landscape architect:
Pope, John Russell, 1874-1937  Search this
Barney, J. Stewart  Search this
Owner:
Landfall Development Company  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
United States of America -- North Carolina -- New Hanover County -- Wilmington
General:
The frontage of this estate is on Wrightsville Beach. Pembroke Jones began acquiring property in the late 19th century for a hunting preserve. He build a hunting lodge on the tract. John Russell Pope designed the lodge. The property was called Pembroke Park.
The property has been developed by the Landfall Development Company. "Landfall" is name given to this development in honor of the explorer that landed on the shores of Cape Fear River on March 1, 1524.
Related Materials:
Airlie (NC) related holdings consist of 1 folder (1 35mm slide)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Spring  Search this
Follies (Architecture)  Search this
Temples  Search this
Publications  Search this
Water gardens  Search this
Gardens -- North Carolina -- Wilmington  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File NC020
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / North Carolina
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6d80e1941-f51a-422d-a26d-111051d66309
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref12980

Houston -- Christ Church Cathedral

Landscape designer:
Gunn, Ralph Ellis  Search this
Catlow, A. Gregory  Search this
Landscape architect:
Thompson, Lance  Search this
Thompson & Hanson  Search this
Architect:
Tempest, J. Arthur  Search this
Merriman, William H.  Search this
Harper, Richard  Search this
Ray Bailey Architects, Inc.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Christ Church Cathedral (Houston, Texas)
United States of America -- Texas -- Houston
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, two site plans with plant names, and brochures and other documents relating to Christ Church Cathedral and the dedication of the Cleveland Courtyard.
General:
The oldest church in Houston, Christ Church Cathedral includes extensive garden space in its Bishop's Garden and Cleveland courtyards. Although the church has been in existence since the 19th century, the current gardens have been developed only since 1970, with new additions being completed in 1990. Although there is an underlying structure of hardscaping, trees, and shrubs, other plantings are changed with the seasons and vary from year to year.
Persons and firms associated with the garden include: Ralph Ellis Gunn (landscape designer, 1969-1975); A. Gregory Catlow (landscape designer, 1975-1984); Lance Thompson (landscape architect, 1990-1992); J. Arthur Tempest (architect, 1893); William H. Merriman (architect, 1990); Richard Harper (architect, 1990); Ray Bailey Architects, Inc. (architects, 1990); and Thompson & Hanson (landscape architects, 1990-1992).
Related Materials:
Christ Church Cathedral related holdings consist of 1 folder (28 35 mm. slides)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Texas -- Houston  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File TX028
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Texas
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb694fb5789-734f-4db1-96e6-112339f574e1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref13503

