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Duke Ellington Collection

Collector:
Musical History, Division of (NMAH, SI)  Search this
Musical History, Division of (NMAH, SI)  Search this
Creator:
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Names:
Duke Ellington Orchestra  Search this
Washingtonians, The.  Search this
Ellington, Mercer Kennedy, 1919-1996 (musician)  Search this
Strayhorn, Billy (William Thomas), 1915-1967  Search this
Extent:
400 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Phonograph records
Papers
Photographic prints
Posters
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Music
Clippings
Awards
Audiotapes
Place:
New York (N.Y.) -- 20th century
Harlem (New York, N.Y.) -- 20th century
Washington (D.C.) -- 20th century
Date:
1903 - 1989
Summary:
The collection documents Duke Ellington's career primarily through orchestrations (scores and parts), music manuscripts, lead sheets, transcriptions, and sheet music. It also includes concert posters, concert programs, television, radio, motion picture and musical theater scripts, business records, correspondence, awards, as well as audiotapes, audiodiscs, photographs, tour itineraries, newspaper clippings, magazines, caricatures, paintings, and scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents:
Dating approximately from the time Duke Ellington permanently moved to New York City in 1923 to the time the material was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution in 1988, the bulk of the material in the Duke Ellington Collection is dated from 1934-1974 and comprises sound recordings, original music manuscripts and published sheet music, hand-written notes, correspondence, business records, photographs, scrapbooks, news clippings, concert programs, posters, pamphlets, books and other ephemera. These materials document Ellington's contributions as composer, musician, orchestra leader, and an ambassador of American music and culture abroad. In addition, the materials paint a picture of the life of a big band maintained for fifty years and open a unique window through which to view an evolving American society.

The approximate four hundred cubic feet of archival materials have been processed and organized into sixteen series arranged by type of material. Several of the series have been divided into subseries allowing additional organization to describe the content of the material. For example, Series 6, Sound Recordings, is divided into four subseries: Radio and Television Interviews, Concert Performances, Studio Dates and Non-Ellington Recordings. Each series has its own scope and content note describing the material and arrangement (for example; Series 10, Magazines and Newspaper Articles, is organized into two groups, foreign and domestic, and arranged chronologically within each group). A container list provides folder titles and box numbers.

The bulk of the material is located in Series 1, Music Manuscripts, and consists of compositions and arrangements by Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn and other composers. Series 6, Sound Recordings also provides a record of the performance of many of these compositions. The materials in Series 2, Performances and Programs, Series 3, Business Records, Series 8, Scrapbooks, Series 9, Newspaper Clippings, Series 11, Publicity and Series 12, Posters provide documentation of specific performances by Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Ellington was a spontaneous and prolific composer as evidenced by music, lyrical thoughts, and themes for extended works and plays captured on letterhead stationery in Series 3, Business Records, in the margin notes of individual books and pamphlets in Series 14, Religious Materials and Series 15, Books, and in the hand-written notes in Series 5, Personal Correspondence and Notes.

During its fifty-year lifespan, Duke Ellington and His Orchestra were billed under various names including The Washingtonians, The Harlem Footwarmers and The Jungle Band. The soloists were informally called "the band", and Series 3 includes salary statements, IOU's, receipts and ephemera relating to individual band members. Series 1, Music Manuscripts contains the soloists' parts and includes "band books" of several soloists (for example; Harry Carney and Johnny Hodges) and numerous music manuscripts of Billy Strayhorn. The changing role of Strayhorn from arranger hired in 1938 to Ellington's main collaborator and composer of many well-known titles for Duke Ellington and His Orchestra including "Take The A' Train" and "Satin Doll" can be traced in these music manuscripts. Series 7, Photographs and Series 2, Performances and Programs contain many images of the band members and Strayhorn. This Collection also documents the business history of Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Series 3, Business Records contains correspondence on letterhead stationery and Series 11, Publicity contains promotional material from the various booking agencies, professional companies, and public relations firms that managed the Orchestra.

The materials in the Duke Ellington Collection provide insight into public and institutional attitudes towards African Americans in mid-twentieth-century America. The business records in Series 3 beginning in 1938 and published sheet music in Series 1 depict Duke Ellington's progression from an African-American musician who needed "legitimization" by a white publisher, Irving Mills, to a businessmen who established his own companies including Tempo Music and Duke Ellington, Incorporated to control his copyright and financial affairs. Programs from the segregated Cotton Club in Series 2, Performances And Programs and contracts with no-segregation clauses in Series 3: Business Records further illustrate racial policies and practices in this time period. The public shift in perception of Duke Ellington from a leader of an exotic "Jungle Band" in the 1930s to a recipient of the Congressional Medal Of Freedom in 1970 is evidenced in Series 2, Performances And Programs, Series 12, Posters, Series 7, Photographs and Series 13, Awards. Reviews and articles reflecting Ellington's evolving status are also documented in Series 8, Newspaper Clippings, Series 9, Scrapbooks, Series 10, Newspaper and Magazine Articles.

