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Minutes

Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution, Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Minutes digital asset number 1

DC Street Art: A Visual Conversation

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (digital audio file)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2017 July 02
Scope and Contents:
Diana N'Diaye (presenter); CHELOVE (Cita Sadeli) and MASPAZ( Frederico) ;Artists CHELOVE and MASPAZ discuss how they use their work to celebrate the natural world and examine cultural roots drawing upon their American upbringing, their cultural heritage (Javanese and Colombian, respectively), and their involvement in the D.C. street art scene.
General:
This audio recording has been transcribed. View transcription and play recording here. Download a PDF of the transcription here.
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Mural painting and decoration -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Street art  Search this
Graffiti artists  Search this
Immigrants  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2017, Item SFF2017_0702_OTM_Story_Circle_0001
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2017 Smithsonian Folklife Festival / Series 4: On The Move / 4.3: Audio
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5fcf97e25-ba9e-4c83-9f23-0878db9e55ea
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2017-ref949
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View DC Street Art: A Visual Conversation digital asset number 1

American Anthropological Association; AAA - Problems of Anth. Research & Ethics

Collection Creator:
Gibson, Gordon D. (Gordon Davis), 1915-2007  Search this
Container:
Box 138
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1936 - 2007
Collection Restrictions:
The Gordon Davis Gibson papers are open for research. Access to the computer disks in the collection are restricted due to preservation concerns. The personnel files of Smithsonian staff have also been restricted.

Access to the Gordon Davis Gibson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Citation:
Gordon Davis Gibson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Gordon Davis Gibson papers
Gordon Davis Gibson papers / Series 12: Organizations
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw314f5ce2d-8502-4534-9edf-4628f7fd4e07
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1984-13-ref3596

American Anthropological Association; A.A. Committee on Research Problems and Ethics

Collection Creator:
Gibson, Gordon D. (Gordon Davis), 1915-2007  Search this
Container:
Box 138
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1936 - 2007
Collection Restrictions:
The Gordon Davis Gibson papers are open for research. Access to the computer disks in the collection are restricted due to preservation concerns. The personnel files of Smithsonian staff have also been restricted.

Access to the Gordon Davis Gibson papers requires an appointment.
Collection Citation:
Gordon Davis Gibson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Gordon Davis Gibson papers
Gordon Davis Gibson papers / Series 12: Organizations
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw392860978-0090-49b7-a967-ade3fe0c62c6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1984-13-ref3599

American Anthropology association correspondence

Collection Creator:
Beals, Ralph L. (Ralph Leon), 1901-1985  Search this
Container:
Box 75
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1966-01 - 1967-02
Arrangement:
Chronological
Collection Restrictions:
The Ralph Leon Beals papers are open for research. At Ralph Beals' request, his 1930-1933 correspondence were restricted until 2000. These include letters to and from his wife while he was in the field, several letters to his children, and one letter to his mother-in-law. Beals supplied edited copies of the restricted letters for public access. The restrictions have since been lifted, and the edited copies have been retained with the original letters. His field assistants' materials have been restricted for the lifetime of the creators.

Access to the Ralph Leon Beals papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Ralph Leon Beals papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Ralph Leon Beals papers
Ralph Leon Beals papers / Series 11: Research and Ethics
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3939cc0fb-d472-4557-98b0-4376b98b89d3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1980-54a-ref1315

