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The Historical Records of the Barnett-Aden Gallery

Creator:
Barnett-Aden Gallery  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
Howard University  Search this
Howard University. Gallery of Art  Search this
Aden, Alonzo J., 1906-1963  Search this
Asher, Lila Oliver  Search this
Driskell, David C.  Search this
Ealey, Adolphus  Search this
Greene, Carroll  Search this
Herring, James V. (James Vernon)  Search this
Johnson, Robert L., 1946 April 8-  Search this
Lazzari, Pietro, 1898-1979  Search this
Long, Richard, 1945-  Search this
Porter, James A. (James Amos), 1905-1970  Search this
Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962  Search this
Spellman, Gladys Noon  Search this
Thomas, Alma  Search this
Wells, James Lesesne, 1902-1993  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet
Culture:
African American artists  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Ephemera
Catalogues
Business records
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
South Carolina
Date:
1954-1989
bulk 1961-1977
Summary:
The Historical Records of the Barnett-Aden Gallery showcases one of the first galleries owned and operated by African Americans. The work of the Gallery was invaluable as they opened the exhibition space to established and unknown artists regardless of race or gender.
Scope and Contents:
The Historical Records of Barnett-Aden Gallery collection includes historical background materials on the gallery, its founders James V. Herring and Alonzo Aden as well as Adolphus Ealey, its steward after its closure in 1969. The materials include correspondence, business records, photographs, exhibition catalogues, and clippings.
Arrangement:
The materials in this collection have been kept at the folder level and separated into four series. The materials have been ordered and organized based on the content. Within each series and subseries, the folders are organized as close to the collection's original order as when it was acquired.
Historical Sketch:
The Barnett-Aden Gallery, suggested to be the first African American privately-owned gallery in the U.S, open its doors on October 16, 1943. The gallery was founded by artist and scholar James V. Herring alongside his protegee, curator Alonzo Aden. The gallery was housed in a private home that they shared, located on 127 Randolph Street NW in Washington, DC. These men aimed to create an art gallery that provided a venue for underrepresented artists of all races and genres. It was this partnership that laid the foundation for the shift in African American representation in modern art. Aden stated that the gallery's aims were to help foster new talent while also bringing "art of superior quality" to the community. Throughout its history, the gallery held almost 200 exhibitions and showcased the work of over 400 artists.

James Vernon Herring was born on January 7, 1887 in Clio, South Carolina to an African American mother, Alice Herring (1860-1942), and white father, William Culbreth. As a young man, he moved to Washington, DC for better educational opportunities. Herring was educated at the Howard Academy, a preparatory high school located at nearby Howard University campus. Herring received his undergraduate degree from Syracuse University and completed graduate studies at Columbia and Harvard Universities. Trained in art and classical studies with a focus on French impressionism, Herring was initially brought on Howard University's faculty as architecture instructor in 1920. This experience inspired Herring to create the Department of Art at the university where he convinced former home economics student and future prominent visual artist, Alma Thomas to be the art school's first graduate in 1924. Herring continued to mentor and discover young artists as was the case with Alonzo Aden.

Alonzo Aden was born on May 6, 1906 in Spartanburg, South Carolina to Naomi Barnett (1883-1956) and Ephraim Aden (1859-1917). His working-class parents wanting more for their eldest son, decided to send him to live with relatives in Washington, DC for greater educational opportunities. Aden did well academically and completed some studies at Hampton Institute (now Hampton University) before finally entering Howard University in 1927. The following year, Herring opened the Howard University Gallery of Art and installed Aden as its first curator. Aden initially pursued a career as an educator but became more interested in art history and after his graduation from Howard in 1933, he pursued studies in museum and curatorial work.

Recent scholarship has suggested that Herring and Aden were in a romantic as well as working relationship. Working together in the Howard Gallery of Art, they sought to provide a space for art students, local artists and other relatively unknown artists from around the world. Living together since 1929, Herring supported Aden's post-graduate pursuits including his studies of African arts and crafts in galleries across Europe as well as his curatorial work at the American Negro Exposition in Chicago in 1940. Aden returned to Washington to great acclaim and continued his work with Herring at the Howard Gallery of Art.

The Gallery was housed in a Victorian townhouse located in the then middle-class African American neighborhoods of LeDroit Park and Logan Circle (present-day Bloomingdale). Research notes that the house was purchased during the late 1920s by Herring with some assistance of artist Alma Thomas (or vice versa). Both were listed as owners of the property until 1933 when Aden was listed as the co-owner. In 1943, Aden resigned as head of the Howard Gallery for unknown reasons which led Herring and Aden to open a gallery in their home. The gallery was named after Aden's mother Naomi, who also served as an early benefactor of the gallery giving $1,000 in support. It was the support of various benefactors alongside Herring's salary as a Howard professor and Aden's several "government jobs" that kept the gallery afloat during its time in the home. The first floor of the gallery consisted entirely of exhibition space with the second-floor space interchanged between exhibition, study, and living spaces over the years. Herring's library, also located on the upper floors, was used for research by students and local scholars. Herring and Aden never saw the gallery as a truly profitable venture but instead wanted to offer avenues for the artists to showcase their work. As policy, each artist retained all money earned from sales but were required to donate at least one work of art to the Barnett-Aden collection.

