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Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Names:
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Linear feet (2 boxes)
57 Sound recordings (57 audio cassette sound recordings)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1997-1998
bulk 1998-1998
Scope and Contents note:
This is a collection of original audio interviews conducted by Audrey Brown for her 1999 Ph.D. dissertation at American University entitled "Imagining a Nation: Late Twentieth Century African American Women's Participation in cultural Politics and Transformative Social Action."
Biographical / Historical:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998 is a collection of original audio interviews conducted by Audrey Brown for her 1999 Ph.D. dissertation at American University entitled "Imagining a Nation: Late Twentieth Century African American Women's Participation in Cultural Politics and Transformative Social Action."
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Political science  Search this
Activism  Search this
African American women  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7ef318056-2b96-46f6-9a04-f2bb6c3ef91c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-09-016

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Dr. Leslie Richards

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her home in Washington, D.C., Dr. Leslie Richards (born 1946 IL), a sociologist, spoke about her early life, family, education, and research as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Richards expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, economic empowerment, independence, and self-determination; her thoughts on differences between the social classes; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She identified the black community as a geographic place, cultural identification, and socio-political. Richards stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Richards talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Richards described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971005. Second date notation on asset: Sept. 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000151_B
General:
Title created by ACM staff based on project name and interviewee's name transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Dr. Leslie Richards, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000151_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c56b4606-f87b-425c-a1de-805020120343
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref1

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Susan Kidd

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed at NBS TV News Station in Washington, D.C., journalist Susan Kidd (born MD) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Kidd expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Kidd talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Kidd described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971103. Second date notation on asset: Nov. 1998.
General:
Title created by ACM staff based on project name and interviewee's name transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Susan Kidd, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000160
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c707be7a-4c05-46be-bf77-57d249d15bc8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref10

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Pamela Johnson

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her office at Essence in New York, NY., writer Pamela Johnson (born 1960 NY) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She talked about the program 'Harlem Overheard,' a monthly newspaper written and produced by youth. Johnson explained how she identifies herself. She expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Johnson talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Johnson described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971101.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000161_B
General:
Title created by ACM staff based on project name and interviewee's name transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Pamela Johnson, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000161_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa731c39ee7-5850-411f-8651-67b1702f5f6e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref11

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Michelle Jacobs

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in Washington, D.C., attorney Michelle Jacobs (born 1954 NY) spoke about her early life, family, education, and work as a law professor as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Jacobs expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Jacobs talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Jacobs described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980904. Second date notation on asset: Dec. 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000162_B

ACMA AV000163
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Michelle Jacobs, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000162_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa72e0a1460-7a1b-4beb-bdbd-290bce57bcac
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref12

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Delores Binah Waite

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her home in Altadena, CA., Delores Binah Waite (born 1945 NY) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She talked about the Mary Magdalene Project, and running a business and educational programs. Binah Waite explained how she identifies herself. She expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Binah Waite talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Binah Waite described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. AV000164_A and AV000165: same content. Dated 19980427.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000164_B

ACMA AV000165
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Delores Binah Waite, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000164_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7fae0d84c-7ce8-45c9-ad7f-e0c0057f5005
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref13

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Jennifer Champagne

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in Washington, D.C., Jennifer Champagne (born 1973 MA) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She talked about her Haitian heritage, and her experience as a tutor and teacher. Champagne explained how she identifies herself. She expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Champagne talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Champagne described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. AV000166 and AV000171: same content. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980409.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000166_B

ACMA AV000171_A

ACMA AV000171_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Jennifer Champagne, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000166_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa79726c718-3811-477d-bd39-7896b1dfe869
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref14

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Denise Rolark-Barnes

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her office in Washington, D.C., Denise Rolark-Barnes (born 1954 DC) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Rolark-Barnes expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Rolark-Barnes talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Rolark-Barnes described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971216. Second date notation on asset: April 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000167_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Dr. Denise Rolark Barnes, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000167_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa71130a798-8989-4eed-85a4-c75d166e5d94
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref15

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Nikki Smith

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her home in Washington, D.C., Nikki Smith (born 1967 MD) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She talked about her work as Executive Director of the Museum of African-American History and Culture Commission for Maryland, and the planning of an African American heritage museum in Baltimore. Smith explained how she identifies herself. She expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Smith talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Smith described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19981101.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000168_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Nikki Smith, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000168_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa777581acb-4918-471b-aeca-8938da6d27da
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref16

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Karen E. Sutton

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her home in Baltimore, MD., Karen E. Sutton (born 1950 TX) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She talked about her work as a nurse and the field of health care. Sutton explained how she identifies herself. She expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Sutton talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Sutton described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971211. Second date notation on asset: Nov 1997.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000169_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Karen E. Sutton, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000169_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa76c0e1e02-090b-42f9-a988-b6de6a3685c1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref17

