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Oral history interview with Joyce J. Scott

Interviewee:
Scott, Joyce J., 1948-  Search this
Interviewer:
Silberman, Robert B. (Robert Bruce), 1950-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
61 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2009 July 22
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Joyce J. Scott conducted 2009 July 22, by Robert Silberman, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Scott's home and studio, in Baltimore, Maryland.
Scott talks about her childhood in Baltimore; childhood visits to the Baltimore Museum of Art and Walters Art Gallery; her parents' lives growing up in the segregated South; her artist mother, who was her first bead-teacher; craft traditions in her family, including pottery and quilting; quilting as storytelling, "diaries" for preliterate people; improvisational craft; Three Generation Quilt; Fifty .; undergraduate studies at Maryland Institute College of Art; travels after graduation in Mexico, Central , and South America; graduate studies in craft in Mexico; decision at age 23 to become a studio artist, and partnership with her mother; theater work with Robert Sherman and in New York and in Baltimore; theater work with Kay Lawal in Thunder Thigh Revue; studies at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Deer Isle, ME, where she learned traditional Navajo weaving, and learned the peyote stitch for beadwork, a seminal technique for her career; her book Fearless Beadwork: Improvisational Peyote Stitch: handwriting & drawings from hell. Rochester, NY: Visual Studies Workshop, 1994; working in different mediums; What You Mean Jungle Music? [1988]; working for recognition of beadwork as a sculptural medium; politics, social commentary, and humor in her work; series Day after Rape; her working processes; Rodney King's Head Was Squashed Like a Watermelon; working in monoprints; working in glass (flameworking, lampworking), including at Pilchuck Glass School, Stanwood, WA, Tacoma [WA] Museum of Glass, UrbanGlass, New York, NY, Haystack Mountain; retrospective exhibition, "Joyce Scott Kickin' It With the Old Masters" at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 2000; series Africa in Unexpected Places; installation work, including in "Images Concealed," San Francisco, 1995, and Believe I've Been Sanctified, Charleston, SC, 1991; small-scale work; influence of her upbringing in the Pentecostal church; Buddha Gives Basketball to the Ghetto [1991] and the importance of spirituality in her work; travels in South America, Africa, and Europe; the complementarity of performance/theater work and visual art; performance pieces: Generic Interference, Genetic Engineering, Virtual Reality, and Walk a Mile in My Drawers; Lips mosaic at Reagan National Airport, Washington, D.C.; teaching workshops at Haystack, Penland School of Crafts, Penland, NC, the Oregon School of Arts and Craft, Portland; artist-in-residency at Pilchuck; gallery affiliations, and usefulness of the gallery system, which allows her to work as a studio artist; the importance of galleries as a free venue open to ordinary people; luxuriating in beauty. She recalls Betty Woodman, Dr. Leslie King-Hammond, Lowery Sims, Fritz Dreisbach, Anthony Corradetti, Antony Gormley, Ann Hamilton, David Hammons, Mary Jane Jacob, Cesar Pelli, Susan Cummins, and Helen Drutt English.
Biographical / Historical:
Joyce J. Scott (1948- ) is a visual and performance artist and educator who lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 memory cards. Reformatted in 2010 as 4 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 11 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
This transcript is open for research. Access to the entire recording is restricted. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Performance artists -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Quiltmakers -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Jewelers -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Educators -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Women jewelers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women jewelers  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
African American sculptors  Search this
African American educators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.scott09
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9e43800a6-9a2b-4379-b1cc-daffdb8fe6f9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-scott09
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Peggie L. Hartwell

