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Ellis B. Haizlip Papers

Producer:
Haizlip, Ellis B., 1929-1991  Search this
Musician:
Asford & Simpson. Asford, Nickolas. Simpson, Valerie, 1946  Search this
Monk, Thelonious  Search this
Author:
Baldwin, James, 1924-1987  Search this
Giovanni, Nikki  Search this
Extent:
63.64 Linear feet (82 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1945-1991
bulk 1965-1990
Summary:
The Ellis B. Haizlip papers, which date from circa 1945 --1991 (bulk dates 1965-1990) and measure 63.64 linear feets, are the personal papers of Ellis B. Haizlip, a television, theatre, and event producer most noted for his work on Soul! and Watch your Mouth! The collection is comprised of correspondence, scripts, financial and business documents, printed material, objects, photographs, slides, and videotapes.
Scope and Contents n ote:
This collection, consisting of materials which date from 1945 --1991 (bulk dates 1965-1990), contains personal and business documents accrued by Ellis B. Haizlip over the course of his adult life. The papers do not include many documents relating to Haizlip's family or childhood. Included are instances of personal and business correspondence, paperwork and notes relating to the productions with which Haizlip was involved, and documentation of his political, community, and artistic activist work. Also included are photographs and slides both personal and event-related, and videotapes of various television and film projects, including Soul! and Watch Your Mouth!
Arrangement note:
The collection is divided into 7 series.

Series 1: Biographical, 1941-1990; undated

Series 2: Career, 1950-1990; undated

Series 3: Organizations, 1948-1990; undated

Series 4: Scripts, 1942-1988; undated

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1950-1990; undated

Series 6: Photographs, undated

Series 7: Videotapes, undated
Biographical/Historical note:
Born September 21, 1929 in Washington, D.C., Ellis Benjamin Haizlip was the son of Ellis M. and Sarah Corbett Haizlip. Haizlip began his production career during his days at Howard University, where he produced the Howard Players in addition to majoring in sociology and economics. He moved to New York after graduation and began his involvement in professional production, including both productions at the Harlem YMCA of plays such as Dark of the Moon and international tours of James Baldwin's The Amen Corner and the dance show Black New World. Haizlip is best known for the television series Soul!, a program that aired on public television WNET during the late 1960s and early 1970s, then resurfaced in the early 1980s. Soul! was a variety show focused on African-American experience, featuring music, dance, poetry, and interviews by and with black performers. Haizlip produced and occasionally hosted the program. He also created the educational series Watch Your Mouth!, a sitcom-style program featuring a diverse cast of characters who all struggled with Standard English. In addition to his career, Haizlip was involved with a plethora of organizations of all sorts, from political campaigns to arts organizations to a variety of African American groups such as Black Convention, Inc. and the Delta Sigma Theta sorority. Haizlip had a complex relationship with these organizations, serving as a board member on some, a hired event producer on others, and in some cases playing multiple roles within a single organization, such as the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Haizlip was openly gay, and was active in several LGBT rights groups during his life. His personal life was filled with a social circle of devoted and notable friends, among them Betty Shabazz, Novella Nelson, and Nikki Giovanni. Haizlip died of lung cancer on January 25, 1991. He was 61 years old.
Related Materials:
This collection contains artifacts catalogued in theACM Ojects collection.
Provenance:
The Ellis B. Haizlip papers were donated to the Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture on November 12, 1995, by Doris (Haizlip) Sanders.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Medical documents, financial materials and some correspondence in Career series are restricted. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Ellis B. Haizlip papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American celebrities  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Television producers and directors  Search this
African American dance  Search this
African American theater  Search this
Citation:
Ellis B. Haizlip papers, Anacostia Communityh Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Doris Sanders.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-005
See more items in:
Ellis B. Haizlip Papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-005
Online Media:

Poster for A Series of Events Endangered: Art and Performance by Men of Color

Designed by:
Seitu Jones  Search this
Subject of:
Marlon Riggs, American, 1957 - 1994  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper (fiber product)
Dimensions:
H x W: 16 1/2 × 12 3/4 in. (41.9 × 32.4 cm)
Type:
posters
Place used:
Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1990
Topic:
African American  Search this
Gender  Search this
Identity  Search this
LGBTQ  Search this
Men  Search this
Sexuality  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Jack Vincent in memory of Marlon Riggs
Object number:
2014.169.4
Restrictions & Rights:
Unknown - Restrictions Possible
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Memorabilia and Ephemera-Advertisements
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd544e177d2-d46b-4bbe-ac4c-40969c449c55
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2014.169.4
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Poster for A Series of Events Endangered: Art and Performance by Men of Color digital asset number 1
Online Media:

Kendall Productions Records

Topic:
Dance Party: the Teenarama Story (television program)
Teenarama (television program)
Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
4.6 Cubic feet (3 cartons, 2 oversized boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Scripts (documents)
Notes
Audiocassettes
Compact discs
Research
Photographs
Questionnaires
Letters (correspondence)
Interviews
Federal government records
Clippings
Videocassettes
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1952-2006
bulk 1997-2004
Summary:
The Kendall Productions records date from 1952-2006 with the bulk of material dating from 1997-2004 and measure 4.42 cubic feet. The records consist of material documenting the Kendall Productions documentary Dance Party: The Teenarama Story which first aired on Howard University's PBS affiliate WHUT in 2006. The records are comprised of research and production notes, government records, newspaper articles, questionnaires, photographs, letters, and scripts, accompanied by a significant amount of original media in the following formats: VHS and Beta videocassettes, audiocassettes, and audio compact discs.
Scope and Contents:
The records of Kendall Productions measure 4.6 cubic feet and date from 1952 to 2006, with the bulk of material dating from 1997-2004. The records contain the administrative files, research, project files, photographs, and audiovisual material produced during the creation of the documentary Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.

Administrative records include committee records, project assessments, budget files, promotional material, correspondence, and material related to individuals working on the documentary. Material within the series directly relate to the production processes of Dance Party: The Teenarama Story. Restricted files within the series have been indicated at the folder level. The administrative records were previously scattered throughout the collection.

Research files include biographical information, the history of television broadcasting in Washington D.C., community history, background on Teenarama, and race relations from 1940 through the 1960s. The research file subjects were originally labeled by the creators, and their subject designations have been maintained where relevant. Material includes newsclippings, informational booklets, notes, pamphlets, unpublished essays or write-ups, and prints of website pages.

Project files include interview transcripts and copies of questions for interviewees, documentary scripts, event fliers, equipment request forms, and realia. Event material relates to the production of Dance Party: The Teenarama Story, and not events related to the release or showings of the finished documentary.

Photographs document people who were a part of the Teenarama show, cast reunion events, and the documentary filming or recording processes. Folder titles were given by the creators and have been maintained. They are organized alphabetically by folder title.

Audiovisual material contains 63 items, a majority of which are VHS tapes. Material includes clips and edits of Dance Party: The Teenarama Story. Objects are listed alphabetically by their labels. Playback equipment is available.
Arrangement:
Kendall Productions Records is arranged in five series:

Series 1: Administrative Records

Series 2: Research Files

Series 3: Project Files

Series 4: Photographs

Series 5: Audiovisual Material
Historical Note:
The documentary film Dance Party: The Teenarama Story first broadcast in 2006 on the Howard University public television station WHUT in Washington D.C. The film traced the history and development of the television show Teenarama that aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970.

Teenarama originated as the Teenarama Dance Party radio program broadcast on WOOK Radio in Washington D.C. and became a television program after WOOK Radio received a license to operate a television station. The program premiered as a teen dance show for Black teenagers in the Washington D.C. and surrounding metropolitan area, featuring popular songs. The show's programming was first created by Cal Hackett and Al Jefferson. Bob King hosted the show from 1963-1965. Following King's departure, the show rotated hosts such as Leon Isaac Kennedy, Moon Man, and Daniel "Hollywood Breeze" Clayton. Guest performers on the show included James Brown, Smokey Robinson and The Miracles, Major Lance, Mary Wells, Aretha Franklin, Lou Rawls, Billy Stewart, Martha and The Vandellas, the Supremes, and the Four Seasons, among others. The program broadcasted live six days a week, the first of its kind in the country catering specifically to a Black audience.