The materials in the Duke Ellington Collection reflect rapid technological changes in American society from 1923-1982. Sound recordings in Series 6 range from 78 phonograph records of three minutes duration manufactured for play on Victrolas in monaural sound to long-playing (LP) phonograph records produced for stereo record players. Television scripts in Series 4, programs in Series 2 and music manuscripts (for example, Drum Is A Woman) in Series 1 demonstrate how the development of television as a means of mass communication spread the Orchestra's sound to a wider audience. The availability of commercial air travel enabled the Ellington Orchestra to extend their international performances from Europe to other continents including tours to Asia, Africa, South America and Australia and archival material from these tours is included in every series.

Series 4, Scripts and Transcripts and Series 6, Audio Recordings contain scripts and radio performances promoting the sale of United States War bonds during World War II, and Series 7, Photographs includes many images of Duke Ellington and His Orchestra's performances for military personnel revealing the impact of historic events on Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Series 2: Programs and Performances, Series 9, Newspaper clippings and Series 8, Scrapbooks document the 1963 Far East tour aborted as a result of President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

The Duke Ellington Collection contains works by numerous twentieth-century music, literature, and art luminaries. Series 1, Music Manuscripts contains original music manuscripts of William Grant Still, Eubie Blake, Mary Lou Williams, and others. Series 4, Scripts and Transcripts contains a play by Langston Hughes, and Series 12, Posters contains many original artworks.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Music Manuscripts, circa 1930-1981, undated

Series 2: Performances and Programs, 1933-1973, undated

Series 3: Business Records, 1938-1988

Series 4: Scripts and Transcripts, 1937-1970

Series 5: Personal Correspondence and Notes, 1941-1974, undated

Series 6: Sound Recordings, 1927-1974

Series 7: Photographs, 1924-1972, undated

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1931-1973

Series 9: Newspaper Clippings, 1939-1973, undated

Series 10: Magazine Articles and Newspaper Clippings, 1940-1974

Series 11: Publicity, 1935-1988

Series 12: Posters and Oversize Graphics, 1933-1989, undated

Series 13: Awards, 1939-1982

Series 14: Religious Material, 1928-1974

Series 15: Books, 1903-1980

Series 16: Miscellaneous, 1940-1974
Biographical / Historical:
A native of Washington, DC, Edward Kennedy Ellington was born on April 29, 1899. Edward was raised in a middle-class home in the Northwest section of Washington described by his sister Ruth--younger by sixteen years--as a "house full of love." Ellington himself wrote that his father J.E. (James Edward) raised his family "as though he were a millionaire" but Edward was especially devoted to his mother, Daisy Kennedy Ellington. In 1969, thirty-four years after his mother's death, Ellington accepted the Presidential Medal of Freedom with these words, "There is nowhere else I would rather be tonight but in my mother's arms." Both his parents played the piano and Ellington began piano lessons at the age of seven, but like many boys he was easily distracted by baseball.

In his early teens, Ellington sneaked into Washington clubs and performance halls where he was exposed to ragtime musicians, including James P. Johnson, and where he met people from all walks of life. He returned in earnest to his piano studies, and at age fourteen wrote his first composition, "Soda Fountain Rag" also known as "Poodle Dog Rag." Ellington was earning income from playing music at seventeen years of age, and around this time he earned the sobriquet "Duke" for his sartorial splendor and regal air. On July 2, 1918, he married a high school sweetheart, Edna Thompson; their only child, Mercer Kennedy Ellington, was born on March 11, 1919. Duke Ellington spent the first twenty-four years of his life in Washington's culturally thriving Negro community. In this vibrant atmosphere he was inspired to be a composer and learned to take pride in his African-American heritage.

Ellington moved to New York City in 1923 to join and eventually lead a small group of transplanted Washington musicians called "The Washingtonians," which included future Ellington band members, Sonny Greer, Otto Hardwicke and "Bubber" Miley. Between 1923 and 1927, the group played at the Club Kentucky on Broadway and the ensemble increased from a quintet to a ten-piece orchestra. With stride pianist Willie "The Lion" Smith as his unofficial guide, Ellington soon became part of New York's music scene; Smith proved to be a long-lasting influence on Duke's composing and arranging direction. At the Club Kentucky, Ellington came under the tutelage of another legendary stride pianist, "Fats" Waller. Waller, a protege of Johnson and Smith, played solos during the band's breaks and also tutored Ellington who began to show progress in his compositions. In November 1924, Duke made his publishing and recording debut with "Choo Choo (I Got To Hurry Home)" released on the Blu-Disc label. In 1925, he contributed two songs to Chocolate Kiddies, an all-black revue which introduced European audiences to black American styles and performers. By this time Ellington's family, Edna and Mercer, had joined him in New York City. The couple separated in the late 1920's, but they never divorced or reconciled.

