Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
227 documents - page 1 of 12

From Labrador to Samoa the theory and practice of Eleanor Burke Leacock Constance R. Sutton, editor

Author:
Sutton, Constance R  Search this
Association for Feminist Anthropology  Search this
International Women's Anthropology Conference  Search this
American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting (86th : 1987 : Chicago, Ill.)  Search this
International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (12th : 1988 : Zagreb, Croatia)  Search this
Subject:
Leacock, Eleanor Burke 1922-  Search this
Physical description:
x, 153 pages illustrations 23 cm
Type:
Biography
Congresses
Congrès
Biographies
Conference papers and proceedings
Place:
United States
États-Unis
Date:
1993
Topic:
Anthropologists  Search this
Feminist anthropology--Philosophy  Search this
Applied anthropology--Philosophy  Search this
Applied anthropology  Search this
Anthropologues  Search this
Féminisme et anthropologie--Philosophie  Search this
Anthropologie appliquée  Search this
Anthropologie appliquée--Philosophie  Search this
Culturele antropologie  Search this
Theorieën  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_479258

James C. Jones collection from Bolivia

Creator:
Jones, James C. (James Clyde), 1944-  Search this
Extent:
910 Slides (photographs) (color, 35mm)
2 Sound cassettes
Culture:
Moxo (Mojo)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Sound cassettes
Sound cassette
Place:
Bolivia
Date:
1977-1979
1988
Summary:
This collection includes slides (photographic) and audio-cassettes created by James Jones during research trips to San Ingnacio de Moxos, Beni, Bolivia in 1977-1979 and 1988. Jones was conducting research to complete his dissertation in anthropology and photographed many indigenous Moxo (Mojo) community members he interviewed during the course of his research, as well as local festivals and agricultural activities.
Scope and Contents:
The James C. Jones collection includes photographic slides (35mm) and two audio-cassettes made by Jones in San Ignacios de Moxis, Beni, Bolivia in 1977-1979 and in 1988. The majority of the photographic slides in this collection were taken by Jones during his 1977-1979 research trip for his PhD dissertation. There are a small number of slides that were shot in 1988 on a return trip to Beni, Bolivia. The slides from 1977-1979 were shot in 25 rolls with 36 slides per roll. The majority of the photographs were shot in and near San Ignacio de Moxos in Beni, Bolivia an indigenous village in Norther Bolivia, though additional locations in Bolivia visited include Trinidad and La Paz. Jones interviewed around 70 local Moxo (Mojo) men and women in and near San Ignacio. During and in between interviews Jones shot photographs that documented daily life for his interviewees with a particular focus on agricultural activities such as farming and cooking. Many of the photographs include images of the Rivero family (Ignacito and Yolanda) with whom Jones stayed for extended periods of time. Jones also took a special interest in the many celebrations and festivals that occurred during his stay in Bolivia and took photographs of dancers, musicians and processions. He also shot many landscape views of the village, farms, "pampas," as well as aerial views of roads and rivers and close up images of the local flora and fauna.

The two audio-cassettes, recorded by Jones in 1977-1978, includes music played by local Moxo musicians during special occasions, such as Christmas, Independence Day as well as music played in the local church. There are also interviews with Juan Bautista Savala and Chaco war veteran Horacio Semani.
Arrangement:
Arranged chronologically and by slide roll or sound-cassette.
Biographical / Historical:
James C. Jones was born in Harlan, Kentucky in 1944. He graduated from University of Kentucky in 1966 with a B.A. in Science in Mathematics. Jones spent two years teaching math in Columbia (1969-1970) and developed an interest in Latin American studies while traveling around South America. Due to this interest, he pursued and received a Master's degree and later PhD in anthropology at the University of Florida. Jones first visited San Ignacio/Beni in 1976 for three months to define his topic for his PhD thesis with funding from the University of Florida's Tropical South American Program. He returned to Bolivia with funding from the Inter-American Foundation in 1977 (September) and stayed through the first quarter of 1979. Returning to Florida, Jones finished his dissertation in 1980 titled "Conflict between Whites and Indians on the Llanos de Moxos, Beni Department" (PhD diss., University of Florida, 1980).

After completing his degree, Jones left the field of anthropology and received a Master's degree in agricultural economics, entering the world of development for the next 15 years. During this time Jones worked on development and security issues across the globe. Jones resumed research on Bolivia in the late 1980's and 1990s and published an essay, "Development: Reflections from Bolivia" in the Society for Applied Anthropology's Human Organization, Vol. 56, No. 1 (Spring 1997), pp.111-120. Since then, Jones has worked as an independent contractor.
Separated Materials:
Jones took copious notes that describe that photographic and audio materials but these are still in the possession of Jones himself. The Archive Center has copies of these notes for reference purposes only.
Provenance:
Gift of James Jones, 2017.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.
Topic:
Indians of South America -- Bolivia  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Applied anthropology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs) -- 1950-2000
Sound cassette
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); James Jones collection from Bolivia, Item Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.110
See more items in:
James C. Jones collection from Bolivia
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4d29abf08-ec3a-48a0-9436-35ad7b76ceeb
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-110
Online Media:

Laura Thompson papers

Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Names:
Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project  Search this
Saint Mary's University (Halifax, N.S.). Institute of Human Values  Search this
United States. Office of Indian Affairs  Search this
Extent:
27 Linear feet (50 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Germany
Guam
Fiji
Iceland
Date:
1905-1997
Summary:
The papers of Laura Thompson reflect the professional and personal life of an active and pioneering anthropologist. In the 1930s, Thompson began her work in applied anthropology, producing studies of Fiji, Guam and Hawaii intended to aid administrators of economic, educational and political development and pioneering approaches now known as "administrative" and "educational" anthropology. In the 1940s, Thompson applied her skills to the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, a study of eleven communities of five Native American tribes. From the 1950s until the end of her career, Thompson sought to formulate and demonstrate a theoretical anthropological synthesis of man and culture, while pursuing fieldwork in Iceland and Germany, teaching, and consulting for numerous institutions.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Laura Thompson reflect the professional and personal life of an active and pioneering anthropologist. In the 1930s, Thompson began her work in applied anthropology, producing studies of Fiji, Guam and Hawaii intended to aid administrators of economic, educational and political development and pioneering approaches now known as "administrative" and "educational" anthropology. In the 1940s, Thompson applied her skills to the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, a study of eleven communities of five Native American tribes. From the 1950s until the end of her career, Thompson sought to formulate and demonstrate a theoretical anthropological synthesis of man and culture, while pursuing fieldwork in Iceland and Germany, teaching, and consulting for numerous institutions.