The documentary about Teenarama was created by Beverly Lindsay-Johnson, Herb Grimes, and the National Hand Dance Association, and was funded in part by grants through the Humanities Council of Washington D.C.,The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, The Dudley Foundation and private donations. The film uses Teenarama to tell the story of teen dance television shows, youth and pop culture, race, and television history. The documentary is narrated by Martha Reeves of Martha and The Vandellas.
Provenance:
Donated by Beverly Lindsey-Johnson in 2006.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American radio stations  Search this
Television stations  Search this
Teen television programs  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Dance in motion pictures, television, etc.  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Scripts (documents)
Notes
Audiocassettes
Compact discs
Research
Photographs
Questionnaires
Letters (correspondence) -- 20th century.
Interviews
Federal government records
Clippings
Videocassettes
Citation:
Kendall Productions records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Beverly Lindsey-Johnson.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-055

Scooter Magruder Show: Interview on Beverly Lindsay

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2000
Scope and Contents:
Scooter Magruder interviewed Beverly Lindsay, who spoke of her film 'Swing, Bop & Hand Dance' and her current project about Teenarama, including information about the hand dance reenactment necessary for the documentary production.
Radio program. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 20000312.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Scooter Magruder Show: Interview on Beverly Lindsay, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005300
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref320

Teenarama Reunion Committee Meeting

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
On April 2, 1998, the Teenarama Reunion Committee held a production meeting for the planning of the Teenarama reunion as well as the documentary. Discussion included locating information about how WOOK radio and WOOK TV were perceived; the challenges involved in locating any information about WOOK; interviews to be conducted by humanities scholar Katrina Hazzard-Donald, Ph.D. to understand the events of the United States during the Teenarama era; and finding out if white teenagers wanted to be on the Teenarama show and why. One of the members stated a list of events which occurred during the Teenarama era; and there was discussion about segregation in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area in the 1960s, the Civil Rights Movement, Washington, D.C. as a community sheltered from the activism which occurred in cities, and how white people were different in Washington, D.C. in comparison to other cities. The committee also talked about music of the time and the Ed Sullivan show; various types of dances on Teenarama; D.C. hand dancing compared to hand dancing in other cities; and watching dancers at the Eclipse.
Meeting. Poor audio quality. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19980402.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005290_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama Reunion Committee Meeting, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005290_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref711

The Teenarama Dance Party 35th Anniversary Reunion Gala

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
The Teenarama Dance Party 35th Anniversary Reunion Gala was held on October 10, 1998 at the Eclipse Nightclub. The gala consisted of music from the Teenarama era, performances by the Teenarama Dance Party regulars, a reenactment of the Teenarama television program, and a dance party. The proceeds from the gala benefited the making of the Teenarama documentary.
Celebration - dance and music. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Timecode burnt into image. Dated 19981010.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
The Teenarama Dance Party 35th Anniversary Reunion Gala, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005284
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref712

Teenarama: Interviews with Donald Thoms and Arlene Kozak

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Baltimore (Md.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1998
Scope and Contents:
Donald Thoms, a former performer on 'The Buddy Dean Show,' explained how he became a teenage dancer on the show; how people in his school and neighborhood reacted to his participation in the show; and his feelings about the segregation practices of the show. Arlene Kozak spoke about Buddy Dean, 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and her role as a producer for the show. She explained how the teenagers were selected for the show, the segregation of the show, and the social interaction between white teens and black teens. Additionally, she discussed television station's (WJZ-Baltimore) reaction to the possibility of integrating 'The Buddy Dean Show.' The interviews were part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.' After the interviews, there is footage of production materials related to the film 'Hairspray' and exterior shots of The Senator in Baltimore, Maryland.
Interviews and b-roll footage. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Timecode burnt into image. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interviews with Donald Thoms and Arlene Kozak, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005285
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref713

