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Rhiannon Giddens - "Georgia Buck" [Just Around The Bend - Mike Seeger's Last Documentary]

Creator:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2019-09-10T14:58:17.000Z
YouTube Category:
Music  Search this
Topic:
Cultural property  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianfolkways
Data Source:
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianfolkways
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_0UokuvakxMA

Frederic Ramsey audio recordings

Creator:
Ramsey, Frederic, 1915-1995  Search this
Extent:
8.83 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Southern States -- Music
Date:
1945-1959
Summary:
This collection contains open reel recordings made by noted jazz scholar Frederic Ramsey during his tour of the American South in the 1950s.
Scope and Contents:
The collection includes 400? Open reel audio tapes. They are from Ramsey's fieldwork and various projects, many for Folkways Records. The bulk of the recordings come from Ramsey's fieldwork in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana in 1954-56.
Arrangement:
The tapes are organized and shelved by accession number.
Biographical / Historical:
Frederic Ramsey Jr. (1915-1995), son of painter Charles Frederic Ramsey, was a jazz scholar and author who worked with a number of musicians in the South and the New York/New Jersey area, notably Lead Belly. After receiving a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1953, Ramsey undertook a tour of the South in order to explore and document the African-American music environment. His goal was to record the speech and music of persons at least sixty years of age or older in an attempt to trace the evolution of the musical genre that would become jazz. Ramsey produced a number of recordings for the Folkways label in the 1950s-1960s.

[From Jeff: Frederic Ramsey Jr. (1915-1995) was a jazz critic, scholar, fieldworker and record producer. He was the author of a number of books on jazz, including Jazzmen (with Charles Edward Smith) and the Jazz Record Book. He became one of the main producers for Moses Asch at Asch, Disc, and Folkways Records of jazz and blues. Ramsey was one of the first to deploy an open reel tape recorder using it in New York City in 1949 to record Lead Belly in a set of sessions at his apartment, that were to be Lead Belly's last. What was noteworthy about this is that a reel to reel deck allowed one to record a longer recording than the previous 4 minutes on instantaneous discs. This allowed Led Belly to stretch out and do his extended rhymes and longer songs and to tell stories of his life. It was released by Folkways as a 2 LP 2-records each set. Each side was one track so more material could be fit in. The new LP format allowed for Folkways to create anthologies of music with multiple tracks per side. This allowed Ramsey the ability to create a 11-volume anthology of jazz in the early 1950s. It was the first of many anthologies for Folkways. He also received a Guggenheim fellowship in 1954-56 to go to Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana to record vernacular African American music. This included field hollers, spirituals, and brass bands. It was Ramsey's desire to find the roots of jazz in early African-American music forms. He recorded hundreds of tapes they make up the bulk of Ramsey Tape Collection. A 10 LP set Music from the South was released from these trips. Also, there was a book Been Here and Gone with his magnificent photographs from the trip. Other notable recordings released by Folkways include an interview album of Baby Dodds, a box set of shape-note singing, and recordings of a, then, teenaged Michael Hurley. In 1975, with other grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and Ford Foundation, he researched the life of Buddy Bolden. After the death of Frederic Ramsey Jr., folklorist Kip Lornell arranged the donation of Ramsey's tape and record collection to the Smithsonian.]
Shared Stewardship of Collections:
The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acknowledges and respects the right of artists, performers, Folklife Festival participants, community-based scholars, and knowledge-keepers to collaboratively steward representations of themselves and their intangible cultural heritage in media produced, curated, and distributed by the Center. Making this collection accessible to the public is an ongoing process grounded in the Center's commitment to connecting living people and cultures to the materials this collection represents. To view the Center's full shared stewardship policy, which defines our protocols for addressing collections-related inquiries and concerns, please visit https://folklife.si.edu/archives#shared-stewardship.
Related Materials:
Frederic Ramsey's personal papers are available at Rutgers University Institute of Jazz Studies.

