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Oprah and Will Smith Share Favorite Quotes at the NMAAHC Grand Opening Dedication Ceremony

Creator:
National Museum of African American History and Culture  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2016-09-27T19:38:58.000Z
YouTube Category:
Education  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
See more by:
WatchNMAAHC
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
YouTube Channel:
WatchNMAAHC
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_nnz4xSzc9e8

[Phillis Wheatley : copy of engraving : glass plate photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Wheatley, Phillis, 1753-1784  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on glass, 7" x 5".)
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
New coccine (or crocein scarlet) dye
Photographs
Copy negatives
Retouching
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Date:
[undated]
Scope and Contents:
Copy negative of an engraving of published slave poet Phillis Wheatley as illustrated by Scipio Moorhead in the frontispiece to her book 'Poems on Various Subjects'. No ink on negative, no edge imprint, no Scurlock number. This glass plate copy negative is broken and taped to a second glass plate. A section of acetate film sheet is taped to fold over the glass plate. This sheet contains only a section of new coccine to lighten the area around the subject's head.
Arrangement:
In box 4.3.1.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Series 8: Business Records, Subseries 8.1: Studio Session Registers are restricted. Digital copies available for research. See repository for details.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Portraits -- African American women  Search this
African American women  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Engraving  Search this
Genre/Form:
New Coccine (or Crocein Scarlet) dye
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Glass
Copy negatives
Retouching -- Dye
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.10: Glass Plate Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.10: Glass Plate Negatives / 4.10: Glass Plate Negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-10-ref1

Sterling Brown, Oct. 7, #120 [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Names:
Howard University -- 1940-1950  Search this
Brown, Sterling Allen, 1901-1989  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (7" x 5"..)
Container:
Box 312
Type:
Archival materials
Portraits
Photographs
Date:
1944 October 7
ca. 1944
Scope and Contents:
Job Number: 49129
Ink on negative: "Mr. Sterling Brown 3-5x7 - 3-8x10". Tape on negative: " "C" 1-8x10". Portrait of Mr. Brown with head resting against hand. Sterling Brown was a poet and professor of English at Howard University. No edge imprint.
Exhibitions Note:
Reproduction print exhibited in "The Scurlock Studio and Black Washington: Picturing the Promise" held in NMAAHC Gallery, NMAH, January 30-November 15, 2009; image reproduced in exhibit's companion book.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Series 8: Business Records, Subseries 8.1: Studio Session Registers are restricted. Digital copies available for research. See repository for details.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American poets  Search this
College teachers  Search this
African American college teachers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Portraits -- African American men
Photographs -- 1940-1950 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.5: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by job number
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.5: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by job number / Scurlock client negatives: B - Byrons
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-05-ref9199

Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters Oral History Collection

Creator:
Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters  Search this
Names:
Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters Oral History Collection  Search this
Sixteenth Street Baptist Church (Birmingham, Ala.)  Search this
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968  Search this
Extent:
159 Video recordings (U-matic 3/4" video recordings)
1 Video recording (VHS 1/2" video recording)
15 Linear feet (15 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Videocassettes
Place:
United States -- Race relations
United States -- Rural conditions
Date:
1989-1994
Scope and Contents note:
The collection, which dates from 1989 to 1994 and measures 15 linear feet, documents the reminiscences of elderly members of various African-American churches in the Atlanta area, as well as individual church histories, outstanding personalities of the South, religious expression in the South, and styles of singing and worship. The collection is comprised of audiovisual materials.
Biographical/Historical note:
Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters, Inc. is the nation's largest regional interfaith cable network. AIB has been providing faith-based communities and nonprofit service organizations access to a larger audience since 1969. AIB remains a destination for international dignitaries and media representatives due to its unique programming platform, which promotes dialogue between all faiths, cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds. Seen in over 1,000,000 homes across 19 metro area counties, AIB is a self-supporting organization and does not allow the solicitation of funds or attacks on other faiths. Viewers can find Christians, Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus and others presenting their views.
Provenance:
Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters Oral History Collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Negro leagues  Search this
Spirituals (Songs)  Search this
Women clergy  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- African Americans  Search this
Choirs (Music)  Search this
Civil rights movements -- United States  Search this
African American clergy  Search this
African American churches  Search this
African American journalists  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American poets  Search this
African American lawyers  Search this
African American soldiers  Search this
African American social reformers  Search this
African Americans -- Religious life  Search this
African Americans -- Music  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
African Americans -- Social conditions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Videocassettes
Citation:
Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters oral history collection exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.09-001
See more items in:
Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters Oral History Collection
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-09-001