Teenarama: Interview with Mike and Donna Leake

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1999
Scope and Contents:
Mike and Donna Leake talked about their experience as performers on 'The Teenarama Dance Party.' The couple discussed how they gained access to the show; why they were a part of the show; how they met; how long they have been married; and whether or not they reminsce about their days performing on the Teenarama television show. The interviews were part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.'
Interviews. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Physical asset: undated. Contents of recording: dated 19990203.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005298_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interviews with Mike and Donna Leake, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005298_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref714

Teenarama: Interview with Reginald 'Lucky' Luckett

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Reginald 'Lucky' Luckett, also known as Reggie, and Beverly Lindsay-Johnson discussed line dance, particularly as related to African culture and religion; song writers as prophets of their day; and how girls and boys, and women and men related to each other in the 1960s and the 1990s in regards to dancing and dating. Luckett spoke about how he developed social skills as a result of being a part of Teenarama, his fascination with and learning about the production of the show, his leadership role of screening the teenagers before they entered the studio prior to the taping of the show, the regular dancers on the show, and working with host Bob King. The interview was part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.'
Interviews. Poor audio quality. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19980520.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005299_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interviews with Reginald 'Lucky' Luckett, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005299_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref715

Teenarama: Interview with Gene Chandler

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
During an interview with Beverly Lindsay-Johnson, singer and songwriter Gene Chandler, also known as 'The Duke of Earl' or 'The Duke,' spoke about the importance of the 1960 teenage dance shows to the beginning of his career and exposing his music to a wider audience, particularly nationally on American Bandstand; the differences when performing at Howard Theater, the Apollo Theater, and the Regal Theater; and his views on race and opportunity. The interview was part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.'
Interview. Audio only. Poor audio quality. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19980523.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interview with Gene Chandler, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005292_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref716

Teenarama: Interview with Joe King

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
During an interview with Beverly Lindsay-Johnson, Joe King, born and raised in southeast Washington, D.C., talked about his experiences growing up in a working class, ethnically mixed neighborhood in southeast Washington, D.C. where 'there was no complete segregation.' King explained when and how he learned to dance, specifically hand dancing; his experience attending ethnically mixed parties hosted by blacks and whites; and the differences in the way people danced based on where they lived. He also spoke of his experience dancing on the Milt Grant Show; his thoughts about The Teenarama Dance Party as a viewer at home; and dance competitions. The interview was part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.'
Interviews. Poor audio quality. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19980618.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005295_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interview with Joe King, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005295_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref717

Teenarama: Interview with Al Jefferson, Bobby Lane, and Charles 'Chaz' Hall

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Al Jefferson, Bobby Lane, and Charles 'Chaz' Hall discussed the Teenarama radio program and how it evolved into the Teenarama dance program. Jefferson explained his role in the development of WOOK radio and the radio station's history, including a description of the radio station's programming and other on-air personalities. Jefferson and Lane talked about Richard Eaton - his personality, business sense, his relationship with the community, his family - and the program he hosted titled 'Unity Viewpoint.' They also talked about students' roles in the programming of Teenarama; the recruitment of the students; and recording of shows in the fishbowl at Waxie Maxie's record store. Hall described how he started at WOOK when he was in high school; how his interest evolved into learning more and more about the business side of broadcasting; and the various shows he worked on for WOOK. Lane, Hall, and Jefferson talked about Tex Daners and their relationship with him as well as the opening of the dance hall for teenagers called Casino Ball. They also talked about Bob King and 'Teenarama,' the television program. The interview was part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.'
Interviews. Audio only. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19980927.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005296_B

ACMA AV005274_A

ACMA AV005274_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interview with Al Jefferson, Bobby Lane, and Charles 'Chaz' Hall, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005296_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref718