Ellington's achievements as a composer and bandleader began to attract national attention while he worked at the Cotton Club in Harlem, New York City, from 1927 to 1932. The orchestra developed a distinctive sound that displayed the non-traditional voicings of Ellington's arrangements and featured the unique talents of the individual soloists. Ellington integrated his soloists' exotic-sounding trombone growls and wah-wahs, their high-squealed trumpets, their sultry saxophone blues licks and Harlem's street rhythms into his arrangements. In the promotional material of the Cotton Club, the band was often billed as "Duke Ellington and His Jungle Band." With the success of compositions like "Mood Indigo," and an increasing number of recordings and national radio broadcasts from the Cotton Club, the band's reputation soared.

The ten years from 1932 to 1942 are considered by some major critics to represent the "golden age" for the Ellington Orchestra, but it represents just one of their creative peaks. These years did bring an influx of extraordinary new talent to the band including Jimmy Blanton on double bass, Ben Webster on tenor saxophone, and Ray Nance on trumpet, violin and vocals. During this ten year span Ellington composed several of his best known short works, including "Concerto For Cootie," "Ko-Ko," "Cotton Tail," "In A Sentimental Mood," and Jump For Joy, his first full-length musical stage revue.

Most notably, 1938 marked the arrival of Billy Strayhorn. While a teenager in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Strayhorn had already written "Lush Life," "Something To Live For" and a musical, Fantastic Rhythm. Ellington was initially impressed with Strayhorn's lyrics but realized long before Billy's composition "Take the A' Train" became the band's theme song in 1942 that Strayhorn's talents were not limited to penning clever lyrics. By 1942, "Swee' Pea" had become arranger, composer, second pianist, collaborator, and as Duke described him, "my right arm, my left arm, all the eyes in the back of my head, my brain waves in his head, and his in mine." Many Ellington/Strayhorn songs have entered the jazz canon, and their extended works are still being discovered and studied today. Strayhorn remained with the Ellington Organization until his death on May 30, 1967.

Ellington had often hinted of a work in progress depicting the struggle of blacks in America. The original script, Boola, debuted in Carnegie Hall in November of 1943, retitled Black, Brown and Beige. The performance met with mixed reviews, and although Ellington often returned to Carnegie Hall the piece was never recorded in a studio, and after 1944 was never performed in entirety again by the Ellington Orchestra. Nonetheless, it is now considered a milestone in jazz composition.

After World War II the mood and musical tastes of the country shifted and hard times befell big bands, but Ellington kept his band together. The band was not always financially self-sufficient and during the lean times Ellington used his songwriting royalties to meet the soloists' salaries. One could assign to Ellington the altruistic motive of loyalty to his sidemen, but another motivation may have been his compositional style which was rooted in hearing his music in the formative stage come alive in rehearsal. "The band was his instrument," Billy Strayhorn said, and no Ellington composition was complete until he heard the orchestra play it. Then he could fine tune his compositions, omit and augment passages, or weave a soloist's contribution into the structure of the tune.

In 1956, the American public rediscovered Duke and the band at the Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island. The searing performances of tenor saxophonist Paul Gonsalves on "Diminuendo and Crescendo In Blue," his premiere soloist, alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges on "Jeep's Blues", and the crowd's ecstatic reaction have become jazz legend. Later that year Duke landed on the cover of Time magazine. Although Ellington had previously written music for film and television (including the short film, Black and Tan Fantasy in 1929) it wasn't until 1959 that Otto Preminger asked him to score music for his mainstream film, Anatomy of a Murder, starring Jimmy Stewart. Paris Blues in 1961, featuring box-office stars Paul Newman and Sidney Poitier in roles as American jazz musicians in Paris, followed.

Ellington's first performance overseas was in England in 1933, but the 1960s brought extensive overseas tours including diplomatic tours sponsored by the State Department. Ellington and Strayhorn composed exquisite extended works reflecting the sights and sounds of their travels, including the Far East Suite, 1966. They wrote homages to their classical influences; in 1963, they adapted Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker Suite and celebrated Shakespeare's works with the suite Such Sweet Thunder in 1957. With Ella Fitzgerald, they continued the Norman Granz Songbook Series. Ellington also began to flex his considerable pianist skills and recorded albums with John Coltrane (1963), Coleman Hawkins (1963), Frank Sinatra, and Money Jungle (1963) with Charles Mingus and Max Roach. The First Sacred Concert debuted in San Francisco's Grace Cathedral in 1965. In his final years, Ellington's thoughts turned to spiritual themes and he added a Second (1968) and Third (1973) Concert of Sacred Music to his compositions.

In his lifetime, Duke received numerous awards and honors including the highest honor bestowed on an American civilian, the Congressional Medal Of Freedom. In 1965, Ellington was recommended for a Pulitzer Prize to honor his forty years of contribution to music but the recommendation was rejected by the board. Most likely he was disappointed, but his response at the age of sixty-six was, "Fate is being kind to me. Fate doesn't want me to be famous too young."