Ramsey's photograph collection (many from the same field projects) can be found in the collections of the Hogan Jazz Archive at Tulane University.
Provenance:
This collection was donated by Frederic Ramsey's daughter Alida Porter in 1996.
Restrictions:
Access to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections is by appointment only. Visit our website for more information on scheduling a visit or making a digitization request. Researchers interested in accessing born-digital records or audiovisual recordings in this collection must use access copies.
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Please visit our website to learn more about submitting a request. The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections make no guarantees concerning copyright or other intellectual property restrictions. Other usage conditions may apply; please see the Smithsonian's Terms of Use for more information.
Topic:
Blues (Music)  Search this
Music -- African-American  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Jazz musicians  Search this
Jazz -- Louisiana -- New Orleans  Search this
Jazz  Search this
Citation:
Frederic Ramsey audio recordings, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.RAMS
See more items in:
Frederic Ramsey audio recordings
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/bk5ebc883ed-96f3-4f1b-9e4b-1b8fde86e4f4
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-rams
Online Media:

[Group of soldiers with musical instruments, ca. 1930 : cellulose acetate photonegative, banquet camera format]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
United States. Army  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on cellulose acetate film sheet., [10" x 20"].)
Container:
Box 2, Folder 6
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Banquet camera photographs
Panoramas
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans -- 1930-1950
Washington (D.C.) -- 1930-1950 -- Photographs
Date:
circa 1930
Scope and Contents:
AC0618.004.0001246.tif
Posed group of men in military greatcoats and tin helmets holding musical instruments. Group is standing in front of a wooden building. Negative has been cut at edge in form of image. Image is similar to AC0618.004.0001247 but cannot be verified as the same group. Ink on negative: "H" and "Thompson Ill...Pet..." further inscription is obscured by tape. No edge imprint.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Series 8: Business Records, Subseries 8.1: Studio Session Registers are restricted. Digital copies available for research. See repository for details.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American military personnel  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Portraits, Group -- African Americans -- 1930-1940  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1930-1940 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Banquet camera photographs -- 1930-1940
Panoramas
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.12: Banquet Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.12: Banquet Negatives / 4.12: Banquet Negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep832d51f86-19f3-4bd9-b549-67ca0ecdb6d5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-12-ref56

370th Infantry Band [ca. 1930 : cellulose acetate photonegative, banquet camera format]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
United States.. Army.Infantry Regiment, 370th  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on cellulose acetate film sheet., [10" x 20"].)
Container:
Box 2, Folder 7
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Banquet camera photographs
Panoramas
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans -- 1930-1950
Washington (D.C.) -- 1930-1950 -- Photographs
Date:
1930
[ca. 1930]
Scope and Contents:
Scan Number: AC061.004.0001247.tif
Posed group of men in military greatcoats and tin helmets holding musical instruments. Group is standing in front of a wooden building. Other soldiers are standing behind and looking out of windows in the building. Negative has been cut at edge in form of image. Caption in ink on negative. No edge imprint.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Series 8: Business Records, Subseries 8.1: Studio Session Registers are restricted. Digital copies available for research. See repository for details.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American military personnel  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Portraits, Group -- African Americans -- 1930-1940  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1930-1940 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Banquet camera photographs -- 1930-1940
Panoramas
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.12: Banquet Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.12: Banquet Negatives / 4.12: Banquet Negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8f6e816ce-acfd-40d3-8b0f-d05215fa8d9f
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-12-ref58

[Group of young men and women with musical instruments, ca. 1930 : cellulose acetate photonegative, banquet camera format]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Creator:
Eastman Kodak Company (film manufacturer)  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on cellulose acetate film sheet., [12" x 20"].)
Container:
Box 2, Folder 21
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Banquet camera photographs
Panoramas
Retouching
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Washington (D.C.) -- 1930-1950 -- Photographs
Date:
circa 1930
Scope and Contents:
Scan Number: AC0618.004.0001261.tif
Group of young men and one young woman posing in front of a building. They are holding musical instruments, including saxophones, trombones, clarinets and violins. Ink on negative: "G". "EASTMAN - SAFETY - KODAK 96" edge imprint. Pencil retouching on faces.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Series 8: Business Records, Subseries 8.1: Studio Session Registers are restricted. Digital copies available for research. See repository for details.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American musicians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1930-1940 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Banquet camera photographs -- 1930-1940
Panoramas
Retouching -- Pencil
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.12: Banquet Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.12: Banquet Negatives / 4.12: Banquet Negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8cb9a5d06-9db3-4ab0-b823-516cbbe17b87
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-12-ref85

