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Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Business records
Sound recordings
Negatives
Video recordings
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Videotapes
Notes
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Audiotapes
Digital images
Date:
June 23-July 4, 1995
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1995 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: The Cape Verdean Connection

Series 3: The Czech Republic: Tradition and Transformation

Series 4: Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women

Series 5: Russian Roots, American Branches: Music in Two Worlds

Series 6: Special Events
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1995 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The 1995 Festival featured American Indian women's musical traditions, the heritage of the Czech Republic and Czech Americans, music of Russian and Russian American groups, and the cultural life of the Cape Verdean community. These programs testified to the vitality of the human spirit, and to how people, ideas, and forms of cultural expression increasingly cross boundaries of geography, politics, language, race, and gender. Special events included evening concerts devoted to African immigrant communities in the Washington, D.C. area and a memorial concert for Festival founding director, Ralph Rinzler.

Heartbeat: The Voices of First Nations Women presented the musical culture of American Indian women. The program examined how these women express their identity through the use of a variety of musical forms - from traditional songs of home to contemporary songs of Indian life, from the appropriation of men's music to the fusion of root music with country, folk, blues, and gospel.

The Czech Republic: Tradition and Transformation provided a broad survey of the ways national, regional, ethnic, and local traditions have been defined in a complex state located at the crossroads of Central Europe. The "Velvet Revolution" of 1989 and the separation of the Czech and Slovak Republics in 1993 have prompted further examinations of cultural identity, the relationship between the state and popular expression, creativity and tradition. Czech Americans, too, have looked at these changes and the reestablishment of relationships to their ancestral homeland.

A third program, Russian Roots, American Branches: Music in Two Worlds, explored the musical culture of Old Believers and Molokans, Russian religious communities created in the 17th and 18th centuries. The program united immigrant communities long established in the United States with those from Russia, and brought together people who, although separated by generations and different social environments, have nonetheless faced parallel issues with regard to cultural persistence and adaptation.

All these programs involved complex institutional arrangements, local-level research and documentation, and strong commitment to and pride in Festival representation. The Cape Verdean Connection program well demonstrated these processes. Cape Verde is an independent island nation and former Portuguese colony located off the west coast of Africa. Cape Verdean Americans, now numbering about 400,000, most born and raised here, historically settled in New England during the 18th century, playing instrumental roles in the whaling and cranberry industries. Cape Verdeans had an important story to tell about their role in American life, their immigrant and continuing transnational cultural experience, their multiracial heritage, and their enduring sense of community - a story with much to tell others as well. Cape Verdeans provided the impetus for the Festival program, carried out most of the research in concert with Smithsonian scholars, led the effort to raise funds from governments, foundations, corporations, and individuals through benefit dances, auctions, and other community events, and, as is fitting, joined with the Smithsonian to share their experiences with the American public.

The 1995 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 13th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured four programs and several special events.

The 1995 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; essays provided background on the Festival and each of the four programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies.

Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Director, Smithsonian/Folkways Recordngs; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Betty Belanus, Olivia Cadaval, Amy Horowitz, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Curators, Folklorists, Educational and Cultural Specialists; Carla M. Borden, John W. Franklin, Charlene James-Duguid, Program Managers; Felicia Erickson, Arlene L. Reiniger, Mary Van Meter, Program Specialists; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Kenneth M. Bilby, Roland Freeman, Ivan Karp, Corrine Kratz, Alan Lomax, Worth Long, Yook Jung Park, Kate Rinzler, Research Associates & Collaborators

Folklife Advisory Council and Folkways Advisory Council

Roger Abrahams, Jacinto Arias, Michael Asch, Jane Beck, Don DeVito, Pat Jasper, Ella Jenkins, Jon Kertzer, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, John Nixdorf, Bernice Reagon, John Roberts, Carol Robertson, Gilbert Sprauve, Jack Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos, Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez

National Park Service

Roger Kennedy, Director; Robert G. Stanton, Regional Director, National Capital Region
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Business records
Sound recordings
Negatives
Video recordings
Correspondence
Plans (drawings)
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Videotapes
Notes
Audiocassettes
Contracts
Slides (photographs)
Audiotapes
Digital images
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1995
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1995 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5d0f338f7-ff86-4399-82c5-39d8a73d9b35
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1995

Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished

Creator:
Tamarin, Alfred H.  Search this
Extent:
425 Negatives (photographic) (black and white, 35mm, 120 film)
65 Photographic prints (black and white, 8x10)
Culture:
Passamaquoddy  Search this
Mashpee Wampanoag  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Cayuga [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)]  Search this
Mohawk [Akwesasne (St. Regis), Hogansburg, New York]  Search this
Seneca  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Nanticoke [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)]  Search this
Pamunkey  Search this
Chickahominy  Search this
Eastern Band of Cherokee  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Southeast  Search this
Mid-Atlantic  Search this
Northeast  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Copy prints
Date:
1970-1971
Summary:
The Alfred Tamarin photograph collection consists of negatives and contact prints shot by Tamarin in 1971 during research for his publication We Have not Vanished: Eastern Indians of the United States. Tamarin made photographs among the Passamaquoddy, Mashpee Wampanoag, Narragansett, Cayuga [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)], Mohawk [Akwesasne (St. Regis), Hogansburg, New York], Seneca, Lenape (Delaware), Nanticoke, Pamunkey, Chickahominy and Eastern Band of Cherokee communities, capturing both events and craftspeople at work.
Scope and Contents:
The Alfred Tamarin photograph collection consists of negatives and contact prints shot by Tamarin during research for his publication We Have not Vanished: Eastern Indians of the United States. In addition to Tamarins own photographs there are also 8x10 black and white prints from other sources used in the same publication.

Series 1: Reasearch Negatives includes photographic negatives made by Tamarin which were shot on 35mm film and 120 (6x6) film and have accompanying contact sheets. Most of the negatives were shot in 1971 along the east coast of the United States in Maine, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, Virginia as well as in Ontario, Canada and at the Heard Fair in Phoenix, Arizona. Tamarin made photographs among the Passamaquoddy, Mashpee Wampanoag, Narragansett, Cayuga [Six Nations/Grand River (Brantford, Ontario)], Mohawk [Akwesasne (St. Regis), Hogansburg, New York], Seneca, Lenape (Delaware), Nanticoke, Pamunkey, Chickahominy and Eastern Band of Cherokee communities, capturing both events and craftspeople at work.

Events of note photographed include--the Monroe Powwow sponsored by Lenape (Delaware) Chief Earl Two Bears and a Narragansett anniversary celebration. There are also several photographs featuring Chief Jake Thomas (Ha-da-jib-ghen-ta [Descending Cloud]/Jacob Ezra Thomas) and his daughter Donna Thomas during a mask making demonstration in Brantford, Ontario. At the time, Chief Thomas was a museum preparator at the Mohawk Indian Woodland Indian Cultural.

Series 2: Publication Prints includes 65 8x10 black and white photographic prints and copy prints. Subseries 2.1 includes 19 prints from Tamarin's negatives that can be found in Series 1. Subseries 2.2 includes copy prints requested from outside photographer and institutions for use in We Have Not Vanished. These include photographs from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Florida News Bureau, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Maine State Highway Commission, and National Anthropological Archives (Smithsonian Institution).
Arrangement:
Arranged in two series. Series 1: Research Negatives and Series 2: Publication Prints.
Biographical / Historical:
Alfred Tamarin (1913-1980) was born in New York to parents Abraham and Fannie. Tamarin worked in publicity and advertising for theatre and film until the 1960s. During that time he worked for the Theatre Guild, United Artists Corporation and was also a founder and vice president of In Flight Motion Pictures Inc. After marrying his second wife Shirley Glubok in 1968, Alfred began his second career as a photographer for a series of art books written by Shirley. Alfred also wrote several books himself including We Have not Vanished: Eastern Indians of the United States (1974). We Have not Vanished was illustrated with photographs taken by Alfred in 1970-1971 among several Native American communities along the East Coast of the United States. Other books written by the Tamarins include Ancient Indians of the Southwest (1975), The Art of the Plains Indians (1975), Voyaging to Cathay (1976), among many others. Shirley Glubok Tamarin donated Alfred's materials related to We Have not Vanished to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye foundation in 1985 following Alfred's death in 1980.
Provenance:
Gift of Shirley Glubok Tamarin, 1985.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.