Included in this collection are field diaries, numerous manuscripts and lectures, research materials, correspondence, sound recordings and ethnographic photographs. Also included are various subject and index files maintained by Thompson for her many research projects. The collection is particularly rich in unpublished manuscripts that Thompson created from 1950 to the mid 1990s. Manuscript topics include particular field sites, such as Fiji and West Germany, as well as Thompson's critical and theoretical exposition regarding the future of applied anthropology, variously titled "Clinical" and "Holistic Anthropology."

Numerous materials pertaining to Thompson's personal life are also located in the collection, including personal diaries and professional awards, correspondence with friends and family, and personal photographs of Thompson from infancy to old age. Located in Thompson's personal papers are her writings from late in life, in which she addressed aging through her anthropological sensibilities, recorded formative memories from her youth, and projected the future of a world rife with injustice and environmental destruction. A large portion of the Laura Thompson papers include documents from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration (IPEA) Project, initiated by the Office of Indian Affairs and the University of Chicago Committee on Human Development. This investigation of five Native American tribes includes the results of over 1000 psychological studies of native children. Materials included encompass the protocols for and implementation of the project, as well as field reports, psychological tests, correspondence, worker supervision reports and final analyses of findings. Included is a copy of the project's published final report, Personality and Government (1951). The bulk of the records date between 1941and 47; related material spans as late as 1992. Correspondents primarily include project members and consultants, particularly: John Collier, A. I. Hallowell, Maud Hallowell, Royal Hassrick, Robert Havinghurst, Alice Joseph, Bruno Klopfer, Clyde Kluckhohn, Dorothea Leighton, D'Arcy McNickle, Trude Schmidl-Waehner, Heinrich Schultz, Ruth Underhill, and W. Lloyd Warner. The papers of the IPEA Project are restricted in use.

Additional material in the NAA relating to the IPEA Research Project can be found in the following collections: Indian Personality and Administration Research Project Papers, donated by Robert J. Havighurst, and the Dorothea Cross Leighton papers. A list of publications resulting from findings of the project can be found in the Thompson collection accession folder.

Nearly absent from the collection are materials reflecting Thompson's fieldwork in Hawaii, her marriages to Bernhard Tüting and John Collier, and manuscripts of her early publications.

Correspondents in Thompson's papers include: Ruth BENEDICT, Charles W. COLLIER, John COLLIER, Malcolm COLLIER, Cora DUBOIS, Fred EGGAN, Alfred EMERSON, Kenneth EMORY, Frederick V. FIELD, Roland W. FORCE, Derek FREEMAN, Ann Pinson GILL, Peggy GOLDE, A. I. HALLOWELL, Maude HALLOWELL, Royal HASSRICK, Robert HAVINGHURST, Alice JOSEPH, Felix KEESING, Lawrence KELLY, Bruno KLOPFER, Clyde KLUCKHOHN, A. L. KROEBER, Harry S. LADD, Bruno LASKER, Dorothy LEE, Dorothea LEIGHTON, Charles F. LOOMIS, Katherine LOUMALA, Robert H. LOWIE, John R. MACCORMACK, Bronislaw MALINOWSKI, D'Arcy MCNICKLE, Margaret MEAD, Robert REDFIELD, Trude SCHMIDL-WAEHNER, Heinrich SCHULTZ, Leslie SPIER, George D. SPINDLER, Rebecca STEVENSON, Ratu J. L. V. SUKUNA (District Commissioner of Lau), Alfred TOZZER, W. Lloyd WARNER and Alvin WOLFE.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
Arranged in 11 series: (1) Fiji, 1933-1995; (2) Germany, 1934-1991; (3) Guam, 1938-1996; (4) Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, 1941-1992; (5) Iceland, 1952-1981; (6) Institute of Human Values, 1973-1982; (8) Manuscripts and research, 1935-1994; (9) Professional correspondence, 1943-1992; (10) Publications, 1932-1991; (11) Personal Papers, 1905-1997.
Biographical Note:
Laura Thompson (1905-2000) conducted fieldwork in Oceania, the Southwestern United States and Europe; she taught at numerous institutions and served as a consultant for many organizations, including the Naval Government of Guam and the Office of Indian Affairs, throughout her career. Thompson's papers reflect her involvement in each of these activities as well as her desire to formulate a unifying theory of applied anthropology that would address issues including environmentalism and overpopulation.

1905 -- Born in Honolulu, Hawaii on January 23.

1923 -- Graduated from Punahou Academy, Hawaii.

1927 -- Bachelor of Arts, Mills College, California.

1928 -- Graduate studies in anthropology, Radcliffe College and Harvard University, Massachusetts.

1929-33 -- Graduate studies in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley.

1929-34 -- Assistant Ethnologist, Bishop Museum, Hawaii.

1931-32 -- Fellow, Bishop Museum, Hawaii.

1933 -- Ph.D. in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley.

1933-34 -- Lau Islands, Fiji, fieldwork.

1934-37 -- Germany, travel and research.

1938-39 -- Guam, fieldwork under U.S. Naval Government and University of Hawaii.