The Literary Corner: Introduction to African American Poetry with Eugene Redmond—Part I (side a) / Introduction to African American Poetry with Eugene Redmond—Part II (side b)

Title:
Cassette tape with two episodes of the Literary Corner radio program
Created by:
Brooks B. Robinson Ph.D., American  Search this
Interview of:
Eugene B. Redmond, American, born 1937  Search this
Subject of:
Phillis Wheatley, American, 1753 - 1784  Search this
Paul Laurence Dunbar, American, 1872 - 1906  Search this
James Weldon Johnson, American, 1871 - 1938  Search this
Gwendolyn Brooks, American, 1917 - 2000  Search this
Directed by:
Robert Cham  Search this
Medium:
plastic and tape
Dimensions:
H x W (audiocassette): 2 3/4 × 4 1/4 × 5/8 in. (7 × 10.8 × 1.6 cm)
Duration (side a): 00:14:19
Duration (side b): 00:14:50
Type:
audiotapes
Place made:
United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Harlem, New York, New York, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1978
Topic:
African American  Search this
Literature  Search this
Poetry  Search this
Radio  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Contributed in memory of Professor Sarah Webster Fabio (1928-1979), poet, educator, Black Arts Movement icon, and one of the Literary Corner's analysts.
Object number:
2010.17.1.6a
Restrictions & Rights:
© Brooks B. Robinson
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Portfolio/Series:
The Literary Corner: Black Writers of the World
Classification:
Media Arts-Audio Recordings
Movement:
Harlem Renaissance (New Negro Movement)
BAM (Black Arts Movement 1965-1976)
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5e3a5e0e5-d806-4870-aea2-cf73f544fa2e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2010.17.1.6a
2 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View <I>The Literary Corner: Introduction to African American Poetry with Eugene Redmond—Part I (side a) / Introduction to African American Poetry with Eugene Redmond—Part II (side b)</I> digital asset number 1
  • View <I>The Literary Corner: Introduction to African American Poetry with Eugene Redmond—Part I (side a) / Introduction to African American Poetry with Eugene Redmond—Part II (side b)</I> digital asset number 2
Online Media:

The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture on Anna J. Cooper

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Fisk University  Search this
Howard University  Search this
M Street High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Oberlin College  Search this
Preparatory High School for Colored Youth (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Université de Paris IV: Paris-Sorbonne  Search this
Virginia Theological Seminary and College (Lynchburg, Va.)  Search this
Brown, Sterling A., 1901-1989  Search this
Cooper, Anna J. (Anna Julia), 1858-1964  Search this
Egypt, Ophelia Settle  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Lynchburg (Va.)
United States
Southern States
Date:
1981
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Sterling A. Brown talks about his experiences and teachers, including Anna J. Cooper, at M Street High School (later known as Dunbar High School); and education and segregation, which was fought by Cooper and Mary Church Terrell. He provides a short history and legacy of Cooper, who he considers a role model; and reads prose by Anna J. Cooper which highlights her educational philosophy and her views regarding education and the roles of teachers. Brown talks about his education and academic career; reminiscences his teaching experiences particularly at Virginia Theological Seminary and College, and living in Lynchburg, Virginia; and reads a few of his own poems, which focus on black life experiences in the Southern United States. Ophelia Settle Egypt, a friend of Sterling Brown, reminiscences about her experiences attending Howard University and adventures with Brown and his wife, Daisy: their resentment of Jim Crow and riding on a segregated bus. Mr. Muhammad reads his poems in tribute of Sterling Brown and "for everyone in the struggle of identifying what is what and who is who and what we need to do about it." Zora Martin-Felton introduces the speakers throughout the lecture series.
Lecture, and poetry and prose reading. AV003057 and AV003051: video. AV001053 and AV001353: audio only. Part of Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records. AV003057, AV003051, and AV001053: undated. AV001353: dated 19810426.
Biographical / Historical:
The collection, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South Audiovisual Records, contains sound and video recordings of exhibit tours, gallery talks, and lectures associated with an exhibition, Anna J. Cooper: A Voice from the South. The exhibition presented the life and times of Washington, D.C. black educator and author Anna Julia Haywood Cooper through historical documents, photographs, memorabilia, and re-creations of her home and classroom settings. It was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from February 1981 to September 1982; Louise Daniel Hutchinson served as curator. The exhibition was based on an unpublished manuscript by the late Dr. Leona Gable, Smith College; and titled after Cooper's written work, A Voice from the South: By a Black Woman of the South.;Educator, author, and speaker Anna Julia Haywood Cooper (1858-1964) was born into slavery and educated at Saint Augustine's Normal School and Collegiate Institute in Raleigh, North Carolina. While teaching at St. Augustine's, she married George A. C. Cooper, who died two years later. After her husband's death, Cooper moved to Washington, D.C., attended Oberlin College, taught at Wilberforce College and M Street High School, and later went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. Cooper taught Greek, Latin, geometry, and science; and created a path for African Americans to attend Ivy League schools. Although she taught and served as principal (1902-1906) of the M Street High School (now Dunbar High School) in Washington, D.C., her role and influence extended beyond its boundaries. Cooper was an advocate of human rights who lectured on a broad range of topics that affected blacks and women, including race relations, poverty, and gender inequality; a feminist of her day. She was a contributor to the District of Columbia's Colored Settlement House; served as president of Frelinghuysen University, which offered affordable liberal arts and professional courses for working African Americans; and wrote A Voice from the South by a Black Woman of the South, the first book-length volume of black feminist analysis in the United States.;Professor, poet, and literary critic Dr. Sterling A. Brown (1901-1989) was born and raised in the Washington, D.C area. He grew up on a farm in Howard County, Maryland; and attended Waterford Oaks Elementary, Dunbar High School, Williams College in Massachusetts, and Harvard University. He married Daisy Turnbull in 1927. Brown taught at Howard University, Fisk University, Vassar College, New York University, Atlanta University, Yale University, and Virginia Theological Seminary and College in Lynchburg, Virginia. His studies and poetry focused on black history and culture of the Southern United States.;Originally named Preparatory High School for Colored Youth and later known as M Street High School, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School, located in Washington, D.C., was the first black public high school in the United States. During the first half of the twentieth century, Dunbar was an academically elite public school with many of its teachers holding master and doctorate degrees. By the 1950s, the school was sending 80 percent of its students to college. During the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century, Dunbar struggled to keep its prestigious reputation and high standards. As with many troubled urban public schools, Dunbar standards fell and some students struggle with basic reading and math. The Dunbar Legacy Lecture Series, which was held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum in the early 1980s, consisted of lectures by and about people associated with Dunbar High School.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003051

ACMA AV001053_A

ACMA AV001053_B

ACMA AV001353_A

ACMA AV001353_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American women educators  Search this
Women  Search this
Educators  Search this
Education  Search this
Segregation  Search this
Race  Search this
Human Rights  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Women's rights  Search this
Civil rights leaders  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
Social history  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Citation:
The Dunbar Legacy: Dr. Sterling A. Brown Lecture on Anna J. Cooper, Exhibition Records AV03-029, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-029, Item ACMA AV003057
See more items in:
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records
Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-029: Anna J. Cooper: a voice from the South audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-029-ref906