Interviewee:
Hartwell, Peggie L., 1939-  Search this
Interviewer:
Malarcher, Patricia  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
80 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 June 3 and July 10
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Peggie Hartwell conducted 2002 June 3-July 10, by Patricia Malarcher, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in the artist's apartment, on Central Park West, New York, N.Y.
Hartwell speaks of growing up on a farm with her extended family in Springfield, S.C.; female quiltmakers and male storytellers in her family; drawing in sand as a child; her mother's move to Brooklyn; joining her mother and father in New York; growing up in Brooklyn; her awareness of the many cultures in New York and being surrounded by art, including her mother's crocheting and her father's a cappella group; taking tap dancing lessons; experimenting with art in public school; working at various factory jobs after high school until "reconnecting" with art; studying with dancer Syvilla Fort at the Katherine Dunham School of Dance in New York; Fort encouraging her to draw on the studio walls and sew costumes; touring internationally with the theater group Harlem Rhythm USA from 1965 to 1972; her return to the U.S. and receiving a theater degree at Queens College; working at an insurance company to support her art; exhibiting her black and white, pen-and-ink drawings; the narratives and "oral histories" in her quilts; the meaning of various fabrics and colors; participating in "quilting communities" such as the Women of Color Quilters Network, Empire Quilters, and the American Quilter's Society; her lectures, workshops, and residencies; working with children;narratives inspired by childhood memories; her move back to South Carolina; themes in her quilts and "quilting styles" (improvisational, traditional, contemporary, and African American); serving on the board of the New York Chapter of the Women of Color Quilters Network; and planning the exhibition "Threads of Faith" for the New York Bible Association. She also comments on John Cage, Cuesta Benberry, Asadata Dafora, Francelise Dawkins, Carolyn Mazloomi, Edjohnetta Miller, Arthur Mitchell, Harriet Powers, Faith Ringgold, Marie Wilson, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Peggie L. Hartwell (1939- ) is an African American quiltmaker of Summerville, S.C. Patricia Malarcher is a fiber artist.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 3 hr., 50 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- South Carolina  Search this
Topic:
Textile crafts  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
African American artists  Search this
African American quilts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.hartwe02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9d8644c2b-f518-4536-a216-e5a078ede75a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hartwe02
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Carolyn Mazloomi

Interviewee:
Mazloomi, Carolyn  Search this
Interviewer:
Cubbs, Joanne  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Women of Colour Quilters Network  Search this
Adkins, Minnie, 1934-  Search this
Benberry, Cuesta  Search this
Cargo, Robert T.  Search this
Connell, Martha Stamm  Search this
Freeman, Roland L., 1936-  Search this
Hill, Lauryn  Search this
Johnson, Nkosi, 1989-2001  Search this
Miller, Edjohnetta  Search this
Sisto, Penny  Search this
Wilson, Marie  Search this
Extent:
16 Items (Sound recording: 16 sound files (4 hr., 33 min.), digital, wav)
56 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2002 September 17-30
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Carolyn Mazloomi conducted 2002 September 17 and 30, by Joanne Cubbs, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, in West Chester, Ohio. Mazloomi speaks of growing up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with a family of self-taught artists; the positive influence of her aunt and teacher Dr. Carter; the generation of African American quilt-makers who followed a gap in quilt-making post-slavery; she describes her previous career as an aeronautical engineer and her transition to quilt-making; how she identifies herself as a craftsperson, not an artist; her experience with Baltimore album and Appalachian quilts; learning to quilt; the Women of Color Quilter's Network and its economic and social development programs; her book, "Spirits of the Cloth"; the positive and negative aspects of travel; the false generalizations of African American quilts in academic circles; the importance of gender, race, and ethnicity in her work; her connection to "praise songs"; she discusses functional vs. nonfunctional quilts; the market for "hand-crafted" quilts; agents and galleries; she describes her working environment; adopting the use of a sewing machine in her work; the importance of community; her technique; her accomplishment of placing African-American quilts in the Renwick Gallery; the influence of magazines, including "Raw Vision;" her aversion to commissions; expanding her use of materials and technology; her exhibitions; her role as an advocate and dealer; finding inspiration in black and white linocuts and her use of color in quilts; and making a connection with her audience. Mazloomi also recalls Marie Wilson, Cuesta Benberry, Edjohnetta Miller, Roland Freeman, Robert Cargo, Martha Connell, Penny Sisto, Minnie Adkins, Nkosi Johnson, and Lauryn Hill.
Biographical / Historical:
Carolyn Mazloomi (1948- ) is a quilt maker from West Chester, Ohio.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 sound discs. Reformatted in 2010 as 16 digital wav files. Duration is 4 hrs., 33 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
Transcript available on the Archives of American Art website.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- Ohio  Search this
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Baltimore album quilts  Search this
African American artists  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
African American art -- African influences  Search this
Women textile designers  Search this
Quilting  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.mazloo02
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9d9a5becc-43a8-46ff-8692-ae6babf46aac
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mazloo02
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Michael A. Cummings