The gallery, the first of its kind in Washington at the time, exhibited works of artists regardless of race; African American artists displayed alongside their more notable white peers. Notable artists featured in the gallery include Henri Matisse, Paul Cezanne, Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall, and M.C. Escher were exhibited alongside notable African American artists Richmond Barthé, Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett, Charles White, Selma Burke as well as many others. Several Howard professors who went on to have notable art careers also exhibited their work at the gallery including James Porter, Lois Mailou Jones, and James Lesesne Wells. Many of the artists featured in the gallery were also greatly involved in the operations. Alma Thomas served gallery's vice president before she began exhibiting her work there in 1950s. Artist and scholar, David Driskell served as the associate director of the gallery after Aden's death.

The gallery held five to eight exhibitions every year including a special annual anniversary exhibition. In 1944, the gallery opened a show featuring Brazilian modern artist, Candido Portinari, who had previously completed a mural at the Library of Congress, that sparked great interest at the gallery. The exhibition opening brought in visitors from all over Washington including members of the president's cabinet, foreign ambassadors and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. This renewed interest created a somewhat hectic pace in keeping up with the work of the gallery. This pace coupled with the full-time jobs and other ventures including a gift shop enabled the gallery to act as a luminary of the African American and local arts community in Washington.

In 1961, while preparing for the annual anniversary exhibition, Alonzo Aden died suddenly. Herring with aid of his friends and students took on the management of the gallery after his partner's death but was unable to keep the pace of Aden's work and the attendance declined. In 1969, Herring died in the home leaving behind a formidable legacy. The home and its contents including the gallery's art collection was sold in order to settle the debts of Herring's estate. The collection was divided amongst three individuals. Artist and former Herring student, Adolphus Ealey inherited the bulk of the collection that featured 250 significant works. Herring's books, graphic drawings, and prints were given to Herring associate and friend, Dr. Felton J. Earls, while the sculptures went to art collectors and friends Dr. and Mrs. Cecil Marquez.

The portion of the collection owned by Ealey was described as the preeminent selection from the gallery's collection. The size and ongoing upkeep of the collection was significant which caused the collection to be moved several times over the years. The collection which out of necessity was originally stored in Ealey's Southwest Washington apartment then moved a to a house in LeDroit Park and then to another space in the Washington neighborhood of Fort Lincoln. Ealey collaborated with colleagues and institutions to have it exhibited in various locations but also bid to find the collection a permanent home. During the 1970s, the collection was featured at the Museum of Afro-American Culture and History in Philadelphia, the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum) and the Corcoran Gallery of Art.

Unable to find an institutional home for the collection, Ealey was forced to sell the collection in 1989 to the Florida Endowment Fund for Higher Education. Ealey stipulated that collection must remain intact but also that the new owners had to develop educational and outreach programs focused on African Americans in the arts. Failing to find consistent opportunities to exhibit the collection, the owners were forced to sell the collection. In 1998, Robert L. Johnson, then chairman and founder of the television channel, Black Entertainment Television (BET), purchased the collection. The collection went on a national tour then was displayed for some time at the BET headquarters in Washington. In 2015, Johnson donated selections from the gallery collection to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in an effort to preserve the legacy of the Barnett-Aden Gallery and the tireless work of James V. Herring and Alonzo Aden for generations to come.

Historical Timeline

1897 -- James Vernon Herring was born January 7 in Clio, South Carolina.

1906 -- Alonzo James Aden was born May 6 in Spartanburg, South Carolina.

1914-1916 -- While attending Syracuse University, Herring taught summer classes at Wilberforce University in Ohio for two summers.

1917 -- Herring graduated from Syracuse University with a Bachelors of Pedagogy in Art degree.

1917-1920 -- Herring served as YMCA secretary for the YMCA in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, and then Camp Lee, Virginia. Herring also held teaching positions at Straight College in New Orleans and Bennett College in North Carolina

1920 -- Alonzo was sent to Washington, D.C. to live with his uncle, James Aden, and his wife Laura.

1921 -- Herring was initially hired as architectural drawing instructor at Howard University and after negotiations established Department of Art later that same year.

1927 -- Herring organized an exhibition of Howard U. students' artwork that toured the Deep South U.S. Aden enrolled in Howard University in pursuit of an education degree.

1930 -- The Howard University Gallery of Art formally opened on April 7. Aden was hired as gallery assistant.

1933 -- Aden received his Bachelor of Arts in Education; Herring added Aden's name as co-owner of the 127 Randolph Place home.

1934-1939 -- Aden engaged in post-graduate study and museum curatorial work around the U.S. and Europe.

1940 -- Aden served as art curator for the American Negro Exposition (the "Negro's World Fair") in Chicago

1943 -- Aden resigned his position at the Howard University Gallery of Art for undisclosed reasons. The Barnett-Aden Gallery was founded by James V. Herring and Alonzo Aden. The first exhibition, "American Paintings for the Home" featured Elizabeth Catlett, Lois Mailou Jones, Malvin Gray Johnson, James Lesesne Wells, Jacob Lawrence, and many others.

1944 -- First anniversary exhibition featuring artist Candido Portinari, Brazilian artist who was already known in Washington from his mural for the Library of Congress. It was attended by the First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt. Exhibition, "The Negro in Art" and "American Paintings for the Home" featuring Catlett, James A. Porter, Wells, Jones, Richmond Barthé, Hale Woodruff, Betsy Graves Reyneau and others.

1946 -- Exhibition, "Paintings by Lois Mailou Jones" and featured paintings of Jacob Lawrence for Third Anniversary exhibition.