Duke Ellington Oral History Project

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Greenlee, Marcia (oral historian)  Search this
Willard, Patricia  Search this
Names:
Duke Ellington Orchestra  Search this
Aasland, Benny  Search this
Babs, Alice  Search this
Bell, Aaron  Search this
Bellson, Louis  Search this
Boatwright, Ruth Ellington, 1915-2004  Search this
Bolling, Claude  Search this
Bridgers, Aaron  Search this
Burrell, Kenny  Search this
Carneiro, Luis  Search this
Celley, Al  Search this
Cohen, Oscar  Search this
Cole, Maria  Search this
Cook, John  Search this
Cooper, Buster  Search this
Courtney, Shirley  Search this
Dance, Helen Oakley, 1913-2001  Search this
Dance, Stanley, 1910-1999  Search this
Davis, Kay  Search this
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Ellington, Mercer Kennedy, 1919-1996 (musician)  Search this
Granz, Norman  Search this
Hamilton, Jimmy  Search this
Jeffries, Herb  Search this
Jones, Herbie  Search this
Jones, Max  Search this
Kerr, Brooks  Search this
Lamb, John  Search this
Lowe, Arnold "Jim"  Search this
McCuen, Brad  Search this
Roche, Betty  Search this
Sanders, John  Search this
Sherrill, Joya  Search this
Szterenfeld, Alejandro  Search this
Terry, Clark  Search this
Udkoff, Evelyn  Search this
Udkoff, Robert, 1918- (businessman)  Search this
Vono, Caio  Search this
Wein, George  Search this
Woode, James  Search this
Woodman, Britt  Search this
Extent:
15 Cubic feet (22 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Oral history
Interviews
Date:
1989- 1993
Summary:
Thirty-nine oral history interviews created by the Archives Center with Duke Ellington's music and business associates. The interviews cover a range of topics including Ellington as a musician, the significance of race in Ellington's work and life, Ellington and the economics of the music business, Ellington as international cultural figure, and Ellington and the historical record.
Scope and Contents:
Interviews with musicians who performed with Ellington, producers and other business associates, Ellington scholars and fans, and family members documenting personal and musical relationships with Duke Ellington.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in one series.

Series 1, Oral History Tapes, 1989-1993
Biographical / Historical:
The collection was created by the Archives Center to provide research background about the Duke Ellington Orchestra. It complements a growing number of Archives Center collections related to Ellington and American music. The interviewees were asked about their own backgrounds, their personal and musical relationships with Duke, and their assessment of Ellington's strengths and weaknesses and his role in twentieth century American music. The discussions centered on five major themes including Ellington as a musician, the significance of race in Ellington's work and life, Ellington and the economics of the music business, Ellington as international cultural figure, and Ellington and the historical record. Recollections range from approximately the 1940s through the mid 1970s.

The thirty-nine Interviews were conducted by oral historian Marcia Greenlee and former Duke Ellington publicist Patricia Willard with former Ellington music and business associates.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Annual International Conference of the Duke Ellington Study Group Proceedings (AC0385)

Al Celley Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC1240)

Duke Ellington Collection (AC0301)

Edward and Gaye Ellington Collection (AC0704)

Ruth Ellington Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0415)

Carter Harman Collection of Interviews with Duke Ellington (AC0422)

New York Chapter of the Duke Ellington Society Collection (AC0390)

William Russo Transcription and Arrangement of Duke Ellington's First Concert of Sacred Music (AC0406)