Images in Subseries 2.2: Copy prints from other sources are not owned by the National Museum of the American Indian.
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Negatives
Copy prints
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished, image #, NMAI.AC.376; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.376
See more items in:
Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4e3e6f8d7-c04d-46c3-989e-ccf7043e6b93
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-376

Copy prints from other sources

Collection Creator:
Tamarin, Alfred H.  Search this
Extent:
46 Copy prints (black and white, 8x10)
Container:
Photo-folder 4
Photo-folder 5
Photo-folder 6
Photo-folder 7
Photo-folder 8
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Copy prints
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Subseries 2.2 includes copy prints requested from outside photographer and institutions for use in We Have Not Vanished. These include photographs from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Florida News Bureau, Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Maine State Highway Commission, and National Anthropological Archives (Smithsonian Institution).
Collection Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archives Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Collection Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not modified in any way, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian. For more information please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use and NMAI Archive Center's Digital Image request website.

Images in Subseries 2.2: Copy prints from other sources are not owned by the National Museum of the American Indian.
Collection Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished, image #, NMAI.AC.376; National Museum of the American Indian Archives Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.376, Subseries 2.2
See more items in:
Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished
Alfred Tamarin photographs for We Have not Vanished / Series 2: Publication Prints
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sv4cfb4410b-7eb2-46a0-b170-e97e6e4a3dbf
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmai-ac-376-ref4

Double Take Online: Native Artists Creating during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Creator:
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2020-12-30T02:46:54.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
See more by:
americanartmuseum
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
YouTube Channel:
americanartmuseum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_mdUabHckTuw

Vase

Culture/People:
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Legoria Tafoya (Legoria Velarde/Juanita K'po), K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), 1911-1984  Search this
Previous owner:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Department of the Interior (IACB), 1935-  Search this
IACB source:
DOI Indian Craft Shop (Department of the Interior Indian Craft Shop)  Search this
Object Name:
Vase
Media/Materials:
Pottery, clay slip
Techniques:
Coiled/hand built, modeled, carved, burnished, slipped
Dimensions:
16.0 x 15.4 cm
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Santa Clara Pueblo, Santa Clara Reservation; Rio Arriba County; New Mexico; USA
Date created:
1964
Catalog Number:
26/1108
Barcode:
261108.000
See related items:
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)
Containers and Vessels
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6bb048ba2-3848-4af0-8184-94e6d108d3ac
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_277204

Lizard figure

Culture/People:
Lower Muscogee (Georgia Creek)  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Joseph F. Johns (Cayoni), Muscogee (Creek), 1928-2020  Search this
Previous owner:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Department of the Interior (IACB), 1935-  Search this
IACB source:
Joseph F. Johns (Cayoni), Muscogee (Creek), 1928-2020  Search this
Object Name:
Lizard figure
Media/Materials:
Walnut wood, brass tacks/bosses, wood stain, wax
Techniques:
Carved, stained
Dimensions:
102.2 x 21 x 4.7 cm
Object Type:
Sculpture/Carving/Figures
Place:
Cambridge; Middlesex County; Massachusetts; USA
Date created:
1979
Catalog Number:
25/6178
Barcode:
256178.000
See related items:
Lower Muscogee (Georgia Creek)
Sculpture/Carving/Figures
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6b32b9e7e-67a9-4a9d-ac8b-e67d4a37cde7
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_272051
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Culture:
Afro-Caribbean cults  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Videotapes
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiotapes
Contracts
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Notes
Video recordings
Plena
Place:
Caribbean Area
Haiti
Jamaica
Puerto Rico
Trinidad and Tobago
Date:
June 16-September 6, 1976
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1976 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 9 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: African Diaspora

Series 3: Children's Program

Series 4: Family Folklore

Series 5: Festival Stage

Series 6: Native Americans

Series 7: Old Ways in the New World

Series 8: Regional America

Series 9: Working Americans
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1976 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Division of Performing Arts and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The Festival of American Folklife's first decade culminated with the Bicentennial Festival of American Folklife that took place for twelve weeks in the summer of 1976, from June 16 to September 6 (programs typically ran from Wednesday through Sunday each week). More than 5000 participants took part over the course of the summer. The 1976 Festival involved the participation of every region of the United States, 38 foreign governments, scores of American Indian tribes, and many labor organizations. Some 4.5 million people attended the Festival.

The Bicentennial Festival resulted from the collaboration of the Smithsonian with thousands of national and international scholars, community spokespeople, and cultural exemplars involved in the documentation, presentation, transmission, and conservation of cultural traditions. Preceding the Festival were several years of establishing cultural networks, training students, and providing opportunities for diverse peoples to interpret and present their traditions. The Bicentennial also saw the flowering of a touring program, begun in 1973, in which foreign groups at the Festival subsequently toured the United States. Scores of groups from the African Diaspora and Old Ways in the New World programs gave some 200 performances in 50 cities and towns across the U.S.