Ellington never rested on his laurels or stopped composing. Whenever he was asked to name his favorite compositions his characteristic reply was "the next five coming up," but to please his loyal fans Ellington always featured some of his standards in every performance. Even on his deathbed, he was composing the opera buffo called Queenie Pie.

Duke Ellington died on May 24, 1974 at seventy-five years of age. His funeral was held in New York's Cathedral of St. John The Divine; he was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery. His long-time companion Beatrice "Evie" Ellis was buried beside him after her death in 1976. He was survived by his only child, Mercer Kennedy Ellington, who not only took up the baton to lead the Duke Ellington Orchestra but assumed the task of caring for his father's papers and his legacy to the nation. Mercer Ellington died in Copenhagan, Denmark on February 8, 1996, at the age of seventy-six. Ruth Ellington Boatwright died in New York on March 6, 2004, at the age of eighty-eight. Both Mercer and Ruth were responsible for shepherding the documents and artifacts that celebrate Duke Ellington's genius and creative life to their current home in the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

William H. Quealy Collection of Duke Ellington Recordings (AC0296)

Rutgers University Collection of Radio Interviews about Duke Ellington (AC0328)

Duke Ellington Oral History Project (AC0368)

Duke Ellington Collection of Ephemera and realated Audiovisual Materials (AC0386)

Annual International Conference of the Duke Ellington Study Group Proceedings (AC0385)

Robert Udkoff Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0388)

Frank Driggs Collection of Duke Ellington Photographic Prints (AC0389)

New York Chapter of the Duke Ellington Society Collection (AC390)

Earl Okin Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0391)

William Russo Transcription and Arrangement of Duke Ellington's First Concert of Sacred Music (AC0406)

Ruth Ellington Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0415)

Music manuscripts in the Ruth Ellington Collection complement the music manuscripts found in the Duke Ellington Collection.

Carter Harman Collection of Interviews with Duke Ellington (AC0422)

Betty McGettigan Collection of Duke Ellington Memorabilia (AC0494)

Dr. Theodore Shell Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0502)

Edward and Gaye Ellington Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0704)

Andrew Homzy Collection of Duke Ellington Stock Music Arrangements (AC0740)

John Gensel Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0763)

Al Celley Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC1240)

Materials at Other Organizations

Institute of Jazz Studies
Separated Materials:
Artifacts related to this collection are in the Division of Culture and the Arts and include trophies, plaques, and medals. See accessions: 1989.0369; 1991.0808; 1993.0032; and 1999.0148.
Provenance:
The collection was purchased through an appropriation of Congress in 1988.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.

Copyright restrictions. Consult the Archives Center at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.

Paul Ellington, executor, is represented by:

Richard J.J. Scarola, Scarola Ellis LLP, 888 Seventh Avenue, 45th Floor, New York, New York 10106. Telephone (212) 757-0007 x 235; Fax (212) 757-0469; email: rjjs@selaw.com; www.selaw.com; www.ourlawfirm.com.
Occupation:
Composers -- 20th century  Search this
Topic:
Big bands  Search this
Pianists  Search this
Bandsmen -- 20th century  Search this
Jazz -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Musicians -- 20th century  Search this
Music -- Performance  Search this
African American entertainers -- 20th century  Search this
African Americans -- History  Search this
Popular music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Phonograph records
Papers
Photographic prints
Posters
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Music -- Manuscripts
Clippings
Awards
Audiotapes
Citation:
Duke Ellington Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0301
See more items in:
Duke Ellington Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0301
Online Media:

Catherine Burt vertical file on black women

Creator:
Burt, Catherine  Search this
Names:
Alexander, Sadie Tanner Mossell, 1898-1989  Search this
Bethune, Mary McLeod, 1875-1955  Search this
Brooks, Gwendolyn, 1917-2000  Search this
Cobb, Jewel Plummer, 1924-  Search this
Coppin, Fanny Jackson  Search this
Davis, Angela Y. (Angela Yvonne), 1944-  Search this
Dunham, Katherine  Search this
Harper, Frances Ellen Watkins, 1825-1911  Search this
Lee, Jarena, b. 1783  Search this
Parks, Rosa, 1913-2005  Search this
Parsons, Lucy E. (Lucy Eldine), 1853-1942  Search this
Powers, Harriet, 1837-1911  Search this
Rudolph, Wilma, 1940-  Search this
Smith, Bessie, 1894-1937  Search this
Truth, Sojourner, d. 1883  Search this
Tubman, Harriet, 1820?-1913  Search this
Walker, Alice, 1944-  Search this
Walker, Maggie  Search this
Wells-Barnett, Ida B., 1862-1931  Search this
Wright, Jane Cooke., Dr., 1919-  Search this
Extent:
1.42 Linear feet ((2 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Articles
Photocopies
Correspondence
Pamphlets
Brochures
Clippings
Date:
circa 1980s
Summary:
The collection, which dates from the 1980s and measures 1.42 linear feet, was compiled in the course of preparations for the "Black Women: Achievements Against the Odds" exhibit, which was staged at the Anacostia Museum from February 1976 to December 1976. This collection documents the lives and achievements of African American women in a variety of fields, including law, medicine, education, politics, science and the arts. The collection is comprised of documents, magazine and newspaper clippings, correspondence, photocopies, brochures and pamphlets.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American women educators  Search this
African American women jazz singers  Search this
African American women executives  Search this
African American women journalists  Search this
African American clergy  Search this
African American abolitionists  Search this
African American women artists  Search this
African American women athletes  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
African American women civil rights workers  Search this
African American women scientists  Search this
African American women political activists  Search this
African American women poets  Search this
African American women physicians  Search this
African American women librarians  Search this
African American women legislators  Search this
African American women lawyers  Search this
African American women judges  Search this
African American women singers  Search this
African American women social reformers  Search this
Women clergy  Search this
African American soldiers  Search this
African American women  Search this
African American women entertainers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Articles
Photocopies
Correspondence
Pamphlets
Brochures
Clippings
Citation:
Catherine Burt vertical file on Black women, circa 1980s, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Catherine Burt.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-065
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-065