Terence Turner papers

Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Names:
Chagnon, Napoleon A., 1938-  Search this
Neel, James V. (James Van Gundia), 1915-  Search this
Tierney, Patrick  Search this
Extent:
56.6 Linear feet (100 document boxes, 4 half-document boxes, 21 shoe boxes, 1 oversize box, and 10 map folders)
86 Sound cassettes
72 Sound tape reels (5")
21 Sound tape reels (3")
4 Sound cassettes (microcassette)
3 Sound tape reels (7")
157 Videocassettes (VHS)
48 Videocassettes (MiniDV)
11 Videodiscs (DVD)
10 Videocassettes (U-matic)
6 Electronic discs (DVD)
2 Film reels (Approximately 3200 feet)
1 Videocassettes (VHS-C)
1 Videocassettes (Hi8)
1 Videocassettes (Video 8)
Culture:
Mebêngôkre (Kayapó/Cayapo)  Search this
Yanomami (Yanoama)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Sound cassettes
Sound tape reels
Sound cassettes (microcassette)
Videocassettes (vhs)
Videocassettes (minidv)
Videodiscs (dvd)
Videocassettes (u-matic)
Electronic discs (dvd)
Film reels
Videocassettes (vhs-c)
Videocassettes (hi8)
Videocassettes (video 8)
Place:
Amazon River Region
Date:
1938-1942
1952-2015
bulk 1964-2008
Summary:
Terence "Terry" Sheldon Turner (1935-2015) was best known for his ethnographic work among the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) people of the Amazon rainforest and his work as an activist for the Mebêngôkre and other communities. This collection documents his interest in the Mebêngôkre and his work as a human rights activist. It includes field notes, censuses, papers, notes, correspondence, news clippings, sound recordings, films, photographs, charts and diagrams, genealogy and kinship information, and computer discs.
Scope and Contents:
The Terence Turner papers contain materials related to his work as an anthropologist and human rights activist. Turner's primary focus of research was the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) people of the Amazon rainforest. The collection contains field notes, censuses, papers and draft manuscripts, correspondence, notes, news clippings, sound recordings, films, photographs, charts and diagrams, genealogy and kinship information, and computer discs relating to that interest. His work in human rights is also well documented; the collection contains notes, papers, correspondence, and news clippings. A significant amount of the human rights material relates to the Yanomami controversy which arose when Turner and Leslie Sponsel sent the American Anthropological Association a memo warning of the furor that was likely to result from the publication of the book Darkness in El Dorado by Patrick Tierney. The human rights materials in the collection also include materials relating to the Mebêngôkre and their environmental protection protests and demonstrations. The film and video primarily relate to the Granada Television films for which he consulted and the films produced by the Kayapo with the help of the Kayapo Video Project. There are some materials relating to courses which he taught or took.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 7 series: (1) Research, 1952-2015; (2) Human rights, ethics, and activism, circa 1964-2015; (3) Papers, conferences, and courses, 1959-2013; (4) Correspondence and contacts, 1966-2008; (5) Computer files, 1983-2010; (6) Photographs, 1938-1942, 1952, 1962-2014; (7) Sound recordings, 1962, 1976-2003; and (8) Film and video, 1975-2008
Biographical Note:
Terence "Terry" Sheldon Turner (1935-2015) was best known for his ethnographic work with the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) people of the Amazon rainforest and his work as an activist for the Mebêngôkre and other communities. He was born in Philadelphia and raised outside of Washington, DC. He earned his A.B. from Harvard University (1957) and M.A. from the University of California, Berkeley (1959), in Modern European History. His interest in how society functions brought him to the Department of Social Relations at Harvard University for his Ph.D. (1965), where his studies turned to Social Anthropology. His interests were still in Europe, but his advisor, David Maybury-Lewis, persuaded him to study the Mebêngôkre in Brazil (Moberg). Despite his initial intentions, Turner developed a lasting relationship with the Mebêngôkre, who gave him the name Wakampu. He worked with the community for more than 50 years, visiting them over 20 times.

Turner and his then wife, Joan Bamberger, lived with the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) from 1962 to 1964 while conducting research for their dissertations. His initial studies were on socio-cultural change, social organization, political systems, dual organization, a comparison to other Gê tribes, and mythology. Joan studied Mebêngôkre material culture, as it related to both function and significance. Turner's interest in mythology and the ties between the structure and motifs of myths to social structure led him to spend a year (1966-1967) at the University of Paris where Claude Lévi-Strauss was working on a project involving comparisons of mythology and social structure of different Central Brazilian indigenous groups.

Turner taught at Cornell University from 1966 to 1968, at the University of Chicago from 1968 to 1999, and then returned to Cornell from 1999 to 2015 where his wife, Jane Fajans, was also a professor. While teaching at the University of Chicago, Turner developed an interest in Karl Marx and the applications of his theories to anthropology (Moberg). He stated in a Guggenheim grant application that "Another main line of theoretical effort has been my attempt to generalize Marx's concept of value to account for the forms of social value generated in such forms of 'social production', in particular those of the Kayapo and other primitive, classless societies" (Terence Turner papers). In an interview for an article in the Chicago Reader, he said that "The Kayapo didn't have an economic sphere. They didn't have commodity production. Production for them in an immediate sense is production of their lives, and of course then you realize–wow!–this is a society for which the complete human being through all stages of life, right up to death, is the supreme product. It's the most complex and demanding product, and the social order is the whole process of producing that product" (Moberg). His interest in Marx led him to study Piaget, Vygotsky, Leont'ev, and Zinchenko, who "provided analytically principled ways of connecting material activity with forms of consciousness" (Terence Turner papers).