The 1976 Festival again took place in the western part of the National Mall to the south of the Reflecting Pool, between 17th and 23rd Streets (see site plan). It was co-organized by the Smithsonian Institution, Division of Performing Arts (James R. Morris, Director; Richard Lusher, Deputy Director) and the National Park Service (Gary Everhardt, Director). Ralph Rinzler was Director of the Festival, and Bess Lomax Hawes and Robert Byington were Deputy Directors of the Festival. Tom Vennum served as Ethnomusicologist, and Frank Proschan as Archivist. The Bicentennial Festival was sponsored by American Airlines and General Foods.

The 1976 Festival again featured seven thematic programs, complemented by a Festival Stage. African Diaspora featured different countries every two weeks. The Festival Stage brought together participants from other areas and - for the last four weeks - its own dedicated performers. Native Americans changed focus by region every week; similarly, Old Ways in the New World changed focus by country every week. Regional America (June 16-August 8) changed focus by region every week, and Working Americans changed focus by theme every two weeks, with an expanded program on Transportation the last four weeks (August 11-September 6).

The 1975 Program Book provided information on each of the programs. Biweekly, a Program Supplement provided schedules and participant information.
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Folk music  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk art  Search this
occupational folklore  Search this
Orisha religion  Search this
Vodou -- Haiti -- Rituals.  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Business records
Videotapes
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiotapes
Contracts
Digital images
Audiocassettes
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Memorandums
Photographic prints
Notes
Video recordings
plena
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1976
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1976 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5858643e8-749f-494f-b205-eca860d96375
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1976
Online Media:

Spirit Dancers

Culture/People:
Hopi-Tewa  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Dan Namingha, Hopi-Tewa, b. 1950  Search this
Previous owner:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Department of the Interior (IACB), 1935-  Search this
IACB source:
Museum of Northern Arizona Museum Shop  Search this
Title:
Spirit Dancers
Object Name:
Figural group
Media/Materials:
Bronze
Techniques:
Cast
Dimensions:
13.2 x 14.3 x 13.3 cm
Object Type:
Sculpture/Carving/Figures
Place:
Polacca, First Mesa, Hopi Reservation; Navajo County; Arizona; USA
Date created:
1975
Catalog Number:
25/5424
Barcode:
255424.000
See related items:
Hopi-Tewa
Sculpture/Carving/Figures
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6f1a29cd1-de3b-4caf-a967-32ac29e07d4b
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_271289
Online Media:

Man's kilt

Culture/People:
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Previous owner:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Department of the Interior (IACB), 1935-  Search this
Object Name:
Man's kilt
Media/Materials:
Cotton yarn, wool yarn
Techniques:
Woven, embroidered
Dimensions:
115 x 67 x 0.7 cm
Object Type:
Clothing/Garments
Place:
Hopi Reservation; Navajo County, Coconino County; Arizona; USA (inferred)
Date created:
circa 1970
Catalog Number:
25/5990
Barcode:
255990.000
See related items:
Hopi Pueblo
Clothing/Garments
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6b0a06b56-997b-4725-b013-61454d0eb055
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_271859
Online Media:

Mother and Child

Culture/People:
Inupiaq (Alaskan Inupiat Eskimo)  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Joseph E. Senungetuk (Inusunaaq/Inusuyauq Sinuyituq), Inupiaq (Alaskan Inupiat Eskimo), b. 1940  Search this
IACB source:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board Office, Sitka, Alaska (IACB Office, Sitka, Alaska)  Search this
Indian Arts and Crafts Board Demonstration Workshop (Sitka, Alaska) (IACB Demonstration Workshop)  Search this
Previous owner:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Department of the Interior (IACB), 1935-  Search this
Title:
Mother and Child
Object Name:
Mother and child figure
Media/Materials:
Alder
Techniques:
Carved
Dimensions:
20 x 12.5 x 41.5 cm
Object Type:
Sculpture/Carving/Figures
Place:
Sitka; Sealaska Native Corporation; Alaska; USA
Archipelago:
Alexander Archipelago
Island Name:
Baranof Island
Date created:
1967
Catalog Number:
25/7003
Barcode:
257003.000
See related items:
Inupiaq (Alaskan Inupiat Eskimo)
Sculpture/Carving/Figures
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6d85cbf2c-ce5f-496c-ad1d-798476e7b318
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_272888
Online Media:

Beaded bottle

Culture/People:
Paiute  Search this
Previous owner:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Department of the Interior (IACB), 1935-  Search this
IACB source:
Northern Plains Indian Crafts Association  Search this
Object Name:
Beaded bottle
Media/Materials:
Glass bottle, commercial suede, glass bead/beads, plastic
Techniques:
Gourd stitch/Brick stitch/Netted beadwork, sewn
Dimensions:
22.5 x 9.7 cm
Object Type:
Made-for-Sale items and Souvenirs
Place:
Nevada; USA (inferred)
Date created:
1966
Catalog Number:
26/1309
Barcode:
261309.000
See related items:
Paiute
Made-for-Sale items and Souvenirs
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6eedadce9-c982-4469-b449-fbfed6dfa01b
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_277406
Online Media:

Basket tray

Culture/People:
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Eunice Yowyetewa, Hopi Pueblo, 1921-2007  Search this
Previous owner:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Department of the Interior (IACB), 1935-  Search this
IACB source:
DOI Indian Craft Shop (Department of the Interior Indian Craft Shop)  Search this
Object Name:
Basket tray
Media/Materials:
Wild Currant, rabbitbrush, yucca fiber, dye/dyes
Techniques:
Dyed, wicker-plaited
Dimensions:
3.6 x 36.2 cm
Object Type:
Made-for-Sale items and Souvenirs
Place:
Second Mesa, Hopi Reservation; Navajo County; Arizona; USA
Date created:
1968
Catalog Number:
26/1439
Barcode:
261439.000
See related items:
Hopi Pueblo
Made-for-Sale items and Souvenirs
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws60bbddb7e-7129-4f5e-a1b8-ad57d18ababf
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_277536
Online Media:

Messenger and Patient in Corrall Dance MTN. Chant (fire dance)

Culture/People:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Beatien Yazz (Jimmy Toddy/Little No Shirt), Diné (Navajo), 1928-2022  Search this
Previous owner:
Woodard's Indian Arts and Crafts (Gallup NM)  Search this
Byron Harvey, III (Byron Schemerhorn Harvey III), Non-Indian, 1932-2005  Search this
Donor:
Byron Harvey, III (Byron Schemerhorn Harvey III), Non-Indian, 1932-2005  Search this
Title:
Messenger and Patient in Corrall Dance MTN. Chant (fire dance)
Object Name:
Painting (Image withheld)
Media/Materials:
Paper, watercolor, ink
Techniques:
Painted
Dimensions:
41.6 x 41 cm
Object Type:
Painting/Drawing/Print
Place:
Arizona; USA
Date created:
1960-1965
Catalog Number:
23/7588
Barcode:
237588.000
See related items:
Diné (Navajo)
Painting/Drawing/Print
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws69e64344d-7dd1-489b-9e08-af81da18c23e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_252956

Evergreen Dance

Culture/People:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Beatien Yazz (Jimmy Toddy/Little No Shirt), Diné (Navajo), 1928-2022  Search this
Previous owner:
Woodard's Indian Arts and Crafts (Gallup NM)  Search this
Byron Harvey, III (Byron Schemerhorn Harvey III), Non-Indian, 1932-2005  Search this
Donor:
Byron Harvey, III (Byron Schemerhorn Harvey III), Non-Indian, 1932-2005  Search this
Title:
Evergreen Dance
Object Name:
Painting
Media/Materials:
Paper, watercolor
Techniques:
Painted
Dimensions:
33.5 x 36 cm
Object Type:
Painting/Drawing/Print
Place:
Arizona; USA
Date created:
1950-1960
Catalog Number:
23/7589
Barcode:
237589.000
See related items:
Diné (Navajo)
Painting/Drawing/Print
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6e9c0ce44-e14f-4e1f-a637-7a97ca086363
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_252957
Online Media:

Blessing of the Corn Meal

Culture/People:
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Artist/Maker:
Beatien Yazz (Jimmy Toddy/Little No Shirt), Diné (Navajo), 1928-2022  Search this
IACB source:
Scottsdale National Exhibition of Indian Arts  Search this
Previous owner:
Indian Arts and Crafts Board, Department of the Interior (IACB), 1935-  Search this
Title:
Blessing of the Corn Meal
Object Name:
Painting
Media/Materials:
Paperboard, tempera
Techniques:
Painted
Dimensions:
74.0 x 50.8 cm
Object Type:
Painting/Drawing/Print
Place:
Wide Ruins, Navajo Reservation; Apache County; Arizona; USA
Date created:
1962
Catalog Number:
26/2409
Barcode:
262409.000
See related items:
Diné (Navajo)
Painting/Drawing/Print
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ws6ce9ffc52-9126-440f-9f65-19ac97229680
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:NMAI_278519

Harvest of Hope: 5 Ben Nighthorse Campbell

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2013-12-20T14:08:37.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_b4fVwMrsBv4

Folders 7-11 American Indian Arts and Crafts and Contemporary American Crafts (Two Small Craft Displays, American Indian Arts and Crafts, Miscellaneous Art Objects, Contemporary American Crafts and American Indian Arts and Crafts, North American Indian...

Container:
Box 82 of 287
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 321, National Museum of American Art, Office of Program Support, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 16: Numbered Exhibitions, c. 1954-1981 / Box 82
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0321-refidd1e11695

Folder 14 American Indian Arts and Crafts, 1966-1969

Container:
Box 47 of 287
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 321, National Museum of American Art, Office of Program Support, Records
See more items in:
Records
Records / Series 14: Proposed or Canceled Exhibition Projects, 1954-1978 / Box 47
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0321-refidd1e8279

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1986 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Notes
Contracts
Sound recordings
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Video recordings
Videotapes
Correspondence
Digital images
Negatives
Photographic prints
Slides (photographs)
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Date:
June 25-July 6, 1986
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1986 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: 20th Anniversary Music Stage

Series 3: American Trial Lawyers

Series 4: Cultural Conservation: Traditional Crafts in a Post-Industrial Age

Series 5: Japan: Rice in Japanese Folk Culture

Series 6: Tennessee
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1986 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Office of Folklife Programs and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
1986 saw the 20th annual Festival. Twenty years previously, the Smithsonian's 1967 Festival of American Folklife had announced in a national forum that study and conservation of living traditional cultures were a continuing part of the Federal government's engagement with arts, humanities, and science. Since that time, this idea has resonated outside the Institution in a way that helped to shape a coordinated Federal approach to traditional cultures.

1986 marked as well the 10th anniversary of the American Folklife Center in the Library of Congress, on whose board the Secretary of the Smithsonian sits as an ex-officio member. In his remarks for the Festival Program Book, Secretary Robert McC. Adams took note that the Smithsonian had collaborated with the Center on several folklife matters, among them the Federal Cylinder Project, which preserved and was actively making available to Indian communities the earliest sound recordings of American Indian music. He offered his congratulations to the American Folklife Center and also to the Folk Arts Program at the National Endowment for the Arts, in its 14th year in 1986, for their continuing good work.

The 1986 Festival featured four thematic programs and a series of musical performance celebrating the Festival's 20th anniversary. The 1986 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; the Program Book essays provided a larger context for the Festival presentations, without being limited to traditions actually presented at the 1986 Festival.

The 1986 Festival took place for two five-day weeks (June 25-29 and July 2-6) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). A visual highlight of the 1986 Festival site was a large flooded rice paddy in the Japan program, where daily rice-transplanting rituals were enacted. The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Office of Folklife Programs.

Office of Folklife Programs

Peter Seitel, Director; Richard Kurin, Deputy Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Alicia María González, Assistant Director for Program Development; Marjorie Hunt, Phyllis M. May, Nicholas R. Spitzer, Folklorists; Richard Derbyshire, Archivist

National Park Service

William Penn Mott, Jr., Director; Manus J. Fish, Jr., Regional Director, National Capital Region
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1986 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Folk festivals  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Food habits  Search this
World music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notes
Contracts
Sound recordings
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Video recordings
Videotapes
Correspondence
Digital images
Negatives
Photographic prints
Slides (photographs)
Plans (drawings)
Business records
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1986 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1986
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1986 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5e5d0b7a9-ee40-4c10-9622-ca4ebcd9d931
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1986
Online Media:

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Digital images
Business records
Contracts
Notes
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Slides (photographs)
Audiocassettes
Photographic prints
Video recordings
Videotapes
Date:
June 25-July 5, 1992
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 1992 Festival of American Folklife. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: The Changing Soundscape in Indian Country

Series 3: Creativity and Resistance: Maroon Culture in the Americas

Series 4: New Mexico

Series 5: Workers at the White House
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 1992 Festival of American Folklife was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The Columbus Quincentenary that was commemorated in 1992 gave pause to reflect on the forces that over the preceding 500 years had shaped social life in the Americas. The Festival programs on New Mexico, Maroons, and American Indian musics illustrated important historical and ongoing processes through which communities establish cultural identities in complex and dynamic social circumstances.