The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
James, Portia P.  Search this
Extent:
3.52 Linear feet (6 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Exhibit scripts
Contact sheets
Catalogs
Correspondence
Photographic prints
Exhibition records
Date:
1989-05 - 1990-05
Summary:
An exhibition on African American inventors and innovators, from prominent figures such as the 19th century inventor Elijah McCoy to the anonymous men and women who made important contributions to the development of American technology. The show was curated by Portia James and organized by the Anacostia Museum. It was held at the museum from May 1989 --May 1990. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials created for the exhibition by Anacostia Community Museum.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American inventors  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Exhibit scripts
Contact sheets
Catalogs
Correspondence
Photographic prints
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Citation:
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-026
See more items in:
The Real McCoy: Afro-American invention and innovation, 1619-1930 exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-026
Online Media:

Southern city, national ambition: the growth of early Washington, D.C., 1800- 1860 exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Octagon (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Rice, Kym S.  Search this
Extent:
# linear feet (# boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Catalogs
Exhibition records
Brochures
Exhibit scripts
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- History -- Exhibitions
Date:
1995-10-15 - 1996-03-03
Summary:
A collaborative exhibit between the Anacostia Museum and the Octagon Museum that tells the story of the early years of the District of Columbia, the people, and their communities. The exhibition was held between the two museums from October 15, 1995 to March 3, 1996 and curated by Kym S. Rice. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, artifact lists, education packets, loan agreements, and catalogues.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Catalogs
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Brochures
Exhibit scripts
Citation:
Southern city, national ambition: the growth of early Washington, D.C., 1800- 1860 exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-017
See more items in:
Southern city, national ambition: the growth of early Washington, D.C., 1800- 1860 exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-017

Southern City, National Ambition: Walk Thru Tours and Opening Reception

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1995
Scope and Contents:
Walk thru tours, led by Kym Rice, for the exhibition 'Southern City, National Ambition: The Growth of Washington, D.C., 1800-1860.' Tours were given to docents as part of their training. Steven Newsome and others spoke at the opening of the exhibition; speeches followed by a reception.
Exhibition Tour and Exhibition Opening. Related to exhibition 'Southern City, National Ambition: The Growth of Washington, D.C., 1800-1860.' Dated 19951014.
Biographical / Historical:
'Southern City, National Ambition: The Growth of Washington, D.C., 1800-1860' reflected the early growth and development of Washington as an urban center, focusing on its communities and architecture. A collaboration between the Anacostia Museum and The Octagon Museum, the exhibition was divided between the two sites. The exhibition was held at the Anacostia Museum from October 14, 1995 - March 3, 1996
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002212
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Community development, Urban  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Southern City, National Ambition: Walk Thru Tours and Opening Reception, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-017, Item ACMA AV002211
See more items in:
Southern city, national ambition: the growth of early Washington, D.C., 1800- 1860 exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-017-ref505

Southern City, National Ambition: Docent Education

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Octagon (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1995
Scope and Contents:
To a group of docents, Curator Kym S. Rice explained the context of the exhibition 'Southern City, National Ambition: The Growth of Washington, D.C. 1880-1860' and answered questions at The Octagon Museum.
Lecture. Dated 19950930.
Biographical / Historical:
Southern City, National Ambition: The Growth of Washington, D.C. 1880-1860' reflected the early growth and development of Washington as an urban center, focusing on its communities and architecture. A collaboration between the Anacostia Museum and The Octagon Museum, the exhibition was divided between the two museums from October 15, 1995 to March 3, 1996 and curated by Kym S. Rice.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Community development, Urban  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Southern City, National Ambition: Docent Education, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-017, Item ACMA AV002082
See more items in:
Southern city, national ambition: the growth of early Washington, D.C., 1800- 1860 exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-017-ref506