Interviewee:
Cummings, Michael, 1945-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Creator:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Names:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Extent:
138 Pages (Transcript)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Sound recordings
Interviews
Date:
2012 October 25-26
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Michael A. Cummings conducted 2012 October 25 and 26, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Cummings' home and studio, in New York, New York.
Biographical / Historical:
Michael A. Cummings (1945- ) is quilter and artist in New York, New York. Mija Riedel (1958- ) is an independent scholar in San Francisco, California.
General:
Originally recorded on 4 SD memory cards as 8 digital wav files. Duration is 6 hrs., 53 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics and administrators.
Restrictions:
For more information on how to access this interview contact Reference Services.
Occupation:
Quiltmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Identifier:
AAA.cummin12
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9ed9b21ec-af35-4236-96e8-77931bf7c146
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cummin12
Online Media:

Man Made: African-American Men and Quilting Traditions exhibition records

Creator:
Fry, Gladys-Marie, 1931-  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
0.05 Linear feet (1 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Color slides
Exhibit scripts
Exhibition records
Correspondence
Transparencies
Photographic prints
Brochures
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1998-01 - 1998-03
Summary:
An exhibition on African American male quilt makers organized by Dr. Gladys-Marie Fry and exhibited at Anacostia Community Museum from January 1998 --March 1998. Quilters included: Elroy Atkins, Paul Buford, Charles Carter, Thomas Covington, Raymond Dobard, David Driskell, Benjamin Jackson, Dennis Jones, Thomas Mack, Jeff Martin, Herbert Munn, Charles Palmer, Joe Washington, and Warren Wise. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Scope and Contents note:
These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, education packets, floor plans, and catalogues.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Quiltmakers  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Exhibit scripts
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Correspondence
Transparencies
Photographic prints
Brochures
Citation:
Man made: African-American men and quilting traditions exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-013
See more items in:
Man Made: African-American Men and Quilting Traditions exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7d586eb36-08d9-479d-a9ca-732b4656e575
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-013

Oral history interview with Faith Ringgold

Interviewee:
Ringgold, Faith  Search this
Interviewer:
Nadelman, Cynthia  Search this
Names:
Gwathmey, Robert, 1903-1988  Search this
Lippard, Lucy R.  Search this
Lloyd, Tom, 1929-  Search this
Morris, Robert, 1931-2018  Search this
Tucker, Marcia  Search this
Extent:
349 Pages (Transcript)
15 Items (sound files (10 hr., 49 min.), digital)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Interviews
Sound recordings
Date:
1989 September 6-October 18
Scope and Contents:
An interview of Faith Ringgold conducted 1989 September 6-October 18, by Cynthia Nadelman, for the Archives of American Art.
Ringgold discusses Harlem from the 1930s through the 1970s; her background and education; her art and political activities; feminism; the evolution of her work; her paintings, soft sculpture constructions, quilts, and performance pieces. She recalls Robert Gwathmey, Tom Lloyd, Robert Morris, Marcia Tucker, Lucy Lippard, her mother, and others.
Biographical / Historical:
Faith Ringgold (1930- ) is an Afro-American painter, sculptor, and performance artist from New York, N.Y.
General:
Originally recorded on 8 sound cassettes. Reformatted in 2010 as 15 digital wav files. Duration is 10 hr., 50 min.
Provenance:
This interview is part of the Archives of American Art Oral History Program, started in 1958 to document the history of the visual arts in the United States, primarily through interviews with artists, historians, dealers, critics, and administrators. Funding for this interview provided by the Lannan Foundation.
Occupation:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Quiltmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Performance art  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Women performance artists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Identifier:
AAA.ringgo89
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9a7611879-5e18-48a4-8202-96d4af3aaeb9
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ringgo89
Online Media:

Joyce J. Scott papers

Creator:
Scott, Joyce J., 1948-  Search this
Names:
Scott, Elizabeth Talford, 1916-2011  Search this
Extent:
9.1 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Performances (creative events)
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Photograph albums
Date:
1914-2019
bulk 1970s-2000s
Summary:
The papers of African American sculptor, jewelry maker, quilter, and performance artist Joyce J. Scott measure 9.1 linear feet and date from 1948 to 2019, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1970s to the 2000s, and individual materials from 1914 to 1915, and from 1932. The collection consists of biographical material; correspondence; writings; professional files, including exhibition and project files, born-digital materials, and gallery records; printed material; photographic material, including photo albums; artwork; and audiovisual material, including recordings of performances and lectures.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of African American sculptor, jewelry maker, quilter, and performance artist Joyce J. Scott measure 9.1 linear feet and date from 1948 to 2019, with the bulk of the material dating from the 1970s to the 2000s and individual materials from 1914 to 1915, and from 1932. The collection consists of biographical material; correspondence; writings; professional files, including exhibition and project files, born-digital materials, and gallery records; printed material; photographic material, including photo albums; artwork; and audiovisual material, including recordings of performances and lectures.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as eight series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1948-1977, 1989-2015 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1972-2014 (Box 1; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1970-circa 2000s, undated (Box 1-2; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 4: Professional Files, 1970s-circa 2013 (Box 2, OV 10; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1914-1915, 1932, 1953-2018 (Box 3-5, OV 10; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographic Material, 1971-2019 (Box 5; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, 1987-1989, 1998-2006, undated (Box 5; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 8: Audiovisual Material, 1983-2006, undated (Boxes 5-9; 4.2 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Joyce J. Scott (1948- ) is an African American sculptor, jewelry maker, quilter, and performance artist in Baltimore, Maryland. She is best known for her use of off-loom bead weaving techniques to depict the complexities of race, gender, and class. Born in 1948, Scott is the daughter of quilter and folk artist Elizabeth Talford Scott, from whom she learned quilting. She earned a Bachelor of Fine Art from the Maryland Institute College of Art, and Master of Fine Art from the Instituto Allende in San Miguel de Allende in Mexico. In 2016, Scott was named a MacArthur Fellow, and she was named the Smithsonian Visionary Artist in 2019. Her work is held in permanent collections across the country, including at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Spencer Museum of Art at the University of Kansas, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Joyce J. Scott, 2009 July 22 conducted by Robert Silberman.
Provenance:
The papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in 2019 by Joyce J. Scott as part of the Archives' African American Collecting Initiative funded by the Henry Luce Foundation.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research. Access to original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Occupation:
Sculptors -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Performance artists -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Quiltmakers -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Jewelers -- Maryland -- Baltimore  Search this
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Women performance artists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Women jewelers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Performances (creative events)
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Photograph albums
Citation:
Joyce J. Scott papers, 1914-2019. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.scotjoyc
See more items in:
Joyce J. Scott papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw9d4e05ecc-bf00-40f5-8557-82922aa175ce
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-scotjoyc