Ernie Smith Jazz Film Collection (AC0491)
Provenance:
Collection created by the National Museum of American History, 1989-1993.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the master tapes are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Copyright and commercial use restrictions. Contact Archives Center staff for information.
Topic:
Jazz  Search this
Jazz musicians -- Interviews -- 1989-1991 -- United States  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral history -- 1980-2000
Interviews -- 1980-2000
Citation:
Duke Ellington Oral History Project, 1989-1993, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0368
See more items in:
Duke Ellington Oral History Project
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8df9c0a66-e8cb-4bd7-a894-480248c67aad
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0368

Duke Ellington Collection

Creator:
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Names:
Duke Ellington Orchestra  Search this
Washingtonians, The.  Search this
Ellington, Mercer Kennedy, 1919-1996 (musician)  Search this
Strayhorn, Billy (William Thomas), 1915-1967  Search this
Collector:
National Museum of American History (U.S.). Division of Musical History  Search this
Extent:
400 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Phonograph records
Papers
Photographic prints
Posters
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks
Music
Clippings
Awards
Audiotapes
Place:
New York (N.Y.) -- 20th century
Harlem (New York, N.Y.) -- 20th century
Washington (D.C.) -- 20th century
Date:
1903 - 1989
Summary:
The collection documents Duke Ellington's career primarily through orchestrations (scores and parts), music manuscripts, lead sheets, transcriptions, and sheet music. It also includes concert posters, concert programs, television, radio, motion picture and musical theater scripts, business records, correspondence, awards, as well as audiotapes, audiodiscs, photographs, tour itineraries, newspaper clippings, magazines, caricatures, paintings, and scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents:
Dating approximately from the time Duke Ellington permanently moved to New York City in 1923 to the time the material was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution in 1988, the bulk of the material in the Duke Ellington Collection is dated from 1934-1974 and comprises sound recordings, original music manuscripts and published sheet music, hand-written notes, correspondence, business records, photographs, scrapbooks, news clippings, concert programs, posters, pamphlets, books and other ephemera. These materials document Ellington's contributions as composer, musician, orchestra leader, and an ambassador of American music and culture abroad. In addition, the materials paint a picture of the life of a big band maintained for fifty years and open a unique window through which to view an evolving American society.

The approximate four hundred cubic feet of archival materials have been processed and organized into sixteen series arranged by type of material. Several of the series have been divided into subseries allowing additional organization to describe the content of the material. For example, Series 6, Sound Recordings, is divided into four subseries: Radio and Television Interviews, Concert Performances, Studio Dates and Non-Ellington Recordings. Each series has its own scope and content note describing the material and arrangement (for example; Series 10, Magazines and Newspaper Articles, is organized into two groups, foreign and domestic, and arranged chronologically within each group). A container list provides folder titles and box numbers.

The bulk of the material is located in Series 1, Music Manuscripts, and consists of compositions and arrangements by Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn and other composers. Series 6, Sound Recordings also provides a record of the performance of many of these compositions. The materials in Series 2, Performances and Programs, Series 3, Business Records, Series 8, Scrapbooks, Series 9, Newspaper Clippings, Series 11, Publicity and Series 12, Posters provide documentation of specific performances by Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Ellington was a spontaneous and prolific composer as evidenced by music, lyrical thoughts, and themes for extended works and plays captured on letterhead stationery in Series 3, Business Records, in the margin notes of individual books and pamphlets in Series 14, Religious Materials and Series 15, Books, and in the hand-written notes in Series 5, Personal Correspondence and Notes.