1938-40 -- Consultant, U. S. Naval Government of Guam.

1940-41 -- Social Scientist, Community Survey of Education, Hawaii.

1941 -- Co-founder, Society for Applied Anthropology. Graduate work in Human Development, University of Chicago, Illinois.

1941-47 -- Coordinator, Indian Personality, Education, and Administration Research Project.

1941-43 -- Papago Indians, fieldwork. Pine Ridge Sioux Indians, fieldwork. Hopi Indians, fieldwork. Navaho Indians, fieldwork. Poston War Relocation Camp, fieldwork. Zuni Indians, fieldwork.

1942-44 -- Consultant, U. S. Office of Indian Affairs.

1946 -- Papago Indians, fieldwork.

1946-54 -- Research consultant, Institute of Ethnic Affairs (Washington DC and New York).

1952 -- Iceland, fieldwork.

1954-56 -- Professor of Anthropology, City College of New York.

1957-58 -- Visiting Professor of Anthropology, University of North Carolina.

1958-59 -- Research fellow, Laboratories of Anthropology, University of North Carolina.

1959-60 -- Visiting Professor, North Carolina State College.

1960 -- Iceland, fieldwork.

1961 -- Visiting professor, Utah State University (summer). Distinguished Visiting Professor, Pennsylvania State University.

1961-62 -- Professor of Anthropology, University of Southern Illinois.

1962 -- Visiting Professor, University of Hawaii (summer).

1962-63 -- Professor of Anthropology, San Francisco State College.

1964 -- Lecturer, Brooklyn College, CUNY.

1974 -- Honorary Ll.D., Mills College, CA.

1976 -- Board of Governors, Institute of Human Values, St. Mary's University, Halifax.

1977 -- Ancient Order of the Chammori (Honor for public service in Guam).

1979 -- Malinowski Award, Society for Applied Anthropology.

1985 -- Returned to Hawaii.

2000 -- Died January 29.
Related Materials:
Additional material in the NAA relating to the IPEA Research Project can be found in the following collections: Indian Personality and Administration Research Project Papers, donated by Robert J. Havighurst, and the Dorothea Cross Leighton papers. A list of publications resulting from findings of the project can be found in the Thompson collection accession folder.
Provenance:
Thompson's papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by the creator periodically over 25 years.
Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1983-51
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw368b0c5ca-b0b1-4f61-b59e-b87cf0b0ff5b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1983-51

INDIAN PERSONALITY, EDUCATION AND ADMINISTRATION RESEARCH PROJECT

Collection Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Extent:
4.25 Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1941-1992
Scope and Contents note:
The Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project was supported jointly by the Office of Indian Affairs and the University of Chicago Committee on Human Development. Initiated in 1941 by Indian Affairs Commissioner John Collier, the study investigated eleven communities of five Native American tribes: Hopi, Navaho, Papago, and United Pueblos. The project studied Native Americans as both individuals and as tribal societies, with the aim of increasing the effectiveness of Indian Service policies and programs, improving Indian welfare and developing local autonomy. Thompson coordinated the project; at Chicago, the Indian Education Research Committee, headed by W. Lloyd Warner, was charged with the investigation's scientific work. When the University of Chicago withdrew from the program, they were replaced by the Society for Applied Anthropology. This series reflects much of the work of the IPEA project from its inception in 1941 through its termination in 1947; also included are materials that post-date the study as participants collaborated on investigational analyses. Materials are divided into the following subseries, based upon Thompson's original arrangement of the materials: general correspondence; subject file; interviews; Rorschach monograph; free drawing test; pilot study - Papago Reservation; Hopi materials; publications; and retrospective manuscripts and correspondence. All but the last subseries are restricted. See each subseries section for a description of contents.
Arrangement note:
Materials divided into subseries based upon document type, alphabetically therein. Correspondence and publications filed chronologically. Dates non-inclusive.
Restrictions:
Restricted
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1983-51, Series 4
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33dc23417-493b-4f1a-8240-a620906aad28
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1983-51-ref205

Fejos, Paul, Outline of Lectures on Applied Anthropology

Collection Creator:
Strong, William Duncan, 1899-1962  Search this
Container:
Box 46
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
The William Duncan Strong papers are open for research.

Access to the William Duncan Strong papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
William Duncan Strong papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
William Duncan Strong papers
William Duncan Strong papers / Series 8: Writings by other authors
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw361f19cde-c521-4840-92a6-9363a8bb7b2b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1974-28-ref693