Turner was interested in visual anthropology. He assisted in the production of three British documentaries on the Mebêngôkre people: the BBC's Face Values in 1976 and Granada Television's Disappearing World series episodes "The Kayapo" and "The Kayapo: Out of the Forest" in 1987 and 1989. He also assisted the Mebêngôkre in documenting their own culture. The Mebêngôkre had obtained video cameras in 1985 and Turner encouraged them to obtain more cameras from the Granada crew in return for access to the community in 1987 (Harms). In 1990, he created the Kayapo Video Project, which funded the purchase of cameras, education for the Mebêngôkre filmmakers in filming and editing, and preserving the original footage at the Kayapo Video Archive/Arquivo de Video Kaiapo at the Centro de Trabalho Indigenista. Turner stated in a 1996 request for funding that the purpose of the project was "to generate an extensive archive of videos about all aspects of Kayapo culture and ecological knowledge, and simultaneously build up a cadre of well-trained video camerapersons and video-editors capable of continuing video-making and using activities into the future. The videos will be produced (both shot and edited) by the Kayapo themselves. They will form the backbone of a larger project of Kayapo cultural preservation, provide visual tests for use in a projected Kayapo educational program, and also generate a unique audio-visual record of the ecological knowledge and technology of a major Amazonian culture" (Terence Turner papers).

Turner was also very involved in human rights work and activism for indigenous communities. He felt it was the responsibility of anthropologists to defend the rights of the people whom they studied. He was involved in "anthropological activism," assisting the Mebêngôkre and others in their fight to protect their rights and environment. This interest began when Turner investigated the movement of miners, loggers, and poachers onto Mebêngôkre lands for FUNAI (the Fundação Nacional do Índio) (Harms). There were widespread protests against these incursions by the Mebêngôkre beginning in the early 1970s, which resulted in the Mebêngôkre gaining land rights. Despite this success, conflicts between the Mebêngôkre and Brazilian nationals, as well as within the Mebêngôkre community, continued. Turner both observed and participated in many of these protests and documented the ways in which these actions affected Mebêngôkre society and culture. Two of the most important protests concerned the planned construction of a series of hydroelectric dams on the Xingú River. The first protest, at Altamira in 1989, successfully derailed the project. The success of this protest brought international attention to the Mebêngôkre, who sent representatives to Canada in 1992 to support the Cree, who were protesting the construction of a hydroelectric dam there. The Brazilian government redesigned their original plans for the series of dams on the Xingú River; when these plans were leaked in 2008, another protest ensued. Turner and his daughter, Vanessa, documented this protest.

Turner's commitment to human rights led to him becoming a founding member of the American Anthropological Association's Ethics Committee (1969-1972) and Committee for Human Rights (1992-1997), serving as president of Survival International, U.S.A., heading the Special Commission of the American Anthropological Association to Investigate the Situation of the Brazilian Yanomami (1990-1991), and receiving the Solon T. Kimball Award from the American Anthropological Association in 1998.

Sources Cited

American Anthropological Association. "AAA Mourns the Loss of Dr. Terence Turner." Accessed June 22, 2022. https://www.americananthro.org/StayInformed/NewsDetail.aspx?ItemNumber=13188

Glaser, Linda B. "Anthropologist Terence Turner dies at 79." Cornell Chronicle, November 11, 2015.

Harms, William. "Terence Turner, anthropologist and human rights advocate for indigenous people, 1935-2015." UChicago News, November 17, 2015.

Moberg, David. "When Worlds Collide: Encounters with Anthropologist Terence Turner and other agents of modernity left the Kayapo of Brazil with something they'd never had before: power." Chicago Reader, October 2, 1997.

