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Second and Third Ecuador Expeditions photograph collection

Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Photographer:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Saville, Foster H. (Foster Harmon), 1874-1942  Search this
Saville, Marshall H. (Marshall Howard), 1867-1935  Search this
Extent:
398 Negatives (photographic)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Place:
Manabí (Ecuador)
Ecuador
Date:
1907-1908
Summary:
Photographic negatives made by George Pepper, Marshall Saville and Foster Saville during the second and third Ecuador expeditions in 1907 and 1908. The expeditions were sponsored by George Gustav Heye and included archaeological work in the Manabi and Esmereldas provinces in Ecuador.
Scope and Contents:
This collection includes negatives made in the Manabi and Esmereldas provinces of Ecuador during the second and third Ecuador Expeditions sponsored by George Gustav Heye. The photographs were shot by George Hubbard Pepper, Foster H. Saville and Marshall H. Saville. The majority of the photographs are from the Manabi Province and include images from Cerro Jaboncillo, Cerro de Hojas, Manta, La Secita and Monte Christi. The photographs from Esmereldas includes images from Isla de la Tola, La Tolita and Tonsupa. Many of the photographs document the excavation work that was conducted. This includes images of excavation sites and archaeological objects, local workers hired for the expedition as well as landscape views and street scenes in the various expedition locations in Ecuador. Additionally, many of Foster Savilles's photographs in Monte Christi and Manta show local happenings such as the procession of Fiesta de San Pablo, fishermen drawing nets and women bathing on the beach. There are several photographs that feature George Pepper and Marshall Saville in the field. The negatives were likely shot on both glass plate and nitrate. There are 75 glass plate negatives, made by George Pepper, that are still in the collection. The remainder of the negatives which were likely shot on nitrate are now on acetate film, copied during the 1960s photograph conservation project at the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation.
This collection includes negatives with the following catalog numbers: N00001-N00074, N00170-N00171, N00178, N00221, N00798-N01112, N01453-N01457

N00170 - N00171 ; N00178 ; N00221 are the only photographs from the Third Ecuador Expedition, the rest are from the Second.
Arrangement:
Arranged by catalog number.
Biographical / Historical:
The Second and Third Ecuador expeditions were sponsored by George Gustav Heye and conducted during the summers of 1907 and 1908. These followed an initial archaeological investigation on the coast of Ecuador in 1906, later called the First Ecuador Expedition. Marshall H. Saville, George Hubbard Pepper and Foster H. Saville arrived in Manabi, Ecuador in the middle of June, 1907 and the expedition remained there until October. The work centered mainly around the Cerro Jaboncillo and Cerro de Hojas hills where excavations of house-sites and mounds were conducted. Following this work in Manabi, George Pepper and Foster Saville traveled to the hills south of Mone Cristi and Marshall Saville proceeded to the Esmeraldas coast with Louis W. Niendorff conducting excavations through the first of November. In 1908 Marshall Saville returned to Ecuador with George D. Hedian, revisiting sites in Manabi and making several trips into the mountainous region south of Manta as well as Bahia de Caraques. Over the course of these two trips more than 3000 archaeological items were collected and brought back to New York as part of the Heye collection, eventually becoming part of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. For more information see "The Antiquities of Manabi, Ecuador; Final Report" by Marshall H. Saville in Contributions to South American Archaeology, Volume 2, 1910.
Related Materials:
A small amount of field notes from George Pepper can be found in the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation records, NMAI.AC.001, (Box 189, Folder 3). Additional Pepper field notes can be found in his collection at Tulane University.
Provenance:
Sent to the Heye Museum, later the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, by George Pepper, Marshall Savillle and Foster Saville, along with other excavation materials in 1907 and 1908.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu). Photographs with burials, human remains or any other cultural sensitivity are restricted.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Ecuador  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Second and Third Ecuador Expeditions photograph collection, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.041
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4b76c8054-0812-4dee-8bd3-f8ac44ac0b0b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-041

Inka Engineering Symposium 9: Closing Remarks

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2013-11-19T18:32:11.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_bxEy8EyU3cU

John Victor Murra papers

Correspondent:
Zalinger, Alvin D.  Search this
Swift, Arthur L.  Search this
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Yanez Perez, Luis  Search this
Wolf, Eric R.  Search this
Service, Elman R. (Elman Rogers), 1915-1996  Search this
Seda Bonilla, Eduardo, 1927-  Search this
Steward, Julian Haynes, 1902-1972  Search this
Reining, Priscilla  Search this
Steinbert, Arthur  Search this
Reining, Conrad Copeland, 1918-1984  Search this
Reichel-Dolmatoff, Gerardo  Search this
Rouse, Irving, 1913-2006  Search this
Nnoke Grant, Barbara S.  Search this
O'Brien, Denise A.  Search this
Padeilla, Elena  Search this
Reichel-Dolmatoff, Alicia  Search this
Dancer, Clifford C.  Search this
Diamond, Stanley, 1922-1991  Search this
Diskin, Martin  Search this
Douglas, Richard M.  Search this
Brown, Jennifer  Search this
Caro, Isabel Sklow  Search this
Codere, Helen F., 1917-2009  Search this
Comhaire, Jean L.  Search this
Ascher, Robert  Search this
Boggs, Stephen Taylor  Search this
Bott, Elizabeth  Search this
Brant, Charles Sanford  Search this
Armstrong, Robert Geiston  Search this
Drake, St. Clair  Search this
Drucker, Susana  Search this
Dubreiul, Guy  Search this
Griffith, Sanford  Search this
Harris, J.S.  Search this
Heath, Dwight Braley  Search this
Leslie, Charles  Search this
Manners, Robert A. (Robert Alan), 1913-1996  Search this
McWilliams, Carey  Search this
Meggers, Betty Jane  Search this
Mintz, Sidney W. (Sidney Wilfred), 1922-2015  Search this
Creator:
Murra, John V. (John Victor), 1916-2006  Search this
Extent:
42.5 Linear feet ((88 boxes and 1 map case folder) )
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Correspondence
Notes
Date:
1927-1998
Summary:
The Papers of John Victor Murra document his personal and professional life through audiovisual materials, correspondence, diaries, graduate school notes, lectures, photocopies of archival materials, photographs, published materials collected by Murra, reading and research notes and his own writings. The materials span more than 70 years. The collection includes materials relating to Murra's immigration to the United States and later lawsuit for naturalization, his undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Chicago, his experiences in the Spanish Civil War and in Ecuador during the Second World War as Don Collier's assistant, his teaching career at a number of colleges and universities in the United States and abroad including the University of Puerto Rico, Vassar College, Yale University, and Cornell University, and his research interests such as the fieldwork projects he directed at Hunuco and Lake Titicaca. The bulk of his correspondence may be found in Series I - Correspondence which mostly consists of his communications with former classmates from the University of Chicago, colleagues in the United States and abroad, and former students. Series IV - Biographical and Series VII - Graduate School and Teaching contain a significant amount of material pertaining to Murra's studies at the University of Chicago and his lawsuit for naturalization. Correspondence and newspaper editorials from F. C. Cole and Robert Redfield as well as oral history transcripts of Murra's personal reminiscences are among the items found in these series. For many years, Murra also kept personal diaries, originally intended as records of his dreams, which form Series III - Dream Archives. Although this collection is primarily textual in nature, there are also a photograph and an audio-visual series. The later includes recordings of Murra's Lewis Henry Morgan lectures. The occasional photograph also appears throughout other series.
Scope and Contents:
The Papers of John Victor Murra document his personal and professional life through audiovisual materials, correspondence, diaries, graduate school notes, lectures, photocopies of archival materials, photographs, published materials collected by Murra, reading and research notes and his own writings. The materials span more than 70 years.

The collection includes materials relating to Murra's immigration to the United States and later lawsuit for naturalization, his undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Chicago, his experiences in the Spanish Civil War and in Ecuador during the Second World War as Don Collier's assistant, his teaching career at a number of colleges and universities in the United States and abroad including the University of Puerto Rico, Vassar College, Yale University, and Cornell University, and his research interests such as the fieldwork projects he directed at Huánuco and Lake Titicaca.

Murra is a polyglot and a prolific correspondent, two elements which are reflected throughout the collection. English, French, Spanish and Romanian are the predominant languages used in his correspondence, but there are also letters in German, Italian and Russian. The bulk of his correspondence may be found in Series I --Correspondence which mostly consists of his communications with former classmates from the University of Chicago, colleagues in the United States and abroad, and former students. Series IV --Biographical and Series VII --Graduate School and Teaching contain a significant amount of material pertaining to Murra's studies at the University of Chicago and his lawsuit for naturalization. Correspondence and newspaper editorials from F. C. Cole and Robert Redfield as well as oral history transcripts of Murra's personal reminiscences are among the items found in these series. For many years, Murra also kept personal diaries, originally intended as records of his dreams, which form Series III --Dream Archives. Although this collection is primarily textual in nature, there are also a photograph and an audio-visual series. The later includes recordings of Murra's Lewis Henry Morgan lectures. The occasional photograph also appears throughout other series.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
Arranged in 12 series and 1 accretion: (I) Correspondence (1927-1998, 2004) [Bulk 1950-1990], (II) Chronological Correspondence (1953-1991), (III) Dream Archives [Diaries] (1951-1996) [Bulk: 1951-1983], (IV) Biographical (1937-1995), (V) Subject and Publications (1922-1996), (VI) Archival Documents, (VII) Graduate School and Teaching (1936-1992) [Bulk: 1936-1982], (VIII) J. V. M. Publications (1959-1993), (IX) Photographs (1937-1988), (X) Audio Visual Materials (1964-1998), (XI) Maps, (XII) Artwork, Accretions.
Biographical Note:
John Victor Murra was born Isak Lipschitz on August 24, 1916 in Odessa, Ukraine. He spent his childhood and adolescence in Bucharest, Romania where he passed his baccalaureate examinations in 1933. Following high school, he worked as an apprentice in paper factories in Romania and Croatia.