"The Changing Soundscape in Indian Country," produced jointly with the National Museum of the American Indian, explored ways that Indian musicians and their communities creatively adapted elements from the musical traditions brought to this continent from Europe, Africa, and elsewhere. Although many of the forms of this Indian music are non-Indian in origin, the themes and performance styles clearly address Indian experience and aesthetic expectations. In their creative hands, as Festival visitors could experience first-hand, external musical influences became part of the self-definition of Indian identity and trenchant commentary on what had been happening in "Indian Country" over the past five centuries.

Nowhere is the connection between creativity and self-definition more clear than in the cultural identities of contemporary Maroon peoples, whose ancestors escaped plantation slavery in the Americas and founded independent societies. Faced with the task of constructing and defending their positions, Maroons creatively defined themselves from a variety of sources. While their political institutions, expressive arts, religions, and other social forms were predominantly African in origin, they drew from a broad range of African cultures, and from European and Native American cultures as well. Much of the aesthetic component of Maroon cultures - their vibrant traditions of verbal and visual arts, shared with Festival visitors on the National Mall - encourages the cohesiveness of their society and voices themes that embody common experience and interest.

The Spanish Conquest established the Western Hemisphere's European presence and its most widely spoken language. While the original conquerors' culture did not value the Native cultures it encountered, over the centuries segments of Hispanic and Native American and later English-speaking and other populations engaged one another, by necessity, in ways that gave rise to today's rich array of cultural identities. New Mexico's distinctive cultural landscape took shape in this way, represented by some peoples who sustain their cultural identities through centuries-old combinations of Indian and European forms of thought and action, and by others whose basis of identity lies in reaffirming the wisdom and relevance of ancestral ways. Festival visitors could witness how, in New Mexico, cultural identity reflects the changes that continue to be wrought from the varieties of these social encounters.

The 1992 Festival also marked the 200th anniversary of the White House. Not a king's palace but rather "the people's house," the White House is at once national symbol, executive office and conference center, ceremonial setting, museum, tourist attraction, and family residence. The Festival revealed the culture of White House workers, who supported this broad array of functions over a span of history shaped by remarkable events, people and social change. White House workers had made the White House work with their labor and dedication. The Festival's living exhibition presented some of the skills, experiences, and values through which they gave shape to their occupational identities, calling visitors' attention to an important human component of the 200 year institutional history.

The 1992 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 25-29 and July 2-5) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 10th Street and 13th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan).

The 1992 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; keynote essays provided background on the Festival and each of the four programs, with shorter essays spotlighting particular traditions and offering a forum for statements from Maroon spokespeople.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies.

Center for Folklife Programs & Cultural Studies

Richard Kurin, Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Director, Smithsonian/Folkways Recordings; Peter Seitel, Senior Folklorist; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Olivia Cadaval, Director, Quincentenary Projects; Richard Kennedy, Program Analyst; Vivian Chen, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Folklorists; Ken Bilby, Marjorie Hunt, Curators; Carla Borden, John Franklin, Program Managers; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Betty Belanus, Frank Proschan, Nicholas Spitzer, Research Associates

Folklife Advisory Council

Roger Abrahams, Jacinto Arias, Jane Beck, Pat Jasper, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, Bernice Reagon, John Roberts, Carol Robertson, Gilbert Sprauve, John Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos, Carlos Vélez-Ibáñez

National Park Service

James M. Ridenour, Director; Robert G. Stanton, Regional Director, National Capital Region
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Folklore  Search this
Food habits  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
World music  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Digital images
Business records
Contracts
Notes
Sound recordings
Plans (drawings)
Negatives
Audiotapes
Memorandums
Slides (photographs)
Audiocassettes
Photographic prints
Video recordings
Videotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1992
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1992 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5f73b77d3-05ca-40f8-be62-39e38b1d04cd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-1992

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