Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
153 documents - page 1 of 8

Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the Present exhibition records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Willis, Deborah, 1948-  Search this
Extent:
0.6 Linear feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Photocopies
Exhibit scripts
Slides (photographs)
Brochures
Exhibition records
Correspondence
Date:
2000
Summary:
This show presented photographs and photo media based art work produced by black photographers from 1840 to the present. The images in the exhibition form a technical history of the medium as well as a pictorial history of African Americans. Curated by Deborah Willis , the show was exhibited at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building, South Gallery from February 4 to June 30, 2000.
Scope and Contents note:
These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, exhibit scripts, administrative records, exhibit layouts and brochures.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American photographers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Photographers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Photocopies
Exhibit scripts
Slides (photographs)
Brochures
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Correspondence
Citation:
Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the Present exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-004
See more items in:
Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the Present exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa778a6aad7-b85f-41ab-8c22-c5a8371b1e45
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-004

Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the present audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
3 Video recordings (VHS 1/2" video recordings)
4 Sound recordings (Audio cassette sound recordings)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Date:
2000
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual Materials related to an exhibit on African American photographers held a the Art and Industries Building February 4, 2000 - July 16, 2000. The exhibit featured more than 300 images by 120 leading African American photographers that document
Provenance:
This exhibit was created by the Center for African American History and Culture, a Smithsonian Initiative which operated in the 1990s before merging with the Anacostia Museum.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American photographers  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the present audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-004, Series ACMA AV03-004
See more items in:
Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the Present exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa74a6ca3d5-e611-4b42-a3d2-90dd8c8d532a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-004-ref520

Reflections in Black: Exhibition Opening and Reception

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2000
Scope and Contents:
Opening of the exhibition 'Reflections in Black: African American Photography: 1840 to the Present' at the Anacostia Museum on February 3, 2000. Speakers included Steven Newsome, Larry Small, Debbi Jarvis, Linda Sullivan, and Sandra Allen. Reception and concert of doo-wop music followed the speeches.
Reception. Audio only. Related to exhibition 'Reflections in Black: African American Photography: 1840 to the Present.' Dated 20000203.
Biographical / Historical:
Reflections in Black: African American Photography: 1840 to the Present examined how, throughout history, black photographers have played a central role in influencing how African Americans visualized themselves. The exhibition was presented as a series of three thematic sections: The First One Hundred Years, 1842-1942, Art and Activism, and A History Deconstructed. It was held at the Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture from February 4 - June 30, 2000.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001922_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Photographers  Search this
African American photographers  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Music  Search this
Doo-wop (Music)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Reflections in Black: Exhibition Opening and Reception, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-004, Item ACMA AV001922_A
See more items in:
Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the Present exhibition records
Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the Present exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-004: Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers, 1840 to the present audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa793e5018c-8b78-45e3-bdbd-643b6afa1cb4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-004-ref521

Equal Rights and Justice: Reflections on Rights exhibition records

Creator:
High Museum of Art  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
High Museum of Art  Search this
Chin, Mel, 1951-  Search this
Jaar, Alfredo  Search this
Extent:
2.42 Linear feet (5 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibition records
Brochures
Catalogues
Correspondence
Compact discs
Exhibit scripts
Photocopies
Photographs
Slides
Transcripts
Videotapes
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1995
Scope and Contents:
An exhibition organized by the High Museum of Art and the National Black Arts Festival, Atlanta Georgia and presented to the Washington, D.C. area by the Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture. The exhibit was held at the Arts and Industries Building, Smithsonian Institution September 22, 1995 through March 03, 1996 and featured contemporary artwork inspired by the events and history of the Civil Rights Movement. Artists of the exhibit include: Radcliffe Baily, Mel Chin, Marie Cochran, Ellen Driscoll, Alfredo Jaar, Jin Soo Kim, Joe Lewis, Glenn Ligon, May Sun, Frances Torres and Carrie Mae Weems.
These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, exhibit scripts, administrative records, exhibit layouts, brochure, Interview transcripts, press releases, and grant proposals.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Brochures
Catalogues
Correspondence
Compact discs
Exhibit scripts
Photocopies
Photographs
Slides
Transcripts
Videotapes
Identifier:
ACMA.03-034
See more items in:
Equal Rights and Justice: Reflections on Rights exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa78933058f-d660-45e6-a9cc-16cfd34b9212
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-034
Online Media:

Equal Rights and Justice: Reflections on Rights audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Rivera, Dennis Mario  Search this
Collection Creator:
High Museum of Art  Search this
Extent:
10 Video recordings (5 Betacam SP video recordings ; 1 U-matic 3/4" video recording ; 4 VHS 1/2" video recordings)
0.5 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Date:
1994-1995
bulk 1995-1995
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual materials created for an exhibition on the struggle for equal rights that was exhibited in the Arts and Industries Building, Smithsonian Institution, from September 22, 1995 to March 3, 1996. This collection contains the audiovisual output of the exhibit, including video interviews on the topic and compilation tapes used within the exhibit.
Provenance:
This exhibit was created by the Center for African American History and Culture, a Smithsonian Initiative which operated in the 1990s before merging with the Anacostia Museum.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
Equal Rights and Justice: Reflections on Rights audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-034, Series ACMA AV03-034
See more items in:
Equal Rights and Justice: Reflections on Rights exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa71c1ae75f-8622-47ee-a499-d268a08fa8c5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-034-ref1

Dr. Cornel West Lecture

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
West, Cornel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States -- Politics and government
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
In coordination with the exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life,' Dr. Cornel West spoke about the crisis in America as it relates to people who suffer, of all colors, of all faiths, and of all political persuasions. He stressed the importance of gathering community builders and provided guidance on 'reinventing ourselves, our public institutions and our communities.' West spoke of the truth or lack of truth in America; democracy in America; political and economic reform; and getting to the deep, hidden truths about America and its legacy, including white supremacy, male supremacy, wealth inequality. Specifically, he talked about how to restructure U.S. economy; the role of media and corporations; churches and faith-based communities; new social order; the loss, or lack, of dignity; and the Democratic Party's disconnect with the African American community. This lecture and conversation took place post-election cycle and a few weeks after the release of his and Roberto Unger's book, 'The Future of American Progressivism.'
Lecture/conversation. Audio only. Related to 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life' exhibition. Dated 19981105.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001925_A

ACMA AV001925_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Economics  Search this
Political science  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Democracy  Search this
Equality  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Dr. Cornel West Lecture, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Item ACMA AV001924
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa75164e4d5-7f18-4e0e-a5aa-e5d1fdd84aef
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref153

Speak to My Heart: Recording Session at Bible Way Temple

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Musical recording session at Bible Way Temple, located in northwest Washington, D.C., to create CD of religious music. Contents include First Fruits, Cureton Family, and Bible Way Choir.
Music. Related to Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life. Dated 19980423.
Biographical / Historical:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life examined the faith and spiritual traditions in African American religious life in the 1990s. The exhibition featured members of Christian churches as well as those of other faiths. Special attention was given to the ways that African American congregations were responding to contemporary challenges affecting their families, neighborhoods, and communities. The exhibition was developed by the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, and held at The Arts and Industries Building, North Gallery, 900 Jefferson Street, SW, Washington, D.C. from February 1998 to August 1999.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002234
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Choirs (Music)  Search this
Spirituals  Search this
Gospel music  Search this
Church music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Speak to My Heart: Recording Session at Bible Way Temple, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Item ACMA AV002233
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-037: Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7bec117af-6832-4db2-933b-c5173f9b0042
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref653

Speak To My Heart: Exhibition Talk with Gail S. Lowe, Ph.D

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1996
Scope and Contents:
Gail S. Lowe, Ph.D. talked about the center of African American life and community - the Black Chruch. She detailed the significance and work of the Black Church in communities, and provided an introduction to the upcoming exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life.' Lowe discussed each section of the exhibition, and the types of materials and information the museum planned to include in the exhibit. The talk was part of a meeting for the Friends for the Preservation of African American History and Culture.
Exhibition talk. Related to exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life.' Dated 19961016.
Biographical / Historical:
'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life' examined the faith and spiritual traditions in African American religious life in the 1990s. The exhibition featured members of Christian churches as well as those of other faiths. Special attention was given to the ways that African American congregations were responding to contemporary challenges affecting their families, neighborhoods, and communities. The exhibition was developed by the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, and held at The Arts and Industries Building, North Gallery, 900 Jefferson Street, SW, Washington, D.C. from February 1998 to August 1999.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Churches  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Communities  Search this
Religion  Search this
Spirituality  Search this
Choirs (Music)  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Speak To My Heart: Exhibition Talk with Gail S. Lowe, Ph.D., Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Item ACMA AV001049
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-037: Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7a2a132f6-1fd7-4e06-9f96-9991c23da606
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref654