1947 -- Fourth Anniversary Exhibition, "Recent Paintings by Charles White". Exhibition of Elizabeth Catlett, "Paintings, Sculpture, and Prints of The Negro Woman".

1948 -- Exhibition, "Paintings and Drawings by James A. Porter".

1949 -- Exhibition, "Sylvia Carewe".

1950 -- "Exhibition of Six Washington Artists" featuring Romare Bearden, Samuel Bookatz, Bernice Cross, Robert Gates, Norma Mazo, and James A. Porter. "Exhibition "Paintings and Prints by James Lesesne Wells."

1951 -- Exhibition, "Three Washington Artists" featuring Richard Dempsey, Sam Herman, and Jack Perlmutter Exhibition, "Herman Maril: Paintings in Retrospect, 1931-1951"

1953 -- Tenth Anniversary Exhibition, "Eighteen Washington Artists" featuring Sarah Baker, Samuel Bookatz, William Calfee, Bernice Cross, Robert Franklin Gates, Jacob Kainen, Marjorie Phillips, James Porter, and James Lesesne Wells.

1954 -- Exhibition "Six Washington Painters" featuring Theresa Abbott, Gabriel Cherin, Gloria Besser Green, Alma W. Thomas, and Anita Wertheim.

1955 -- Twelfth anniversary exhibition focused on "Jack Perlmutter".

1957 -- Exhibition, "David C. Driskell: Exhibition of Paintings"

1958 -- Exhibition "Norman Lewis: Paintings"

1959 -- Sixteenth Anniversary Exhibition of "Paintings by Pietro Lazzari, Helen Rennie, Alma Thomas, Andrea De Zerega". Exhibition of "Religious Paintings and Prints by James L. Wells and Sculpture by Selma Burke"

1962 -- Alonzo Aden died suddenly at the age of 56 on October 13 in Washington D.C. Herring solely inherits the Gallery collection.

1969 -- Herring dies at age 84 in Washington, DC. on May 29. Artist Adolphus Ealey inherits the bulk of the gallery collection along with Dr. Felton J. Earls and Dr. and Mrs. Cecil Marquez.

1974 -- Two exhibitions of the collection at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and the Corcoran Gallery of Art.

1989 -- Collection sold to Florida Endowment Fund for Higher Education.

1998 -- Robert Johnson, founder and former CEO of Black Entertainment Television (BET) purchased the entire collection and serves as administrators over the collection.
Provenance:
Acquired through a purchase by the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Access to collection materials requires an appointment.
Rights:
The NMAAHC Archives can provide reproductions of some materials for research and educational use. Copyright and right to publicity restrictions apply and limit reproduction for other purposes.
Topic:
Photographs  Search this
Art  Search this
Business  Search this
LGBTQ  Search this
Museums  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Galleries  Search this
Education  Search this
finance  Search this
Local and Regional  Search this
HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Ephemera
Catalogues
Business records
Citation:
Historical Records of the Barnett-Aden Gallery, Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.A2014.63.32
See more items in:
The Historical Records of the Barnett-Aden Gallery
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-a2014-63-32

Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film

Creator:
Anderson, Harold M.  Search this
Names:
Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969  Search this
Nixon, Pat, 1912-1993  Search this
Nixon, Richard M. (Richard Milhous), 1913-1994  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (1 reel.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion pictures (visual works)
Place:
Oklahoma -- Tulsa
Date:
1948-1952
Summary:
Black Wall Street was a vibrant African American community in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Filmed between 1948 and 1952 Reverend Harold Anderson's Black Wall Street Film documents many of the neighborhood's businesses including barber shops, bakers, taxi companies, jewelers, and other stores. Reverand Andserson also captured its citizens in church, at school, participating in parades, and walking around the area. The film includes footage Richard and Pat Nixon as they campaigned in Black Wall Street, the first vice-presidential candidate to visit the African American neighborhood.
Scope and Contents:
A black and white, silent 16mm film documenting the people and businesses of the Black Wall Street section of Tulsa, Oklahoma from 1948-1952.
Arrangement:
Arranged in one series.

Series 1, Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film
Biographical / Historical:
Black Wall Street was a vibrant African American community that was destroyed during a race riot that broke out in 1921. Its businesses were burned to the ground and the residents were displaced. Against the odds, Black Wall Street was reborn and by the 1940s was once again a center for African American life in Tulsa.

Reverend Harold Mose Anderson's film titled Reverend Harold Anderson's Black Wall Street documents evidence of this resurgance. Although Anderson was only a year old when the riots occurred, he grew up hearing stories about life in Black Wall Street before the riot. He was both a witness to and participant in the rebuilding and revival of the community. And, he documented the resulting renewal with his 16mm motion picture camera.

Filmed between 1948 and 1952 Reverend Harold Anderson's Black Wall Street does just that. A successful businessman, Anderson managed and then owned two neighborhood movie theaters, a skating rink, bowling alley, and shopping strip, among other enterprises. He also brought the Golden Gloves boxing tournament to the area, making it accessible to African American fans. Anderson felt that it was critical that Black Wall Street sustain independent African American business, ensuring resident dollars would stay in the community and guarantee its vibrancy.