During its fifty-year lifespan, Duke Ellington and His Orchestra were billed under various names including The Washingtonians, The Harlem Footwarmers and The Jungle Band. The soloists were informally called "the band", and Series 3 includes salary statements, IOU's, receipts and ephemera relating to individual band members. Series 1, Music Manuscripts contains the soloists' parts and includes "band books" of several soloists (for example; Harry Carney and Johnny Hodges) and numerous music manuscripts of Billy Strayhorn. The changing role of Strayhorn from arranger hired in 1938 to Ellington's main collaborator and composer of many well-known titles for Duke Ellington and His Orchestra including "Take The A' Train" and "Satin Doll" can be traced in these music manuscripts. Series 7, Photographs and Series 2, Performances and Programs contain many images of the band members and Strayhorn. This Collection also documents the business history of Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Series 3, Business Records contains correspondence on letterhead stationery and Series 11, Publicity contains promotional material from the various booking agencies, professional companies, and public relations firms that managed the Orchestra.

The materials in the Duke Ellington Collection provide insight into public and institutional attitudes towards African Americans in mid-twentieth-century America. The business records in Series 3 beginning in 1938 and published sheet music in Series 1 depict Duke Ellington's progression from an African-American musician who needed "legitimization" by a white publisher, Irving Mills, to a businessmen who established his own companies including Tempo Music and Duke Ellington, Incorporated to control his copyright and financial affairs. Programs from the segregated Cotton Club in Series 2, Performances And Programs and contracts with no-segregation clauses in Series 3: Business Records further illustrate racial policies and practices in this time period. The public shift in perception of Duke Ellington from a leader of an exotic "Jungle Band" in the 1930s to a recipient of the Congressional Medal Of Freedom in 1970 is evidenced in Series 2, Performances And Programs, Series 12, Posters, Series 7, Photographs and Series 13, Awards. Reviews and articles reflecting Ellington's evolving status are also documented in Series 8, Newspaper Clippings, Series 9, Scrapbooks, Series 10, Newspaper and Magazine Articles.

The materials in the Duke Ellington Collection reflect rapid technological changes in American society from 1923-1982. Sound recordings in Series 6 range from 78 phonograph records of three minutes duration manufactured for play on Victrolas in monaural sound to long-playing (LP) phonograph records produced for stereo record players. Television scripts in Series 4, programs in Series 2 and music manuscripts (for example, Drum Is A Woman) in Series 1 demonstrate how the development of television as a means of mass communication spread the Orchestra's sound to a wider audience. The availability of commercial air travel enabled the Ellington Orchestra to extend their international performances from Europe to other continents including tours to Asia, Africa, South America and Australia and archival material from these tours is included in every series.

Series 4, Scripts and Transcripts and Series 6, Audio Recordings contain scripts and radio performances promoting the sale of United States War bonds during World War II, and Series 7, Photographs includes many images of Duke Ellington and His Orchestra's performances for military personnel revealing the impact of historic events on Duke Ellington and His Orchestra. Series 2: Programs and Performances, Series 9, Newspaper clippings and Series 8, Scrapbooks document the 1963 Far East tour aborted as a result of President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

The Duke Ellington Collection contains works by numerous twentieth-century music, literature, and art luminaries. Series 1, Music Manuscripts contains original music manuscripts of William Grant Still, Eubie Blake, Mary Lou Williams, and others. Series 4, Scripts and Transcripts contains a play by Langston Hughes, and Series 12, Posters contains many original artworks.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Music Manuscripts, circa 1930-1981, undated

Series 2: Performances and Programs, 1933-1973, undated

Series 3: Business Records, 1938-1988

Series 4: Scripts and Transcripts, 1937-1970

Series 5: Personal Correspondence and Notes, 1941-1974, undated

Series 6: Sound Recordings, 1927-1974

Series 7: Photographs, 1924-1972, undated

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1931-1973

Series 9: Newspaper Clippings, 1939-1973, undated

Series 10: Magazine Articles and Newspaper Clippings, 1940-1974

Series 11: Publicity, 1935-1988

Series 12: Posters and Oversize Graphics, 1933-1989, undated

Series 13: Awards, 1939-1982

Series 14: Religious Material, 1928-1974

Series 15: Books, 1903-1980

Series 16: Miscellaneous, 1940-1974
Biographical / Historical:
A native of Washington, DC, Edward Kennedy Ellington was born on April 29, 1899. Edward was raised in a middle-class home in the Northwest section of Washington described by his sister Ruth--younger by sixteen years--as a "house full of love." Ellington himself wrote that his father J.E. (James Edward) raised his family "as though he were a millionaire" but Edward was especially devoted to his mother, Daisy Kennedy Ellington. In 1969, thirty-four years after his mother's death, Ellington accepted the Presidential Medal of Freedom with these words, "There is nowhere else I would rather be tonight but in my mother's arms." Both his parents played the piano and Ellington began piano lessons at the age of seven, but like many boys he was easily distracted by baseball.

