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Reverend Divine [acetate film photo negative]

Photographer:
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Names:
Divine, Father, or Rev. (George Baker), ca. 1882-1965  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Container:
Box 1
Culture:
African Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Job Number: 25695
Group portrait of Divine with three other men and two women. Ink ident. on film edge. Signed "Scurlock / Photo" in ink, bottom right.
Biographical / Historical:
African-American religious leader, founder of the Peace Mission movement, b. probably near Savannah, Ga. and named George Baker. After preaching in the South, he moved to Harlem (1915) in New York City, became one of the neighborhood's biggest landlords, acquired wealth through other businesses, including restaurants and grocery stores, and began styling himself Major M. J. Divine, later Father Divine. Although once dismissed as a cult leader, he built the largest religious movement in northern ghettos during the Great Depression. His role as an early civil rights activist — he led anti-lynching campaigns, instituted economic cooperatives, and organized political action against racial discrimination — has come to be more appreciated. The movement spread beyond New York City to other places in the United States and abroad, sometimes after the group sent whites to purchase property in segregated areas. During the 1940s, his health and influence declined, but his movement symbolized the progressive spirit in the black church and helped define the church's active role in the civil rights movement. See Sara Harris, Father Divine (rev. ed. 1971); Kenneth E. Burnham, God Comes to America (1979); Robert Weisbrot, Father Divine (1984); Jill Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A. (1992). The Columbia Encyclopedia, Fifth Edition Copyright ©1994, 1995 Columbia University Press.
General:
#150 on original envelope? From box D.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Portraits, Group -- African Americans  Search this
African American clergy  Search this
Cults and nonconventional religious groups  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1930-1940 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives / 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep86137c154-86c0-4bb8-9ffc-f059f65c0b09
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-01-ref16

Father Divine "George" Baker [?] : [acetate film photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Names:
Divine, Father, or Rev. (George Baker), ca. 1882-1965  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Container:
Box 54
Culture:
African Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Portraits
Photographs
Date:
[undated]
Scope and Contents:
Fr. Divine standing behind his desk in the front of a row house living room. Signed in the negative, "Scurlock / Wash. D.C." Similar (but not identical) to 10" x 8" image, SIRIS bib. # 289384, Scan no. AC0618.00.0002500.tif. Signed in the (original) negative: "Scurlock / Wash. D.C."
Biographical / Historical:
African-American religious leader, founder of the Peace Mission movement, b. probably near Savannah, Ga. and named George Baker. After preaching in the South, he moved to Harlem (1915) in New York City, became one of the neighborhood's biggest landlords, acquired wealth through other businesses, including restaurants and grocery stores, and began styling himself Major M. J. Divine, later Father Divine. Although once dismissed as a cult leader, he built the largest religious movement in northern ghettos during the Great Depression. His role as an early civil rights activist&#x2014he led anti-lynching campaigns, instituted economic cooperatives, and organized political action against racial discrimination&#x2014has come to be more appreciated. The movement spread beyond New York City to other places in the United States and abroad, sometimes after the group sent whites to purchase property in segregated areas. During the 1940s, his health and influence declined, but his movement symbolized the progressive spirit in the black church and helped define the church's active role in the civil rights movement. See Sara Harris, Father Divine (rev. ed. 1971); Kenneth E. Burnham, God Comes to America (1979); Robert Weisbrot, Father Divine (1984); Jill Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A. (1992). The Columbia Encyclopedia, Fifth Edition Copyright ©1994, 1995 Columbia University Press.
Addison Scurlock probably photographed Father Divine in 1932, according to research by Professor Leonard Primiano, Cabrini College (e-mail Aug. 6, 2010).
General:
Probably a copy negative.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American clergy  Search this
Cults and nonconventional religious groups  Search this
Genre/Form:
Portraits -- African American men
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives / 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8c4a14793-ac72-4b06-8feb-79625bad11ac
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-01-ref1685