Speak To My Heart: Exhibition Tour

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Gail Lowe led a tour of the exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life.'
Exhibition tour. Related to Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life. Dated 19981006.
Biographical / Historical:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life examined the faith and spiritual traditions in African American religious life in the 1990s. The exhibition featured members of Christian churches as well as those of other faiths. Special attention was given to the ways that African American congregations were responding to contemporary challenges affecting their families, neighborhoods, and communities. The exhibition was developed by the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, and held at The Arts and Industries Building, North Gallery, 900 Jefferson Street, SW, Washington, D.C. from February 1998 to August 1999.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Churches  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Religion  Search this
Spirituality  Search this
Choirs (Music)  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Speak To My Heart: Exhibition Tour, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Item ACMA AV002190
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-037: Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa78e42c9cd-3e8e-4ba6-824c-d1062bed2d34
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref655

Empowerment Poetry with Cherie Ward and Community Arts Experience with Life Pieces to Masterpieces

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1999
Scope and Contents:
Cherie Ward performs her empowerment poetry. Community arts experience performed by Life Pieces to Masterpieces, a nonprofit arts organization for boys so they can experience love, security and expression by telling their stories through poetry, song, dance, and art. In addition to performing, the boys explain the principles of Life Pieces to Masterpieces, and what they have learned through the program.
Poetry, and music and dance performances. Audio only. Related to exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life.' Dated 19990803.
Biographical / Historical:
'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life' examined the faith and spiritual traditions in African American religious life in the 1990s. The exhibition featured members of Christian churches as well as those of other faiths. Special attention was given to the ways that African American congregations were responding to contemporary challenges affecting their families, neighborhoods, and communities. The exhibition was developed by the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, and held at The Arts and Industries Building, North Gallery, 900 Jefferson Street, SW, Washington, D.C. from February 1998 to August 1999.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001934_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women poets  Search this
Poetry  Search this
African American youth  Search this
Youth  Search this
African Americans in the performing arts  Search this
Community arts projects  Search this
Spirituality  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Empowerment Poetry with Cherie Ward and Community Arts Experience with Life Pieces to Masterpieces, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Item ACMA AV001934_A
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-037: Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f7fc4c28-65b3-4010-9b3b-e6609b1b143e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref656

Scooter Magruder Show: Interview on Beverly Lindsay

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2000
Scope and Contents:
Scooter Magruder interviewed Beverly Lindsay, who spoke of her film 'Swing, Bop & Hand Dance' and her current project about Teenarama, including information about the hand dance reenactment necessary for the documentary production.
Radio program. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 20000312.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Scooter Magruder Show: Interview on Beverly Lindsay, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005300
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c9f57af7-3123-4d6c-9eb6-db6b75a66ff4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref320

WPFW 89.3: Interview with Arthur Crier

Creator:
WPFW (Radio station : Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
New York (N.Y.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1998
Scope and Contents:
Arthur Crier talked about the upcoming event 'Salute to the Pioneers of Rhythm and Blues, and Doo-Wop Presentation at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem' in which Doo-Wop and Rhythm and Blues artists from 1940s and early 60s will pose for a historical photograph in New York City. The photograph donated to Schomburg Center and Smithsonian Center for African American History and Culture. Crier also talked about Doo-Wop music; and Doo-Wop music was played throughout the program.
Radio Program. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19981109.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Musicians  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Doo-wop (Music)  Search this
Rhythm and blues music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
WPFW 89.3: Interview with Arthur Crier, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005302_B
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f043bb73-a522-4df5-8f27-5497300a76ae
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref387

Mercer Film

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (BetaSP)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1995
Scope and Contents:
Footage of a gathering of African Americans, presumably a family, playing and conversing in a yard; landscapes while walking through a city and traveling on a train; football, basketball, and volleyball games in a park or similar area (water nearby); and a gathering for a picnic at a park or similar area.
Home movie footage. 8mm film to Beta transfer (poor quality transfer). Sound of film projector and 2 people talking about Teenarama over images. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005287
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Family  Search this
Recreation  Search this
Leisure  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Mercer Film, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005286
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7493bd111-2d8e-4603-a1da-ff68678b6f69
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref409

Teenarama Reunion Committee Meeting

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
On April 2, 1998, the Teenarama Reunion Committee held a production meeting for the planning of the Teenarama reunion as well as the documentary. Discussion included locating information about how WOOK radio and WOOK TV were perceived; the challenges involved in locating any information about WOOK; interviews to be conducted by humanities scholar Katrina Hazzard-Donald, Ph.D. to understand the events of the United States during the Teenarama era; and finding out if white teenagers wanted to be on the Teenarama show and why. One of the members stated a list of events which occurred during the Teenarama era; and there was discussion about segregation in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area in the 1960s, the Civil Rights Movement, Washington, D.C. as a community sheltered from the activism which occurred in cities, and how white people were different in Washington, D.C. in comparison to other cities. The committee also talked about music of the time and the Ed Sullivan show; various types of dances on Teenarama; D.C. hand dancing compared to hand dancing in other cities; and watching dancers at the Eclipse.
Meeting. Poor audio quality. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19980402.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005290_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama Reunion Committee Meeting, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005290_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa760abccc5-5bc6-48ef-92e3-07f319430b02
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref711