The Renaissance: Black Arts of the South Exhibit Tape

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Black Swan (Sound recording label)  Search this
Connie's Inn (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Cotton Club  Search this
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People  Search this
National Urban League  Search this
Savoy Ballroom (Harlem, New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Small's Paradise (Nightclub : Harlem, New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Universal Negro Improvement Association  Search this
Barthé, Richmond, 1901-1989  Search this
Bledsoe, Jules, 1898-1943  Search this
Burleigh, H. T. (Harry Thacker), 1866-1949  Search this
Cullen, Countee, 1903-1946  Search this
Douglas, Aaron  Search this
Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963  Search this
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Fauset, Jessie Redmon  Search this
Fuller, Meta Warrick, 1877-1968  Search this
Garvey, Marcus, 1887-1940  Search this
Gilpin, Charles S. (Charles Sidney), 1878-1930  Search this
Hayes, Roland, 1887-1977  Search this
Henderson, Fletcher, 1897-1952  Search this
Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967  Search this
Johnson, Charles Spurgeon, 1893-1956  Search this
Johnson, Georgia Douglas, 1886-1966  Search this
Johnson, James Weldon, 1871-1938  Search this
Johnson, Sargent, 1888-1967  Search this
Johnson, William H., 1901-1970  Search this
Jones, Lois Mailou, 1905-1998  Search this
Larsen, Nella  Search this
Locke, Alain, 1885-1954  Search this
McKay, Claude, 1890-1948  Search this
Motley, Archibald John, 1891-1981  Search this
Randolph, A. Philip (Asa Philip), 1889-1979  Search this
Richardson, Willis, 1889-1977  Search this
Robeson, Paul, 1898-1976  Search this
Smith, Bessie, 1894-1937  Search this
Smith, Mamie  Search this
Still, William Grant, 1895-1978  Search this
Thurman, Wallace, 1902-1934  Search this
Toomer, Jean, 1894-1967  Search this
Van Vechten, Carl, 1880-1964  Search this
Walker, C. J., Madam, 1867-1919  Search this
White, Walter, 1893-1955  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Harlem (New York, N.Y.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1985
Scope and Contents:
During the audio tour of exhibition, The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties, narrator Robert Hall presents the evolution and achievements of black creative expression beginning in Harlem and spreading across the United States during th 1920s. Literary, visual, performance, and cinematic achievements are profiled. Including brief biographical histories and achievements by Marcus Garvey, James Weldon Johnson, Jessie Fauset, A. Philip Randolph, Claude McKay, Nella Larson, Carl Van Vechten, Countee Cullen, Alain Locke, Harry T. Burleigh, Paul Robeson, Roland Hayes, Lois Mailou Jones, Jules Bledsoe, Fletcher Henderson, Bessie Smith, and Mamie Smith.
Self guided audio tour narration. Part of The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties Audiovisual Records. AV001362: master. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties - showcased the evolution and achievements of the Renaissance, which was the explosion of literary, visual, performance, and cinematic creativity generated by black artists between the end of World War I and the early days of the Great Depression. Represented is the creativity of Marian Anderson, Richard Barthe, Countee Cullen, Aaron Douglas, Duke Ellington, Meta Warrick Fuller, Roland Hayes, Zora Neale Hurston, Malvin Gray Johnson, Alain Locke, "Jelly Roll" Morton, Paul Robeson, George Schuyler, and Wallace Thurman, among others. The exhibition, held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, ran from September 1985 - December 1986.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001362
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Dramatists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Sculpture  Search this
Painting  Search this
African Americans in the performing arts  Search this
Musical theater  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Spirituals (Songs)  Search this
Jazz  Search this
Blues (Music)  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Citation:
The Renaissance: Black Arts of the South Exhibit Tape, Exhibition Records AV03-024, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-024, Item ACMA AV002682
See more items in:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-024: The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-024-ref503

Interview with Prentiss Taylor

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967  Search this
McClendon, Rose, 1884-1936  Search this
Taylor, Prentiss, 1907-1991  Search this
Van Vechten, Carl, 1880-1964  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1970s
Scope and Contents:
Prentiss Taylor talks about working with Langston Hughes to create The Negro Mother and the Scottsboro Limited. The illustrations created by Taylor, and the texts created by Hughes. Taylor talks about Hughes' personality and their relationship to Carl Van Vechten. Additionally, Taylor speaks of the Ethiopian Art Theatre, Rose McClendon, and the origin of Van Vechten's Nigger Heaven.
Interview. Sound is distorted. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Undated.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003312-2
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American artists  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
Theater  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Interview with Prentiss Taylor, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV003312-1
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref639