Survival International. "Terry Turner." Accessed June 22, 2022. https://www.survivalinternational.org/news/10992

Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

1935 December 30 -- Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1957 -- A.B. from Harvard College in Modern European History, graduating cum Laude

1959 -- M.A. from the University of California, Berkley, in Modern European History

1961 -- Married Joan Bamberger on August 25

1962 -- Began work with Mebêngôkre (Kayapó)

1965 -- Ph.D. from Harvard University's Department of Social Relations in Social Anthropology Research associate at the Museo Nacional do Brasil

1966-1968 -- Visiting assistant professor of anthropology at Cornell University

1968-1982 -- Assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago

1969-1972 -- Member of the American Anthropological Association's Ethics Committee

1976 -- Advisor for the filming of Face Values with the BBC

1980 -- Married Jane Fajans on July 25

1981 -- Daughter Vanessa Fajans-Turner born on September 26

1982-1999 -- Professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago.

1984 -- Daughter Allison Fajans-Turner born on June 15

1987 -- Advisor for the filming of Disappearing World: The Kayapo with Granada Films

1989 -- Advisor for the filming of Disappearing World: The Kayapo: Out of the Forest with Granada Films

1990-1991 -- Chair of the American Anthropological Association's Special Commission to Investigate the Situation of the Brazilian Yanomami

1992-1997 -- Member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee for Human Rights

1998 -- Received Solon T. Kimball Award from the American Anthropological Association

1999-2004 -- Adjunct professor of anthropology at Cornell University.

2004-2015 -- Visiting professor of anthropology at Cornell University.

2015 November 7 -- Died in Ithaca, New York.
Orthography:
The archivist uses Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) or Mebêngôkre to refer to the Mebêngôkre people. However, Turner and other anthropologists whose work is included in the collection used other spelling variations (Mẽbêngôkre, Mebengokre, Megengokré, Kayapó, Kayapo, Kaiapó, Kaiapo, Cayapó, Cayapo, and Caiapo) which have not be altered in folder titles or descriptions.

The archivist uses Yanomami to refer to the Yanomami (Yanoama) people. Some folder titles or contents may use the Yanomamö spelling.
Related Materials:
Materials related to the Mebêngôkre (Kayapó) in the National Anthropological Archives (NAA) can also be found in the William Lipkind papers and Photo Lot 79-1. Materials related to the Yanomami in the NAA can also be found in the Timothy Asch papers, the American Anthropological Association records, and Photo Lot 94-28. Materials related to the Yanomami in the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA) can be found in the Timothy Asch and Napoleon Chagnon films of the Yanomamo.
Provenance:
The Terence Turner papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Turner's wife, Jane Fajans, in 2020.
Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Human Rights  Search this
Ethics  Search this
Brazil  Search this
Environmental issues  Search this
Indigenous peoples -- Civil rights  Search this
Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2020-03
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c4036e9a-bdac-4313-9fe0-b42094d645fd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2020-03

"The AAA's Relation to Its Own Code of Ethics" (AAA Meeting Paper 2006)

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Container:
Box 80, Folder 16
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2006-2008
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes a draft of a paper by Turner entitled "The American Anthropological Association's Relation to Its Own Code of Ethics: Anthropology's Ethical Accountability to Its Others and Itself," transparencies, a paper by Turner entitled "The Special Relationship between Anthropology and Human Rights," the American Anthropological Association's Code of Ethics as approved in 1998, and a paper by Turner entitled "American Anthropological Association considers prohibition of clandestine research."
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 3: Papers, conferences, and courses / 3.1: Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw371cec7cb-7e55-4ac9-8992-12f39c9f598f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref1070

Human rights

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1968
1986-2012
undated
Scope and Contents:
This subseries contains materials related to Turner's work with human rights, specifically in relation to indigenous rights, intellectual property rights, and the environment. The first section relates to his work for the American Anthropological Association's Committee for Human Rights, and the remainder of the materials relate to his interest in the topic outside of the committee. Materials include papers, notes, memos, correspondence, and news clippings.
Arrangement:
The subseries begins with a section on the Committee for Human Rights (CfHR) of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and then proceeds chronologically. Some folders have been removed from their chronological position to be grouped with related folders of an earlier date.
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2020-03, Subseries 2.1
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw312f99ee0-880a-4b11-ac02-ea5006cbba23
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref213