Almost lost in a devastating house fire, Reverend Anderson's film recognizes the efforts and successes of the community. With his camera he documented many of Black Wall Street's businesses including barber shops, bakers, taxi companies, jewelers, and other stores. He also captured its citizens in church, at school, participating in parades, and walking around the area. The film includes footage Richard and Pat Nixon as they campaigned in Black Wall Street, the first vice-presidential candidate to visit the African American neighborhood.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center by Patricia Sanders on behalf of the heirs of Harold M. Anderson in 2009.
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment. Reference copy in Smithsonian Institution Digital Asset Management System (DAMS) must be used.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. All third party requests to use the film for other than standard museum purposes are to be direced to GettyImages. See repository for information.
Topic:
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Parades -- United States  Search this
Riots -- 1920-1930 -- Oklahoma -- Tulsa  Search this
African American businesspeople  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Citation:
Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film, 1948-1952, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1197
See more items in:
Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1197

Henson Family Papers

Creator:
Henson family  Search this
Names:
Henson family  Search this
Henson, Tobias  Search this
Extent:
0.18 Linear feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Leaflets
Correspondence
Financial records
Newsletters
Account books
Receipts
Legal documents
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1818-1943
bulk 1830-1900
Summary:
The Henson Family papers, which date from 1818 to 1943 and measure 0.18 linear feet, document the activities of Tobias Henson and his descendants. The papers are comprised of booklets, correspondence, legal documents, and receipts.
Scope and Contents:
This collection documents the activities of Tobias Henson and his descendants between 1818 and 1943. It contains materials related to the Hensons' financial and legal activities. Included in the collection are booklets, correspondence, deeds and titles, legal documents, and receipts.

Arrangement The papers are organized into four series. The content of each series is arranged alphabetically. The series are arranged as follows:

Series I: Financial Records Series II: Legal Records Series III: Printed Materials Series IV: Miscellaneous
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged by series: 1) Financial Records, 2) Legal Records, 3) Printed Materials, 4) Miscellaneous.
Biographical/Historical note:
The history of the Hensons begins with the family's patriarch, Tobias Henson. Mr. Henson was a slave in the Washington, DC area during the 18th and 19th centuries and, given his family's history, it is apparent that he was a man with an ambitious mission: to attain the American dream. He had two tasks to accomplish if he were to see his dream realized. First he had to gain freedom for himself and his family. Second he had to purchase property upon which he could build a home, and from which he could earn a living.

He took the first step in 1813 when he purchased himself from his slave master, thus gaining his freedom. Next he purchased his wife, Elizabeth. In April of 1832 Mr. Henson purchased his daughter Matlinda Smith and her three children. In May of the following year he purchased his second daughter Mary Anderson.

With these purchases, Tobias Henson became a slaveholder, with his wife and children his slaves. Ever resourceful, Mr. Henson used this to his advantage; he rented out his daughters for income and used them as collateral for loans. With the income he generated, he purchased the freedom of his other family members. In fact, he used his daughters, Matlinda and Mary, as collateral for a loan he acquired to purchase Mary's freedom.

In addition to purchasing his freedom in 1813, Tobias Henson entered into an agreement to buy land in the Anacostia section of Washington, DC. The land, named the Ridge, consisted of twenty-four acres located in the Congress Heights section of Anacostia. He made payments on the Ridge until 1826, at which time he made the final payment and became the legal owner. Initially Mr. Henson farmed the land, but as his family grew he subdivided the acreage so that the members of his family could experience their own American dream.

Over the subsequent decades members of the Henson family continued to purchase land in the area surrounding the Ridge; at one point they were one of the largest landowners in the Anacostia section of Washington, DC. The family maintained residence on various parts of the land from the time of its purchase until the middle of the 20th century. Title records filed with the District of Columbia show that, in 1931, the portion of the Ridge that Tobias Henson gave to his grandson, Richard Smith, was still in possession of his descendants. But that was the exception. Most of the Henson family's real estate was either sold or "taken" by the government under the auspices of eminent domain. Just a decade after this title was filed, the federal government made plans to take what remained of the Ridge.

The family did all they could to save the legacy of Tobias Henson. They contacted local and federal government officials in an attempt to stave off what would amount to the destruction of an important piece of black history dating from antebellum Washington, DC. When they had exhausted all of the possibilities, they made a last ditch appeal to First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. In a 1943 letter they pleaded,

At the present there are some thirteen or fourteen families living on this land, which is still designated as the Ridge, and with only one or two exceptions, these families are the direct descendants of Tobian [sic] Henson…we do not feel that taking our homes will aid in the War Effort or in the Ideals of Democracy.

Unfortunately, their plea went unanswered; the land was taken by the government and the houses thereon where razed.
Related Materials:
Anacostia Historical Society Records.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Slavery -- United States  Search this
African American soldiers  Search this
Free blacks  Search this
African Education Society  Search this
American Colonization Society  Search this
Public housing  Search this
Eminent domain  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
African American families  Search this
Genre/Form:
Leaflets
Correspondence
Financial records
Newsletters
Account books
Receipts
Legal documents
Citation:
Henson family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Dr. Myrtle Henson.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-030
See more items in:
Henson Family Papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-030
Online Media:

Percival Bryan collection

Creator:
Bryan, Percival  Search this
Names:
Anderson, Marian, 1897-1993  Search this
Bryan, Percival  Search this
Cummings, Homer S. (Homer Stillé), 1870-1956  Search this
Extent:
5.94 Linear feet (20 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Photographic prints
Autograph albums
Memorabilia
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1932-1993
bulk 1942-1980
Summary:
The collection, which dates from 1932 to 1993 and measures 5.94 linear feet, documents the career and personal life of Washington, DC cabdriver Percival Bryan. The collection is comprised of an autobiography, autograph books, citations, correspondence, memorabilia, photographic prints, and printed materials.
Arrangement note:
The papers are organized into five series. The Photographs series has been further arranged into subseries. The contents of each series and subseries are arranged alphabetically. There are oversize materials in the Biographical and Photographs series. The series and subseries are arranged as follows:

Series 1: Autobiographical

Series 2: Biographical

Series 3: Autograph albums

Series 4 Memorabilia

Series 5: Photographs

Subseries 5.1: Portraits

Subseries 5.2: Bryans and friends

Subseries 5.3: Special events

Subseries 5.4: Social groups

Subseries 5.5: Travel and recreation

Subseries 5.6: Miscellaneous
Biographical/Historical note:
Born in Galena, St. Mary's Parish, Jamaica, Percival Bryan (1906-1996) came to the United States in 1924 as a stowaway in search of adventure and opportunity. He settled in the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington, D.C., involved himself with various social and civic organizations, and was instrumental in forming the Caribbean American Inter-cultural Organization. He worked as a White House butler under Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945), Harry S. Truman (1884--972), and Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969). Bryan also served as a chauffer for Attorney General Homer S. Cummings (1870-1956) before becoming a cab driver. An autograph collector, Mr. Bryan collected over 100,000 signatures of notable individuals.
Separated Materials note:
Three-dimensional items located in the objects collection.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Taxicab drivers  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Jamaican Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Photographic prints
Autograph albums
Memorabilia -- 20th century
Citation:
Percival Bryan collection, Anacostia Community Museum, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Rose Dyke.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-001
See more items in:
Percival Bryan collection
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-001
Online Media:

Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, SE

Creator:
McGrath, Dorn C., Jr.  Search this
Anacostia Coordinating Council  Search this
George Washington University  Search this
Collection Creator:
McGrath, Dorn C., Jr.  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col., 2 x 2 in.)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Slides (photographs)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1987
Scope and Contents:
This image was taken during the 1987 survey of Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, SE in Washington, D.C., for the Historic Anacostia Revitalization Project, a survey of all buildings in the Anacostia Historic District.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Dorn C. McGrath, Jr. slides and other material are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Automobiles  Search this
Commercial buildings  Search this
Historic districts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Collection Citation:
Dorn C. McGrath, Jr. slides and other material, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Dorn C. McGrath, Jr.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-059, Item ACMA McGrath_016
See more items in:
Dorn C. McGrath, Jr. slides and other material
Dorn C. McGrath, Jr. slides and other material / Series 1: Slides
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-059-ref590

Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
2.26 Cubic feet (1 box, 1 oversized box.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibition catalogs
Contact sheets
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographic prints
Negatives
Exhibition records
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1898-1988
Scope and Contents:
The records of the Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition presented by the Anacostia Community Museum measure 2.26 cubic feet and date from 1898 to 1988. Included are exhibit administrative files, lists of images, press releases for the promotion of the exhibit, oral history transcripts and permission forms, and extensive research files into the Anacostia community in southeast Washington D.C.

Exhibit Records include an outline for exhibit themes and proposed layouts, administrative files that include work plans and meeting notes, lists of exhibit images, promotional press releases, and related correspondence. Subjects relate to project management and community engagement.

Oral History of Anacostia Project Files include transcripts of the audio collected from the Oral History of Anacostia Project. This includes a list of interviewees and their interviewers.

Neighborhood Background Research Files represent two-thirds of the collection. Research files include news clippings, publications, unpublished articles, project files, and research material. Subjects include local figures and the Barry's Farm neighborhood, unpublished historical narratives, and project records related to archaeological investigations and neighborhood development programs.
Arrangement:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records is arranged in 3 series.

Series 1: Exhibit Records

Series 2: Oral History of Anacostia Project Files

Series 3: Neighborhood Background Research Files
Historical Note:
An exhibition on history of the Anacostia neighborhood of Washington D.C. post-World War II. The show was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum) and held there from January 1, 1972 to December 31, 1972.
Related Materials:
Anacostia Story: 1608-1930 Exhibition Records, M03-039.
Provenance:
Records of the Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition were created by the Anacostia Community Museum.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibition catalogs
Contact sheets
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographic prints
Negatives
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-040
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-040
Online Media:

Footsteps from North Brentwood exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
North Brentwood Historical Society (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2.42 Linear feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Brochures
Photographic prints
Exhibition records
Exhibit scripts
Contact sheets
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1996-04 - 1996-12
Summary:
An exhibition on the North Brentwood neighborhood of Washington, DC. The show was created by the Anacostia Community Museum in collaboration with the North Brentwood Historical Society. It was exhibited at the museum from April 1996 to December 1996. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, and floor plans.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Brochures
Photographic prints
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Exhibit scripts
Contact sheets
Citation:
Footsteps from North Brentwood exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-019
See more items in:
Footsteps from North Brentwood exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-019