In December 1934, Murra immigrated to Chicago, Illinois, where his uncle lived, to escape the worsening political turmoil in Romania. Shortly after his arrival in the United States, Murra enrolled at the University of Chicago where he completed a Bachelor of Arts in sociology in 1936. He then enlisted in the International Brigade and served as an infantry corporal in the 58th battalion, 15th brigade in the Spanish Republican Army. At the end of the Spanish Civil War, he spent almost six months (February-June 1939) in refugee internment camps, most notably the camp at Argèles-sur-Mer, France. In 1939, Murra returned to Chicago to continue his studies and it was about this time that he started to use the name Murra in official documents. He completed his Master of Arts degree in Anthropology at the University of Chicago in 1942.

The war injuries sustained by Murra during the Spanish Civil War exempted him from military service during the Second World War. Between 1941 and 1942, Murra traveled to Ecuador as the assistant to Donald Collier, Conservator at the Field Museum of Chicago, on an archaeological project sponsored by the Institute of Andean Research. His work with Collier ultimately led him to contribute to the Handbook of South American Indians. Between 1942 and 1943, he worked as an interviewer for John Dollard and Ruth Benedict in their work for the United States Department of War to survey Abraham Lincoln Brigade veterans. In 1943, Murra was appointed Instructor in Anthropology at the University of Chicago to fill in for Fred Eggan, who entered military service. In addition to instructing at the University of Chicago during the mid-1940s, Murra also served as editor on the topic of anthropology for the Encyclopedia Britannica (1945-1946).

The decade or so following the Second World War was often extremely frustrating for Murra as he pursued his quest for American citizenship. In 1946, the U.S. government denied his applications for naturalization and travel papers on the grounds that he had served in the Spanish Republican Army. Consequently, Murra was unable to accept a fellowship from the Social Science Research Council that would have funded his travel to Ecuador to pursue his doctoral research. Although he finally won his lawsuit for citizenship in 1950, Murra did not receive a passport until 1956 and was ultimately forced to change thesis topics in order to continue his doctoral studies without field work. To support himself during this difficult period, Murra taught at several American institutions—most notably at the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (1947-1950) and Vassar College (1950-1961), and supervised a number of field work programs in the Caribbean for Columbia University, Vassar College, Yale University and the University of Montreal. He also served briefly as a regional specialist on African land tenure for the United Nations.

In 1955, Murra defended his Ph.D. dissertation, The Economic Organization of the Inca State and he was awarded a Ph.D. in Anthropology the following year from the University of Chicago. Shortly thereafter he took a sabbatical from Vassar College to teach in Peru (1958-1960) at the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima and pursue research at the archives of Cuzco.

In the 1960s, Murra turned his attention towards pursuing research interests and cultivating the anthropological training of South American graduate students. He left Vassar College in 1961 and spent time teaching as a visiting professor, first for the Organization of American States at the Escuela Nacional de Antropología y Historia, Mexico (1961) and then at Yale University (1962). Murra received in 1963 a three-year National Science Foundation grant for his well known study of Huánuco, Peru. During his fieldwork for this project, he continued to teach at the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Lima, Peru (1965-1966) and the Universidad de Chile (1965). He also worked to improve the educational opportunities for South American students by supporting efforts to establish a graduate school at the Universidad de La Plata. Upon returning to the United States, Murra was a National Academy of Sciences postdoctoral associate at the Smithsonian Institution (1966-1967).

From 1968 to 1982, Murra served as Professor of Anthropology at Cornell University. He continued to travel extensively to archives in Spain and South America during this period and held a number of academic posts at other institutions including Yale University (1970-1971), the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University (1974-1975), l'Université Paris X Nanterre (1975-1976), the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia in Mexico (1977) and John Hopkins University (1981). He also served as the president of the American Society of Ethnohistory (1970-1971), the American Ethnological Society (1972-1973), and the Institute of Andean Research (1977-1983). Murra's efforts to cultivate educational opportunities for South American graduate students and promote international dialogue among students from different nationalities produced three well known programs: the comparative seminar on the Andes and Mesoamerica that he organized with Angel Palerm (1972), the Lake Titicaca field project he ran with Luis G. Lumbrebas (1973) and the Otoño Andino held at Cornell University (1977). In 1969, he received the honor of being the Lewis Henry Morgan Lecturer at the University of Rochester.

Following his retirement from Cornell University (1982), Murra served as a consultant to the Banco Nacional de Bolivia at the Museo Nacional de Etnografía, La Paz (1982-1983). He received a Guggenheim Fellowship (1983-1984), that enabled him to pursue research at the Archivo Nacional and the Academia de la Historia in Madrid and the Archivo General de Indias in Seville. During his time in Spain, he also taught at the Universities of Madrid and Seville and at the Institut Catalá d'Antropologi in Barcelonia (1985-1986). The following year, he was a Visiting Professor at the London School of Economics and was awarded the Grand Cross of the Order of the Sun, Peru. He then pursued research at the Instituto de Antropologia de Buenos Aires (1988-1989) and then returned to Spain, where he was a fellow at the Archivo de Indias (1990-1991). In 1993, the Universidad de Barcelona awarded him the honor of Doctor Honoris Causa.

Murra was married and divorced twice; neither marriage produced any children. He first married Virginia Miller in 1936; the date of their divorce is unknown. His second marriage to Elizabeth "Tommy" Sawyer lasted thirteen years (1945-1958).

Bibliography of Selected Publications

1943 -- Survey and Excavations in Southern Ecuador. Chicago: Field Museum of Natural History, Publication 528, Anthropological series volume 35, May 15, 1943. Co-authored with Donald Collier.

1948 -- "The Cayapa and Colorado" in the Handbook of South American Indians. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office

1951 -- Soviet Linguistic Controversy, translated from the Soviet Press. New York: King's Crown Press. Co-authored with Robert M. Hankin and Fred Holling.

1956 -- The Economic Organization of the Inca State. Chicago: University of Chicago.

1962 -- Cloth and its Functions in the Inca State.

1964 -- Visita hecha a la Provincia de Chucuito por Garci Diez de San Miguel en el año 1567. Lima: Casa de la Cultura del Perú. Co-authored with Waldemar Espinoza Soriano and Frey Pedro Gutiérrez Flores.

1966 -- New Data on Retainer and Servile Populations in Tawantinsuyu.

1967 -- Visita de la provincia de León de Huánuco en 1562. Iñigo Ortiz de Zúñiga, visitador. Huánuco, Peru: Universidad Nacional Hermilio Valdizán, Facultad de Letras y Educación. Contains articles by several authors.

1970 -- Current Research and Prospects in Andean Ethnohistory. Ithaca: Cornell University.

1975 -- Formaciones económicas y políticas del mundo andino. Lima: Instituto de Estudios Peruanos.

1976 -- American Anthropology, the Early Years. St. Paul: West Publishing Co. Edited for the American Ethnological Society

1978 -- La organización económica del Estado inca. México: Siglo Veintiuno. Murra's Ph.D. thesis translated from English to Spanish by Daniel R. Wagner.

1980 -- Formazioni economiche e politiche nel mondo andino: saggi di etnostoria. Torino: Giulio Einaudi. Primer nueva corónica y buen gobierno Guamán Poma de Ayala (Waman Puma). Co-authored with Rolena Adorno and Jorge L. Urioste. Republished in 1987. The Economic Organization of the Inca State. Greenwich, Conn.: JAI Press.

1981 -- The "Vertical Control" of a Maximum of Ecologic Tiers in the Economies of Andean Societies. The Mit'a Obligations of Ethnic groups to the Inka State. Las etnocategorías de un Khipu estatal.

1983 -- Los Olleros del Inka: Hacia una Historia y Arqueología del Qollasuyu. La Paz: Centrol de Investigaciones Históricas.

1986 -- Anthropological History of Andean Polities. New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited with Nathan Wachtel and Jacques Revel. Originally published in French in 1978 as Anthropologie historique des sociétés andines by Editions de la Maison des science de l'homme in Paris.

1987 -- La teoría de la complementariedad vertical eco-simbiótica. La Paz: Hisbol. Co-authored with Ramiro Condarco Morales. Civilizatie inca: organizarea economica a statului incas. Bucharest: Editura Stiintifica si Enciclopedica. Murra's Ph.D. thesis translated from English to Romanian by Murra's sister, Ata Iosifescu.

1991 -- Visita de los valles de Sonqo en los yunka de coca de La Paz (1568-1570). Madrid: Instituto de Cooperación Iberoamericana: Quinto Centenario: Instituo de Estudios Fiscales.

1996 -- Las cartas de Arguedas. Lima: Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Fondo Editorial. Co-authored with Mercedes López-Baralt.

1999 -- Historia general de América Latina / 1. Las sociedades originales. Madrid: Editorial Trotta. Co-authored with Teresa Rojas Rabiela.

2002 -- El mundo andino: población, medio ambiente y economía. Lima: Instituto de Estudios Peuanos: Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.

2000 -- Nispa ninchis/decimos diciendo : conversaciones con John Murra. Lima: IEP –Instituto de Estudios Peruanos and IAR – Institute of Andean Research. Edited by Victoria Castro, Carlos Aldunate and Jorge Hidalgo Los esfuerzos de Sísifo, coversaciones sobre las ciencias sociales en América Latina. Heredia, Costa Rica: EUNA. A collection of interviews of John Victor Murra and others conducted by Fernando Calderón.
Related Materials:
National Anthropological Archives holds additional materials related to Murra in the American Ethnological Society records, the American Society for Ethnohistory records, and the Handbook of South American Indians records.