Reverend Divine [acetate film photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Names:
Divine, Father, or Rev. (George Baker), ca. 1882-1965  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Container:
Box 1
Culture:
African Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Job Number: 25695
Group portrait of Divine with fourteen other men and women, seated around a table; man in left foreground is writing on a pad and a woman is writing on the table. A sign on the wall behind them reads simply, "Abundance." Ink ident. on film edge, plus "15- Prints". Signed "Scurlock / Wash. D.C." in ink, bottom left.
Biographical / Historical:
African-American religious leader, founder of the Peace Mission movement, b. probably near Savannah, Ga. and named George Baker. After preaching in the South, he moved to Harlem (1915) in New York City, became one of the neighborhood's biggest landlords, acquired wealth through other businesses, including restaurants and grocery stores, and began styling himself Major M. J. Divine, later Father Divine. Although once dismissed as a cult leader, he built the largest religious movement in northern ghettos during the Great Depression. His role as an early civil rights activist — he led anti-lynching campaigns, instituted economic cooperatives, and organized political action against racial discrimination — has come to be more appreciated. The movement spread beyond New York City to other places in the United States and abroad, sometimes after the group sent whites to purchase property in segregated areas. During the 1940s, his health and influence declined, but his movement symbolized the progressive spirit in the black church and helped define the church's active role in the civil rights movement. See Sara Harris, Father Divine (rev. ed. 1971); Kenneth E. Burnham, God Comes to America (1979); Robert Weisbrot, Father Divine (1984); Jill Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A. (1992). -- The Columbia Encyclopedia, Fifth Edition Copyright ©1994, 1995 Columbia University Press.
Addison Scurlock probably photographed Father Divine in 1932, according to research by Professor Leonard Primiano, Cabrini College (e-mail Aug. 6, 2010).
General:
#151 on original envelope, from box D.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Portraits, Group -- African Americans  Search this
African American clergy  Search this
Cults and nonconventional religious groups  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1930-1940 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin Negatives / 4.1: Black-and-White Silver Gelatin negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep80b19cb43-7551-4ecd-b2f4-022f0639629a
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-01-ref21

[Fr. Divine (?) group photograph : acetate film photonegative.]

Photographer:
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Names:
Divine, Father, or Rev. (George Baker), ca. 1882-1965  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Culture:
African Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- 1930-1950 -- Photographs
Scope and Contents:
Ink on negative edge: "25695 [R.W. Divine ?] 35 prints". No manufacturer's mark on film edge.
Biographical / Historical:
African-American religious leader, founder of the Peace Mission movement, b. probably near Savannah, Ga. and named George Baker. After preaching in the South, he moved to Harlem (1915) in New York City, became one of the neighborhood's biggest landlords, acquired wealth through other businesses, including restaurants and grocery stores, and began styling himself Major M. J. Divine, later Father Divine. Although once dismissed as a cult leader, he built the largest religious movement in northern ghettos during the Great Depression. His role as an early civil rights activist — he led anti-lynching campaigns, instituted economic cooperatives, and organized political action against racial discrimination — has come to be more appreciated. The movement spread beyond New York City to other places in the United States and abroad, sometimes after the group sent whites to purchase property in segregated areas. During the 1940s, his health and influence declined, but his movement symbolized the progressive spirit in the black church and helped define the church's active role in the civil rights movement. See Sara Harris, Father Divine (rev. ed. 1971); Kenneth E. Burnham, God Comes to America (1979); Robert Weisbrot, Father Divine (1984); Jill Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A. (1992). The Columbia Encyclopedia, Fifth Edition Copyright ©1994, 1995 Columbia University Press.
Addison Scurlock probably photographed Father Divine in 1932, according to research by Professor Leonard Primiano, Cabrini College (e-mail Aug. 6, 2010).
General:
From negative Box D.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Portraits, Group -- African Americans  Search this
Offices  Search this
Organizations  Search this
Cults and nonconventional religious groups  Search this
African American clergy  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1930-1940 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.2: Black and white negatives in freezers arranged by job number
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.2: Black and white negatives in freezers arranged by job number / 4.2: Black and white negatives in freezers arranged by job number / Divine (Reverend) and Wife
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep81939aaad-f662-4d37-b699-6ed9b5bab22b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-02-ref27229

[Fr. Divine (?) in group photo, with woman writing : acetate film photonegative.]