Footsteps from North Brentwood Sound Bites

Creator:
North Brentwood Historical Society (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Howard University  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Brentwood A.M.E. Zion Church (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
First Baptist Church (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
North Brentwood Elementary School (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
Beverly, Lillian K.  Search this
Dock, Arthur J.  Search this
Fitzhugh, Marion Patricia Hawkins  Search this
Fleming, Elsie Johnson  Search this
Green, Delores  Search this
Hobbs, Addison  Search this
Hodge, Thelma  Search this
Jennings, Georgia  Search this
Palmer, William  Search this
Randall, Henry  Search this
Randall, Peter  Search this
Thomas, James Curtis  Search this
Thomas, William Hammond  Search this
Vaden, Lillie  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
North Brentwood Historical Society (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
Segregation  Search this
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
North Brentwood (Md.)
Prince George's County (Md.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1993
Scope and Contents:
Former and present residents of North Brentwood speak about growing up and raising their families in North Brentwood. They discuss education, schools, churches, family histories, incorporation of the town, desegregation, and community as a family. They reminiscence about a time when the area was rural, everyone knew everyone, and neighbors disciplined each other's children.
Interview clips. Part of Footsteps from North Brentwood Audiovisual Records. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition, Footsteps from North Brentwood, included an oral, pictorial and artifact collection of life in North Brentwood from the 1900s to 1930. It was developed by the North Brentwood Historical Society and the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum; and on display at the Anacostia Museum from April 1996 through December 1996, North Brentwood Community Center from February 1997 through May 1997, and Lowe House of Delegates in Annapolis, Maryland from June 1997 through December 1997. The exhibition used pictures, documents, and artifacts to document the history of the first black incorporated town in Prince George's County. The oral histories describe North Brentwood's social history as told by 23 families who were either residents or descendants of residents who lived there during the 1920 U.S. Manuscript Census; they were collected by students in Dr. Elizabeth-Clark Lewis' public history class at Howard University between November 10, 1993 and November 29, 1993.
General:
Title created by ACMA staff from transcription on physical asset and title of related exhibition.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African American churches  Search this
African American families  Search this
Education  Search this
Schools  Search this
Social history  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Footsteps from North Brentwood Sound Bites, Exhibition Records AV03-019, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-019, Item ACMA AV000925
See more items in:
Footsteps from North Brentwood exhibition records
Footsteps from North Brentwood exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-019: Footsteps from North Brentwood audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-019-ref696

Footsteps from North Brentwood audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
North Brentwood Historical Society (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet (1 box)
21 Sound recordings (21 audio cassette sound recordings)
1 Sound recording (1 open reel 1/4" sound recording)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
circa 1993
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual materials created for an exhibition on the North Brentwood neighborhood of Washington, DC. The show was created by the Anacostia Community Museum in collaboration with the North Brentwood Historical Society. It was exhibited at the museum from April 1996 to December 1996. This collection contains the audiovisual output of the Anacostia the exhibit, including audio interviews conducted for use within the exhibit along with outtakes and sound bites.
Related Archival Materials note:
Anacostia Community Museum. Footsteps from North Brentwood.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Citation:
Footsteps from North Brentwood audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-019, Series ACMA AV03-019
See more items in:
Footsteps from North Brentwood exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-019-ref697

Anacostia: Not the Same Old Story exhibition records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Lucy Ellen Moton  Search this
Extent:
0.29 Linear feet (1 box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Exhibition records
Exhibition catalogs
Contact sheets
Photographic prints
Clippings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1995
Summary:
Held at the Anacostia Museum from June 17, 1995 to August 28, 1995, this exhibition was the result of a partnership between the museum and Lucy Ellen Moton Elementary School. During the 1994-95 school years, the students researched the community of Anacostia and produced photographs, poems, stories, drawings, interviews, documents, and personal artifacts. The student efforts were included under the themes: Moten Elementary School, From Our Homes, Institutions and Organizations, and Community Life.
Scope and Contents note:
These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit script, administrative records, brochures, exhibit layouts, and student statements.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Elementary schools  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Exhibition records -- 1990-2004
Exhibition catalogs
Contact sheets
Photographic prints
Clippings
Citation:
Anacostia: Not the Same Old Story exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-041
See more items in:
Anacostia: Not the Same Old Story exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-041

Charles E. Qualls papers

Creator:
Qualls, Charles E.  Search this
Names:
American Cancer Society  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Greater Southeast Community Hospital (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People  Search this
National Cancer Society  Search this
National Pharmaceutical Association  Search this
Barry, Marion, 1936-  Search this
Patterson, Frederick D. (Frederick Douglass), 1901-1988  Search this
Qualls, Charles E.  Search this
Extent:
3.02 Linear feet (7 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photograph albums
Certificates
Diplomas
Journals (periodicals)
Clippings
Correspondence
Broadsides (notices)
Photographic prints
Scrapbooks
Awards
Financial records
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1899-1996
bulk 1960-1983
Summary:
The Charles E. Qualls papers, which date from 1899 to 1988 and measure 3.02 linear feet, document the career of pharmacist and community organizer Charles E. Qualls. The papers are comprised of correspondence, documents from community organizations, magazines, newspaper clippings, photographs, and scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the professional life of Charles E. Qualls between 1960 and 1983. It contains materials related to Mr. Qualls's education, community involvement, and pharmacy business. Included in the collection are awards and citations, certificates, correspondence, financial records, photographic albums and prints, printed materials, and scrapbooks.
Arrangement note:
The papers are organized into six series. The content of each series is arranged alphabetically. There are oversize materials in the Biographical, Photographs and Miscellaneous series. The oversize materials in the Biographical and Miscellaneous series contain scrapbooks. The series are arranged as follows:

Series 1: Biographical

Series 2: Community Organizations

Series 3: Correspondence

Series 4: Photographs

Series 5: Printed Materials

Series 6: Miscellaneous
Biographical/Historical note:
On May 23, 1912 Charles Edward Qualls was born in New Bern, Tennessee to Fred and Ary Watts Qualls. Shortly after his birth the family of fourteen moved to South Bend, Indiana. He graduated from high school there in 1932 with a dream of becoming a business owner. After a few diversions along the way, in 1941 he graduated from Howard University's School of Pharmacy. Mr. Qualls's determination to fulfill his dream proved quite strong; a few months after his graduation he opened his own drug store, the Anacostia Pharmacy. From that point on, he became "Doc Qualls" to all who knew him. Two years later he married Aleneitha Johnson of Conway, South Carolina and they had one son, Neal Frederic Qualls.