The Teenarama Dance Party 35th Anniversary Reunion Gala

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
The Teenarama Dance Party 35th Anniversary Reunion Gala was held on October 10, 1998 at the Eclipse Nightclub. The gala consisted of music from the Teenarama era, performances by the Teenarama Dance Party regulars, a reenactment of the Teenarama television program, and a dance party. The proceeds from the gala benefited the making of the Teenarama documentary.
Celebration - dance and music. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Timecode burnt into image. Dated 19981010.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
The Teenarama Dance Party 35th Anniversary Reunion Gala, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005284
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa78bb14821-e8a9-4fed-9c7d-93cb10a04458
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref712

Teenarama: Interviews with Donald Thoms and Arlene Kozak

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Baltimore (Md.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1998
Scope and Contents:
Donald Thoms, a former performer on 'The Buddy Dean Show,' explained how he became a teenage dancer on the show; how people in his school and neighborhood reacted to his participation in the show; and his feelings about the segregation practices of the show. Arlene Kozak spoke about Buddy Dean, 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and her role as a producer for the show. She explained how the teenagers were selected for the show, the segregation of the show, and the social interaction between white teens and black teens. Additionally, she discussed television station's (WJZ-Baltimore) reaction to the possibility of integrating 'The Buddy Dean Show.' The interviews were part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.' After the interviews, there is footage of production materials related to the film 'Hairspray' and exterior shots of The Senator in Baltimore, Maryland.
Interviews and b-roll footage. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Timecode burnt into image. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interviews with Donald Thoms and Arlene Kozak, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005285
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7e35a0c17-a3e7-4b27-a9e7-e6a2498b8e08
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref713

Teenarama: Interview with Mike and Donna Leake

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1999
Scope and Contents:
Mike and Donna Leake talked about their experience as performers on 'The Teenarama Dance Party.' The couple discussed how they gained access to the show; why they were a part of the show; how they met; how long they have been married; and whether or not they reminsce about their days performing on the Teenarama television show. The interviews were part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.'
Interviews. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Physical asset: undated. Contents of recording: dated 19990203.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005298_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interviews with Mike and Donna Leake, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005298_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa76798426b-6e2c-4009-9c57-0d1f23824436
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref714

Teenarama: Interview with Reginald 'Lucky' Luckett

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Reginald 'Lucky' Luckett, also known as Reggie, and Beverly Lindsay-Johnson discussed line dance, particularly as related to African culture and religion; song writers as prophets of their day; and how girls and boys, and women and men related to each other in the 1960s and the 1990s in regards to dancing and dating. Luckett spoke about how he developed social skills as a result of being a part of Teenarama, his fascination with and learning about the production of the show, his leadership role of screening the teenagers before they entered the studio prior to the taping of the show, the regular dancers on the show, and working with host Bob King. The interview was part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.'
Interviews. Poor audio quality. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19980520.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005299_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interviews with Reginald 'Lucky' Luckett, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005299_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa760bb7fb5-20fc-4012-b516-5395295910eb
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref715

Teenarama: Interview with Gene Chandler

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
During an interview with Beverly Lindsay-Johnson, singer and songwriter Gene Chandler, also known as 'The Duke of Earl' or 'The Duke,' spoke about the importance of the 1960 teenage dance shows to the beginning of his career and exposing his music to a wider audience, particularly nationally on American Bandstand; the differences when performing at Howard Theater, the Apollo Theater, and the Regal Theater; and his views on race and opportunity. The interview was part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.'
Interview. Audio only. Poor audio quality. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19980523.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interview with Gene Chandler, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005292_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa79dd2f853-d8bd-4d42-b4ee-d55da2395278
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref716

Teenarama: Interview with Joe King

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
During an interview with Beverly Lindsay-Johnson, Joe King, born and raised in southeast Washington, D.C., talked about his experiences growing up in a working class, ethnically mixed neighborhood in southeast Washington, D.C. where 'there was no complete segregation.' King explained when and how he learned to dance, specifically hand dancing; his experience attending ethnically mixed parties hosted by blacks and whites; and the differences in the way people danced based on where they lived. He also spoke of his experience dancing on the Milt Grant Show; his thoughts about The Teenarama Dance Party as a viewer at home; and dance competitions. The interview was part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.'
Interviews. Poor audio quality. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19980618.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005295_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interview with Joe King, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005295_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7e9c801a4-bb2c-4412-bddc-ed63b2a9bc22
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref717

Modify Your Search







or


Narrow By