Southern City, National Ambition: Education Program

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Octagon (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1995
Scope and Contents:
Joanna Banks discussed slaves and slavery with a group of young students. After the discussion, Banks read a story about the life of African Americans in Washington, D.C. from 1800-1860; specifically, the story about Addy and her life as a house slave. After the story, there was a discussion about freedom and singing of a 'Sweet Honey in the Rock' song about freedom. The program concluded with Banks showing students a few objects and photographs on display in the exhibition 'Southern City, National Ambition: The Growth of Washington, D.C. 1800-1860.'
Education program. Related to the exhibition 'Southern City, National Ambition: The Growth of Washington, D.C. 1800-1860.' Dated 19951204.
Biographical / Historical:
Southern City, National Ambition: The Growth of Washington, D.C. 1800-1860' reflected the early growth and development of Washington as an urban center, focusing on its communities and architecture. A collaboration between the Anacostia Museum and The Octagon Museum, the exhibition was divided between the two museums from October 15, 1995 to March 3, 1996 and curated by Kym S. Rice.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Slaves  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Liberty  Search this
Education -- Museums  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Southern City, National Ambition: Education Program, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-017, Item ACMA AV002215
See more items in:
Southern city, national ambition: the growth of early Washington, D.C., 1800- 1860 exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-017-ref507

Remembering U Street Festival

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1995
Scope and Contents:
Footage of a festival, including a parade, musicians, and classic cars.
Festival. Dated 19950930.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Festivals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Remembering U Street Festival, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-017, Item ACMA AV002082
See more items in:
Southern city, national ambition: the growth of early Washington, D.C., 1800- 1860 exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-017-ref508

Always There: Docent Training

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1993
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Raymond Dobard, quilter and art historian, provided a historical overview of African American quilts and detailed explanations regarding the ways in which the quilts were constructed. After the lecture, Robert Hall led the docents on a tour through the exhibition 'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts.'
Lecture and exhibition tour. Related to exhibition 'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts.' Dated 19930717.
Biographical / Historical:
'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts' displayed 27 quilts with photographs and related objects, and surveyed 200 years of black quiltmaking. The quilts, images and artifacts in the exhibit were presented within a dual framework of black history and quilt history. Profiled quiltmakers included Mary Bell Berry, Jessie Telfair, Dorothy Nelle Sanders, parents of school children at P.S. 48 in New York City, Michael Cummings, Carolyn Mazloomi, Lillian Beattie, Jim Smoote, and Carole Harris. The exhibition was organized by the Kentucky Quilt Project, Inc. in Louisville, Kentucky, and on display at the Anacostia Museum from July 15 to October 17, 1993.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002165
Collection Restrictions:
Use of materials is restricted. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Quiltmakers  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Quilts  Search this
Blacks -- History  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Always There: Docent Training, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-014, Item ACMA AV002164
See more items in:
Always there: the African American presence in American quilts exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-014-ref508

News Coverage of the exhibition 'Always There.'

Creator:
WTTG (Television station : Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1993
Scope and Contents:
During an interview for a news segment on FOX News 5, Anacostia Museum Director Steven Newsome talked about the exhibition 'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts' and African American quilt techniques; and a provided an explanation of story quilts. The news segment also included footage of the quilts which were on display throughout the exhibit.
News program. Related to exhibition 'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts.' Dated 1993.
Biographical / Historical:
'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts' displayed 27 quilts with photographs and related objects, and surveyed 200 years of black quiltmaking. The quilts, images and artifacts in the exhibit were presented within a dual framework of black history and quilt history. Profiled quiltmakers included Mary Bell Berry, Jessie Telfair, Dorothy Nelle Sanders, parents of school children at P.S. 48 in New York City, Michael Cummings, Carolyn Mazloomi, Lillian Beattie, Jim Smoote, and Carole Harris. The exhibition was organized by the Kentucky Quilt Project, Inc. in Louisville, Kentucky, and on display at the Anacostia Museum from July 15 to October 17, 1993.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of materials is restricted. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Quiltmakers  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Quilts  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
News Coverage of the exhibition 'Always There,' Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-014, Item ACMA AV002223
See more items in:
Always there: the African American presence in American quilts exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-014-ref509

Visual Journal: Harlem and D.C. in the Thirties and Forties exhibition records

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Parks, Gordon, 1912-2006  Search this
Willis, Deborah, 1948-  Search this
Extent:
8.5 Linear feet (15 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibition records
Photographs
Brochures
Invitations
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Catalogues
Photocopies
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Virginia
New York (N.Y.)
Date:
1996
Summary:
An exhibitionn celebrating the work of five African American photographers who documented segregated black communities in Washington, D.C., rural Virginia, and New York City in the 1930s and 1940s. Curated by Deborah Willis the exhibition was held at the Smithsonian Arts & Industries Building, South Gallery from April 18, 1996 to September 29, 1996. Photographers included: Robert H. McNeil, The Scurlock Studio, Morgan and Marvin Smith, and Gordon Parks.
Scope and Contents note:
These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, exhibit scripts, administrative records, exhibit layouts, brochures, art files,invitations, inventory, project scheudle, permission forms, photocopies, and clippings.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American photographers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Photographs
Brochures
Invitations
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Catalogues
Photocopies
Citation:
Visual Journal: Harlem and D.C. in the Thirties and Forties exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-025
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-025
Online Media:

Morgan and Marvin Smith Audiovisual Collection

Creator:
Smith, Morgan and Marvin, b. 1910  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Center for African American History & Culture (U.S.)  Search this
Smith, Marvin, 1910-2003  Search this
Extent:
481 Sound recordings (203 audio cassette sound recordings ; 6 vinyl sound recordings ; 272 open reel 1/4" sound recordings)
1 Floppy disc
209 Video recordings (21 16mm film prints ; 188 video recordings)
23 Linear feet (27 boxes)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Floppy discs
Video recordings
Place:
Harlem (New York, N.Y.)
Date:
circa 1954-1990
bulk 1970-1980
Scope and Contents note:
Morgan and Marvin Smith, twin brothers who lived and worked in Harlem, NY, are regarded as the premiere photographers of the area from the 1930s-1950s. The two brothers pursued many creative outlets outside of photography, including painting, film, and
Related Archival Materials note:
Morgan and Marvin Smith's photograph collection is housed at the New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York City.
Provenance:
This collection was donated to the Center for African American History and Culture, a Smithsonian Initiative which operated in the 1990s before merging with the Anacostia Museum.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Many materials in the collection are inaccessible due to their obsolete formats and fragile state. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African American photographers  Search this
Music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
Morgan and Marvin Smith Audiovisual Collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.09-012
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-09-012

Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hall, Robert L., 1950-  Search this
Extent:
1.25 Linear feet (4 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Exhibition records
Correspondence
Date:
undated
Summary:
An exhibition on contemporary African American women artists curated by Robert L. Hall and exhibited at the Anacostia Museum of the Smithsonian Institution from November 1990 to April 1991. Artists included are: Erlena Chisolm Bland, Lilian Thomas Burwell, Yvonne Pickering Carter, Margo Humphrey, Martha Jackson-Jarvis, Viola Burley Leak, Winnie Owens-Hart, Stephanie E. Pogue, Malkia Roberts, Gail Shaw-Clemons, Sylvia Snowden, Renée Stout, Denise Ward-Brown, Joyce E. Wellman, and Adell Westbrook.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American women artists -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Correspondence
Citation:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-044
See more items in:
Gathered visions: selected works by African American women artists exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-044
Online Media:

Dr. Cornel West Lecture

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
West, Cornel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
United States -- Politics and government
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
In coordination with the exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life,' Dr. Cornel West spoke about the crisis in America as it relates to people who suffer, of all colors, of all faiths, and of all political persuasions. He stressed the importance of gathering community builders and provided guidance on 'reinventing ourselves, our public institutions and our communities.' West spoke of the truth or lack of truth in America; democracy in America; political and economic reform; and getting to the deep, hidden truths about America and its legacy, including white supremacy, male supremacy, wealth inequality. Specifically, he talked about how to restructure U.S. economy; the role of media and corporations; churches and faith-based communities; new social order; the loss, or lack, of dignity; and the Democratic Party's disconnect with the African American community. This lecture and conversation took place post-election cycle and a few weeks after the release of his and Roberto Unger's book, 'The Future of American Progressivism.'
Lecture/conversation. Audio only. Related to 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life' exhibition. Dated 19981105.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001925_A

ACMA AV001925_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Economics  Search this
Political science  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Democracy  Search this
Equality  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Dr. Cornel West Lecture, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Item ACMA AV001924
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref153

Speak to My Heart: Recording Session at Bible Way Temple

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Musical recording session at Bible Way Temple, located in northwest Washington, D.C., to create CD of religious music. Contents include First Fruits, Cureton Family, and Bible Way Choir.
Music. Related to Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life. Dated 19980423.
Biographical / Historical:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life examined the faith and spiritual traditions in African American religious life in the 1990s. The exhibition featured members of Christian churches as well as those of other faiths. Special attention was given to the ways that African American congregations were responding to contemporary challenges affecting their families, neighborhoods, and communities. The exhibition was developed by the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, and held at The Arts and Industries Building, North Gallery, 900 Jefferson Street, SW, Washington, D.C. from February 1998 to August 1999.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002234
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Choirs (Music)  Search this
Spirituals  Search this
Gospel music  Search this
Church music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Speak to My Heart: Recording Session at Bible Way Temple, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Item ACMA AV002233
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-037: Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref653