H. Scudder Mekeel photographs

Creator:
Mekeel, H. Scudder (Haviland Scudder), 1902-1947  Search this
Names:
Laboratory of Anthropology (Museum of New Mexico)  Search this
Collier, John, 1884-1968  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Photographer:
Fiske, Frank Bennett, 1883-1952  Search this
Rise, Carl H., 1888-1939  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (photochrom)
443 Negatives (nitrate)
235 Prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Taos Indians  Search this
Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Lakota (Teton/Western Sioux)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Oglala Lakota (Oglala Sioux)  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Osage  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Negatives
Place:
Standing Rock Indian Reservation (N.D. and S.D.)
Oraibi (Ariz.)
Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (S.D.)
Date:
bulk 1930-1933
circa 1920-1947
Scope and Contents note:
The photographs primarily document ceremonies, people, and lands of Native Americans in the Plains and Southwest, taken during Mekeel's field research from 1929 to 1936. A large portion of the collection depicts Mekeel's research during the early 1930s among the Oglala of the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Another large portion of the collection includes personal photos depicting Mekeel's homes and children.
Biographical/Historical note:
H. Scudder Mekeel (1902-1947) was an anthropologist who studied social and psychological aspects of Native American cultures. Educated at Harvard University (BA, 1928), the University of Chicago (MA, 1929), and Yale University (PhD, 1932), he was a member of the 1929 Laboratory of Anthropology (Santa Fe) ethnological field school led by Alfred L. Kroeber. In 1929-1932, he carried out three field expeditions to the Sioux communities of South Dakota, working mainly on the Pine Ridge Reservation. He joined the Bureau of Indian Affairs as Director of Applied Anthropology under Commissioner John Collier in 1935. Two years later, he was appointed Director of the Laboratory of Anthropology at Santa Fe and continued there until 1940, when he accepted a teaching position at the University of Wisconsin.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 94-21
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives holds copies of Mekeel's Field Notes from the summers of 1930 and 1931 in the White Clay District of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota (MS 7088). Originals of these field notes and Mekeel's population notes on the White Clay District are held by the American Museum of Natural History, Division of Anthropology Archives (.M454).
The Human Studies Film Archives holds Mekeel's film footage of a Lakota Sioux Sundance from 1930 (HSFA 92.8.1).
Correspondence from Mekeel held in the National Anthropological Archives in the William Duncan Strong papers, Raoul Weston LaBarre Papers, and Bureau of American Ethnology Administrative File.
Restrictions:
Original nitrate negatives are in cold storage and require special arrangements for viewing.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Photo Lot 94-21, the H. Scudder Mekeel photographs, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.94-21
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3dbffcbe1-fa91-4298-a955-884082c29279
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-94-21

Alan Harwood Papers

Correspondent:
Conklin, Harold C., 1926-2016  Search this
Greenberg, Joseph H. (Joseph Harold), 1915-2001  Search this
Creator:
Harwood, Alan  Search this
Extent:
27 Linear feet (60 boxes, 2 manuscript folders), 8 sound recordings, 35 computer disks, 1 oversize box, 1 oversize folder, 1 map drawer)
Culture:
Chinese Americans  Search this
Irish Americans  Search this
Jamaican Americans  Search this
Puerto Ricans  Search this
Safwa (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilms
Sound recordings
Photographic prints
Field notes
Place:
Bronx (New York, N.Y.)
Boston (Mass.)
Mbeya Region (Tanzania)
Date:
circa 1940s-2001
bulk 1953-2001
Summary:
Alan Harwood is a Professor Emeritus at University of Massachusetts, Boston in the Anthropology Department. Trained in social anthropology he has studied illness and healing in Tanzania and communities in New York City and Boston. Harwood was the founding editor of Medical Anthropology Quarterly (new series, 1986-1991) and series editor of Cambridge Studies in Medical Anthropology (1999-2004) The bulk of this collection is composed of Alan Harwood's 1962-1964 ethnographic research among the Safwa in Tanzania (then known as Tanganyika); his research on health beliefs and medical practices of residents in a low-income area of the Bronx, New York (1967-1970); and his research in Boston, Massachusetts on different ethnic groups' conceptions of health (1994-1995). Also among his papers are materials from his involvement in the Centers for Disease Control and American Anthropological Association (AAA) Workgroup on "The Use of Race & Ethnicity as Scientific Categories" at the 1994 AAA meeting.
Scope and Contents:
The bulk of the collection is composed of Alan Harwood's ethnographic research among the Safwa in Tanzania (then known as Tanganyika); his research on health beliefs and medical practices of residents in a low-income area of the Bronx, New York; and his research in Boston, Massachusetts on different ethnic groups' conceptions of health. The few photographs in the collection are aerial views of Isyesye, where he conducted his Safwa research, and images from Utengule taken by White Fathers and dating from the 1940s. The collection also contains Harwood's linguistic recordings of Kimalila and of Kisafwa and Kinyiha spoken in various dialects. In addition, the collection contains sound recordings of Safwa ceremonies and an audio letter from Harold Conklin, Mario Bick, Georgeda Buchbinder Bick, and Michiko Takaki. Also among his papers are his correspondence as the editor of Medical Anthropology Quarterly and of Ethnicity and Medical Care; materials from his involvement in the Centers for Disease Control and American Anthropological Association (AAA) Workgroup on "The Use of Race & Ethnicity as Scientific Categories" at the 1994 AAA meeting; and letters of recommendation (restricted until 2056) that Harwood wrote for students and colleagues. In addition, the collection contains Harwood's course notes as an undergraduate student at Harvard and as a graduate student at University of Michigan and Columbia University. The collection also contains Harwood's research notes on North Luzon as Conklin's student research assistant at Columbia University. Harwood's correspondence is spread throughout the collection and filed by project. Among his notable correspondents are Harold Conklin and Joseph Greenberg. Their letters can be found with the Safwa materials.
Arrangement:
Arranged into 8 series: (1) Safwa Research, 1961-1970; (2) Bronx Research, 1957-1986; (3) Boston Research, 1993-1996; (4) Professional Activities, 1975-2001; (5) Student Files, 1953-1962; (6) Microfilm; (7) Photographs, circa 1940s & 1963; (8) Sound Recordings, 1962-1964
Biographical/Historical note:
Alan Harwood was born on March 20, 1935 in Tarrytown, New York. He earned his undergraduate degree, magna cum laude, in Social Relations from Harvard University in 1957 and attended the London School of Economics on a one year fellowship the following year. When he returned to the United States, he began his graduate studies in anthropology at the University of Michigan, earning his M.A. in 1960. He went on to Columbia University for his doctorate, which he was awarded in 1967.

Under a pre-doctoral fellowship funded by the Social Science Research Council, Harwood conducted ethnographic research on the Safwa of the southwestern region of Tanganyika (now known as Tanzania). From September 1962 to 1964, Harwood carried out his research mainly in the village of Isyesye, near Mbeya, Southern Highlands Region. At the time, witchcraft accusations were common, and it thus became the subject of his dissertation, Witchcraft, Sorcery, and Social Categories among the Safwa, later published in 1970.