The New York University Libraries, Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives holds materials related to Murra in Abraham Lincoln Brigade Archive (ALBA), John Dollard Research Files for Fear and Courage under Battle Conditions, and James Lardner Papers.

The Truman Presidential Museum and Library holds Records on the President's Committee on Civil Rights Record Group 220.
\:
In 2008, the VHS videos in the collection were transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives. Additional videotapes were sent to the NAA and transferred to HSFA.
Provenance:
The John Victor Murra papers came to the National Anthropological Archives in several installments over three decades. David Block of Cornell University assisted Murra in selecting and identifying materials for the installment of the collection which arrived at the Smithsonian Institution in September 2003.
Restrictions:
The John Victor Murra papers are open for research. Some materials are restricted for privacy reasons.

Access to the John Victor Murra papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Correspondence -- 1927-1998
Notes
Citation:
John Victor Murra papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1982-59
See more items in:
John Victor Murra papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3f075cb2e-bf8e-40c9-8fea-e0aae2701d3c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1982-59

The persistence of prehispanic chiefdoms on the Río Daule, Coastal Ecuador = La persistencia de los cacicazgos prehispánicos en el Río Daule, Costa del Ecuador / David M. Stemper ; Spanish translation by Juana Camacho

Author:
Stemper, David M. 1951-  Search this
Physical description:
xvi, 212 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Ecuador
Daule River Region (Pichincha-Guayas)
Daule River Region (Pichincha-Guayas, Ecuador)
Date:
1993
Topic:
Kings and rulers  Search this
Chiefdoms--History  Search this
Government relations  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Raised bed gardening  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Antiquities  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_475630

Frederick Starr negatives and lantern slides

Creator:
Starr, Frederick, 1859-1933  Search this
Photographer:
Lang, Charles B.  Search this
Grabic, Louis  Search this
Extent:
152 Lantern slides
3344 Negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Zoque  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo  Search this
Mazatec [Huautla]  Search this
Zapotec  Search this
Maya  Search this
Wampanoag  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Mazahua  Search this
Ute  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Numakiki (Mandan)  Search this
Tzotzil Maya  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tzeltal Maya  Search this
Sac and Fox (Sauk & Fox)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Triqui (Trique) [San Joan Copala]  Search this
Shuar  Search this
Niimíipuu (Nez Perce)  Search this
Chol Maya  Search this
Totonac  Search this
Osage  Search this
Chaticks Si Chaticks (Pawnee)  Search this
Tonkawa  Search this
Otomí (Otomi)  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Tlingit  Search this
Mixe  Search this
Chinantec  Search this
Mixtec  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Chibcha  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Mehináku (Mehinacu)  Search this
Salish (Flathead)  Search this
Apache  Search this
Tsitsistas/Suhtai (Cheyenne)  Search this
Ponca  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Cahuilla  Search this
Haida  Search this
Karajá (Caraja)  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Assiniboine (Stoney)  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Caddo  Search this
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Teotihuacán (archaeological culture)  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Purepecha (Tarasco)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Macushi (Macusi)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Lantern slides
Negatives (photographic)
Negatives
Place:
Colombia
Washington
West Virginia
Kansas
Kentucky
New Mexico
Brazil
Ecuador
Missouri
Wisconsin
Oklahoma
Ohio
New York
Georgia
Mexico
Iowa
Arkansas
Illinois
Pennsylvania
Alaska
Date:
1894-1910
Summary:
The collection includes materials from cultures in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala, Colombia, Ecuador, and Guiana: Acoma Pueblo, Apache, Arapaho, Arikara, Assiniboine, Caddo, Cahuilla, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chinantec, Chippewa (Ojibwa), Choco, Chol, Chontal, Cochiti Pueblo, Crow, Cuicatec, Eskimo, Flathead, Haida, Hopi, Huastec, Huave, Iowa, Iroquois, Isleta, Karaja, Kwakiutl, Laguna Pueblo, Macusi, Mandan, Maya, Mazahua, Mazatec, Mehinaku, Menomini, Mixe, Mixtec, Navajo, Nez Perce, Osage, Otomi, Ottawa, Pawnee, Pima, Ponca, Potawatomi, Salish, San Blas, San Felipe Pueblo, Sauk & Fox, Shuar, Sioux, Taos Pueblo, Tarasco, Teotihuacan, Tepehua, Tlaxcala, Tlingit, Tonkawa, Totonac, Triqui, Tzental, Tzotzil, Ute, Wampanoag, Zapotec, Zoque, Zuni.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Frederick Starr was born in Auburn, New York, on September 2, 1858. He received a Ph.D. in biology in 1884 at Coe College, where he was later appointed professor of biology. Starr did postgraduate work in anthropology at Yale. In 1889 he was appointed head of Ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History, and in 1892 he was chosen by William Harper to organize the Anthropology Department at the new University of Chicago. Starr remained at the University until his retirement in 1923. Besides his field studies with various Indian tribes in the United States, Starr traveled to Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Ecuador, Guiana, Japan, the Philippines, and Africa. He died in Tokyo, Japan, on August 14, 1933. Starr was the author of several books and scholarly articles.
General note:
Starr hired professional photographers Charles B. Lang and Louis Grabic to accompany him on his field trips. One lantern slide of Moses Ladd (Menomini) was taken by William H. Jackson.
Provenance:
Dr. Frederick Starr, Purchased, circa 1929
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Topic:
Indians of South America -- Brazil  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest  Search this
Indians of South America -- Colombia  Search this
Indians of North America -- Alaska  Search this
Indians of North America -- Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Midwest  Search this
Indians of South America -- Ecuador  Search this
Indians of South America -- Guiana  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Lantern slides
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.052
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv40602e9f6-8984-4da6-a139-bd97c27fa824
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-052

Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records

Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Director:
Heye, George G. (George Gustav), 1874-1957  Search this
Dockstader, Frederick J.  Search this
Names:
Ford-Bartlett East Greenland Expedition 1930  Search this
Harriman Alaska Expedition (1899)  Search this
Hendricks-Hodge Expedition (1917-1923).  Search this
Huntington Free Library  Search this
Hyde Exploring Expedition (1902-1903)  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research  Search this
Collector:
Barrett, S. A. (Samuel Alfred), 1879-1965  Search this
Churchill, Clara G.  Search this
Churchill, Frank C. (Frank Carroll), 1850-1912  Search this
Davis, Edward H., b. 1862  Search this
Emmons, George Thornton  Search this
Gridley, Marion E. (Marion Eleanor), 1906-1974  Search this
Harrington, M. R. (Mark Raymond), 1882-1971  Search this
Harvey, Byron  Search this
Harvey, Fred  Search this
Hodge, Frederick Webb, 1864-1956  Search this
Johnson, Frederick, 1904-1994  Search this
Keppler, Udo J., 1872-1956  Search this
Lothrop, S. K. (Samuel Kirkland), 1892-1965  Search this
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924  Search this
Skinner, Alanson, 1886-1925  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Stiles, William F., 1912-1980  Search this
Verrill, A. Hyatt (Alpheus Hyatt), 1871-1954  Search this
Waterman, T. T. (Thomas Talbot), 1885-1936  Search this
Wildschut, William  Search this
Former owner:
Burnett, Edwin K.  Search this
Force, Roland W.  Search this
Extent:
400 Linear feet
Culture:
Indians of North America  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Administrative records
Photographs
Annual reports
Field notes
Correspondence
Ledgers (account books)
Minutes
Date:
1890-1998
Summary:
These records document the governance and programmatic activities of the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation (MAI) from its inception in 1904 until its sublimation by the Smithsonian Institution in 1990. The types of materials present in this collection include personal and institutional correspondence, individual subject files, minutes and annual reports, financial ledgers, legal records, expedition field notes, research notes, catalog and object lists, publications, clippings, flyers, maps, photographs, negatives and audio-visual materials. These materials span a varied range of subjects relating to the activities of the museum which are more fully described on the series level.
Scope and Contents:
These records document the governance and programmatic activities of the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation (MAI) from its inception in 1904 until its sublimation by the Smithsonian Institution in 1990. The types of materials present in this collection include personal and institutional correspondence, individual subject files, minutes and annual reports, financial ledgers, legal records, expedition field notes, research notes, catalog and object lists, publications, clippings, flyers, maps, photographs, negatives and audio-visual materials. These materials span a varied range of subjects relating to the activities of the museum which are more fully described on the series level.
Arrangement:
The MAI, Heye Foundation records have been arranged into 21 series and 50 subseries: Series 1: Directors, 1908-1990 (1.1: George Gustav Heye, 1863-1962, 1.2: Edwin K. Burnett, 1943-1960, 1.3: Frederick Dockstader, 1950-1976, 1.4: Alexander F. Draper, 1972-1977, 1.5:Roland W. Force, 1963-1990, 1.6: George Eager, Assistant Director, 1977-1990) Series 2: Board of Trustees, 1916-1990 (2.1: Board of Trustee Minutes, 1916-1990, 2.2: Individual Board Correspondence, 1943-1990, 2.3: Subject Files, 1917-1990) Series 3: Administrative, 1916-1989 (3.1: Subject Files, 1904-1991, 3.2: Personnel, 1956-1991, 3.3: Legal, 1900-1989, 3.4: Task Force, 1976-1986, 3.5: George Abrams, 1980-1991) Series 4: Financial, 1916-1990 (4.1: Ledgers, 1900-1962, 4.2: Correspondence, 1905-1985, 4.3: Subject Files, 1916-1990) Series 5: Expeditions, 1896-1973Series 6: Collectors, 1872-1981Series 7: Registration, 1856-1993Series 8: Collections Management, 1937-1988Series 9: Curatorial, 1963-1990 (9.1: Curatorial Council, 1973-1990, 9.2: Gary Galante, 1979-1991, 9.3: Mary Jane Lenz, 1974-1994, 9.4: James G. E. Smith, 1963-1990, 9.5: U. Vincent Wilcox, 1968-1984, 9.6: Anna C. Roosevelt, 1973-1988) Series 10: Exhibits, 1923-1991 (10.1: MAI Exhibits, 1923-1990, 10.2: Non-MAI Exhibits, 1937-1991) Series 11: Public Programs, 1935-1990Series 12: Publications, 1904-1994 (12.1: Annual Reports, 1917-1989, 12.2: Publications by MAI, 1904-1990, 12.3: Publications by Other Sources, 1881-1990, 12.4: Administration, 1920-1988, 12.5: Archival Set of Official Publications, 1907-1976) Series 13: Public Affairs, 1938-1991Series 14: Development, 1927-1991 (14.1: Administration, 1979-1990, 14.2: Donors, 1978-1990, 14.3: Fundraising, 1973-1990, 14.4: Grants, 1970-1990, 14.5: Subject Files, 1976-1990) Series 15: Other Departments, 1914-1990 (15.1: Archives, 1914-1990, 15.2: Conservation, 1972-1989, 15.3: Education, 1921-1990, 15.4: Indian Information Center, 1977-1989, 15.5: Museum Shop, 1947-1989, 15.6: Photography, 1918-1990, 15.7: Physical Anthropology, 1919-1956) Series 16: Huntington Free Library, 1926-1991Series 17: Museum Relocation, 1969-1992 (17.1: Subject Files, 1979-1990, 17.2: American Museum of Natural History, 1980-1987, 17.3: Dallas, Texas, 1984-1987, 17.4: Smithsonian Institution, 1979-1990, 17.5: U.S. Custom House, 1977-1990, 17.6: Other Locations, 1974-1987) Series 18: MediaSeries 19: PhotographsSeries 20: Miscellaneous, 1837-1990Series 21: Oversize, 1873-1972 (21.1: Maps, 1873-1975, 21.2: Miscellaneous, 1884-1982)
History of the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation:
The Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation was established by wealthy collector George Gustav Heye in 1908. Heye began collecting American Indian artifacts as early as 1897 and his collection rapidly increased over the next several years. Based in New York, Heye bought collections and documentary photographs, sponsored expeditions, and traveled and collected items himself. In addition, once MAI was established he sponsored numerous expeditions across the Western Hemisphere, including North American, Canada, South America and Central America.