Speak To My Heart: Exhibition Talk with Gail S. Lowe, Ph.D

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1996
Scope and Contents:
Gail S. Lowe, Ph.D. talked about the center of African American life and community - the Black Chruch. She detailed the significance and work of the Black Church in communities, and provided an introduction to the upcoming exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life.' Lowe discussed each section of the exhibition, and the types of materials and information the museum planned to include in the exhibit. The talk was part of a meeting for the Friends for the Preservation of African American History and Culture.
Exhibition talk. Related to exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life.' Dated 19961016.
Biographical / Historical:
'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life' examined the faith and spiritual traditions in African American religious life in the 1990s. The exhibition featured members of Christian churches as well as those of other faiths. Special attention was given to the ways that African American congregations were responding to contemporary challenges affecting their families, neighborhoods, and communities. The exhibition was developed by the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, and held at The Arts and Industries Building, North Gallery, 900 Jefferson Street, SW, Washington, D.C. from February 1998 to August 1999.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Churches  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Communities  Search this
Religion  Search this
Spirituality  Search this
Choirs (Music)  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Speak To My Heart: Exhibition Talk with Gail S. Lowe, Ph.D., Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Item ACMA AV001049
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-037: Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref654

Speak To My Heart: Exhibition Tour

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Gail Lowe led a tour of the exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life.'
Exhibition tour. Related to Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life. Dated 19981006.
Biographical / Historical:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life examined the faith and spiritual traditions in African American religious life in the 1990s. The exhibition featured members of Christian churches as well as those of other faiths. Special attention was given to the ways that African American congregations were responding to contemporary challenges affecting their families, neighborhoods, and communities. The exhibition was developed by the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, and held at The Arts and Industries Building, North Gallery, 900 Jefferson Street, SW, Washington, D.C. from February 1998 to August 1999.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Churches  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Religion  Search this
Spirituality  Search this
Choirs (Music)  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Speak To My Heart: Exhibition Tour, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Item ACMA AV002190
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-037: Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref655

Empowerment Poetry with Cherie Ward and Community Arts Experience with Life Pieces to Masterpieces

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1999
Scope and Contents:
Cherie Ward performs her empowerment poetry. Community arts experience performed by Life Pieces to Masterpieces, a nonprofit arts organization for boys so they can experience love, security and expression by telling their stories through poetry, song, dance, and art. In addition to performing, the boys explain the principles of Life Pieces to Masterpieces, and what they have learned through the program.
Poetry, and music and dance performances. Audio only. Related to exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life.' Dated 19990803.
Biographical / Historical:
'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life' examined the faith and spiritual traditions in African American religious life in the 1990s. The exhibition featured members of Christian churches as well as those of other faiths. Special attention was given to the ways that African American congregations were responding to contemporary challenges affecting their families, neighborhoods, and communities. The exhibition was developed by the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, and held at The Arts and Industries Building, North Gallery, 900 Jefferson Street, SW, Washington, D.C. from February 1998 to August 1999.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001934_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women poets  Search this
Poetry  Search this
African American youth  Search this
Youth  Search this
African Americans in the performing arts  Search this
Community arts projects  Search this
Spirituality  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Empowerment Poetry with Cherie Ward and Community Arts Experience with Life Pieces to Masterpieces, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Item ACMA AV001934_A
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-037: Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref656

Black women: achievements against the odds exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Traveling Exhibition Service  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
7.92 Linear feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Correspondence
Exhibit scripts
Exhibition records
Photographic prints
Date:
1976-02 - 1976-12
Summary:
An exhibition on two-hundred years of achievements by black women. The show was created and circulated by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. It was exhibited at the Anacostia Museum from February 1976 to December 1976. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, and floor plans.
Related Archival Materials note:
Catherine Burt vertical file on black women in the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American women -- History  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Traveling exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Correspondence
Exhibit scripts
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Photographic prints
Citation:
Black women: achievements against the odds exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-028
See more items in:
Black women: achievements against the odds exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-028
Online Media:

Contemporary Visual Expressions: The Art of Sam Gilliam, Martha Jackson-Jarvis, Keith Morrison, William T. Williams exhibition records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Gilliam, Sam, 1933-  Search this
Jackson-Jarvis, Martha, 1952-  Search this
Morrison, Keith, 1942-  Search this
Extent:
2.04 Linear feet
19 Video recordings (VHS, 1/2")
3 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4")
1 Video recording (U-matic, 3/4")
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Date:
1987
Scope and Contents note:
Contemporary Visual Expressions was a 1987 exhibition on Black American artists of the 20th century. It featured the work of Washington artists Sam Gilliam, Martha Jackson-Jarvis, and Keith Morrison, as well as guest artist William T. Williams of New York City. It was the inaugural exhibition in the gallery space in the new home of the Anacostia Museum and presented cultural dimensions found in abstract painting, symbolism within the Afro-Caribbean and Afro-American religious traditions in art, as well as three-dimensional works derived from folk and cultural customs that emerge from the Black Experience.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
Contemporary Visual Expressions: The Art of Sam Gilliam, Martha Jackson-Jarvis, Keith Morrison, William T. Williams exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-012
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
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