In 1967, Harwood was hired by the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center (formerly called the Neighborhood Medical Care Demonstration) in Bronx, New York. From 1967 to 1970, he directed a study on the health, illness, and medical beliefs and practices of residents in a low-income area of the south Bronx. One of the articles produced from this research was Harwood's "The Hot-Cold Theory of Disease: Implications for Treatment of Puerto Rican Patients" (1971). Harwood also looked at spiritism among the Puerto Rican community, which led to his publication, Rx: Spiritist as Needed: A Study of a Puerto Rican Community Mental Health Resource (1977).

From 1994 to 1995, Harwood was the co-principal investigator of a study conducted under the Tufts New England Medical Center on conceptions of health and well-being among 4 ethnic groups in Boston: African Americans, Mandarin-speaking Chinese Americans, Irish Americans, and Puerto Ricans. Harwood led the group studying Irish Americans.

In addition to his research, Harwood was the founding editor of Medical Anthropology Quarterly (new series, 1986-1991) and series editor of Cambridge Studies in Medical Anthropology (1999-2004) and of Studies in Medical Anthropology (2004-2006). He also edited Ethnicity and Medical Care (1981), a book geared towards health professionals.

In 1971, Harwood spent a year in New Zealand as a visiting senior lecturer at the University of Auckland. From 1972 to 2002, he was a professor of Anthropology at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. During his tenure, he also served as adjunct professor in the Department of Psychology (1993-2002) and as associate dean for Undergraduate Education, College of Arts and Sciences (1998-2001). In addition, he was a lecturer in the Department of Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School (1992-present).

In 1982, Harwood was honored with the Wellcome Medal of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland for Research in Anthropology as Applied to Medical Problems. He is also a Fellow of the American Anthropological Association and of the Society for Applied Anthropology.
Restrictions:
Materials that identify the participants in Harwood's Bronx and Boston studies are restricted until 2056.
Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Medical anthropology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Microfilms
Sound recordings
Photographic prints
Field notes
Citation:
Alan Harwood Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2006-25
See more items in:
Alan Harwood Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw39b5f5a44-d962-4a39-bef9-c0d96eca37af
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2006-25
Online Media:

Philleo Nash papers

Creator:
Nash, Philleo, 1909-1987  Search this
Names:
American Anthropological Association  Search this
East Bay Area United Indian Council -- Oakland, California  Search this
DuBois, Cora -- Klamath notes (copies)  Search this
Correspondent:
Eggan, Fred, 1906-1991  Search this
Gower, Charlotte  Search this
Hill, W. W. (Willard Williams), 1902-1974  Search this
Opler, Morris Edward  Search this
Redfield, Robert, 1897-1958  Search this
Depicted:
Humphrey, Hubert  Search this
Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963  Search this
Extent:
12 Linear feet (24 boxes)
Culture:
Sahnish (Arikara)  Search this
Minnesota Chippewa [Red Lake, Minnesota]  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)  Search this
Cocopa  Search this
Colville  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Hualapai (Walapai)  Search this
American Indians -- Religion  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Maya  Search this
Oneida  Search this
Jews -- Toronto, Ontario  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Klamath  Search this
Piipaash (Maricopa)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Spokan  Search this
Walla Walla (Wallawalla)  Search this
Quechan (Yuma/Cuchan)  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Oraons  Search this
Puyallup  Search this
Akimel O'odham (Pima)  Search this
Samoan  Search this
Quileute  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Samoans  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Modoc  Search this
Apache  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Canada -- Ontario -- Lake Alymer -- archeology
Date:
1931-1986
Summary:
The Philleo Nash papers attest to Nash's interest in anthropology, not only research and teaching but also in its application to public service. His papers can be separated into four main areas: undergraduate and graduate education, research, teaching, and public service. Files contain class notes from Nash's undergraduate and graduate studies as well as papers by well-known professors lecturing at the University of Chicago including Ralph Linton, Robert Redfield, and R.A. Radcliffe-Brown. The bulk of his research was conducted in the Pacific Northwest where he studied the Klamath-Modoc culture on the reservation, focusing on revivalism and socio-political organization (1935-1937). Other research included archeology at two sites, a study of the Toronto Jewish community, and a continuing interest in minority issues. Nash taugh at the University of Toronto (1937- 1941) and at American University in Washington, D.C. (1971-1977). Teaching files contain lecture notes from his work at the University of Toronto. Public service files include correspondence from the period when he was Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin (1959-1961) as well as reports and photos from the years as Commissioner of Indian Affairs (1961-1966). Other public service and business positions are not represented in these files.
Scope and Contents:
The Philleo Nash Papers attest to Nash's interest in anthropology, not only research and teaching but also in its application to public service. His papers can be separated into four main areas: undergraduate and graduate education, research, teaching, and public service. Files contain class notes from Nash's undergraduate and graduate studies as well as papers by well-known professors lecturing at the University of Chicago including Ralph Linton, Robert Redfield, and R.A. Radcliffe-Brown. The bulk of his research was conducted in the Pacific Northwest where he studied the Klamath-Modoc culture on the reservation, focusing on revivalism and socio-political organization (1935-1937). Other research included archeology at two sites, a study of the Toronto Jewish community, and a continuing interest in minority issues. Nash taugh at the University of Toronto (1937-1941) and at American University in Washington, D.C. (1971-1977). Teaching files contain lecture notes from his work at the University of Toronto. Public service files include correspondence from the period when he was Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin (1959-1961) as well as reports and photos from the years as Commissioner of Indian Affairs (1961-1966). Other public service and business positions are not represented in these files.