Black Renaissance Forum and Poetry Reading with May Miller Sullivan

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1986
Scope and Contents:
May Miller Sullivan, called a Washington treasure, is the daughter of the historian and educator Kelly Miller. This playwright and poet read from her works and discussed some of the black renaissance personalities she knew well.
Lunch Bag Forum and poetry reading. Sound only. Very poor audio quality. Related to exhibition 'The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties.' Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties - showcased the evolution and achievements of the Renaissance, which was the explosion of literary, visual, performance, and cinematic creativity generated by black artists between the end of World War I and the early days of the Great Depression. Represented is the creativity of Marian Anderson, Richard Barthe, Countee Cullen, Aaron Douglas, Duke Ellington, Meta Warrick Fuller, Roland Hayes, Zora Neale Hurston, Malvin Gray Johnson, Alain Locke, "Jelly Roll" Morton, Paul Robeson, George Schuyler, and Wallace Thurman, among others. The exhibition, held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, ran from September 1985 - December 1986.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001224_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Poets  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poetry  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Black Renaissance Forum and Poetry Reading with May Miller Sullivan, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-024, Item ACMA AV001224_A
See more items in:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-024: The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-024-ref510

Young Audiences Program: The Works of Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, and Gwendolyn Brooks

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Brooks, Gwendolyn, 1917-2000  Search this
Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967  Search this
McKay, Claude, 1890-1948  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1986
Scope and Contents:
Young Audiences Program hosted a series of Saturday programs in music, dance, and theatre of the Black Renaissance in conjunction with the museum's exhibit 'The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties.' On April 5, 1986, Local 12 presented the works of Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, and Gwendolyn Brooks.
Performance. Audio only. Poor audio quality. Related to exhibition 'The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties.' Dated 19860405.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties - showcased the evolution and achievements of the Renaissance, which was the explosion of literary, visual, performance, and cinematic creativity generated by black artists between the end of World War I and the early days of the Great Depression. Represented is the creativity of Marian Anderson, Richard Barthe, Countee Cullen, Aaron Douglas, Duke Ellington, Meta Warrick Fuller, Roland Hayes, Zora Neale Hurston, Malvin Gray Johnson, Alain Locke, "Jelly Roll" Morton, Paul Robeson, George Schuyler, and Wallace Thurman, among others. The exhibition, held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, ran from September 1985 - December 1986.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Poetry  Search this
Poets  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Authors  Search this
African American authors  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Young Audiences Program: The Works of Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, and Gwendolyn Brooks, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-024, Item ACMA AV001228
See more items in:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-024: The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-024-ref512

Charles Williams: 'Porgy & Bess' and 'Five Langston Hughes Songs.'

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1986
Scope and Contents:
Baritone Charles Williams performed selections from the folk opera 'Porgy and Bess' and 'Five Langston Hughes Songs,' composed by Elsie Siegmeister. In between performances, he spoke about the plot and history of the opera as well as the songs composed by Siegmeister. He also addressed questions, many of which revolved around his study of opera. Williams performed the role of Sportin' Life in the folk opera 'Porgy and Bess' at the Metropolitan Opera for two successive seasons.
Lecture and performance. Sound only. Related to exhibition 'The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties.' Dated 19860710.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties - showcased the evolution and achievements of the Renaissance, which was the explosion of literary, visual, performance, and cinematic creativity generated by black artists between the end of World War I and the early days of the Great Depression. Represented is the creativity of Marian Anderson, Richard Barthe, Countee Cullen, Aaron Douglas, Duke Ellington, Meta Warrick Fuller, Roland Hayes, Zora Neale Hurston, Malvin Gray Johnson, Alain Locke, "Jelly Roll" Morton, Paul Robeson, George Schuyler, and Wallace Thurman, among others. The exhibition, held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, ran from September 1985 - December 1986.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001226_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
American woman entrepreneur  Search this
African Americans  Search this
African Americans in the performing arts  Search this
Singers  Search this
African American singers  Search this
Opera  Search this
Poetry  Search this
Poets  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Charles Williams: 'Porgy & Bess' and 'Five Langston Hughes Songs,' Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-024, Item ACMA AV001226_A
See more items in:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-024: The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-024-ref515