Baltimore -- Brightside

Former owner:
White, S. Bonsal Mrs.  Search this
White, S. Bonsal  Search this
Krongard, A. B.  Search this
Krongard, A. B. Mrs.  Search this
Architect:
Ness, Charles M.  Search this
Snead, James A.  Search this
Provenance:
St. George Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Brightside (Owings Mills, Maryland)
United States of America -- Maryland -- Owings Mills -- Baltimore
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, photocopies of images and an illustrated history of the family, house and garden.
General:
The five-acre Brightside gardens were built from 1983 to 2014 on a property with a large country house of white-painted bricks and a slate roof, surrounded by woodland shade and poor soil. Described as a dialog between the heart and the head there are 54 discrete garden areas, including Lutyens-style stairways, a potager, a cemetery for family pets with a statue of a beloved pug, gardens named after the neoclassical statues within them or the friends that designed or inspired them, a pool garden. Formal garden rooms are near the house and more rustic woodlands gardens are further from the house. Some of the hardscapes of the formal gardens were designed to echo the neoclassical lines of Baltimore Federal furniture. Each garden has a theme inspired by a quotation from philosophy, religion, literature or poetry that bespeaks the spirit of that area, with plantings that refer to the symbolic Victorian language of flowers. The owners have been inspired by their visits to hundreds of gardens and the Greek and Roman ideals embodied in neoclassicism and the American Federal and empire styles from the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Among their favorites are the English garden design collaborations of Gertrude Jekyll and Sir Edwin Lutyens, William Kent's Rousham, Sissinghurst, Hidcote, and the fantasy elven gardens in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.
In 1990 woodlands were cleared of understory and hundreds of tons of soil were deposited under the remaining tall trees and dogwood to sculpt a new landscape. Within one week 500 rhododendron, 65,000 fern and 65,000 pachysandra seedlings were planted. There are six levels of woodland gardens descending from a ridgeline, 2,000 specimen trees, and amphitheaters and berms that have altered the contours of the lawns. Since most of the property is shaded native plants and shade tolerant specimen plants are featured. Garden ornaments include pedigreed statues, antique urns, birdbaths, boot scrapers and gates. Formal garden borders near the house in the room named Jessica's garden for its designer contain more colorful and sun-loving plants, including delphinium, peony, phlox, lilac, hydrangea and butterfly bush. For the owners these lyrical gardens are a retreat they liken to medieval gardens where man imposed rationality and beauty in a small part of the chaotic world.
Persons associated with the garden include Mr. and Mrs. S. Bonsal White (former owners, 1950's); Mr. and Mrs. A.B. Krongard (former owners, 1960's); Mr. and Mrs. John Lalley (former owners, 1970's); Charles M. Ness (architect, 1950); James A. Snead (architect, circa 1995-1998).
Related Materials:
Brightside related holdings consist of 1 folder (22 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Maryland -- Owings Mills  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MD366
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Maryland
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6b2572ff5-35fd-477d-8816-6405273eda3f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref14150

Cincinnati -- River High

Landscape architect:
Christie, Eleanor H.  Search this
Taylor, Albert Davis  Search this
Battin, Dalton W.  Search this
Bentley, John A.  Search this
Steele & Whittaker Landscapes, Inc.  Search this
Vivian Llambi & Associates Inc.  Search this
Former owner:
Warrington, George H.  Search this
Richardson, Rosemary Sawyer  Search this
Landscape designer:
Hoffman, Stu  Search this
Provenance:
Cincinnati Town and Country Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
River High (Cincinnati, Ohio)
United States of America -- Ohio -- Hamilton County -- Cincinnati
Scope and Contents:
The folders include work sheets, copies of landscape plans, newspaper and periodical articles, additional visual images, and planting lists.
General:
"River High" represents one of Cincinnati's most characteristic architectural types: the large house set on a wooded hill-top and oriented toward a view of the Ohio River Valley. Built in 1912, the house combines English Georgian and American Colonial Revival with influences of the Arts and Crafts style. "River High" is perceived at first as a long, substantial, dark red brick mass with the original slate roof, lying athwart a shallow bowl of lawn, with the drive winding down to the entrance and sweeping back to the road. The architects' intent was to block the view until the house had been penetrated; when the riverscape appears at the end of the central hallway. The house consists of three main blocks. The lower porch on the left opens onto the reconstructed formal garden that extends the axis of the house eastward. The lower porch leads out onto the lawn that descends gradually through a formal parterre with a pool and fountain. Symmetrical plantings frame this lower lawn. In 2005 the front arrival courtyard was transformed and is now centered with the formal front entrance in keeping with the symmetrical Georgian style of the house. The new design features a fountain with waterfall and a sculpture of two great blue herons as well as seasonal display beds for annuals, a serpentine retaining wall, landscape lighting, and a unique bench sculpture. Completing the picture are custom-designed wrought iron gates, 19th-century Italian urns, and ornamental and shade trees.
Person(s) associated with the property and garden include: George H. Warrington (former owner, 1912-1951); Rosemary Sawyer Richardson (former owner, 1951-1989); Albert Davis Taylor (landscape architect, 1917); Eleanor H. Christie (landscape architect, ca. 1917-1951?); Dalton W. Battin (landscape architect, 1980); Stu Hoffman, Natorp Landscape Organization, Inc. (landscape designer, 1987); Steele & Whittaker Landscapes, Inc. (landscape architects, 1991); Vivian Llambi & Associates Inc. (landscape architects, 1996); and John A. Bentley (landscape architect, 2005).
Related Materials:
River High related holdings consist of 2 folders (51 35 mm. slides; 5 photographic prints)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Ohio -- Cincinnati  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File OH217
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Ohio
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6ab60831a-168c-4e77-a3c7-c18ecec9d374
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref15431