From 1908 to 1917 Heye housed his artifacts on temporary loan at the University of Pennsylvania's University Museum, Pennsylvania, in lofts on East 33rd Street in New York City, and at other depositories. In 1917, the collections moved from his apartment to their permanent museum location at Audubon Terrace, at 155th Street and Broadway in New York City. The museum, containing ethnographic and archaeological collections from North, Central and South America, opened to the public in 1922. Less than ten years later, Heye completed a storage facility in the Pelham Bay area of the Bronx, known as the Research Branch. Heye served as Chairman of the Board and Museum Director until his death in 1957. After growing concern about the financial and other management of the collections came to a head, the museum became part of the Smithsonian Institution in 1989 and in 1994 opened exhibit space in the U.S. Customs House at Bowling Green near New York City's Battery Park. The Cultural Resources Center in Suitland, Maryland later opened in 1999 and the main Washington, DC museum opened in 2004.

Please visit the following links for more information about the history of the museum; History of the Collection, Collections Overview, and Significance of the Collection. Moreover, for information about how the museum currently cares for and exhibits the collection, please see the Conservation department and recent entries regarding Exhibitions and Conservation on the NMAI Blog. In addition, see portions of the NMAI Archive Center's collections highlighted in the SIRIS Blog.
Related Materials:
In 2004, the Huntington Fee Library, once part of the MAI/Heye Foundation, was transferred to the Cornell University Library Rare Book and Manuscript Collection. While this collection mainly contained books, it also contained a significant amount of archival materials. The Huntington Free Library's Native American Collection contains outstanding materials documenting the history, culture, languages, and arts of the native tribes of both North and South America, as well as contemporary politics and human rights issues are also important components of the collection. Further information about the collection and links to finding aids can be found here: rmc.library.cornell.edu/collections/HFL_old.html.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Peru  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Tennessee  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- New York (State)  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Panama  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- New Jersey  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- New Mexico  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Missouri  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Nevada  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- California  Search this
Indians of South America  Search this
Indians of Central America  Search this
Pre-Columbian objects  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Texas  Search this
Museums -- Collection management  Search this
Archaeological expeditions  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Museums -- Acquisitions  Search this
Museums -- Curatorship  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Cuba  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Ecuador  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Arkansas  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Canada  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Guatemala  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Haiti  Search this
Genre/Form:
Administrative records
Photographs
Annual reports
Field notes
Correspondence
Ledgers (account books)
Minutes
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation Records, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001
See more items in:
Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation records
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv412df8cf1-44c0-41fd-9101-eefb477e5aef
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001
Online Media:

The Andes

Collection Creator:
Soule, Thayer  Search this
Extent:
2 Film reels (83 minutes, color silent; 2,944 feet, 16mm)
Type:
Archival materials
Film reels
Date:
1974
Scope and Contents:
Edited film documents travel in the Andes, South America. Film includes scenes of Caracas, Venezuela and surrounding area; Angel Falls; aerial views of the Andes including the volcano Chimboraza; Quito, Ecuador including influence of oil production and the Indian artist and sculptor, Oswaldo Quayasamin; the equator; Pan American highway; Otavalo Indian country; Indian market; Valley of the Volcanoes; Cuenca, Ecuador including market day and making and selling of Panama hats; Gualaceo Village, Ecuador including pottery market, furniture making, dying of fabric, embroidering, jewelry making, and decorating ceramics; Cuzco, Peru; Incan fortress of Sacsahuaman; Village of Pisac and Iquitos, Peru; Yagua Indians; and Punta Arenas, Chile.

Supplementary materials: publicity materials, still photographs, scripts, audio tapes of lectures

Legacy keywords: Mountains South America ; Aerial views ; Volcanoes ; Cities and towns ; Pottery South America ; Markets South America ; Archeology sites ; Artists Ecuador ; Artisans
General:
Local Numbers: HSFA 1991.20.10
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Thayer Soule Travel Lecture Films collection, Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Thayer Soule Travel Lecture Films collection
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc9d0dc8958-cc29-4e7d-9359-8368b5e762dc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-hsfa-1991-20-ref16

Peace Corps Volunteers collection

Names:
Peace Corps (U.S.)  Search this
Ballendorf, Dirk  Search this
Riesenberg, Saul H.  Search this
Viola, Herman J. (1938-)  Search this
Extent:
25 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Manuscripts
Letters
Photographs
Printed material
Processed materials
Audiotapes
Administrative records
Place:
Costa Rica
Oman
Dahomey
Swaziland
Tanzania
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
Togo
Upper Volta
El Salvador
Turkey
Ethiopia
Tunisia
Gabon
Ghana
Guatemala
Guinea
Thailand
Honduras
Burkina Faso
Kenya
Jamaica
Iran
Indonesia
Korea
Malaysia
Malawi
Liberia
Marshall Islands
Ceylon
Ivory Coast
Morocco
Cameroon
Central African Republic
Nepal
Niger
Brazil
Botswana
Bolivia
Nigeria
Afghanistan
Micronesia
Antigua
Pakistan
Philippines
Peru
Panama
China
Somalia
Sierra Leone
Senegal
Colombia
India
Chad
Chile
Date:
1920-1984
Scope and Contents:
The collection includes contributions from 101 former volunteers or administrators who served in such countries and regions as Afghanistan, Antigua, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Ceylon, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dahomey, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Kenya, Korea, Liberia, Malawi, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Morocco, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Swaziland,Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey and Upper Volta.

The volunteers were involved in diverse assignments such as education, community development, agriculture, health work, and service through such special skills as art, surveying, mechanics, and photography. Two additional collections are including materials of missionaries that were offered to the archives as the result of the program to collect Peace Corps materials. Included are diaries, correspondence, writings, printed and processed material, sound recordings, and administrative materials. There are also photographic materials that show such subjects as traditional and modern agriculture, architecture, body scarification, ceremonies, dance, dress, fishing, food preparation and other domestic activities, industry, medicine, and transportation.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
Arranged numerically, with indexes based upon creator names and subject of materials.
Historical note:
In 1975, Herman Joseph Viola, the director of the National Anthropological Archives; Saul Herbert Riesenberg, the curator for Oceania Ethnology in the Smithsonianʹs Department of Anthropology; and Dirk Ballendorf, assistant chief of programs and training for Peace Corps operations in North Africa, the Near East, Asia, and the Pacific, worked out a program whereby the archives would collect materials of former Peace Corps volunteers. In addition to photographic and other materials of potential use to many researchers, the collection was intended to document the impact of the volunteers on host countries and the experiences of the volunteers in working in foreign cultures.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use. In some cases, copyright or literary property rights have been retained by the donor.
Topic:
Cookery  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Dance  Search this
Fishing  Search this
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Industry  Search this
Transportation  Search this
Body scarification  Search this
Dress  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Medicine  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Manuscripts
Letters
Photographs
Printed material
Processed materials
Audiotapes
Administrative records
Citation:
Peace Corps Volunteers collection, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1975-43
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw36b879838-37b2-42bc-be41-d91ace56fcd9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1975-43

Biological Research with Archaeologically Recovered Human Remains from Ecuador: methodological issues

Author:
Ubelaker, Douglas H.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
1995
Citation:
Ubelaker, Douglas H. 1995. "Biological Research with Archaeologically Recovered Human Remains from Ecuador: methodological issues." In Archaelology in the Lowland American Tropics; Current Analytical methods and Recent applications. 181–197. Cambridge, Britain: Cambridge University Press.
Identifier:
131813
ISBN:
0-521-44486-1
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_131813