Man Made: Gallery tour with Curator Dr. Gladys-Marie Fry

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Fry, Gladys-Marie, 1931-  Search this
Collection Creator:
Fry, Gladys-Marie, 1931-  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Curator Dr. Gladys-Marie Fry led a gallery walk of the exhibition 'Man Made: African-American Men and Quilting Traditions.'
Exhibition tour. Related to exhibition 'Man Made: African-American Men and Quilting Traditions.' Dated 19980117.
Biographical / Historical:
Man Made: African-American Men and Quilting Traditions featured quilts made by members of the least represented group among all American quilt makers, African American men. The quilts shown had their origins in both the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and included both utilitarian bed quilts to purely decorative ones. The quilt makers represented ranged from the 9-year-old Herbert Munn to the 105-year-old Benjamin Jackson. The quilts came from four different areas of the country: the Deep South, the Atlantic Seaboard, the Midwest, and the Far West. The exhibition was developed by guest curator Dr. Gladys-Marie Fry at the University of Maryland in 1996.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Quilts  Search this
Quiltmakers  Search this
Male quiltmakers  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Man Made: Gallery Walk with Curator Dr. Gladys-Marie Fry, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-013, Item ACMA AV002236
See more items in:
Man Made: African-American Men and Quilting Traditions exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa700cec8f2-45f9-4ea5-b695-20754141d932
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-013-ref506

Always There: Docent Training

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1993
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Raymond Dobard, quilter and art historian, provided a historical overview of African American quilts and detailed explanations regarding the ways in which the quilts were constructed. After the lecture, Robert Hall led the docents on a tour through the exhibition 'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts.'
Lecture and exhibition tour. Related to exhibition 'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts.' Dated 19930717.
Biographical / Historical:
'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts' displayed 27 quilts with photographs and related objects, and surveyed 200 years of black quiltmaking. The quilts, images and artifacts in the exhibit were presented within a dual framework of black history and quilt history. Profiled quiltmakers included Mary Bell Berry, Jessie Telfair, Dorothy Nelle Sanders, parents of school children at P.S. 48 in New York City, Michael Cummings, Carolyn Mazloomi, Lillian Beattie, Jim Smoote, and Carole Harris. The exhibition was organized by the Kentucky Quilt Project, Inc. in Louisville, Kentucky, and on display at the Anacostia Museum from July 15 to October 17, 1993.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV002165
Collection Restrictions:
Use of materials is restricted. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Quiltmakers  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Quilts  Search this
Blacks -- History  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Always There: Docent Training, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-014, Item ACMA AV002164
See more items in:
Always there: the African American presence in American quilts exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7e7e4ceb6-c00b-48e6-bcc3-4b593a0ad1b9
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-014-ref508

News Coverage of the exhibition 'Always There.'

Creator:
WTTG (Television station : Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1993
Scope and Contents:
During an interview for a news segment on FOX News 5, Anacostia Museum Director Steven Newsome talked about the exhibition 'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts' and African American quilt techniques; and a provided an explanation of story quilts. The news segment also included footage of the quilts which were on display throughout the exhibit.
News program. Related to exhibition 'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts.' Dated 1993.
Biographical / Historical:
'Always There: The African American Presence in American Quilts' displayed 27 quilts with photographs and related objects, and surveyed 200 years of black quiltmaking. The quilts, images and artifacts in the exhibit were presented within a dual framework of black history and quilt history. Profiled quiltmakers included Mary Bell Berry, Jessie Telfair, Dorothy Nelle Sanders, parents of school children at P.S. 48 in New York City, Michael Cummings, Carolyn Mazloomi, Lillian Beattie, Jim Smoote, and Carole Harris. The exhibition was organized by the Kentucky Quilt Project, Inc. in Louisville, Kentucky, and on display at the Anacostia Museum from July 15 to October 17, 1993.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of materials is restricted. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Quiltmakers  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Quilts  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
News Coverage of the exhibition 'Always There,' Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-014, Item ACMA AV002223
See more items in:
Always there: the African American presence in American quilts exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa735249cbd-6118-4933-8053-7991f0635c8b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-014-ref509