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Melinda Lee Crowley

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in the Department of Anthropology at American University, Melinda Lee Crowley (born 1970 CT) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She talked about her education in New Haven. Crowley explained how she identifies herself. She expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Crowley talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Crowley described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980301.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000170_B
General:
Title created by ACM staff based on project/exhibition name and interviewee's name.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Melinda Lee Crowley, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000170_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa72424d22f-a68f-4d71-bd37-6ca5ed7e04fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref18

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Paula Walker Madison

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her office in NY, Paula Walker Madison (born 1952 NY) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She talked about her work as a journalist and news director. Madison explained how she identifies herself. She expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Madison talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Madison described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Undated.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000172_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Paula Walker Madison, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000172_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa71aa21d7e-2952-4250-8bfc-218633af2fec
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref19

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in Washington, D.C., Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds (born 1942 Ohio) spoke about her early life, family, education, and research as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She talked about her work as a minister and journalist - writing, teaching, and preaching; the lectures she presented; and her work with Harriet's children. Reynolds explained how she identifies herself. Reynolds expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Reynolds talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Reynolds described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980901.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000152_B
General:
Title created by ACM staff based on project name and interviewee's name transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000152_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7482678c4-4c65-44a9-90fb-a78fa93bcb8c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref2

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Delna White

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her office in Washington, D.C., Delna White (born 1967 CA) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. White expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. White talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. White described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971015. Second date notation on asset: Dec. 1997.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000173_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Communities  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Delna White, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000173_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa75097b612-ec02-4e51-8f19-2f5bf3b4df9c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref20

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Melissa Bradley

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her office in Washington, D.C., Melissa Bradley (born 1968 NJ) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Bradley expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Bradley talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Bradley described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971101.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000174_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Melissa Bradley, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000174_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c5e14dbe-8504-4ef9-9ff3-13868c17f9b4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref21

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Valerie Wesley

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in Washington, D.C., Valerie Wesley (born 1947 CT) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Wesley expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Wesley talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Wesley described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19971018. Second date notation on asset: Nov. 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000175_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Valerie Wesley, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000175_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7b829ae42-0d6b-438c-bf1a-cb949c56a18e
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref22

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Alberta Brasfield

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her office in Washington, D.C., Alberta Brasfield (born 1930s VA) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Brasfield expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Brasfield talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Brasfield described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980203. Second date notation on asset: Nov. 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000176_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Alberta Brasfield, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000176_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7368375e3-4508-416a-bdac-8121b526ca7c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref23

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Margaret Boyer

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in Oakland, CA., Margaret Boyer (born 1925 WVA) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Boyer expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Boyer talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Boyer described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980203. Second date notation on asset: April 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000177_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Margaret Boyer, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000177_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa76673774e-d429-49ef-b969-fc51d82a8074
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref24

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Aurelia Richie Downey

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her home in Greenbelt, MD., Aurelia Richie Downey (born 1917 VA) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Downey expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Downey talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Downey described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Transcribed from AV000178: 3 of 3. Transcribed from AV000179: 1 of 3. Dated 19980618.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000179_A

ACMA AV000179_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Aurelia Richie Downey, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000178
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa708042bf6-54e7-4714-915c-eae2ed73bbb7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref25

Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Ophelia T. Pinkard

Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
American University (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Brown, Audrey  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Interviewed in her home in Washington, D.C., Ophelia T. Pinkard (born 1917 IL) spoke about her early life, family, and education as well as the individuals who most influenced her. She explained how she identifies herself. Pinkard expressed her thoughts on ethnicity and how ethnic identification affected her life; her thoughts on black community, empowerment, independence, and self-determination; and her thoughts on identifying the black community as one group or many different groups. She stated groups/affiliations she belongs to/activities she is involved in, any social activism work, and how she stays in touch with African Americans and the African American community, including publications, websites, other communication/media, conferences, and celebrations/events. She explained how emphasizing African descent in one's appearance relate to social change in America. Pinkard talked about the accuracy of African American history and how African American people, particularly African American women, are portrayed. She explained how knowing history influences what is happening now and in the future; where women fit in in terms of passing on history; and what African American women can accomplish personally in their everyday lives to affect change. Pinkard described what she would change, what she would build, and what she would eliminate with unlimited power and/or resources.
Interview. Part of Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews 1997-1998. Dated 19980623. Second date notation on asset: Sept. 1998.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV000180_B
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Women  Search this
Ethnicity  Search this
Social action  Search this
Social change  Search this
Political science  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Activists  Search this
African American history  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation: Interview with Ophelia T. Pinkard, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-016, Item ACMA AV000180_A
See more items in:
Audrey Brown PhD Dissertation Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7cab88436-2c9b-4257-895e-b0f1171970aa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-016-ref26

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