Please note that the contents of the collection and the language and terminology used reflect the context and culture of the time of its creation. As an historical document, its contents may be at odds with contemporary views and terminology and considered offensive today. The information within this collection does not reflect the views of the Smithsonian Institution or National Anthropological Archives, but is available in its original form to facilitate research.
Arrangement:
Arranged in 6 series: (I) Education (1931-1937), (II) Klamath-Modoc Culture (1930s), (III) Teaching (1937-1942, 1971-1977), (IV) Miscellaneous (1936-1986), (V) Non-Academic Positions (1939-1970), (VI) Photos (1931-1967).
Biographical Note:
Philleo Nash was born on October 25, 1909, in Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. He studied at the University of Wisconsin, taking a year off to study music at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia. On his return to the University of Wisconsin, Nash completed his undergraduate degree in anthropology (1932) and went on to the University of Chicago for a Ph.D. in anthropology (1937). His doctoral dissertation explored the concepts of revivalism and social change with a focus on the Klamath Ghost Dance activities of the 1870s.

Nash held positions in teaching as well as in government and his family business. He was a lecturer in anthropology at the University of Toronto (1937-1941). He also lectured at the University of Wisconsin (1941-1942) and at American University in Washington, D.C. (1971-1977).

From 1942 to 1953, Nash served in various positions in the federal government, first in the Office of War Information and later as Assistant to President Truman, focusing on minority affairs and as liaison to the Department of the Interior. During this period in Washington, Nash also acted as President of the Georgetown Day School (1945-1952), where he was one of the founders of this racially integrated cooperative school. In 1953, Nash returned to Wisconsin where his interest in politics continued, and he became Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin from 1959 to 1961. In 1961, he returned to Washington, DC as U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs, a position he held until 1966.

Following his work as Commissioner, Nash remained in Washington where he acted as a consultant in applied anthropology and held offices in various associations including hte Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA), the American Anthropological Association (AAA), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). During all the years of professional responsibilities, Nash also held positions in the family business, Biron Cranberry Company. He returned to Wisconsin in 1977 to be President and Manager of the Company.

Throughout his life Nash was active in various associations for science and anthropology. He was awarded the AAA's Distinguished Service Award in 1984. In 1986, the SfAA presented him with the Bronislaw Malinowski Award in recognition of outstanding scholarship and long term commitment in applying the social sciences to contemporary issues.

Philleo Nash died in 1987. Some years before his death Nash sent his archaeological research material from the Pound Village Site (1938-1939) to Toronto and his research material from the DuBay Village Site (1940) to the Milwaukee Public Museum. According to the terms of his will, his government and political papers are housed at the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Missouri.

Reference: Landman, Ruth H. and Katherine S. Halpern (eds.). Applied Anthropologist and Public Servant: the Life and Work of Philleo Nash. NAPA Bulletin #7. Washington, DC: American Anthropological Association, 1989.
Related Materials:
According to the terms of his will, Nash's government and political papers are housed at the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Missouri.
Restrictions:
The Philleo Nash papers are open for research.

Access to the Philleo Nash papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ghost dance -- Klamath  Search this
Nativistic religions -- American Indians  Search this
Citation:
Philleo Nash papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1990-23
See more items in:
Philleo Nash papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3ac739603-097f-4085-8ae3-6b4213d44974
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1990-23

Priscilla Reining papers

Creator:
Reining, Priscilla  Search this
Extent:
2 Flat boxes
60.25 Linear feet (145 boxes)
23 Computer storage devices (floppy discs, zip discs, data tapes, and magnetic tape)
6 Sound recordings
2 Map drawers
Culture:
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Kikuyu (African people)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Minnesota Chippewa [Red Lake, Minnesota]  Search this
Haya (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Computer storage devices
Sound recordings
Map drawers
Correspondence
Photographs
Electronic records
Place:
Tanganyika
Tanzania
Kenya
Uganda
Niger
Burkina Faso
Bukoba District (Tanzania)
Date:
1916-2007
bulk 1934-2007
Summary:
The Priscilla Reining papers, 1916-2007, primarily document the professional life of Reining, a social anthropologist and Africanist who worked for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from 1974 to 1989. Her area of specialty was sub-Saharan Africa, specializing in desertification, land tenure, land use, kinship, population, fertility, and HIV/AIDS. During the 1970s, she pioneered the use of satellite imagery in conjunction with ethnographic data. She is also known for her ground-breaking research in the late 1980s that showed that uncircumcised men were more susceptible to contracting HIV/AIDS than circumcised men.

The collection contains correspondence, field research, research files, writings, day planners, teaching files, student files, photographs, maps, sound recordings, and electronic records. Reining's research files, particularly on the Red Lake Ojibwa, the Haya, HIV/AIDS, and satellite imagery, form a significant portion of the collection.
Scope and Contents:
These papers primarily document the professional life of Priscilla Reining. The collection contains correspondence, field research, research files, writings, day planners, teaching files, student files, photographs, maps, sound recordings, and electronic records.

Reining's research files, particularly on the Red Lake Ojibwa, the Haya, HIV/AIDS, and satellite imagery, form a significant portion of the collection. Her consultancy work is also well-represented, as well as her involvement in a large number of professional organizations. The collection also contains a great deal of material relating to her work on different programs and projects at AAAS, including the Committee on Arid Lands, Ethnography of Reproduction Project, and Cultural Factors in Population Programs. Also present in the collection are materials from her time as Urgent Anthropology Program Coordinator at the Smithsonian Institution, her files as an instructor and professor, and her files as a student at University of Chicago. Materials from her personal life can also be found in the collection, such as correspondence and childhood mementos.
Arrangement:
The Priscilla Reining papers are organized in 13 series: 1. Correspondence, 1944-2007; 2. Research, 1955-1970; 3. AAAS, 1971-1990; 4. Professional Activities, 5. 1957-2007; Daily Planners and Notebooks, 1960-2002; 6. Writings, 1952-1996; 7. Smithsonian Institution, 1964-1971; 8. University, 1958-1994; 9. Student, 1937-1975; 10. Biographical and Personal Files, 1934-2004; 11. Maps, 1916-1989, undated; 12. Photographs, circa 1950-1987, undated; 13. Electronic records.
Biographical / Historical:
Priscilla Copeland Reining was a social anthropologist and Africanist who worked for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from 1974 to 1989. Her area of specialty was sub-Saharan Africa, specializing in desertification, land tenure, land use, kinship, population, fertility, and HIV/AIDS. During the 1970s, she pioneered the use of satellite imagery in conjunction with ethnographic data. She is also known for her ground-breaking research in the late 1980s that showed that uncircumcised men were more susceptible to contracting HIV/AIDS than circumcised men.