Black Perspective Series: Sterling Brown

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Brown, Sterling A., 1901-1989  Search this
Martin-Felton, Zora  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Video recordings (open reel, 1/2 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1972
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Sterling Brown talks about growing up in Washington, D.C., his educational background, his career as a teacher and writer, what he has learned in this life, his poetic influences, and his poetry. Dr. Brown reads his poetry, including Old Lem. Zora Martin-Felton provides introduction.
Lecture and poetry reading. AV003081: Part 1. AV003570: Part 2. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Dated 19720303.
Biographical / Historical:
Professor, poet, and literary critic Dr. Sterling A. Brown (1901-1989) was born and raised in the Washington, D.C area. He grew up on a farm in Howard County, Maryland; and attended Waterford Oaks Elementary, Dunbar High School, Williams College in Massachusetts, and Harvard University. He married Daisy Turnbull in 1927. Brown taught at Howard University, Fisk University, Vassar College, New York University, Atlanta University, Yale University, and Virginia Theological Seminary and College in Lynchburg, Virginia. His studies and poetry focused on black history and culture of the Southern United States.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003570
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American educators  Search this
Educators  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
Poetry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Citation:
Black Perspective Series: Sterling Brown, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV003081
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989 / Recordings of lectures
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref531

Poetry Reading by Sterling Brown

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Brown, Sterling A., 1901-1989  Search this
Dunbar, Paul Laurence, 1872-1906  Search this
Johnson, James Weldon, 1871-1938  Search this
Kinard, John, 1936-1989  Search this
McKay, Claude, 1890-1948  Search this
Walker, Margaret, 1915-1998  Search this
Wheatley, Phillis, 1753-1784  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Poetry
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1970s
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Sterling Brown reads poems which illustrate certain things he believes should be said about the poetry of American negroes. He speaks about spirituals and African American poets, including Phillis Wheatley, James Weldon Johnson, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Claude McKay, and Margaret Walker; and reads their poems. John Kinard provides introduction.
Poetry reading. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Professor, poet, and literary critic Dr. Sterling A. Brown (1901-1989) was born and raised in the Washington, D.C area. He grew up on a farm in Howard County, Maryland; and attended Waterford Oaks Elementary, Dunbar High School, Williams College in Massachusetts, and Harvard University. He married Daisy Turnbull in 1927. Brown taught at Howard University, Fisk University, Vassar College, New York University, Atlanta University, Yale University, and Virginia Theological Seminary and College in Lynchburg, Virginia. His studies and poetry focused on black history and culture of the Southern United States.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
Poetry  Search this
Spirituals (Songs)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Poetry
Citation:
Sterling Brown, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV003525
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref535

Gaston Neal: 100 Years of Black Writing

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Brown, Sterling A., 1901-1989  Search this
Dunbar, Paul Laurence, 1872-1906  Search this
Johnson, James Weldon, 1871-1938  Search this
Kinard, John, 1936-1989  Search this
McKay, Claude, 1890-1948  Search this
Neal, Gaston, 1934-1999  Search this
Wheatley, Phillis, 1753-1784  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
5 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Africa
Date:
1969
Scope and Contents:
Gaston Neal talks about what poetry is and the origins of it. He begins with a discussion of Egyptian writing, continues through to the oral tradition of Africa, and finally with poetry from African Americans. Neal reads folk tales and poetry from Africa; and poetry by African Americans, including Phillis Wheatley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, James Weldon Johnson, Claude McKay, and Sterling Brown. He also reads a few of his poems. Three Washington, D.C. poets read poetry. The poems cover topics of black history, black identity, and religion. John Kinard introduces Gaston Neal.
Lecture and poetry reading. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Some of the content repeats over assets. AV003446: dated 19690217. AV003519, AV003515, AV003532, AV003445: undated.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003519