Photographer:
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Names:
Divine, Father, or Rev. (George Baker), ca. 1882-1965  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Culture:
African Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Portraits
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- 1930-1950 -- Photographs
Scope and Contents:
Ink on negative edge: "25695 R.W. [Divine ?] 15 prints". No manufacturer's mark on film edge.
Biographical / Historical:
African-American religious leader, founder of the Peace Mission movement, b. probably near Savannah, Ga. and named George Baker. After preaching in the South, he moved to Harlem (1915) in New York City, became one of the neighborhood's biggest landlords, acquired wealth through other businesses, including restaurants and grocery stores, and began styling himself Major M. J. Divine, later Father Divine. Although once dismissed as a cult leader, he built the largest religious movement in northern ghettos during the Great Depression. His role as an early civil rights activist — he led anti-lynching campaigns, instituted economic cooperatives, and organized political action against racial discrimination — has come to be more appreciated. The movement spread beyond New York City to other places in the United States and abroad, sometimes after the group sent whites to purchase property in segregated areas. During the 1940s, his health and influence declined, but his movement symbolized the progressive spirit in the black church and helped define the church's active role in the civil rights movement. See Sara Harris, Father Divine (rev. ed. 1971); Kenneth E. Burnham, God Comes to America (1979); Robert Weisbrot, Father Divine (1984); Jill Watts, God, Harlem U.S.A. (1992). The Columbia Encyclopedia, Fifth Edition Copyright ©1994, 1995 Columbia University Press.
Addison Scurlock probably photographed Father Divine in 1932, according to research by Professor Leonard Primiano, Cabrini College (e-mail Aug. 6, 2010).
General:
From negative storage Box D.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Offices  Search this
Organizations  Search this
Cults and nonconventional religious groups  Search this
African American clergy  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1930-1940 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Portraits -- African American men
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.2: Black and white negatives in freezers arranged by job number
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.2: Black and white negatives in freezers arranged by job number / 4.2: Black and white negatives in freezers arranged by job number / Divine (Reverend) and Wife
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8f0c3ef74-469a-45de-923d-b7cbcb0021cc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-02-ref27230

Rev. H. Rhett James papers

Creator:
James, H. Rhett, Rev.  Search this
Names:
Connally, John Bowden, 1917-1993  Search this
Humphrey, Hubert H. (Hubert Horatio), 1911-1978  Search this
James, H. Rhett, Rev.  Search this
Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973  Search this
Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963  Search this
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968  Search this
Taylor, Hobart, 1920-  Search this
Extent:
1.18 Linear feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Color photographs
Newsletters
Audiocassettes
Books
Photographic prints
Oral histories (document genres)
Awards
Signatures (names)
Videocassettes
Resumes
Ephemera
Invitations
Correspondence
Clippings
Place:
Dallas (Tex.)
Date:
circa 1961-2004
Summary:
The collection, which measures 1.18 linear feet and dates from circa 1961-2004, documents the personal life and professional activities of Rev. H. Rhett James. The collection is comprised of awards, photographs, books, newspaper clippings, correspondence, invitations, newsletters, oral histories, resumes, audio- and videocassettes, and ephemera.
Scope and Contents note:
The Reverend H. Rhett James papers, which date from 1961 to 2004, document the personal and professional life of Reverend H. Rhett James. Very notable are the letters and correspondence between Reverend H. Rhett James and the United States of America President, Lyndon B. Johnson, and his cabinet. The papers include an oral history, a C.V., letters and correspondence, awards, black-and-white photographs, books, clippings. color photographs, ephemera, invitations, newsletters, photographic prints, signatures, audio cassettes, and videocassettes.
Arrangement note:
The collection is organized into four series: Series 1, Biographical, Series 2, Correspondence, Series 3, Writings, Series 4, Sound Recordings, and Series 5, Photogrpahs. One box contains Series 1, 2, and 3. Box 2 contains Series 3, and Box 4 contains Series 5.

Series 1, Biographical, 1961-2004, is comprised of a typed oral history interview with Dr. H. Rhett James, on December 21, 2002, for the Dallas Public Library's Oral History Project (Box 1/Folder 1), a typed C.V. (Box 1/Folder 2), and other biographical information in the form of newsletters, booklets, certificates, visitor passes, and card invitations.