Sample Of Fake Artifacts

Donor Name:
Dr. Clifford Evans Jr.  Search this
Culture:
Paleoindian  Search this
Object Type:
Fake
Place:
Pichincha Province, Ecuador, South America
Accession Date:
12 Dec 1973
Topic:
Archaeology  Search this
Accession Number:
310782
USNM Number:
A472958-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/397b26486-3f6b-4284-9acf-4438c53d64e7
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8227305

Inka Road Symposium 25 - Inka Expansion: The Road Network in the Northern Highlands of Ecuador

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2015-07-15T18:45:36.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_wvlFih5e6Q4

Pre-Columbian art

Author:
Parke-Bernet Galleries  Search this
Subject:
Del Pino Mr Art collections  Search this
Del Pino Mrs Art collections  Search this
Hernandez, Gustave Mr Archaeological collections  Search this
Hernandez, Gustave Mrs Archaeological collections  Search this
Physical description:
1 volume illustrations
Type:
Catalogs
Catalogues
Auction catalogs
Catalogues de vente aux enchères
Place:
Ecuador
Colombia
Peru
Équateur
Colombie
Pérou
New York (État)
New York
Date:
1971
Topic:
Indians of South America--Antiquities  Search this
Indian art  Search this
Archaeology--Private collections  Search this
Art--Private collections  Search this
Art objects, Ancient  Search this
Objets d'art antiques  Search this
Art--Vente aux enchères  Search this
Mr. and Mrs. Del Pino  Search this
Mr. and Mrs. Gustavo Hernandez  Search this
Estate of Albert Gallatin  Search this
Call number:
F1219.3.A7 S58 1971b
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_942311

Oral history interview with Al Qöyawayma, 2010 March 30-31

Interviewee:
Qöyawayma, Al, 1938-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Subject:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Al Qöyawayma, 2010 March 30-31. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Engineers -- Arizona -- Interviews  Search this
Hopi artists -- Arizona -- Interviews  Search this
Potters -- Arizona -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- Arizona -- Interviews  Search this
Theme:
Native American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)15789
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)288760
AAA_collcode_qyaway10
Theme:
Native American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_288760
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Al Qöyawayma

Interviewee:
Qöyawayma, Al, 1938-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
153 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2010 March 30-31
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Al Qöyawayma conducted 2010 March 30 and 31, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Qöyawayma's home and studio, in Prescott, Arizona.
Qoyawayma speaks of his heritage as a Hopi; the influences on his education in science and art; the growth and development of his pottery through his heritage; work through AISES and Smithsonian; concepts behind his artwork; trips that have influenced his work and the development of it; stories of his ancestors that have helped develop his artwork; the value of materials used in the creation of clay; and details about the craft of Native American pottery. Qoyawayma also recalls AISES, University of Arizona, Emery Sekaquaptewa, West Point, Maori, Lee Cohen, Colombus, Fewkes, Smithsonian, Coyote Clan, Tewa, Hopi-Tewa, Uto-Aztecan, Mesa Verde series, yellowware ceramics, American Journal of Archaeology, Ron Bishop, Disney, Lockheed, Old Oraibi, Sherman Institute, San Fernando Valley, Woodland Hills, Sherman Oaks, Van Nuys, Navajo, Herant Engineering, Pete Solokian, Cannon Electric, Rocketdyne, CAD/CAM, San Luis Obispo, Robert Redford, Don Drysdale, Dodgers, Litton Industries, Guidance and Control Division, Apple, IBM, Fortran, Star Trek, Sandra Day O'Conner, Heard Museum, Institute of American Art, Ernest Hemmingway, Roosevelts, Sikyatki, Natural History Museum, National Museum of the American Indian, Secretary Ickes, Mohawk, Norbert, University of Wisconsin at Green Bay, A.T. Anderson, Ely S. Parker, Ely S. Parker Award, Jody Folwell, Inca, Quechua, Valdivia, Ecuador, Betty Meggers, Laguna clay, Chaco Canyon, Toltec, Aztec, Mayan, Nahauatl, Birkland currents, Mixtec Sheild, Los Alamos, Dr. Tony Peratt, Nazca plain, Maxwell's Equations, Te Waka toi, Baye Riddell, Manos Nathan, Blue Corn, Salt River Indian Community, Teotihuacan, Uxmal, Chchen Itza, Coba, George Stuart, National Geographic, Copan, Bill Fash, Herb Kané, Union Carbide, Andy Anderson, Henry Moore, Allan Houser, Charles Loloma, Institute of American Art in Santa Fe, Lloyd Kiva New, Leonardo da Vinci, American Bureau of Ethnology, Peter Lee, Jerry Jacka, Arizona Highways, Chicago Institute of Art, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Al Qöyawayma (1938- ) is a potter, sculptor, and engineer in Prescott, Arizona.
General:
Originally recorded on 8 secure digital memory cards as 10 digital wav files. Duration is 6 hrs., 32 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Topic:
Engineers -- Arizona -- Interviews  Search this
Hopi artists -- Arizona -- Interviews  Search this
Potters -- Arizona -- Interviews  Search this
Sculptors -- Arizona -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.qyaway10
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw93f127eb8-fa62-4aae-98ea-49aaffb078d8
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-qyaway10
Online Media:

Bivalvia

Donor Name:
Dr. Clifford Evans Jr.  Search this
Site Name:
San Jacinto/Punta de Charapoto  Search this
Object Type:
Archaeofauna
Place:
Manabi Province, Ecuador, South America
Accession Date:
12 Dec 1968
Topic:
Archaeology  Search this
Taxonomy:
Animalia Mollusca Bivalvia
Published Name:
Bivalvia
Accession Number:
281591
USNM Number:
A571887-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Archaeobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/3e283d8cb-4d1b-49d6-92d8-bef1c553a770
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8944546

Helga Teiwes photograph collection

Photographer:
Teiwes, Helga  Search this
Names:
Arizona State Museum  Search this
Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah  Search this
Extent:
3775 Negatives (photographic)
3126 Slides (photographs)
433 Photographic prints
196 Transparencies
16 Linear feet
Culture:
San Carlos Apache  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Rarámuri (Tarahumara)  Search this
Tohono O'odham (Papago)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Transparencies
Photographs
Place:
Cuzco (Peru)
Machu Picchu Site (Peru)
Peru
Arizona
Mexico
New Mexico
Gila River Indian Reservation (Ariz.)
Date:
1965-2002
Summary:
The Helga Teiwes photograph collection contains over 7,000 negatives, slides and prints made by Teiwes between 1965 and 2002. For over thirty years Teiwes worked as a staff photographer for the Arizona State Museum, photographing and documenting Native American communities across the American Southwest. During this time, Teiwes also privately took photographs and built personal relationships among members of the Akimel O'odham, Tohono O'odham, Apache, Diné (Navajo) and Hopi tribes. These photographs include portraits of artists at work, families in their homes, daily life on the reservation, special events and landscape photography. Additionally, the Teiwes collection includes photographs from a 1975 trip to Peru and photographs of the Tarahumara (Rarámuri) community in Chihuahua, Mexico.
Scope and Contents:
The Helga Teiwes photograph collection contains over 7,000 negatives, slides and prints made by Teiwes between 1965 and 2002 across the American Southwest, Mexico and Peru. The majority of the photographs document daily life and activities, artists at work, and special events among members of the Akimel O'odham, Tohono O'odham, Apache, Diné (Navajo) and Hopi tribes in Arizona and New Mexico. A smaller amount of photographs documents trips Teiwes made to Mexico to photograph the Tarahumara (Rarámuri) community in Chihuahua and a 1975 summer trip to Peru. The collection is arranged into seven series with additional subseries.

Series 1, Akimel O'odham (Pima), 1965-1993, 2001, contains photographs mostly taken among the Gila River Indian Community in Arizona. These include intimate portraits, landscape views and views of farming and agriculture. Of particular note are photographs of Patricia "Pat" Stone and her family and basket weaver Julia Francisco. The majority of the photographs in Series 2, Apache, 1973-1994, are from two San Carlos Apache coming of age ceremonies, or "Changing Woman" ceremonies, from 1992 and 1994. The 1992 ceremony for Leia Tenille Johnson was held in Whiteriver, Arizona and the 1994 ceremony for Vanessa Jordan of Bylas, Arizona. A selection of 50 photographic prints from these ceremonies were later exhibited in "Western Apache Sunrise Ceremony" at the University of Kansas Museum of Anthropology. The largest series, Series 3, Diné (Navajo), 1969-2002, is divided into seven subseries by topics. This includes artists and artisans, families and individuals across the Navajo Nation, industry and agriculture, trading posts and markets, places, schools, and other topics. Of particular note are the photographs of the Greyeyes family from Tsegi Canyon, Arizona. In addition to photographing matriarch Bessie Salt Greyeyes at home with family, weaving, cooking, shopping around town and herding sheep and goats, Teiwes accompanied Pete Greyeyes to work at the Peabody Coal Mining Company. Other places and events of note include photographs of Monument Valley, Window Rock, seat of the Navajo Nation, the Hubbell and Shonto trading posts and the 1990 graduation from Navajo Community College (Now Diné College).