Teenarama: Interview with Joe Quarterman

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1999
Scope and Contents:
Joe Quarterman talked about his experience as a dancer and musical performer on 'The Teenarama Dance Party.' He discussed when and why he was a performer on Teenarama; his musical career and what he does for a living; how segregation and the Civil Rights Movement affected him; the exposure in which Teenarama provided to local artists; and teen dance shows, in general. The interview was part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.'
Interviews. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19990119.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005301_B
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Musicians  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interview with Joe Quarterman, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005301_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref719

Teenarama: Interview with Peg Desonier

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Peg Desonier spoke of D.C. hand dancing and the jitterbug, and adopting black style of hand dancing. She talked about growing up in Old Greenbelt, Maryland; her education at Catholic schools and then finally public school; her exposure to early rhythm and blues; how white people's dance style differed from black people's; her school and social life as a result of dancing like black people; and the hatred see observed from her peers. Desonier explained when she was a young girl, the white block boys, who could dance, took her to bars and similar to perform for black men and women. She also talked about her desire and inability to dance on The Buddy Dean Show and Teenarama; and segregation in television programming. The interview was part of the research for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.'
Interviews. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19980926.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Stereotypes (Social psychology)  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Interview with Peg Desonier, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005293
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref720

Teenarama: Evaluation Committee Meeting

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1998
Scope and Contents:
Evaluation Committee discussed the treatment that Beverly Lindsay-Johnson wrote for a documentary film about the Teenarama show. The committee's responsibility was to evaluate the treatment and make suggestions to Beverly to strengthen the treatment so she can go into the next phase - the production phase. They also discussed the status of the project, and the difficulties in tracking down original footage of Teenarama.
Meeting. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19981109.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Evaluation Committee Meeting, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005302_A
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref721

Teenarama: Dance Class

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 2000
Scope and Contents:
Dance class for the documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story.' Teens learned the dances of the 1960s, particularly hand dance, for the authenticity of the documentary. The original footage from the television show 'The Teenarama Dance Party' could not be located so the filmmaker created reenactments of the show.
Performance. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Transcribed from physical asset: Eclipse. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV005283
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Dance Class, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005282
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref722

Bob King on WOOK

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1964
Scope and Contents:
Clips of music performed by Brenda Holloway, Valerie & Nick, the Temptations, the Carltons, Otis Leavill, and Mary Wells on WOOK radio program. Bob King was a Teenarama host.
Radio program. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19640502.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Blues (Music)  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Radio programs  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Bob King on WOOK, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005294
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref723

Teenarama: Conversation about the Television Program

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Conversation about the television program 'Teenarama,' particularly the format of the program and 'the regulars' who performed on the show. One of the conversation participants was considered the first 'regular' on the show. Director Beverly Lindsay-Johnson also spoke about a few specifics of the research and production process.
Conversation. Audio only. Poor audio quality. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Transcribed from physical asset: Barnett Williams. Dated 19980523.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Teenarama: Conversation about the Television Program, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005292_B
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref725

Interviews with Former Teenarama Dancers

Creator:
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Theresa Knight Johnson, who grew in the neighborhood of Congress Heights, talked about how she learned about Teenarama, her experience dancing on Teenarama, others' perception of her participation with Teenarama, and her style of dancing. Mike Goodwin of northeast Washington, D.C., spoke about assisting in picking of the regulars, memorable experiences participating with the Teenarama show, and his enjoyment of dancing and hand dance. Yvonne Mills explained the comradery among the Teenarama dancers, her thoughts about the Milt Grant Show, and how Teenarama impacted her personality and life.
Interviews. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Timecode burnt into image. Dated 19981010.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Dance  Search this
D.C. hand dance  Search this
Teenagers  Search this
Television programs  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Interviews with Former Teenarama Dancers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005284
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref727

Blacks in Hollywood : five favorable years in film & television 1987-1991 / George Hill, Spencer Moon

Author:
Hill, George H  Search this
Moon, Spencer  Search this
Physical description:
174 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1992
Topic:
African Americans in motion pictures  Search this
African Americans in the motion picture industry  Search this
African Americans on television  Search this
African Americans in television broadcasting  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1091359

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