Haverford -- Thomas Country Garden

Former owner:
Thayer, Russell  Search this
Thayer, Shelby  Search this
MacCoy, Margureite Wood  Search this
Architect:
Durham, Walter K. (Walter Kremer), 1896-1978  Search this
Landscape architect:
DeVuono, Julie Wood  Search this
Landscape designer:
Wood, Sally  Search this
Provenance:
The Garden Club of Philadelphia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Thomas Country Garden (Haverford, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Montgomery -- Haverford
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets and photocopies of articles.
General:
Built in 1950 by Philadelphia architect Walter K. Durham the cottage style stucco house with dormer windows and multiple roof lines blends in very well with the romantic, profusely flowering and fragrant garden rooms created by the current owners beginning in 1987. Large window pane trellises on the house support climbing hydrangea, schizopraghma, clematis and roses. White picket fences, stone walls and arbors on the slightly more than one acre property are loaded with more roses, with more than one type of vine that will bloom in succession climbing up or over some of the supports. Perennials, especially those that bloom more than once and those with variegated leaves that add light to the garden are planted strategically to disguise any spent foliage or sparse vines. There is no spraying in this garden, and the rose varieties that are grown including hybrid musk and old-fashioned thrive where hybrid tea rose varieties would not. The eight garden rooms are planted primarily with shrubs and also perennials, spring bulbs and ornamental grasses. Mature trees from the earlier 19th century estate, Cheswold, still grow around the perimeter.
Other than the trees there were no surviving gardens so the current owners started with a blank slate that had some hidden surprises: ruins from the earlier mansion that on occasion interfered with their plants. The stone walls on the property re-used these buried materials salvaged from underground. The secluded entrance terrace was the first garden room that was designed on the steep slope that descends to the house. The back terrace needed to be stabilized and slips of hydrangea petiolaris planted along the walls have grown into a living wall. As the property continues to slope downward grass and stone steps to the flatland were added, which led to creating another garden room at the rear of the property, with a trellis for climbing vines and a bench for sitting and looking up at the house, tall trees and sky. A swimming pool was built on the previous service area off to one side and surrounded by upper and lower gardens with tulips, roses, clematis, hydrangeas, grasses, perennials, evergreens, dawn redwoods and katsuras. Various hedges have been planted and re-planted either because they grew too tall or succumbed to weather. Currently there are hedges of holly, lilac, Annabelle hydrangea and germander.
Persons associated with the garden include: Russell and Shelby Thayer (former owners, 1950-1956); Marguerite Wood MacCoy (former owner, 1956-1985); Walter K. Durham (1896-1978) (architect, 1950); Sally Ann Wood (ASLD)(landscape designer, 1987, 1990); Julie Wood DeVuono (ASLD) (landscape architect, 2007).
Related Materials:
Thomas Country Garden related holdings consist of 1 folder (41 digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Haverford  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA755
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb661b4007a-c554-4fc6-a876-9284f2d8d689
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16475