Interview with Maria Goodwin

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
2011
Scope and Contents:
Maria Goodwin - member of the Daughters of Dorcas and Sons quilt guild - discusses her quilting experience, the evolution of quilt making, and the Washington, D.C. based quilting group - Daughters of Dorcas and Sons. Goodwin recalls her early memories of cutting out triangles and sewing them together with her mother, who was a seamstress; she states her mother taught her an appreciation for fabric. She explains she was not interested in clothes making, and decided to explore quilting because she found quilt making less confining. Goodwin explains how the members of Daughters of Dorcas and Sons interact with one another, and describes the various styles the members employ in their quilt making. She talks about how the quilt has evolved from a functional piece to a piece of artwork displayed on the wall; the development and evolution of art quilt; use of technology in quilting; the increase in pricing of quilting and sewing machines; the evolution of fabric house; special quilting fabric lines; the various types of quilting; and working with colors in quilting. Goodwin explains the debate and development of categories in quilt competition shows; use of other media, in addition to fabric, in quilting; the intersection between quilting, family history, and scrapbooking; the growth of quilting communities; the importance of a foundation for beginner quilters; and how quilters build their skills over time. Goodwin talks about her creative style, her creative process, how she designs her quilt, where she finds inspiration, and how her interest in quilting grew. She loves the challenge of designing and incorporating ancient history, including illuminated manuscripts, into her quilts. Goodwin talks about the future of quilting, including children learning to quilt; the importance of preserving old quilts because they document family and quilting heritage; and the importance of documenting the creation of the quilts through video and photographs so the creation process is preserved.
Interview. Dated 20110131.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Quiltmakers  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Civic leaders  Search this
Communities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Maria Goodwin, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.01-007.16, Item ACMA AV005219
See more items in:
Community and Creativity Project Records
Community and Creativity Project Records / Series 2: Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7d6bb5217-6f90-4490-b778-b412ff2d70b4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-01-007-16-ref102

Museum of Craft and Folk Art records

Creator:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art  Search this
Names:
Bean, Bennett, 1941-  Search this
Fasanella, Ralph  Search this
Graham, Bill, 1931-  Search this
Kovatch, Ron  Search this
MacKenzie, Warren, 1924-2018  Search this
Moran, Mike, 1948-  Search this
Extent:
28.9 Linear feet
12.48 Gigabytes
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Gigabytes
Photographs
Transparencies
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Interviews
Visitors' books
Date:
1970-2012
Summary:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art records measure 28.9 linear feet and 12.48 GB and date from 1970 to 2012. The museum was established in 1982 in San Francisco, California and exhibited local and national craft and folk art collections until it closed in 2012. The collection includes administration records, extensive exhibition files, artists' files, museum publications, printed material, video recordings, born digital items, and photographic material.
Scope and Contents:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art records measure 28.9 linear feet and 12.48 GB and date from 1970 to 2012. The museum was established in 1982 in San Francisco, California and exhibited local and national craft and folk art collections until it closed in 2012. The collection includes administration records, extensive exhibition files, artists' files, museum publications, printed material, video recordings, born digital items, and photographic material.

Administration records include museum bylaws, lists of early exhibitions, education program evaluations, documents related to public programs, and printed materials.

Exhibition files comprise the largest group of materials in the collection. Notable exhibitions documented include Who'd A Thought It: Improvisation in African-American Quiltmaking (1987-1988), MetalSpeaks: The Unexpected (1997), and Warren MacKenzie: Legacy of an American Potter (2009). There are also video recordings and born digital content scattered throughout the series. Though most of the material is related to the MOCFA exhibitions, there are a few files on exhibitions at other galleries and museums. The exhibition files contain a wide variety of correspondence, art inventories, price lists, printed and digital materials, guest registers, photographic materials, and video recordings, electronic discs, videodiscs, and floppy discs. Artists' files are found for a handful of artists, including Bennett Bean, Ralph Fasanella, Bill Graham, Ron Kovatch, Mike Moran, and Salvador V. Ricalde. The files contain primarily video recordings of artist performances and interviews, but also include resumes and inquiries.

Museum of Craft and Folk Art publications consist of exhibition catalogs, newsletters, reports, and announcements. There are several video recordings of events, such as fashion shows, that were held at the museum.