The Anacostia Pharmacy, located on Nichols Avenue – later renamed Martin Luther King Avenue – became a gathering place for the community. Young people socialized at the soda fountain while older people planned for the future of Anacostia. It was from these gatherings that the vision for a community business organization developed; a vision that was realized in 1949 with the establishment of Anacostia Business and Professional Association (ABPA).

The ABPA provided assistance to local businesses by garnering grants and loans, lobbying politicians, and, at times, enforcing business regulations. To maintain its presence in Anacostia, the Association sponsored awards for organizations throughout the community: schools, police precincts, and cultural organizations. Additionally, the organization contributed time and money to various politicians, serving as an intermediary between Anacostia and the city at-large.

His influence in Anacostia and District of Columbia extended beyond the interests of local businesses. His concern for the health of Anacostia's residents led him to found the Washington Pharmaceutical Association in 1947. He was also instrumental in the establishment of the Southeast Unit of the D.C. Chapter of the National Cancer Society, which opened to great fanfare in 1968. Undoubtedly his most important contribution in the area of health was his tireless lobbying for a hospital in Ward 8. Eventually the city gave its approval, and Mr. Qualls got right to work conducting several fundraisers. The Morris Cafritz Memorial Hospital (Greater Southeast Community Hospital) opened in the spring of 1966 and Mr. Qualls served on its board.

As if addressing Anacostia's economic and health concerns were not enough, Mr. Qualls found time to work on the cultural front. He was a founding member of the Anacostia Historical Society whose mission was to preserve and promote the history and culture of Anacostia. The Society operated under the auspices of the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, and together the two organizations created an exhibit, Anacostia Story: 1608–1930. The show opened in 1977. On the historical front, Mr. Qualls and the ABPA lobbied the federal government – the National Park Service, in particular – to take ownership of Frederick Douglass's home. He, along with many others in the community, believed that only the stewardship of the government could save the house from ruin. His efforts paid off and he had a front row seat at the dedication ceremony for the newly established National Park Service historic site, Cedar Hill.

This pillar of the community died in 1984 at the age of 72. The official cause of death was cancer. But his family and friends would argue that point; many felt that he died of a broken heart. In late November 1983, the venerable Anacostia Pharmacy was robbed at gunpoint and then ransacked; all of this while Doc Qualls was undergoing what would be successful cancer surgery at his alma mater, Howard University. When he returned to his beloved pharmacy a few weeks later, he was absolutely devastated, so much so that he all but stopped working with the community organizations to which he had been dedicated. With his store padlocked and boarded up, his family and friends watched helplessly as his health declined. He was eventually readmitted to the hospital in late March of 1984 where, except for a few days in May, he remained for the rest of his life.

Charles Edward Qualls died on June 21, 1984.
Related Archival Materials note:
Anacostia Historical Society records located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.

Alice Bell Finlayson papers located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.

Ella B. Howard Pearis papers located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.

Dale/Patterson family collection located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Provenance:
The Charles E. Qualls papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 1990 by the estate of Charles E. Qualls. Additional materials from his estate were donated by Dianne Dale in 2006.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Charles E. Qualls papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
Community organization  Search this
African Americans  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photograph albums
Certificates
Diplomas
Journals (periodicals)
Clippings
Correspondence
Broadsides (notices)
Photographic prints
Scrapbooks
Awards
Financial records
Citation:
Charles E. Qualls papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of the estate of Charles E. Qualls.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-013
See more items in:
Charles E. Qualls papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-013
Online Media:

Remembering U Street Festival

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1995
Scope and Contents:
Footage of a festival, including a parade, musicians, and classic cars.
Festival. Dated 19950930.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Festivals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Remembering U Street Festival, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-017, Item ACMA AV002082
See more items in:
Southern city, national ambition: the growth of early Washington, D.C., 1800- 1860 exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-017-ref508

Riot and Remembrance the Tulsa Race War and Its Legacy

Author:
Hirsch, James S  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource
Type:
Electronic resources
Electdronic books
History
Place:
Oklahoma
Tulsa
Tulsa (Okla.)
Date:
2014
20th century
Topic:
Tulsa Race Massacre, Tulsa, Okla., 1921  Search this
African Americans--History  Search this
Racism--History  Search this
Riots--History  Search this
Violence--History  Search this
African American neighborhoods--History  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Racism  Search this
Riots  Search this
Violence  Search this
Call number:
F704.T92 H56 2002 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
1-user.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1145558

Reconstructing the Dreamland : the Tulsa riot of 1921 : race, reparations, and reconciliation / Alfred L. Brophy