ACMA AV003515

ACMA AV003532

ACMA AV003445-1

ACMA AV003445-2
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Poetry  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Blacks -- Race identity  Search this
Blacks -- History  Search this
Religion  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Lectures
Poetry
Collection Citation:
Anacostia Community Museum Programs and Projects, 1967-1989, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV003446
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref539

Reading of Black Poetry by Students from Federal City College

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Federal City College  Search this
Brown, Sterling A., 1901-1989  Search this
Cullen, Countee, 1903-1946  Search this
Dunbar, Paul Laurence, 1872-1906  Search this
Evans, Mari, 1923-  Search this
Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Poetry
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1970s
Scope and Contents:
Students from Federal City College read poems written by African American poets, including Paul Laurence Dunbar, Countee Cullen, Sterling Brown, Mari Evans, Langston Hughes.
Poetry reading. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Undated.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Poetry  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
Blacks -- Race identity  Search this
Blacks -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Poetry
Citation:
Reading of Black Poetry by Students from Federal City College, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV003528
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref541

An Evening of Poetry by American Negro Poets

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Croxton, Darryl  Search this
Kinard, John, 1936-1989  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Poetry
Literary readings (radio programs)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1978
Scope and Contents:
Darryl Croxton reads poetry written by Paul Laurence Dunbar, Angelina Weld Grimke, Anne Spencer, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Owen Dodson, Countee Cullen, Richard Wright, and other African American poets. John Kinard provides introduction to the poetry reading and encourages visitors to provide comments and suggestions via the suggestion box. Kinard provides a description for the current exhibit, The Sage of Anacostia, about Frederick Douglass.
Poetry reading. Part of ACM Museum Events, PR, and Ceremonies Recordings. Undated.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Poets  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poetry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Poetry
Literary readings (Radio programs)
Citation:
An Evening of Poetry by American Negro Poets, Record Group AV09-023, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.09-023, Item ACMA AV003443-1
See more items in:
Museum Events, Programs, and Projects, 1967-1989
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-09-023-ref654

Poster for A Series of Events Endangered: Art and Performance by Men of Color

Designed by:
Seitu Jones  Search this
Subject of:
Marlon Riggs, American, 1957 - 1994  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper (fiber product)
Dimensions:
H x W: 16 1/2 × 12 3/4 in. (41.9 × 32.4 cm)
Type:
posters
Place used:
Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1990
Topic:
African American  Search this
Gender  Search this
Identity  Search this
LGBTQ  Search this
Men  Search this
Sexuality  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Jack Vincent in memory of Marlon Riggs
Object number:
2014.169.4
Restrictions & Rights:
Unknown - Restrictions Possible
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Memorabilia and Ephemera-Advertisements
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd544e177d2-d46b-4bbe-ac4c-40969c449c55
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2014.169.4
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Poster for A Series of Events Endangered: Art and Performance by Men of Color digital asset number 1
Online Media:

Dr. Theodore Shell Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera

Creator:
Shell, Theodore, Dr. (dentist)  Search this
Names:
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Extent:
1.75 Cubic feet (5 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Broadsides
Correspondence
Drawings
Sketches
Radio scripts
Articles
Programs
Clippings
Date:
1933-1990
Summary:
Periodical articles, news clippings, concert programs, radio transcripts, personal correspondence, broadsides, photographs, and pencil sketches collected by Dr. Shell. The material documents part of Duke Ellington's music career, especially ca. 1940-1974.
Scope and Contents:
The Dr. Theodore Shell Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera contains autographs, concert programs, publicity booklets, conference materials, correspondence, periodicals, news clippings, photographs, play lists, transcripts of radio broadcasts and a variety of other ephemeral materials that document the life, career, and legacy of Duke Ellington, as well as the early history of Jazz. The collection is arranged alphabetically. Oversized materials are located at the end of the collection but are listed alphabetically within the container list.