Reining was born on March 11, 1923 in Chicago, Illinois. She studied anthropology at University of Chicago, where she earned both her A.B. (1945) and Ph.D. (1967) in anthropology. During her graduate studies, she studied peer group relations among the Ojibwa of the Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota (1947, 1950-51). Her husband, Conrad Reining, accompanied her to the field, an experience that inspired him to also become an anthropologist.

In 1951-53 and 1954-55, Reining conducted fieldwork among the Haya of Bukoba District, Tanganyika (now known as Tanzania) as a Fellow of the East African Institute of Social Research. While research for her dissertation focused on the agrarian system of the Haya, Reining also conducted fertility surveys for the East African Medical Survey, studying the relationship between STDs and fertility in Buhaya and Buganda. During the 1980s, Reining became interested in AIDS when she observed that the Haya were dying from the disease at a much higher rate than neighboring groups. When she learned of a possible link between circumcision and the spread of HIV, she drew a map of circumcision practice among the ethnic groups of Africa and found that uncircumcised men were 86% more likely to contract HIV than circumcised men. These results were published in "The Relationship Between Male Circumcision and HIV Infection in African Populations" (1989), which she coauthored with John Bongaarts, Peter Way, and Francis Conant.

Beginning in the 1970s, Reining began exploring the use of satellite imagery in ethnographic research. In 1973, she used Landsat data to identify individual Mali villages, the first use of satellite data in anthropology (Morán 1990). That same year, as a consultant for USAID, she also used ERTS-1 imagery to estimate carrying capacity in Niger and Upper Volta (now known as Burkino Faso). She continued to apply satellite data in her research throughout her career, including in 1993, when she returned to Tanzania to study the environmental consequence of population growth and HIV/AIDS among the Haya.

In 1974, Reining joined the Office of International Science of AAAS as a research associate. She stayed on to become Project Director for the Cultural Factors in Population Programs and to direct a number of projects under the Committee on Arid Lands. She also served as Project Director of the Ethnography of Reproduction project, for which she conducted fieldwork in Kenya in 1976. In 1990, she left AAAS for an appointment as Courtesy Professor of African Studies at University of Florida.

Prior to working for AAAS, Reining worked at the Smithsonian Institution (1966, 1968-70), during which she was the coordinator for the Urgent Anthropology Program in the now defunct Center for the Study of Man. She also taught at University of Minnesota (1956-59), American University (1959-60), and Howard University (1960-64). In addition, she worked as a consultant for various organizations, including Department of Justice, Peace Corps, International Bank for Reconstruction & Development (IBRD), Food and Agriculture Organization, and Carrying Capacity Network.

Reining was also actively involved in various organizations. She served as Secretary of the AAAS Section H (Anthropology) and was a founding member of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) Task Force on AIDS. She was also a fellow of the African Studies Association, AAA, AAAS, East African Academy, Society for Applied Anthropology, and Washington Academy of Science. In 1990, she was honored with a Distinguished Service Award from AAA.

Reining died of lung cancer at the age of 84 on July 19, 2007.

Sources Consulted

PR Vita. Series 10. Biographical and Personal Files. Priscilla Reining Papers. National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

Morán, Emilio F. 2000. The Ecosystem Approach in Anthropology: From Concept to Practice. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan. Page 359

Schudel, Matt. 2007. Anthropologist Broke Ground on AIDS, Satellite Mapping. Washington Post, July 29. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/28/AR2007072801190.html (accessed December 8, 2011).

1923 -- Born March 11 in Chicago, Illinois

1944 -- Marries Conrad C. Reining

1945 -- Earns A.B. from University of Chicago

1947, 1950-51 -- Conducts field research on the Ojibwa of Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota.

1949 -- Earns A.M. from University of Chicago

1951-1953, 1954-1955 -- Field research on Haya of Tanzania

1967 -- Earns Ph.D. from University of Chicago

1972 -- Returns to Tanzania for IBRD consultancy work

1974 -- Begins working at AAAS as a research associate in the Office of International Science

1975 -- Project Director, AAAS

1976 -- Field research on Kikuyu of Kenya for Ethnography of Reproduction

1986-89 -- Program Director, AAAS

1990 -- Courtesy Professor of African Studies at University of Florida Receives Distinguished Service Award from AAA

1993 -- Field research in Tanzania studying environmental consequences of population growth and HIV/AIDS among the Haya

2007 -- Dies of lung cancer at the age of 84 on July 19
Related Materials:
Additional materials at the NAA relating to Priscilla Reining can be found in the papers of Gordon Gibson and John Murra, as well as in the records of the Center for the Study of Man and the records of the Department of Anthropology. Photo Lot 97 contains two Haya photos taken by Reining that are not duplicated in this collection. The papers of her husband, Conrad Reining, are also at the NAA.

The archives of the American Association for the Advancement of Science also holds Reining's papers relating to her work for the organization.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Priscilla Reining's sons, Robert Reining and Conrad Reining, in 2009.
Restrictions:
The Priscilla Reining papers are open for research.

Some materials from the East African Medical Survey and Ethnography of Reproduction project contain personal medical history and are thus restricted. Grant applications sent to Reining to review are also restricted as well as her students' grades, and recommendation letters Reining wrote for her students. Electronic records are also restricted.