Series 2, Correspondence, 1962-1999, is arranged alphabetically by correspondent's last name. It is comprised of typed correspondence and letters on various political and community issues. Members of Lyndon b. Johnson's administration figure prominently in this series. The miscellaneous folders contain reproduced correspondence and letters from the Lyndon B. Johnson museum. A set of original envelopes are at the end of folder 15.

Series 3, Writings, 1972, 1992, 1997, is comprised of two books and a NAACP position paper on Dallas Public Schools by Reverend H. Rhett James. The books are titled, The Audacity to Survive and Stamp your own Passport.

Series 4, Sound Recordings, 1972, 1975, 1981, undated, is comprised of 60 audio cassettes in a box. Three notable cassettes in the box contain Jesse Jackson sermons on Civil Rights, "Silver" Rights, social justice, the black church's role in Black Amerca, and religion's role in America. A majority of the tapes are sermons by H. Rhett James on mind consciousness, spiritual regeneration, empowerment, the Gospel, civil rights, social justice, and ecomonic betterment.

Series 5, Photographs, is comprised of autographed photographs by political personage, family photographs, and other photographs including H. Rhett James with prominent figures, notably one with Martin Luther King Jr. Autographed photographs include Lyndon B Johnson, Benjamin Hoover, ans Hubert Humphrey.
Biographical/Historical note:
Reverend H. Rhett James was an ardent pastor,African-American educator, and community activist, who played a role in Dallas and the larger Texas community during the Civil Rights era.

Reverend H. Rhett James (1928-2004) was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on December 1, 1928. He received his early education in the public schools of Topeka, Kansas, Nashville, Tennessee and San Antonio, Texas, he enrolled at Virginia Union University, Richomond Virginia. Upon graduation (Bachelor's 1950), he accepted a teaching position in San Antonio, and became the first African American to receive the Masters of Education Degree from Our Lady of the Lake College (1951).

Returning to his Alma Mater, Virginia Union, he taught in the Department of Education and Psychology and received his Masters of Divinty Degree (1958). Moving to Dallas to accept the pastorate of New Hope Baptist church, he enrolled in the Brite College, T.C.U. and became the first African American to receive the Masters of Theology Degree (1961). He rceived his Ph.D. degree in Urban Administration frm the University of Texas at Arlingotn (1981). He served as pastor of New Hope Baptist church until his retirement in 1986.

As a political and community activist, he headed scores of local organizations working for desegregation and human rights causes. He headed the N.A.A.C.P through severe local desegregation and human rights causes; founder and twelve year Board President of the Dallas O.I.C. (Opportunities Industrialization Center); the first black president of the Dallas War on Poverty (DCCAC); founding Board member of the Dallas Urban League and Board and Budget committee member for the Dallas United Way, ACLU, Southern Historical Association, UNCF and YMCA boards.

Rverend H. Rhett James died on March 14, 2004. He left one daughter and three sons.
Rights:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans -- Education  Search this
African American religious leaders  Search this
African American political activists  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Discrimination in employment  Search this
African Americans -- Employment  Search this
School integration  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color photographs
Newsletters
Audiocassettes
Books
Photographic prints
Oral histories (document genres)
Awards
Signatures (names)
Videocassettes
Resumes
Ephemera
Invitations
Correspondence
Clippings
Citation:
Rev. H. Rhett James papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Gregory James.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-037
See more items in:
Rev. H. Rhett James papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7200cd434-ea37-4d76-b744-e1be6eebb74a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-037

Robinson-Smith family papers

Creator:
Robinson-Smith family  Search this
Names:
Robinson-Smith family  Search this
Extent:
3 Boxes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pamphlets
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Obituaries
Ephemera
Color photographs
Photographs
Date:
circa 1945-1975
Summary:
The collection, which dates from approximately 1945-1975, documents the daily lives and activities of the Robinson-Smith family. The collection is comprised of photographs, correspondence, bankbooks, obituaries, pamphlets, report cards and ephemera.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American children -- Education  Search this
African American religious leaders  Search this
African Americans -- Religious life  Search this
Funeral rites and ceremonies  Search this
African American families  Search this
Women religious leaders  Search this
Genre/Form:
Pamphlets
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Obituaries
Ephemera
Color photographs
Photographs
Citation:
Robinson-Smith family papers, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Cassandra M. Robinson.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-033
See more items in:
Robinson-Smith family papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa71903e333-4790-4a31-b957-d84ef978be67
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-033