Items of particular interest include: a collection of programs, napkins, and menus autographed by Duke Ellington and other members of his orchestra including Johnny Hodges; concert programs spanning forty years of Ellington's career (1933-1973); a pencil-sketched portrait of Duke Ellington; and photographs of Duke Ellington, Cab Calloway, "Peg leg" Bates, Cat Anderson, Harry Carney, Paul Gonsalves, Harold Ashby, Russell Procope and many other Ellington band members taken or collected by Dr. Shell. There are radio broadcast transcripts that contain the scripts, play lists, and promotional spots from various Ellington radio performances between 1943 and 1946. Biographical notes document the life of one of Ellington's public relations agents, Jerome O. Rhea, and there are also some photographs that might possibly be of Rhea's family. Also of interest are a transcript of a meeting related to the organization of a Negro Baseball League and several hand-illustrated poems by African American poets, both of which are found in the Miscellaneous folder.
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. Theodore Shell (1915- ), dentist, "amateur" photographer and Ellington enthusiast, was born in Rahweh, New Jersey. He graduated from Shaw University in 1937 with a degree in science and chemistry, and he served five years in the U.S. Army's chemical warfare service during World War II in the European Theatre. In 1950 he received his dentistry degree from Howard University and began a practice in Washington D.C. Dr. Shell also held the position of Clinical Professor of Dentistry for 43 years at Howard. He retired in 1993.

Dr. Shell first became interested in Ellington's music in 1952. He and Maurice Lawrence, a fellow member of the Omega Psi Phi National Fraternity, founded a Duke Ellington Club in 1956, and it eventually became Chapter 90 of the Ellington Society by 1962. Other founding members of this chapter include Grant Wright, Terrell Allen, and Juanita Jackson. Over the course of his activities with the Ellington Society, Dr. Shell had the privilege of meeting with Duke Ellington on numerous occasions, the first time being in 1964, and in 1971 he hosted Ellington's 72nd birthday party in his own home. Currently, Dr. Shell is serving as president of the organization.
Provenance:
Dr. Theodore Shell donated his collection of Duke Ellington ephemera to the National Museum of American History on November 17, 1993.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Copyright restrictions. Contact the Archives Center.
Topic:
Jazz musicians -- 1940-1980 -- United States  Search this
Jazz  Search this
Music -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 20th century
Broadsides -- 1940-1980
Correspondence -- 1940-2000
Drawings -- 20th century
Sketches -- 1940-2000
Radio scripts -- 1940-1980
Articles -- 1940-1980
Programs -- 1940-1990
Clippings -- 20th century
Citation:
Dr. Theodore Shell Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera, 1933-1990, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0502
See more items in:
Dr. Theodore Shell Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0502

Smoking Out the Beehive: African American Poets with "Poetic Likeness," February 2, 2013 (includes electronic records)

Collection Creator::
National Portrait Gallery. Office of Education and Visitor Experience  Search this
Container:
Box 3 of 4
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 19-028, National Portrait Gallery. Office of Education and Visitor Experience, Program Records
See more items in:
Program Records
Program Records / Box 3
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa19-028-refidd1e1469

A burst of light : and other essays Audre Lorde ; foreword by Sonia Sanchez

Author:
Lorde, Audre  Search this
Writer of foreword:
Sanchez, Sonia 1934-  Search this
Author:
ProQuest (Firm)  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (ix, 133 pages)
Type:
Biography
Place:
United States
Date:
2017
1988
20th century
Topic:
Poets, American  Search this
Breast--Cancer--Patients  Search this
African American lesbians--Social conditions  Search this
Feminists  Search this
African American poets  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Essays  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Feminism & Feminist Theory  Search this
BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Personal Memoirs  Search this
HEALTH & FITNESS / Diseases / Cancer  Search this
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Women's Studies  Search this
HEALTH & FITNESS / Sexuality  Search this
FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS / Parenting / General  Search this
POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Freedom & Security / Civil Rights  Search this
Call number:
PS3562.O75 Z463 2017 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
Unlimited users
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145120

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