In his early teens, Ellington sneaked into Washington clubs and performance halls where he was exposed to ragtime musicians, including James P. Johnson, and where he met people from all walks of life. He returned in earnest to his piano studies, and at age fourteen wrote his first composition, "Soda Fountain Rag" also known as "Poodle Dog Rag." Ellington was earning income from playing music at seventeen years of age, and around this time he earned the sobriquet "Duke" for his sartorial splendor and regal air. On July 2, 1918, he married a high school sweetheart, Edna Thompson; their only child, Mercer Kennedy Ellington, was born on March 11, 1919. Duke Ellington spent the first twenty-four years of his life in Washington's culturally thriving Negro community. In this vibrant atmosphere he was inspired to be a composer and learned to take pride in his African-American heritage.

Ellington moved to New York City in 1923 to join and eventually lead a small group of transplanted Washington musicians called "The Washingtonians," which included future Ellington band members, Sonny Greer, Otto Hardwicke and "Bubber" Miley. Between 1923 and 1927, the group played at the Club Kentucky on Broadway and the ensemble increased from a quintet to a ten-piece orchestra. With stride pianist Willie "The Lion" Smith as his unofficial guide, Ellington soon became part of New York's music scene; Smith proved to be a long-lasting influence on Duke's composing and arranging direction. At the Club Kentucky, Ellington came under the tutelage of another legendary stride pianist, "Fats" Waller. Waller, a protege of Johnson and Smith, played solos during the band's breaks and also tutored Ellington who began to show progress in his compositions. In November 1924, Duke made his publishing and recording debut with "Choo Choo (I Got To Hurry Home)" released on the Blu-Disc label. In 1925, he contributed two songs to Chocolate Kiddies, an all-black revue which introduced European audiences to black American styles and performers. By this time Ellington's family, Edna and Mercer, had joined him in New York City. The couple separated in the late 1920's, but they never divorced or reconciled.

Ellington's achievements as a composer and bandleader began to attract national attention while he worked at the Cotton Club in Harlem, New York City, from 1927 to 1932. The orchestra developed a distinctive sound that displayed the non-traditional voicings of Ellington's arrangements and featured the unique talents of the individual soloists. Ellington integrated his soloists' exotic-sounding trombone growls and wah-wahs, their high-squealed trumpets, their sultry saxophone blues licks and Harlem's street rhythms into his arrangements. In the promotional material of the Cotton Club, the band was often billed as "Duke Ellington and His Jungle Band." With the success of compositions like "Mood Indigo," and an increasing number of recordings and national radio broadcasts from the Cotton Club, the band's reputation soared.

The ten years from 1932 to 1942 are considered by some major critics to represent the "golden age" for the Ellington Orchestra, but it represents just one of their creative peaks. These years did bring an influx of extraordinary new talent to the band including Jimmy Blanton on double bass, Ben Webster on tenor saxophone, and Ray Nance on trumpet, violin and vocals. During this ten year span Ellington composed several of his best known short works, including "Concerto For Cootie," "Ko-Ko," "Cotton Tail," "In A Sentimental Mood," and Jump For Joy, his first full-length musical stage revue.