Yanomami controversies

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1964-2014
undated
Scope and Contents:
This subseries includes materials related to the two major controversies concerning the Yanomami people with which Turner was involved. The first of these arose from the Brazilian goverment allowing mining and logging in Yanomami territories, which led to the Haximu or Yanomami Massacre in 1993. In 1990, when it became clear that the Brazilian government was not inclined to create a Yanomami reservation which convered their territory, the American Anthropological Association created a Special Commission to Investigate the Situation of the Brazilian Yanomami. Turner chaired this commission and this subseries includes materials related to this investigation including correspondence, press releases, reports, interviews, and papers. The second controversy arose in 2000, just prior to the publication of Darkness in El Dorado by Patrick Tierney, when Turner and Leslie Sponsel warned the AAA that the book would incite controversy. The materials related to this controversy include papers, correspondence, books, news clippings, and interviews.
Arrangement:
This subseries is arranged in two sections: Special Commission to Investigate the Situation of the Brazilian Yanomami and Darkness in El Dorado controversy.
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2020-03, Subseries 2.3
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38bcafda2-833d-485d-933d-2a30aa596017
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref215

[News Updates of the Yanomami People]

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Container:
Box 60, Folder 12
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2010
Scope and Contents:
Includes an informational packet from the American Anthropological Association meeting in 2010.
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism / 2.3: Yanomami controversies / Darkness in El Dorado controversy
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw32c20e974-f78f-495a-ae8b-36a91ecc4347
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref2354

[Yanomami information from AAA]

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Container:
Box 60, Folder 27
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2014
Scope and Contents:
Includes an informational packet on the Yanomami distributed at the American Anthropological Association in 2014 and a handout for a paper on the Yanomami presented at the conference.
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism / 2.3: Yanomami controversies / Darkness in El Dorado controversy
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3490619bc-51e8-47e2-bd1b-b263e877de25
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref2370

[Peacock]

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Container:
Box 60, Folder 34
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes an untitled paper by James Peacock on the American Anthropological Association's inquiry into the allegations made in Darkness in El Dorado.
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism / 2.3: Yanomami controversies / Darkness in El Dorado controversy
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3856bf6e6-36b2-4070-934f-adca6918304c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref2378

CfHR—1980's and 1990's Documents

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Extent:
2 Folders
Container:
Box 39, Folder 7 and 8
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1990-1994
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes correspondence, information about projects of the Committee for Human Rights, a draft for the brochure of the Committee for Human Rights, a syllabus for a seminar, bibliographies, meeting minutes, a proposal for a seminar, three editions of International Policy Report, a draft of a working paper entitled "Background, Considerations, and Recommendations for the Establishment of a Permanent Committee for Human Rights within the American Anthropological Association," a paper entitled "American Anthropological Association Statement on Puvungna Community," information on the Center for World Indigenous Studies, information on the United Nations Working Group on Indigenous Populations, information on the Human Genome Diversity Project, copies of newspaper clippings, and a meeting agenda.
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism / 2.1: Human rights / AAA Committee for Human Rights
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3c5bd97b4-4486-47cf-8808-43ad4a8b4dda
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref2400

CfHR 1980's and 1990's Documents

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Extent:
2 Folders
Container:
Box 40, Folder 1 and 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1992-1994
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes correspondence, newsletters, a draft of an agenda for a meeting of the Committee for Human Rights, meeting minutes, an anthropology and human rights survey, Committee for Human Rights reports and recommendations, photocopies of pamphlets, drafts of an abstract for a proposed session at the AAAs, lists of participants and panel members, information on human rights sessions at the AAAs, newspaper clippings, American Anthropological Association positions on various issues, and a report of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights entitled "Special Report on the Human Rights Situation in the So-Called 'Communities of Peoples in Resistance' in Guatemala."
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism / 2.1: Human rights / AAA Committee for Human Rights
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3077d399d-d265-46da-916b-55afe344e24c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref2401

CfHR Planning Document "Guidelines" Apr 1995

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Container:
Box 41, Folder 4
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1995
Scope and Contents:
Includes multiple drafts of the "Guidelines for a Permanent Committee for Human Rights within the American Anthropological Association" and correspondence.
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism / 2.1: Human rights / AAA Committee for Human Rights
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3a3a65917-a8b9-4256-bcdc-242981d013fe
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref2410