Printed materials and commercial video recordings include an oversize scrapbook, binders of exhibition press clippings, and folders of clippings on various topics, as well as documentaries and news coverage of the museum.

Photographic materials consist of slides, negatives, photographs, transparencies, and a photo album. The images are of artwork, exhibition installations, events, artists, and museum offices and staff.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series.

Missing Title

Series 1: Administration Records, circa 1988-circa 2010 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1, 0.004 GB; ER01-ER02)

Series 2: Exhibition Files, 1976-2012 (22.7 linear feet; Boxes 1-24, 12.14 GB; ER03-ER50)

Series 3: Artists' Files and Video Recordings, 1983-2007 (0.6 linear feet; Box 24)

Series 4: Museum of Craft and Folk Art Publications, 1977-2012 (1.4 linear feet; Boxes 24-25, OV 31-32, 0.003 GB; ER51)

Series 5: Printed Materials and Commercial Video Recordings, 1983-2007 (2.7 linear feet; Boxes 26-28, OV 33-35, 0.050 GB; ER52)

Series 6: Photographic Materials, 1970-2011 (2 linear feet; Boxes 28-30, 0.282 GB; ER53)
Biographical / Historical:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art was established in San Francisco, California by painter and sculptor Gertrud Parker in 1982. The museum was originally located in a house on Balboa Street and then moved to the Fort Mason Center where it operated for over twenty years before relocating to Yerba Buena Lane in 2006.

Notable exhibitions organized or held at the museum include Innerskins/Outerskins: Gut and Fishskin (1987), Who'd A Thought It: Improvisation in African-American Quiltmaking (1987-1988) which was a traveling exhibition, Folk Art of the Soviet Union (1990), MetalSpeaks: The Unexpected (1997), Emblems of Passage: Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (2002), The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts From the Japanese Internment Camp 1942-1946 (2006), and Warren MacKenzie: Legacy of an American Potter (2009). The museum also worked with artists on commission and regularly offered public programs, workshops, and educational outreach events for visitors of all ages. They also partnered with the website Etsy on a popular monthly "Craft Bar" series where people could gather, socialize, and create something handmade.

The Museum of Craft and Folk Art closed in December of 2012. The final exhibition was Fiber Futures: Japan's Textile Pioneers.
Provenance:
The Museum of Craft and Folk Art records were donated by Jennifer McCabe, former executive director of the museum, in 2014.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Archives of American Art makes its archival collections available for non-commercial, educational and personal use unless restricted by copyright and/or donor restrictions, including but not limited to access and publication restrictions. AAA makes no representations concerning such rights and restrictions and it is the user's responsibility to determine whether rights or restrictions exist and to obtain any necessary permission to access, use, reproduce and publish the collections. Please refer to the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for additional information.
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
Handicraft  Search this
African American quilts  Search this
African American artists  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Function:
Art museums -- California
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Transparencies
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Interviews
Visitors' books
Citation:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.musecraf
See more items in:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/mw98f0f3945-c344-402d-b343-648c3d72aadf
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-musecraf
Online Media:

Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012

Creator:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art  Search this
Subject:
MacKenzie, Warren  Search this
Kovatch, Ron  Search this
Graham, Bill  Search this
Fasanella, Ralph  Search this
Bean, Bennett  Search this
Moran, Mike  Search this
Type:
Photographs
Transparencies
Video recordings
Scrapbooks
Interviews
Visitors' books
Citation:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Folk art  Search this
Handicraft  Search this
African American quilts  Search this
African American artists  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Theme:
Art organizations  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16184
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)367139
AAA_collcode_musecraf
Theme:
Art organizations
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_367139
Online Media:

Joyce J. Scott papers, 1914-2019, bulk 1970s-2000s

Creator:
Scott, Joyce J., 1948-  Search this
Subject:
Scott, Elizabeth Talford  Search this
Type:
Performances (creative events)
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Photograph albums
Citation:
Joyce J. Scott papers, 1914-2019, bulk 1970s-2000s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Women artists  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Women performance artists  Search this
Women sculptors  Search this
Women jewelers  Search this
Theme:
African American  Search this
Women  Search this
Lives of artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)21713
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)398529
AAA_collcode_scotjoyc
Theme:
African American
Women
Lives of artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_398529
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Carolyn Mazloomi, 2002 September 17-30