Philadelphia -- Boxly

Former owner:
Penn, William  Search this
Pastorius, Francis Daniel  Search this
Du Barry, Joseph  Search this
Sheridan, Owen  Search this
Taylor, Frederick Winslow, 1856-1915  Search this
Taylor, Frederick Winslow, Mrs.  Search this
Peck, Frederick W. G.  Search this
Peck, Frederick W. G. Mrs.  Search this
Architect:
Fielding, Mantle, 1865-1941  Search this
Landscape architect:
Gallagher, Percival  Search this
Peck, Frederick W. G.  Search this
Olmsted Brothers  Search this
Civil engineer:
Vandu Zee, Harold (civil engineer)  Search this
Gardener:
Bender, Robert  Search this
Provenance:
The Garden Club of Philadelphia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Boxly (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
United States of America -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia County -- Philadelphia
Scope and Contents:
The folders include worksheets, photocopies of newspaper and other printed references about the garden, and photocopies of photographs of the garden when it was owned by Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Winslow Taylor (before 1951).
General:
"Boxly" was originally established by Joseph Du Barry (a friend of Joseph Bonaparte) as "Mulberry Farm." The property was the center of an unsuccessful silk industry in the early 19th century. It was later purchased by the famous efficiency engineer Frederick Winslow Taylor, who built the first undulating putting green (for golf) in America at the property. He renamed it "Boxly" because of its then 100-year-old boxwood bushes. The property was redesigned in the 1950s and 1960s.
Persons associated with the property include: William Penn (former owner, 1681-1683); Francis Daniel Pastorius (former owner, 1683-?); Joseph Du Barry (former owner, 1803-?); Owen Sheridan (former owner, 1833-?); Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Winslow Taylor (former owners, 1901-1951); Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. G. Peck (former owners and landscape architect, 1951-1998); Mantle Fielding (architect, 1901-1905); the Olmsted Brothers (landscape architects, 1901-1910); Percival Gallagher (landscape architect, 1901-1910); Harold Vandu Zee (civil engineer, 1901-1915); and Robert Bender (gardener, 1902-?).
Related Materials:
Boxly related holdings consist of 3 folders (4 glass lantern slides; 63 35 mm. slides; 17 photonegatives)
Records related to this site can be found at the Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site, Olmsted Job Number 00168, F. W. Taylor (Clark, J.S.).
See others in:
Maida Babson Adams American Garden Collection, ca. 1960-1994.
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File PA009
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Pennsylvania
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6eecd6092-7c89-4e8f-9859-2299b3d74d87
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref16501

Boston -- Capitoline Garden, Cobb House Condominium, The

Landscape architect:
Cram, Robert Nathan, d. 1930  Search this
Architect:
Stone, James Hicks, 1889-1928  Search this
Provenance:
Beacon Hill Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Capitoline Garden, The, Cobb House Condominium (Boston, Massachusetts)
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Suffolk County -- Boston
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, copies of articles about the garden from the 1920s and 1930s, and other information.
General:
Located on Beacon Hill, this garden is a well-preserved vestige of the post-1900 movement to convert the service areas of 19th-century townhouses into gardens. The garden was originally designed in 1928 by Harvard landscape design graduate Robert Nathan Cram to lie behind two adjoining Joy Street houses (ca. 1810) that he owned. The Depression intervened, however; Cram, financially ruined, died a suicide in 1930 and subsequent owners made many changes. Finally, in 1984 the property was converted to condominium apartments. The condominium association has imaginatively planted and carefully maintained its unique little courtyard. Remarkably, the outlines of Cram's original design are still in place, with several features intact: a chin-deep "plunging pool" fed by a dolphin-head fountain and a pergola supported by twisted columns.
Persons associated with the garden include Robert Nathan Cram (landscape architect, 1928-30) and James Hicks Stone (architect, 1928).
Related Materials:
The Capitoline Garden, Cobb House Condominium related holdings consist of 1 folder (9 35 mm. slides (photographs); 3 photographic prints)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MA046
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Massachusetts
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6ea14b5da-267b-49d6-8c00-ad8b8bc6d5f6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref17560