Series 4, Hopi, 1968-2002, highlights the work and artistry of Hopi basket weavers. Many of the photographs in this series were included in Teiwes's 1996 book Hopi Basket Weaving: Artistry in Natural Fibers. Coiled basket weavers from the Second Mesa include Madeline Lamson, Joyce Ann Saufkie, Evelyn Selestewa and Bertha Wadsworth, among others. Wicker basket weavers from the Third Mesa include Eva Hoyungowa, Abigail Kaursgowva, Vera Pooyouma and Vernita Silas, among others. Teiwes also photographed additional artists and events on the Hopi reservation including Maechel Saufkie's 1995 wedding. Series 5, Peru, 1975 includes photographs from Teiwes's 1975 summer trip to Peru. Teiwes visited and photographed several pre-Colombian archaeological sites including Sacsahuaman and Machu Piccu in addition to photographing in larger cities such as Cuzco, Lima and Quito (Ecuador). A large number of photographs in this series are from the Inti Raymi parade and festival held in Cuzco during their winter solstice. Series 6, Tarahumara (Rarámuri), 1971, 1977-1979 contains photographs from three trips to Chihuahua, Mexico to photograph the Tarahumara (Rarámuri) people for an Arizona State Museum exhibition held in 1979. Also included are photographs from the exhibition opening in Arizona. Series 7, Tohono O'odham, 1969-1995, 2002 contains photographs of the saguaro cactus harvest in addition to other special events among the Tohono O'odham people. Teiwes documented Juanita Ahill, and later her niece Stella Tucker, throughout the process of harvesting and processing the saguaro cactus plant to make jam and ceremonial wine. Additional events photographed in this series include the San Xavier Elders parade and Tumacacori festival.

The photographs in this collection range all media types: 6x6cm color/black and white negatives; 35mm color/black and white negatives; 35mm and 6x6cm color slides; 6x6cm transparencies; contact sheets; and 3x5, 4x6, 8x10 and larger color/black and white photographic prints, some matted for sale or exhibition purposes. Teiwes did include handwritten notations on the backs of some photographs and slide mounts. There is also a small amount of paper documentation.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into seven series by culture group or location. Series 1: Akimel O'odham (Pima), Series 2: Apache, Series 3: Diné (Navajo), Series 4: Hopi, Series 5: Peru, Series 6: Tarahumara (Rarámuri), Series 7: Tohono O'odham.
Biographical / Historical:
Helga Kulbe Teiwes was born in Büderich, near Düsseldorf, in Germany in 1930. In 1950 Teiwes began a trade apprenticeship in photography under Master photographer Erna Hehmke-Winterer, a specialist in black and white portraiture, architectural and industrial photography. In 1957 Teiwes earned her master's degree in photography and worked as an industrial photographer in Düsseldorf until she emigrated to New York in 1960. During her four years in New York City, Teiwes worked as a darkroom worker, an assistant photographer for Cartier Jewelers and as a transparency retoucher. She also continued to build her portfolio through free-lance work. In 1964, a trip to Mesa Verde inspired Teiwes to seek work in the Southwest. The same year she was hired by Dr. Emil Haury of the University of Arizona to photograph his excavation of Snaketown on the Gila River Indian Reservation. Following Snaketown, Teiwes was hired as a museum photographer for the Arizona State Museum (ASM) at the University of Arizona in Tucson. She was also sought after for other archaeological projects during the 1960s and 1970s to take publication and studio shots. During this time, Teiwes developed a deep interest in the people and cultures of the Southwest and spent a significant amount of time on reservations building personal relationships among the Hopi, Apache, Tohono O'dham and Diné (Navajo) among others. Teiwes took a particular interest in documenting Native artists and the work they produced, including basket weavers, potters, jewelers and carvers. Teiwes also worked to capture everyday life among the Native people of the Southwest in addition to documenting special events like the Apache coming of age ceremony and the Tohono O'odham Saguaro Cactus harvest. Teiwes retired from the Arizona State Museum in 1993 but continued to work as a freelance photographer and writer in Tuscon.

Throughout her career Teiwes's photographs and essays were published nationally and internationally. Her photographic study Navajo was published by the Swiss publisher U. Bar Varlag in 1991 and published in English in 1993. Her books Kachina Dolls: The Art of the Hopi Carvers and Hopi Basket Weaving: Artistry in Natural Fibers were published by the University of Arizona Press in 1991 and 1996. From October 2003 to June 2004, the Arizona State Museum held an exhibition titled "With an Eye on Culture: The Photography of Helga Teiwes" highlighting the broad scope of her career.

In 2013, Teiwes donated her collection of personal photographs, not taken for the Arizona State Museum, to the National Museum of the American Indian, Archive Center. Teiwes's photographs taken for the Arizona State Museum are housed in the ASM's photographic archives.
Related Materials:
There is a large collection of photographs at the Arizona State Museum where Teiwes worked from 1964-1993. These photographs include harvesting of mesquite, cholla, and saguaro; traditional farming of corn at Hopi and of tepary beans among the Tohono O'odham; and craftspeople and their art in basketry, katsina carving, pottery, and weaving.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Helga Teiwes in 2013.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Please contact the NMAI Archive Center (NMAIArchives@si.edu) regarding the use of this collection, donor restrictions apply.
Topic:
Navajo Indians -- Agriculture  Search this
Navajo artists -- Photographs  Search this
Changing Woman Ceremony (Apache rite)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Arizona -- Photographs  Search this
Basket making -- Hopi  Search this
Indians of North America -- New Mexico -- Photographs  Search this
Saguaro -- Arizona  Search this
Basket making -- Pima  Search this
Navajo Indians -- Social life and customs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest -- Photographs  Search this
Hopi women -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Slides (photographs)
Photographs
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Helga Teiwes Photograph Collection, Box and Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.070
See more items in:
Helga Teiwes photograph collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4ea273719-90d2-408b-8cea-d1e165f5f3c7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-070
Online Media:

Human Remains

Author:
Ubelaker, Douglas H.  Search this
Editor:
Grieder, Terence  Search this
Farmer, James D.  Search this
Hill, David V.  Search this
Stahl, Peter W.  Search this
Ubelaker, Douglas H.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Year:
2009
Citation:
Ubelaker, Douglas H. 2009. "Human Remains." In Art and Archaeology of Challuabamba, Ecuador. Grieder, Terence, Farmer, James D., Hill, David V., Stahl, Peter W., and Ubelaker, Douglas H., editors. 159–164. Austin: University of Texas Press.
Identifier:
77573
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries and Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:slasro_77573

Matthew Williams Stirling and Marion Stirling Pugh papers

Creator:
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Stirling, Marion  Search this
Names:
National Geographic Society (U.S.)  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
Extent:
37.94 Linear feet (84 boxes, 3 map folders)
Culture:
Olmec (archaeological culture)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Photographs
Correspondence
Place:
Papua New Guinea
Mexico
Ecuador
Costa Rica
Panama
Date:
1876-2004, undated
bulk 1921-1975
Summary:
The Matthew Williams Stirling and Marion Stirling Pugh papers, 1876-2004 (bulk 1921-1975), document the professional and personal lives of Matthew Stirling, Smithsonian archaeologist and Chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology (1928-1957), and his wife and constant collaborator, Marion Stirling Pugh. The bulk of the material is professional in nature and includes material from Matthew's early career in the 1920s, the careers of Matthew and Marion together from when they married in 1933 to Matthew's death in 1975, and Marion's life and work from 1975 until her death in 2001.

The majority of the documentation relates to the investigation of the Olmec culture in Mexico by the Stirlings, including the discoveries of eight colossal Olmec heads. In addition, the collection documents their work in Panama, Ecuador, and Costa Rica, looking for connections between Mesoamerica and South America. Materials include field notes, journals, correspondence, photographs, writings, clippings, ephemera, articles, and scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents:
The Matthew Williams Stirling and Marion Stirling Pugh papers, 1876-2004 (bulk 1921-1975), document the professional and personal lives of Matthew Stirling, Smithsonian archaeologist, and Chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology (1928-1957), and his wife and constant collaborator, Marion Stirling Pugh. The bulk of the material is professional in nature and includes material from Matthew's early career in the 1920s, the careers of Matthew and Marion together from when they married in 1933 to Matthew's death in 1975, and Marion's life and work from 1975 until her death in 2001. The majority of the documentation relates to the investigation of the Olmec culture in Mexico by the Stirlings, including the discoveries of eight colossal Olmec heads. In addition, the collection documents their work in Panama, Ecuador, and Costa Rica, looking for connections between Mesoamerica and South America. Materials include field notes, journals, correspondence, photographs, writings, clippings, ephemera, articles, and scrapbooks.

Series 1. Field work, 1921-1998 (bulk 1921-1975) and undated, documents the archaeological expeditions undertaken by Matthew and Marion Stirling over a span of 40 years. This includes expeditions Matthew undertook prior to his marriage and collaboration with Marion to Papua New Guinea, Ecuador, and Florida, and extensive documentation of expeditions they embarked on together to Mexico, Panama, Ecuador, and Costa Rica.

Series 2. Other travels, 1946-1972 is comprised of materials documenting trips the Stirlings took that, for the most part, did not include field work. This includes trips for both business and personal travel, however it was common for the two to overlap.

Series 3. Administrative files, 1924-1980 and undated is partly comprised of materials the Stirlings compiled and organized into an alphabetical filing structure and also of materials that are administrative in nature and did not directly relate to other categories outlined in this finding aid.

Series 4 Writings and lectures, 1925-1990 and undated, consists of articles, papers, drafts, and notes primarily written by Matthew Stirling, with some materials co-written by Marion, and documentation relating to presentations the Stirlings gave regarding their field work and other professional matters. Also included is material relating to films that were made about the Stirling's work.

Series 5. Personal and family materials, 1880-1996 and undated, consists of documents, photographs, and ephemera that are personal in nature. This includes items relating to Matthew Stirling's young life and family history, photographs, correspondence, and clippings relating to his extended family, and photographs of and correspondence from Matt and Marion's children.

Series 6. Anthropological journals, 1876-1959, consists of collections of anthropological journals collected and categorized for reference and research purposes.