19th century African-American Literature Collection

Names:
African Methodist Episcopal Church  Search this
First African Baptist Church (Savannah, Ga.)  Search this
Knights of Pythias  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Extent:
3.4 Linear feet ((30 books))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Books
Date:
circa 1800 - circa 1898
Summary:
This collection, which dates from the 19th century, contains 30 books written by or concerning African-Americans. The books are largely non-fiction and include material relating to African-American churches and evangelists, fraternal organizations, prominent members of the African-American Community, former slaves, education and self-improvement. Also present are several volumes of poetry, a tax ledger and a volume concerning patents.
Formatted Contents note:
Life and times of Frederick Douglass, written by himself -- Duplicate copy of the souvenir from the Afro-American league of Tennessee to Hon. James M. Ashley of Ohio... -- Myrtilla Miner, a memoir -- A narrative of the life and travels of Mrs. Nancy Prince -- A list of patents granted by the United States from April 10, 1790... -- Comly's spelling and reading book -- Poems written during the progress of the abolition question in the United States... -- The Black phalanx -- Progress of a race; or, the remarkable advancement of the Afro-American Negro from the bondage of slavery... -- Africa and America; addresses and discourses -- A discourse, delivered on the death of Capt. Paul Cuffe -- An apology for African Methodism -- History of the Knights of Pythias -- The college of life; or, practical self-educator, a manual of self-improvement for the colored race... -- The Rev. J.W. Loguen, as a slave and as a freeman -- Behind the scenes -- The story of Archer Alexander from slavery to freedom, March 30, 1863 -- From slave cabin to pulpit: the autobiography of Rev. Peter Randolph -- Uncle Tom's story of his life from 1789-1877 -- Poems on various subjects, religious and moral -- Men of mark: eminent, progressive and rising -- [Tax ledger] -- A memorial discourse by Rev. Henry Highland Grant -- My recollections of African M.E. Ministers -- William Lloyd Garrison: the abolitionist -- Annals of the First African church in the United States of America... -- How to get and keep churches out of debt... -- Code and the discipline of the African Methodist Episcopalian Zion Church -- History of the First African Baptist Church -- An autobiography: the story of the Lord's dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith, the colored evangelist.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans -- Social conditions  Search this
African American religious leaders  Search this
Slavery -- United States  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
Slaves  Search this
American poetry -- African American authors  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Books
Citation:
19th century African-American literature collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-107
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-107

Screening race in American nontheatrical film edited by Allyson Nadia Field, Marsha Gordon, editors ; with a foreword by Jacqueline Najuma Stewart

Editor:
Field, Allyson Nadia 1976-  Search this
Gordon, Marsha 1971-  Search this
Writer of the foreword:
Stewart, Jacqueline Najuma 1970-  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xxvi, 430 pages) illustrations
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
Place:
United States
Date:
2019
Topic:
Race in motion pictures  Search this
Race awareness in motion pictures  Search this
African Americans in motion pictures  Search this
Minorities in motion pictures  Search this
Motion pictures in education  Search this
Ethnographic films  Search this
Amateur films  Search this
Call number:
PN1995.9.R22 S374 2019 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
1-user
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145488

The story of Ida Robinson / Vivian E. McIver ; illustrated by Heather Steffens

Author:
McIver, Vivian E.  Search this
Illustrator:
Steffens, Heather  Search this
Subject:
Robinson, Ida 1891-1946  Search this
Physical description:
27 pages : color illustrations, portraits ; 26 cm
Type:
Biography
Juvenile literature
Biographies
Juvenile works
Date:
2015
Topic:
African American religious leaders  Search this
African American women  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1076729

African-American religious leaders : a-z of African Americans / Nathan Aaseng

Author:
Aaseng, Nathan  Search this
Physical description:
viii, 264 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
Type:
Biography
Place:
United States
Date:
2003
C2003
Topic:
African American religious leaders  Search this
Religious leaders  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_717282

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