Interviewee:
Mazloomi, Carolyn, 1948-  Search this
Interviewer:
Cubbs, Joanne  Search this
Subject:
Adkins, Minnie  Search this
Benberry, Cuesta  Search this
Cargo, Robert T.  Search this
Connell, Martha Stamm  Search this
Freeman, Roland L.  Search this
Hill, Lauryn  Search this
Johnson, Nkosi  Search this
Miller, Edjohnetta  Search this
Sisto, Penny  Search this
Wilson, Marie  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Women of Colour Quilters Network  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Carolyn Mazloomi, 2002 September 17-30. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Decorative arts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Baltimore album quilts  Search this
African American artists  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
African American art -- African influences  Search this
Women textile designers  Search this
Quilting  Search this
Theme:
African American  Search this
Craft  Search this
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11504
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)240143
AAA_collcode_mazloo02
Theme:
African American
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_240143
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Peggie L. Hartwell, 2002 June 3 and July 10

Interviewee:
Hartwell, Peggie L., 1939-  Search this
Interviewer:
Malarcher, Patricia  Search this
Subject:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Peggie L. Hartwell, 2002 June 3 and July 10. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
Textile crafts  Search this
Decorative arts  Search this
African American artists  Search this
African American quilts  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Women textile artists  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Theme:
African American  Search this
Craft  Search this
Women  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11503
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)237989
AAA_collcode_hartwe02
Theme:
African American
Craft
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_237989
Online Media:

Oral history interview with Michael A. Cummings, 2012 October 25-26

Interviewee:
Cummings, Michael A. (Michael Arthur), 1945-  Search this
Interviewer:
Riedel, Mija, 1958-  Search this
Subject:
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Type:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Quotes and excerpts must be cited as follows: Oral history interview with Michael A. Cummings, 2012 October 25-26. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Theme:
African American  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)16065
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)338389
AAA_collcode_cummin12
Theme:
African American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_338389
Online Media:

Bisa Butler - portraits edited by Erica Warren ; contributions by Bisa Butler, Jordan Carter, Isabella Ko, Erica Warren, Michèle Wije

Contributor:
Warren, Erica 1982-  Search this
Butler, Bisa 1973-  Search this
Carter, Jordan  Search this
Ko, Isabella 1997-  Search this
Wije, Michèle  Search this
Author:
Container of (work): Butler, Bisa 1973- Works Selections  Search this
Host institution:
Art Institute of Chicago  Search this
Katonah Museum of Art  Search this
Subject:
Butler, Bisa 1973-  Search this
Physical description:
95 pages illustrations (chiefly color) 32 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Portraits
Expositions
Exhibition catalogs
Catalogues d'exposition
Date:
2020
Topic:
African Americans in art  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Portraits on quilts  Search this
Art quilts  Search this
African American quiltmakers  Search this
Noirs américains dans l'art  Search this
Noirs américains  Search this
Courtepointes artistiques  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1155159

Exhibition photography for "Improvisation in African-American Quiltmaking," [photographs]

Physical description:
0.5 linear feet (1 document box)
Type:
Photographs
Negatives (photographic)
Slides (photographs)
Date:
Ca. 1991-1992
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Image number:
EXH E0000222
See more items in:
Photograph Study Collection
Data Source:
Photograph Study Collection, Smithsonian American Art Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_jul_142872

Schedule for traveling exhibition Who'd A Thought It: Improvisation in African-American Quiltmaking

Type:
Writings
Date:
circa 1988
Citation:
Schedule for traveling exhibition Who'd A Thought It: Improvisation in African-American Quiltmaking, circa 1988. Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)18662
See more items in:
Museum of Craft and Folk Art records, 1970-2012
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_item_18662

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