Series 7. Marion Stirling Pugh, 1924-2004 (bulk 1948-2002) and undated, consists of materials relating to endeavors Marion undertook without Matthew, primarily relating to her participation in the Society of Women Geographers from 1948-2000 and her life after Matthew died in 1975 until her death in 2001.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 7 series: 1) Field work, 1921-1998 (bulk 1921-1975), undated; 2) Other travels, 1946-1972; 3) Administrative files, 1924-1980, undated; 4) Writings and lectures, 1925-1990, undated; 5) Personal and family materials, 1880-1996, undated; 6) Anthropological journals, 1876-1959; 7) Marion Stirling Pugh, 1924-2004 (bulk 1948-2002), undated.
Biographical note:
MATTHEW WILLIAMS STIRLING:

Matthew Williams Stirling, archaeologist and Director of the Bureau of American Ethnology (1928-1957), was born on August 28, 1896 in Salinas, California. After serving as an Ensign in the Navy from 1917-1919, he graduated with a B.A. in Anthropology in 1920 from the University of California, Berkeley studying under T.T. Waterman, Alfred L. Kroeber, and E.W. Gifford. From 1920-1921 he worked as a teaching fellow at the university, where he taught William Duncan Strong. Stirling's first tenure at the Smithsonian (then the U.S. National Museum (USNM)) was from 1921-1924, first as a museum aide, then as an Assistant Curator of Ethnology. While in the position he took night classes at George Washington University and received his M.A. in 1922. He received an honorary Sc.D. from Tampa University in 1943. In 1924, Stirling resigned his position at the museum and embarked on a journey to South American with his friend Perry Patton. From 1925-1927 he embarked on the Smithsonian sponsored American-Dutch Expedition to Papua New Guinea to explore the previously unknown interior region of Dutch New Guinea. Stirling was appointed Chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution in 1928 and married Marion Illig in 1933. They worked together for the next 40 years studying Olmec culture and the connection to greater Mesoamerica and South America. They had two children (Matthew W. Stirling Jr. in 1938 and Ariana Stirling in 1942). Stirling retired as Director of the B.A.E. on December 31, 1957. He died January 23, 1975 in Washington, D.C.

Sources consulted:

Collins, Henry B. "Matthew Williams Stirling, 1896-1975." American Anthropologist, New Series, 78, no. 4 (1976): 886-88.

Coe, Michael D. "Matthew Williams Stirling, 1896-1975." American Antiquity 41, no. 1 (1976): 67-73.

MARION STIRLING PUGH:

Marion Stirling Pugh (nee Illig) was born in Middletown, New York on May 12, 1911. She graduated from Rider College in 1930 and came to Washington D.C. in 1931 where she took a job as a secretary to the Chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Matthew Stirling. She attended night school at George Washington University from 1931-1933 where she studied anthropology, geology, and Russian. Marion and Matthew were married on December 11, 1933 and promptly embarked on a honeymoon expedition to Florida where Matthew was in charge of Works Progress Administration (WPA) projects. They worked together for the next 40 years studying Olmec culture and the connection to greater Mesoamerica and South America. They had two children (Matthew W. Stirling Jr. in 1938 and Ariana Stirling in 1942).

Marion was an active member of the Society of Women Geographers and was elected to the executive board in 1954. She served as president of the society from 1960-1963 and 1969-1972. She had a long-time association with the Textile Museum in Washington D.C. and in the 1970s established what would become the Latin American Research Fund to secure Latin American ethnographic textiles for the museum.

After Matthew's death in 1975, Marion married General John Ramsey Pugh in 1977. Pugh died in 1994. Marion continued to travel the world, including making a trip to Antarctica in her 80s, until her death on April 24, 2001 in Tucson, Arizona.

Sources consulted:

"Marion Stirling Pugh, 89." The Washington Post. May 11, 2001. https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/local/2001/05/11/marion-stirling-pugh-89/01329ba8-f32b-4d66-83fb-9f3c311aaefb/?utm_term=.ab20f25e060b (accessed May 16, 2019).

Conroy, Sarah Booth. "Archaeologist Marion Pugh, Digging Up Memories." The Washington Post. July 8, 1996. https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/1996/07/08/archaeologist-marion-pugh-digging-up-memories/09f465e7-5900-455e-bcd5-b81828a502d5/?utm_term=.703ff0e84313 (accessed May 16, 2019).

Matthew Williams Stirling and Marion Stirling Pugh Chronology

1896 August 28 -- Matthew Williams Stirling born in Salinas, California to Ariana and John Williams Stirling

1911 May 12 -- Marion Illig born in Middletown, New York

1914-1920 -- Matthew Stirling attended the University of California, Berkeley, receiving his B.A. in Anthropology in 1920. He studied under A.L. Kroeber, T.T. Waterman, and E.W. Gifford.

1917-1919 -- Matthew Stirling served as an ensign in the U.S. Navy during World War I

1920 -- Matthew Stirling's travels to Europe with his parents

1920-1921 -- Matthew Stirling worked as teaching fellow at the University of California, Berkeley and taught William Duncan Strong

1921-1924 -- Matthew Stirling worked at the United States National Museum (USNM), first as a Museum Aide and then as an Assistant Curator of Ethnology

1922 -- Matthew Stirling received Master of Arts degree from George Washington University, studying under Truman Michelson Matthew Stirling went on a trip to the cave country of France and Spain with friend Perry J. Patton

1923 Winter -- Matthew Stirling sent by J. Walter Fewkes to excavate at Weedon (or Weeden) Island, Florida

1924 Spring -- Matthew Stirling resigned from his Smithsonian USNM post

1924 Summer -- Matthew Stirling conducted excavations in Mobridge, South Dakota

1924 July -- Matthew Stirling went on a trip to South America with friend, Perry J. Patton

1924 Winter -- Matthew Stirling continued excavations in Weedon Island, FL

1924-1925 -- Matthew Stirling sold real estate on Weedon Island, Florida to fund the expedition to Papua New Guinea in the winters of 1924 and 1925

1925-1927 -- Matthew Stirling organized and led the American-Dutch Expedition (or Smithsonian Institution-Dutch Colonial Government expedition) to Papua New Guinea

1928 -- Matthew Stirling named Chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) at the Smithsonian Institution

1929 March-April -- Matthew Stirling surveyed mounds in Tampa Bay and Calusa areas of Florida

1930s -- Matthew Stirling conducted various archaeological excavations in Georgia and Florida under the Works Progress Administration (WPA)

1930 -- Marion Illig received a Bachelor of Science degree from Rider College From February through April, Mathew Stirling conducted more work on Tampa Bay mounds in Florida In July, Matthew Stirling went to Marfa, Texas to examine pictographs in caves and also went to Deeth, Nevada

1931 September-1932 March -- Matthew Stirling a member of the Latin American Expedition to South and Central America. He studied the Tule/Kuna Indians in Panama and the Jivaro in Ecuador

1931-1933 -- Marion Illig moved to Washington D.C. to attend George Washington University and worked at the BAE as a secretary for Matthew Stirling

1933 December 11 -- Matthew and Marion Stirling married

1933 December-1934 May 5 -- Matthew Stirling supervised Federal Civil Works Administration (or Federal Emergency Relief Administration) projects in Florida, also called Florida Federal Relief (Bradenton, Perico Island, Canaveral Island, and Belle Glade) and BAE excavations in Macon, Georgia

1934 October -- Conducted archaeological work in King, Queen, and Halifax counties in Virginia and Granville City, North Carolina

1935 -- Matthew Stirling acted as the president of the Anthropological Society of Washington Expedition to Guatemala, Honduras, and Yucatan Peninsula to study the Maya and the Quché (or Quiche) Indians from January to February 15, 1935

1935-1936 -- Matthew Stirling acted as the vice president of the American Anthropological Association

1936 -- Matthew Stirling and WPA workers conducted archaeological surveys in southern Florida in July 1936 Matthew and Marion Stirling visited an excavation in Macon, Georgia in Fall 1936 Matthew Stirling supervised archaeological projects in Hillsborough and Dade Counties in Florida

1938 January-March -- Matthew and Marion Stirling take first field trip to Mexico, visiting Tres Zapotes

1938 December 24-1939 April 15 -- First Smithsonian Institution/National Geographic Society Expedition to Mexico with C.W. Weiant. Excavated Tres Zapotes and discovered lower portion of Stela C

1939 -- Matthew Stirling received his first Franklyn L. Burr Award from the National Geographic Society

1939 December 26-1940 April 20 -- Second Smithsonian Institution/National Geographic Society Expedition to Mexico with Dr. Philip Drucker. Excavated Cerro de las Mesas and La Venta

1940 December 29-1941 April 30 -- Third Smithsonian Institution/National Geographic Society Expedition to Mexico with Dr. Philip Drucker. Excavated Cerro de las Mesas and Izapa

1941 -- Matthew and Marion Stirling received the Franklyn L. Burr Award from the National Geographic Society (shared with Richard Hewitt Stewart)

1942 April -- Matthew Stirling visited Dr. Philip Drucker at La Venta

1942 April-June -- Fourth Smithsonian Institution/National Geographic Society Expedition to Mexico. Visited Tuxtla Gutierrez, Zoque, Tzotzil and Chamula Indians, and Palenque

1943 -- Fifth Smithsonian Institution/National Geographic Society Expedition to Mexico with Dr. Waldo R. Wedel. Excavated La Venta Matthew Stirling awarded honorary Doctor of Science from Tampa University

1944 January 28-May -- Sixth Smithsonian Institution/National Geographic Society Expedition to Mexico. Visited Michoacán, Jalisco, Uruapan, Tlaquepaque, and Tarascan Indians from Lake Pátzcuaro and conducted archaeological surveys in Southern Veracruz, Tabasco, and Campeche

1945 January 22-May 31 -- Seventh Smithsonian Institution/National Geographic Society Expedition to Mexico. Excavated La Venta, San Lorenzo, Piedra Parada, and Tapachula