Most notably, 1938 marked the arrival of Billy Strayhorn. While a teenager in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Strayhorn had already written "Lush Life," "Something To Live For" and a musical, Fantastic Rhythm. Ellington was initially impressed with Strayhorn's lyrics but realized long before Billy's composition "Take the A' Train" became the band's theme song in 1942 that Strayhorn's talents were not limited to penning clever lyrics. By 1942, "Swee' Pea" had become arranger, composer, second pianist, collaborator, and as Duke described him, "my right arm, my left arm, all the eyes in the back of my head, my brain waves in his head, and his in mine." Many Ellington/Strayhorn songs have entered the jazz canon, and their extended works are still being discovered and studied today. Strayhorn remained with the Ellington Organization until his death on May 30, 1967.

Ellington had often hinted of a work in progress depicting the struggle of blacks in America. The original script, Boola, debuted in Carnegie Hall in November of 1943, retitled Black, Brown and Beige. The performance met with mixed reviews, and although Ellington often returned to Carnegie Hall the piece was never recorded in a studio, and after 1944 was never performed in entirety again by the Ellington Orchestra. Nonetheless, it is now considered a milestone in jazz composition.

After World War II the mood and musical tastes of the country shifted and hard times befell big bands, but Ellington kept his band together. The band was not always financially self-sufficient and during the lean times Ellington used his songwriting royalties to meet the soloists' salaries. One could assign to Ellington the altruistic motive of loyalty to his sidemen, but another motivation may have been his compositional style which was rooted in hearing his music in the formative stage come alive in rehearsal. "The band was his instrument," Billy Strayhorn said, and no Ellington composition was complete until he heard the orchestra play it. Then he could fine tune his compositions, omit and augment passages, or weave a soloist's contribution into the structure of the tune.

In 1956, the American public rediscovered Duke and the band at the Newport Jazz Festival in Rhode Island. The searing performances of tenor saxophonist Paul Gonsalves on "Diminuendo and Crescendo In Blue," his premiere soloist, alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges on "Jeep's Blues", and the crowd's ecstatic reaction have become jazz legend. Later that year Duke landed on the cover of Time magazine. Although Ellington had previously written music for film and television (including the short film, Black and Tan Fantasy in 1929) it wasn't until 1959 that Otto Preminger asked him to score music for his mainstream film, Anatomy of a Murder, starring Jimmy Stewart. Paris Blues in 1961, featuring box-office stars Paul Newman and Sidney Poitier in roles as American jazz musicians in Paris, followed.

Ellington's first performance overseas was in England in 1933, but the 1960s brought extensive overseas tours including diplomatic tours sponsored by the State Department. Ellington and Strayhorn composed exquisite extended works reflecting the sights and sounds of their travels, including the Far East Suite, 1966. They wrote homages to their classical influences; in 1963, they adapted Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker Suite and celebrated Shakespeare's works with the suite Such Sweet Thunder in 1957. With Ella Fitzgerald, they continued the Norman Granz Songbook Series. Ellington also began to flex his considerable pianist skills and recorded albums with John Coltrane (1963), Coleman Hawkins (1963), Frank Sinatra, and Money Jungle (1963) with Charles Mingus and Max Roach. The First Sacred Concert debuted in San Francisco's Grace Cathedral in 1965. In his final years, Ellington's thoughts turned to spiritual themes and he added a Second (1968) and Third (1973) Concert of Sacred Music to his compositions.

In his lifetime, Duke received numerous awards and honors including the highest honor bestowed on an American civilian, the Congressional Medal Of Freedom. In 1965, Ellington was recommended for a Pulitzer Prize to honor his forty years of contribution to music but the recommendation was rejected by the board. Most likely he was disappointed, but his response at the age of sixty-six was, "Fate is being kind to me. Fate doesn't want me to be famous too young."

Ellington never rested on his laurels or stopped composing. Whenever he was asked to name his favorite compositions his characteristic reply was "the next five coming up," but to please his loyal fans Ellington always featured some of his standards in every performance. Even on his deathbed, he was composing the opera buffo called Queenie Pie.