A small portion of the materials relating to Reining's Haya research, Ethnography of Reproduction project, and IBRD ujamaa research suffered severe mold damage. These materials have been cleaned and may be accessed. The legibility of some of the documents, however, is limited due to water and mold stains. Mold odor is also still present.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
AIDS (Disease)  Search this
Human ecology  Search this
Fertility, Human  Search this
Kinship  Search this
population  Search this
Landsat satellites  Search this
Remote sensing  Search this
Desertification  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Photographs
Electronic records
Citation:
Priscilla Reining Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2009-25
See more items in:
Priscilla Reining papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw34d98c2cd-c075-443f-b007-9dd7cea86fe2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2009-25

[Malinowski Award materials and Society for Applied Anthropology, 1978-81].

Collection Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 48
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Laura Thompson papers / Series 10: PERSONAL PAPERS
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3e39aad33-a7b4-4a22-bb86-39b43f0a3b90
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1983-51-ref1115

Meetings: Office of Indian Affairs and the Society for Applied Anthropology, 1944-45.

Collection Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 12
Type:
Archival materials
Restrictions:
[RESTRICTED]
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Laura Thompson papers / Series 4: INDIAN PERSONALITY, EDUCATION AND ADMINISTRATION RESEARCH PROJECT / 4.2: SUBJECT FILE, 1941-1960
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31bb21b00-5d99-4c78-a9cb-0194916f0176
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1983-51-ref311

Perspectives in applied anthropology, [correspondence, manuscripts and notes, 1943-71 (non-inclusive)].

Collection Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 23
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Laura Thompson papers / Series 7: MANUSCRIPTS AND RESEARCH / 7.1: A: RESEARCH-ORIENTED MANUSCRIPTS AND NOTES, 1935-1992. / 7.1.1: General manuscripts, 1935-1992
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw331979139-122b-49a7-835c-3bb765df475c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1983-51-ref598

[Uses of applied anthropology: manuscripts and notes, 1951-75, n.d.]

Collection Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 24
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Laura Thompson papers / Series 7: MANUSCRIPTS AND RESEARCH / 7.1: A: RESEARCH-ORIENTED MANUSCRIPTS AND NOTES, 1935-1992. / 7.1.1: General manuscripts, 1935-1992
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw35cf601ba-0715-47d2-b88f-46169a928e1f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1983-51-ref606

[Objectives and concepts in the teaching of applied anthropology, manuscript, lecture, manuscript and notes, 1960, 1962].

Collection Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 24
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Laura Thompson papers / Series 7: MANUSCRIPTS AND RESEARCH / 7.1: A: RESEARCH-ORIENTED MANUSCRIPTS AND NOTES, 1935-1992. / 7.1.1: General manuscripts, 1935-1992
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3fe78f0f0-0455-48fd-88f2-84cfb2206799
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1983-51-ref613

Edited papers for reissue, applied anthropology case studes [most collected c. 1970-71, originals date between 1949-62].

Collection Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 26
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Laura Thompson papers / Series 7: MANUSCRIPTS AND RESEARCH / 7.1: A: RESEARCH-ORIENTED MANUSCRIPTS AND NOTES, 1935-1992. / 7.1.1: General manuscripts, 1935-1992
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b5c2e01b-b9e9-4f7e-a846-b36c20ea52a2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1983-51-ref638

Applied anthropology: [edited manuscripts for projected text on applied anthropology?, c. 1971].

Collection Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 26
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Laura Thompson papers / Series 7: MANUSCRIPTS AND RESEARCH / 7.1: A: RESEARCH-ORIENTED MANUSCRIPTS AND NOTES, 1935-1992. / 7.1.1: General manuscripts, 1935-1992
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d970c620-f850-4b31-929f-cca63552f3f8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1983-51-ref640

Society for Applied Anthropology: Oral History [statement, 1982].

Collection Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 27
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Laura Thompson papers / Series 7: MANUSCRIPTS AND RESEARCH / 7.1: A: RESEARCH-ORIENTED MANUSCRIPTS AND NOTES, 1935-1992. / 7.1.1: General manuscripts, 1935-1992
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3b0412b61-550b-4414-b9f5-a08b1d92bc67
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1983-51-ref660

[Applied Anthropology as key specialty, ms. draft, n.d.].

Collection Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 27
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Laura Thompson papers / Series 7: MANUSCRIPTS AND RESEARCH / 7.1: A: RESEARCH-ORIENTED MANUSCRIPTS AND NOTES, 1935-1992. / 7.1.1: General manuscripts, 1935-1992
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3aae84ac2-40f5-4016-b5af-db95d3555b1a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1983-51-ref672

[Role of applied anthropology, draft manuscript adapted from 1944 publication, n.d.].

Collection Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 27
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Laura Thompson papers / Series 7: MANUSCRIPTS AND RESEARCH / 7.1: A: RESEARCH-ORIENTED MANUSCRIPTS AND NOTES, 1935-1992. / 7.1.1: General manuscripts, 1935-1992
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3abfa7bdb-68ec-4d33-8f51-c8e81e4dff4a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1983-51-ref682

Applied anthropology field guide, [drafts, 1962-63].

Collection Creator:
Thompson, Laura, 1905-2000  Search this
Container:
Box 33
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Portions of the collection, in particular materials from the Indian Personality, Education and Administration Research Project, are restricted in use.

Access to the Laura Thompson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Laura Thompson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Laura Thompson papers
Laura Thompson papers / Series 7: MANUSCRIPTS AND RESEARCH / 7.1: A: RESEARCH-ORIENTED MANUSCRIPTS AND NOTES, 1935-1992. / 7.1.5: Readings in Unified Anthropology, [compiled c. 1975].
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3fdcf0f20-7bbb-4c82-a15f-1a3d66f51b04
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1983-51-ref775

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By