1946 January 26-April -- Eighth Smithsonian Institution/National Geographic Society Expedition to Mexico with Dr. Philip Drucker. Excavated San Lorenzo

1947 -- Matthew Stirling becomes Director of the Bureau of American Ethnology (title changed from "Chief")

1947 December-1948 -- First Smithsonian Institution/ National Geographic Society Expeditions to Panama including Cocle, Balboa, Chitre, Parita (Sixto Pinilla Place), Monagrillo, and El Hatillo

1949 -- Second Smithsonian Institution/ National Geographic Society Expedition to Panama

1951 -- Third Smithsonian Institution/ National Geographic Society Expedition to Panama

1953 -- Fourth Smithsonian Institution/ National Geographic Society Expedition to Panama

1954 -- Marion Stirling elected to the executive board of the Society of Women Geographers

1955 -- "Pan Am" (or Inter-American Highway) Road Trip

1956-1957 -- Smithsonian Institution/ National Geographic Society Expedition to Ecuador. Excavated in the ManabÍ Province

1957 December 31 -- Matthew Stirling retired as Director of the Bureau of American Ethnology

1958 -- Matthew Stirling received his third Franklyn L. Burr Award from the National Geographic Society

1960-1963 -- Marion Stirling acted as president for the Society of Women Geographers for the first time

1960-1975 -- Matthew Stirling's membership in the National Geographic Society Committee on Research and Exploration

1961 -- Trip to Mexico Marion Stirling's trip to Peru Matthew Stirling collaborated with Dr. L.S.B. Leakey through the NGS Committee on Research and Exploration

1963 -- Trip to Nicaragua

1964 -- Expedition to Costa Rica Trip to Asia

1967 -- International Tuna Match, Bahamas

1968 -- Trip to New Guinea Attended the Cultural Olympics in Mexico City

1969 -- Trip to Turkey, Bali, Etc.

1969-1972 -- Marion Stirling acted as president for the Society of Women Geographers for the second time

1972 -- Trip to Peru, Ecuador, Galapagos Islands Farmer finds upper portion of Stela C, confirming Matthew Stirling's original date as 31 B.C.

1972-1973 -- Trip to Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

1974 -- Marion Stirling established the Mexican Research Fund (now the Latin American Research fund) for the Textile Museum

1975 January 23 -- Matthew Williams Stirling died in Washington D.C.

1977 -- Marion Stirling married Major General John Ramsey Pugh

1985 -- Marion Stirling Pugh received the Distinguished Service Medal from the Peruvian Embassy

1994 -- Death of Major General John Ramsey Pugh Marion Stirling Pugh's trip to Spain, Portugal, and Morocco

1995 -- Marion Stirling Pugh's trip to Antarctica and the Falkland Islands

1996 -- Marion Stirling Pugh's trip to China, and separately to Belize and Honduras

2001 April 24 -- Marion Stirling Pugh died in Tucson, Arizona
Separated Materials:
Film materials were transferred to the Human Studies Film Archive (HSFA).
Provenance:
The bulk of these papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives in 2016 by Matthew and Marion Stirling's grandchildren, Jessica Gronberg and Jeremy Withers.
Restrictions:
The Matthew Williams Stirling and Marion Stirling Pugh papers are open for research.

The scrapbooks listed in Series 1.7 are restricted due to preservation concerns. Please contact the reference archivist for more information.

Access to the Matthew Williams Stirling and Marion Stirling Pugh papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Occupation:
Women archaeologists  Search this
Topic:
Archaeology  Search this
Excavations (Archaeology)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Photographs
Correspondence
Citation:
Matthew Williams Stirling and Marion Stirling Pugh papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-24
See more items in:
Matthew Williams Stirling and Marion Stirling Pugh papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31131a350-b4ba-421a-bc30-0ecfb99820e9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2016-24

Field work

Collection Creator:
Stirling, Matthew Williams, 1896-1975  Search this
Stirling, Marion  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1921-1998, undated
bulk 1921-1975
Scope and Contents:
Series 1. Field work, 1921-1998 (bulk 1921-1975) and undated, documents the archaeological expeditions undertaken by Matthew and Marion Stirling over a span of 40 years. This includes expeditions Matthew undertook prior to his marriage and collaboration with Marion (they married in 1933) to Papua New Guinea, Ecuador, and Florida, and extensive documentation of expeditions they embarked on together to Mexico, Panama, Ecuador, and Costa Rica. Materials include field notes, journals, correspondence, photographs, reports, clippings, ephemera, expense reports, travel itineraries, articles, and scrapbooks.

The bulk of the materials in this series relate to Matthew Stirling's 1925-1927 American-Dutch Expedition to Papua New Guinea and the eight Smithsonian Institution/National Geographic Society (SI/NGS) expeditions Matthew and Marion Stirling undertook to various sites in Mexico between 1938 and 1946. The Papua New Guinea materials include field notes, logistical documents, and photographs documenting the expedition. In addition Matthew Stirling's film/lecture tour "By Aeroplane to Pygmyland" that followed the expedition is well documented. The Mexico materials include extensive field notes, correspondence, and photographs documenting the expeditions to sites such as Tres Zapotes, La Venta, Cerro de las Mesas, Izapa, and San Lorenzo, and discoveries regarding Olmec culture, including the excavations of eight colossal Olmec heads.

The remainder of the materials document additional joint SI/NGS expeditions, including four to Panama between 1947 and 1953 and one to Ecuador in 1957; a Latin American Expedition to South and Central America from 1931-1932 where Matthew Stirling primarily conducted ethnographic studies of the Jivaro of Ecuador; an expedition to Costa Rica in 1964; and various other expeditions that Matthew (and sometimes Marion) participated in primarily during the 1920s and 1930s.
Arrangement:
This series is arranged in 7 subseries: 1.1 Papua New Guinea, 1925-1996 (bulk 1925-1928), undated; 1.2 Mexico, 1921-1998 (bulk 1938-1972), undated; 1.3 Panama, 1943-1962, undated; 1.4 Ecuador, 1930-1968, undated; 1.5 Costa Rica, 1963-1965, undated; 1.6 Other expeditions, 1921-1975 (bulk 1921-1935), undated; 1.7 Scrapbooks, 1925-1953.
Collection Restrictions:
The Matthew Williams Stirling and Marion Stirling Pugh papers are open for research.

The scrapbooks listed in Series 1.7 are restricted due to preservation concerns. Please contact the reference archivist for more information.

Access to the Matthew Williams Stirling and Marion Stirling Pugh papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Matthew Williams Stirling and Marion Stirling Pugh papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2016-24, Series 1
See more items in:
Matthew Williams Stirling and Marion Stirling Pugh papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a0a8eaf8-d24a-4db0-92f1-57c60b531a28
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2016-24-ref1440

Victor Wolfgang von Hagen collection of photographs and negatives

Creator:
Von Hagen, Victor Wolfgang, 1908-1985  Search this
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation  Search this
Extent:
285 Photographic prints (albumen)
122 Negatives (photographic) (acetate)
Culture:
Maya (archaeological culture)  Search this
Tsáchila (Colorado)  Search this
Jicaque  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Negatives (photographic)
Negatives
Photographs
Albumen prints
Place:
Ecuador
Honduras
Date:
1936-1938
Summary:
Includes images of the indigenous people of Ecuador, primarily the Tsatchela (Tsachila, Colorado) of Pichincha province and the Shuar-Achuar of Oriente province. Also includes 51 images of the indigenous people of Honduras, primarily the Xicaque and Maya.
Scope and Contents:
The von Hagen collection primarily contains photographs and negatives made by von Hagen during his 1935 and 1936 travels in Ecuador on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. The 1935 materials depict adult and child members of the Shuar-Achuar culture group engaged in weaving, drumming, and cooking. In addition there are representations of indigenous dwellings and of individuals dressed for ceremonies and using blow guns. The 1936 materials overwhelmingly depict Tsáchila (Colorado) peoples preparing food, weaving, potting, playing instruments, and participating in ceremonies, but also include depictions of the Runa (Otavaleño/Otavalo) people spinning cotton and sitting for potraits. The collection also contains photographic materials dated to 1937 that depict Mayan artifacts and Jicaque men of Honduras building rafts, fishing, and standing for their poritraits. Von Hagen's Tsáchila and Jicaque photographs illustrated his contributions to the Museum's series Indian Notes and Monographs, The Tsáchila Indians of western Ecuador (no. 51) and The Jicaque (Torrupan) Indians of Honduras (no. 53).
Arrangement note:
Negatives: organized in individual sleeves; arranged by negative number

Prints: organized in folders; arranged by print number
Arrangement:
Negatives Arranged by negative number (N36360, N36648, N36654-N36656, N36661, N36733-N36740, N36749-N36752, N36755, N36758-N36769, N36772-N36779, N36781-N36797, N36803-N36853, N37366, N37386, N41444) Prints Arranged by photograph number (P11502-P11510, P12316-P12473, P12522-P12525, P12596-P12657, P12855-P12859, P12941-P12949, P13329-P13362, P15428, P15491, P15585, P16246)
Biographical/Historical note:
Victor Wolfgang von Hagen was an American explorer, archaeological historian, anthropologist, naturalist, zoologist, and travel writer. In the 1930s, he led several Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation collecting expeditions to Central and South America and continued to travel throughout the region into the 1970s.
Provenance:
Gift of Dr. von Hagen
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Copyright: National Museum of the American Indian
Topic:
Colorado Indians (Ecuador)  Search this
Indians of South America  Search this
Indians of Central America  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Negatives
Photographs
Albumen prints
Citation:
Victor Wolfgang von Hagen collection of photographs and negatives, 1935-1937, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or print number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.019
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv476d1158f-0159-4934-9499-9279da9b2688
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-019

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