AAA Working Group on Environment

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Container:
Box 45, Folder 13
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1994
Scope and Contents:
Includes two drafts of the "Statement of the American Anthropological Association Task Force on the Environment."
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism / 2.1: Human rights
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw38d682658-96f0-42be-994f-70a82d03bfb8
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref2470

Human Rights Documents and papers

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Container:
Box 46, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1994-1997
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes the agenda for a Committe for Human Rights meeting, lists of the committee members, correspondence, a draft of the American Anthropological Association Code of Ethics, a paper by William Balée entitled "Language, Law, and Land in Pre-Amazonian Brazil," a paper by Josh Kaplan entitled "The Transnational Human Rights Movement in Israel: Justice without Borders or a New (Rights) Imperialism?," the title page and contents of a book entitled People or Peoples; Equality, Autonomy and Self-Determination: the Issues at Stake of the International Decade of the World's Indigenous People, a draft of a declaration on Human Rights by the American Anthropological Association, "Draft of the Inter-American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples" by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, and "An English Translation of the Barbados Declaration III by Anna C. Aguilar and Dr. Nelly Arvelo-Jimenez.
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism / 2.1: Human rights
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3d623dc86-b4cd-4bcf-a2c2-6feae6381f94
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref2477

Yanomami

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Container:
Box 56, Folder 19
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2000
Scope and Contents:
Includes a letter to the editor by Turner entitled "Reply to John Miller, 'The Fierce People: The Wages of Anthropological Incorrectness'" and a memo by Turner and Leslie Sponsel to the American Anthropological Association concerning Darkness in El Dorado by Patrick Tierney.
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism / 2.3: Yanomami controversies / Darkness in El Dorado controversy
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw33123acff-bcb0-47bb-a3be-af45887026f2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref2256

Yano Controversy Enters New Phase

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Container:
Box 57, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
2000-2002
2013
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes a fax to Turner from Les Sponsel with excerpts from The Blank Slate by Steven Pinker and two papers by Sponsel entitled "The Natural History of Peace" and "Yanomami: An Arena of Conflict and Aggression in the Amazon" with annnotations by Turner, a statement by the provost of the University of Michigan updating her previous statement about the Darkness in El Dorado controversy, a draft of a paper by Sponsel and Turner entitled "On Yanomami Rights and Violations of Professional Ethics and Human Rights," a paper for a AAA roundtable forum by Leda Martins entitled "The Swing of the Pendulum: The Impact of Chagnon's Work in Brazil" with annotations by Turner, a paper by Bruce Albert entitled "Human rights and research ethics among indigenous people: Final comments," the code of ethics of the American Anthropological Association, notes, an article by John J. Miller for the National Review entitled "The Fierce People" with annotations by Turner, an abstract for a paper by Janet Chernela entitled "The Case for Collective Responsibility and Repatriations," notes, a draft of a response to William Irons, part of an open letter from the participants of a rountable forum on the controversy with annotations by Turner, and two pages of a draft of an unknown paper.
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism / 2.3: Yanomami controversies / Darkness in El Dorado controversy
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw331000ed1-26f7-439a-997b-b36a9b8178a5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref2268

[Preliminary report of the El Dorado Task Force]

Collection Creator:
Turner, Terence  Search this
Container:
Box 58, Folder 9
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 2002
Scope and Contents:
Includes the "Working Papers of the American Anthropological Association El Dorado Task Force Submitted as a Preliminary Report" (some pages missing) with annotations by Turner.
Collection Restrictions:
Audiovisual and digital materials are restricted. Please contact the archives for information on the availability of access copies.

Graded papers are restricted for 80 years from the date of their creation and grant applications are restricted for 30 years from the date of their creation. These restrictions are noted on the folder level.

Access to the Terence Turner papers requires and appointment.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Terence Turner papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Terence Turner papers
Terence Turner papers / Series 2: Human rights, ethics, and activism / 2.3: Yanomami controversies / Darkness in El Dorado controversy / [El Dorado Task Force]:
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31b76bfba-c31c-4603-85fe-1f9cf6b29f43
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2020-03-ref2297

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