Author:
Brophy, Alfred L  Search this
Physical description:
xx, 187 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
History
Place:
Oklahoma
Tulsa
Tulsa (Okla.)
Schwarze
Date:
2002
20th century
Topic:
Tulsa Race Massacre, Tulsa, Okla., 1921  Search this
African Americans--History  Search this
African American neighborhoods--History  Search this
Riots--History  Search this
Violence--History  Search this
African Americans--Reparations  Search this
Racism--History  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Racism  Search this
Riots  Search this
Violence  Search this
Aufstand  Search this
Rassenonlusten  Search this
African Americans--Claims  Search this
Prejudices  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_671512

The burning : massacre, destruction, and the Tulsa race riot of 1921 / Tim Madigan

Author:
Madigan, Tim 1957-  Search this
Physical description:
xix, 297 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 22 cm
Type:
Books
History
Place:
Oklahoma
Tulsa
Tulsa (Okla.)
Greenwood (Tulsa, Okla.)
Date:
2001
20th century
Topic:
Tulsa Race Massacre, Tulsa, Okla., 1921  Search this
African Americans--History  Search this
African American neighborhoods--History  Search this
Riots--History  Search this
Violence--History  Search this
Racism--History  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Racism  Search this
Riots  Search this
Violence  Search this
Rassenonlusten  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_682415

Impact of 'The Anacostia Story' Exhibition

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
At a staff meeting, Dr. James Savace (psychology department) shared his perceptions about the exhibition 'The Anacostia Story' from a psychological point of view, and what he thinks might be the impact on visitors who visit the exhibition. Staff discussed ways to improve the exhibition, particularly with regard to the amount of text in the exhibition.
Meeting. Audio only. Very poor audio quality. Related to exhibition 'The Anacostia Story.' Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition 'The Anacostia Story' presented the history and development of Anacostia between 1608 and 1930 told through artifacts, photographs, early prints, documents and memorabilia. Well-known residents of the area, including Frederick Douglass, Elzie Hoffman, Dr. Charles Nichols, and Solomon G. Brown, were featured. The exhibition was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from March of 1977 to March 1978.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museum techniques  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Impact of 'The Anacostia Story' Exhibition, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-039, Item ACMA AV001361
See more items in:
Anacostia story: 1608-1930 exhibition records
Anacostia story: 1608-1930 exhibition records / Series ACMA 03-039: Anacostia Story:1608-1930 audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-039-ref922

Frederick Douglass Dwellings

Creator:
Jackson, Frank R., 1908-2007  Search this
Collection Creator:
Jackson, Frank R., 1908-2007  Search this
Extent:
1 Color slide (1 1/2 x 4 inches )
Container:
Box 4, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Photographic slides
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1950-1970
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Public housing  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic slides
Collection Citation:
Frank R. Jackson papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Carole Hyman.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-068, Item acma_06-068-306
See more items in:
Frank R. Jackson papers
Frank R. Jackson papers / Series 1: Photographs / Anacostia Residents, Housing, and Events / Frederick Douglass Dwellings
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-068-ref779

Frederick Douglass Dwellings

Creator:
Jackson, Frank R., 1908-2007  Search this
Collection Creator:
Jackson, Frank R., 1908-2007  Search this
Extent:
1 Color slide (1 1/2 x 4 inches)
Container:
Box 4, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Photographic slides
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1960-1970
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Public housing  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic slides
Collection Citation:
Frank R. Jackson papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Carole Hyman.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-068, Item acma_06-068-308
See more items in:
Frank R. Jackson papers
Frank R. Jackson papers / Series 1: Photographs / Anacostia Residents, Housing, and Events / Frederick Douglass Dwellings
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-068-ref781

Frederick Douglass Dwellings

Creator:
Jackson, Frank R., 1908-2007  Search this
Collection Creator:
Jackson, Frank R., 1908-2007  Search this
Extent:
1 Color slide (1 1/2 x 4 inches)
Container:
Box 4, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Photographic slides
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1960-1970
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Public housing  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic slides
Collection Citation:
Frank R. Jackson papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Carole Hyman.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-068, Item acma_06-068-309
See more items in:
Frank R. Jackson papers
Frank R. Jackson papers / Series 1: Photographs / Anacostia Residents, Housing, and Events / Frederick Douglass Dwellings
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-068-ref782

Henry Bazemore collection of Frederick Douglass Dwellings photographs

Creator:
Bazemore, Henry  Search this
Extent:
0.42 Linear feet ((1 box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Photographs
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
circa 1940s
Summary:
The collection, dated circa 1940s and measuring .42 linear feet, documents the lives and activities of the residents of the Frederick Douglass Dwellings. The collection is comprised of black-and-white photographs.
Biographical/Historical note:
Built as temporary housing for World War II workers, the Frederick Douglass Dwellings were located on land previously owned by Tobias Henson, a former slave, who, after purchasing his freedom and that of his family, purchased and developed a 24-acre tract called The Ridge. Henson added to his landholdings and by the 1870s his family was the principal landholder in the black community of Stantontown; they remained on the land until the 1940s, when the federal government condemned the community to build the Frederick Douglass Dwellings. Deemed uninhabitable in 1998 and left vacant, the Frederick Douglass Dwellings were demolished in 2000 to make way for a new mixed-income community.
Restrictions:
Use of materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Public housing  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Photographs
Citation:
Henry Bazemore collection of Frederick Douglass Dwellings photographs, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Henry Bazemore.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-067
See more items in:
Henry Bazemore collection of Frederick Douglass Dwellings photographs
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-067
Online Media:

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