Nantucket -- 78 Main Street

Former owner:
Coffin, Charles  Search this
Landscape architect:
Callaway, Paul Faulkner "Chip,"  Search this
Callaway & Associates  Search this
Landscape designer:
Jordin, Julie  Search this
The Garden Design Co.  Search this
Provenance:
Nantucket Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
78 Main Street (Nantucket, Massachusetts)
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Nantucket County -- Nantucket
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, garden plans, a description of the garden by Julie Jordin, a tree and shrub list, and detailed historical information (including photocopies of public documents) about the property.
General:
The 1834 Charles Coffin house is the site of this one-third acre garden in the center of Nantucket town. Surrounded by mature maple and elm trees that protect it from the island's harsh climate extremes, the garden features a formal front yard and a backyard that includes several garden "rooms." The front yard is enclosed by the original wheat sheaf fence found in the attic during a restoration, while the plant material is composed primarily of trimmed boxwood hedges in keeping with Coffin's conservative Quaker tradition. The backyard includes a large cutting garden on the west side of the house, while established hydrangeas, azaleas, rhododendrons, and hostas provide a border for the lawn and a backdrop for the pond. A period sunken garden features two 19th-century statues flanking the steps and opposing camelback sofas created out of boxwood. A twisted steel gazebo hides underneath wisteria in a shady back corner.
Persons and firms associated with the property include: Charles Coffin (former owner, ca. 1830s); Paul Faulkner "Chip" Callaway and Callaway & Associates (landscape architects, 2000-2002); and Julie Jordin and The Garden Design Co. (landscape designers, 2004-2006).
Related Materials:
78 Main Street related holdings consist of 1 folder (17 35 mm. slides (photographs))
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Massachusetts -- Nantucket  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MA095
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Massachusetts
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6d3a68e79-9a78-4d5c-b672-c22323ea730e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref17635

Wenham -- Old Farm

Preservation architect:
Chandler, Joseph Everett  Search this
Gardener:
Tennis, Lawrence  Search this
Sculptor:
Seamans, Beverly Benson  Search this
Former owner:
Kent, John H. B.  Search this
Peach, Benjamin F.  Search this
Peach, Adelaine L.  Search this
Daniels, Alanson L.  Search this
Daniels, Frances Pomeroy  Search this
Amory, John S.  Search this
Amory, Mary B.  Search this
Landscape architect:
Shipman, Ellen, 1869-1950  Search this
Provenance:
North Shore Garden Club of Massachusetts  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Old Farm (Wenham, Massachusetts)
United States of America -- Massachusetts -- Essex -- Wenham
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, photocopies of articles, historical images, and biographical and other information.
General:
Old Farm has a sunken and enclosed garden designed in 1912-1913 by Ellen Biddle Shipman in the Colonial Revival style to complement the 17th century farm house, described as a cloistered space within the more than one hundred acres of fields and woodlands that comprise this property. The garden was one of Shipman's earliest documented professional commissions, a rectangular plot sub-divided by stone and gravel walks into smaller rectangular beds surrounded by a low dry stone wall. At the far end there is a stone apse or excedrae with room for outdoor seating and a lily pond, now dry. Shipman's original stone terrace directly behind the house, stone walkway down the middle of the garden, and stone steps that lead up to the excedrae have grown over with grass and the American elm trees that shaded the enclosed garden have been replaced by other mature trees. The flower beds have been retained in their original shapes and siting, and have three distinct seasons of blooms: first daffodils, followed by irises, phlox and peonies, then fall asters.
The original 17th century house had rooms on either side of the chimney in front with a lean-to rear section. In the late 19th century the rear section was raised to two stories, and in the early 20th century the house was restored by preservation specialist Joseph Everett Chandler. Ellen Biddle Shipman added trellises for vines and a garden in front of the house planted with boxwood, roses and oleander.
Persons associated with the garden include: John H. B. Kent (former owner, 1836-1910); Benjamin F. and Adelaine L. Peach (former owners, 1899-1910); Alanson L. and Frances Pomeroy Daniels (former owners, 1910-1933); John S. and Mary B. Amory (former owners, 1933-1961); Ellen Biddle Shipman (landscape architect, 1912-1913); Joseph Everett Chandler (preservation architect, 1915); Lawrence Tennis (gardener, 2004- ); Beverly Benson Seamans (1928-2012) (sculptor).
Related Materials:
Old Farm related holdings consist of 1 folder (3 35mm slides (photographs); 15 digital images)
Additional materials also located in the Benjamin Howe Conant Collection of Photographs, Wenham Museum, Wenham, Massachusetts; Ellen McGowan Biddle Shipman archive #1259, Carl A. Kroch Library Division of Rare and Manuscripts Collection, Cornell University , Ithaca, New York
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original archival materials by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Topic:
Gardens -- Massachusetts -- Wenham  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, The Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File MA611
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Massachusetts
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/kb6c40427c7-9295-4e38-9c08-e7a7467c0021
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref17687
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