Duke Ellington died on May 24, 1974 at seventy-five years of age. His funeral was held in New York's Cathedral of St. John The Divine; he was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery. His long-time companion Beatrice "Evie" Ellis was buried beside him after her death in 1976. He was survived by his only child, Mercer Kennedy Ellington, who not only took up the baton to lead the Duke Ellington Orchestra but assumed the task of caring for his father's papers and his legacy to the nation. Mercer Ellington died in Copenhagan, Denmark on February 8, 1996, at the age of seventy-six. Ruth Ellington Boatwright died in New York on March 6, 2004, at the age of eighty-eight. Both Mercer and Ruth were responsible for shepherding the documents and artifacts that celebrate Duke Ellington's genius and creative life to their current home in the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

William H. Quealy Collection of Duke Ellington Recordings (AC0296)

Rutgers University Collection of Radio Interviews about Duke Ellington (AC0328)

Duke Ellington Oral History Project (AC0368)

Duke Ellington Collection of Ephemera and realated Audiovisual Materials (AC0386)

Annual International Conference of the Duke Ellington Study Group Proceedings (AC0385)

Robert Udkoff Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0388)

Frank Driggs Collection of Duke Ellington Photographic Prints (AC0389)

New York Chapter of the Duke Ellington Society Collection (AC390)

Earl Okin Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0391)

William Russo Transcription and Arrangement of Duke Ellington's First Concert of Sacred Music (AC0406)

Ruth Ellington Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0415)

Music manuscripts in the Ruth Ellington Collection complement the music manuscripts found in the Duke Ellington Collection.

Carter Harman Collection of Interviews with Duke Ellington (AC0422)

Betty McGettigan Collection of Duke Ellington Memorabilia (AC0494)

Dr. Theodore Shell Collection of Duke Ellington Ephemera (AC0502)

Edward and Gaye Ellington Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0704)

Andrew Homzy Collection of Duke Ellington Stock Music Arrangements (AC0740)

John Gensel Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC0763)

Al Celley Collection of Duke Ellington Materials (AC1240)

Materials at Other Organizations

Institute of Jazz Studies
Separated Materials:
Artifacts related to this collection are in the Division of Culture and the Arts (now Division of Cultural and Community Life) and include trophies, plaques, and medals. See accessions: 1989.0369; 1991.0808; 1993.0032; and 1999.0148.

"
Provenance:
The collection was purchased through an appropriation of Congress in 1988.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research but the original and master audiovisual materials are stored off-site and special arrangements must be made to work with it. Contact the Archives Center for information at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.

Copyright restrictions. Consult the Archives Center at archivescenter@si.edu or 202-633-3270.

Paul Ellington, executor, is represented by:

Richard J.J. Scarola, Scarola Ellis LLP, 888 Seventh Avenue, 45th Floor, New York, New York 10106. Telephone (212) 757-0007 x 235; Fax (212) 757-0469; email: rjjs@selaw.com; www.selaw.com; www.ourlawfirm.com.
Occupation:
Composers -- 20th century  Search this
Topic:
Big bands  Search this
Pianists  Search this
Bandsmen -- 20th century  Search this
Jazz -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Musicians -- 20th century  Search this
Music -- Performance  Search this
African American entertainers -- 20th century  Search this
African Americans -- History  Search this
Popular music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Phonograph records
Papers
Photographic prints
Posters
Sound recordings
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Music -- Manuscripts
Clippings
Awards
Audiotapes
Citation:
Duke Ellington Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0301
See more items in:
Duke Ellington Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep850a376a1-6b6d-48bc-9076-cffef76fea2c
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0301
Online Media:

Benny Carter Collection

Creator:
Carter, Benny, 1907-2003  Search this
Extent:
67.5 Cubic feet (182 boxes, 3 oversize folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Awards
Clippings
Scrapbooks
Scores
Posters
Photographs
Music
Manuscripts
Date:
1928-2000
Scope and Contents:
The majority of the material in the Benny Carter Collection is dated from the late 1920s through the later half of the 1990s. Donated to the Smithsonian Institution in December, 2000, the bulk of the collection is comprised of original music manuscripts (full scores and parts), band books, and published sheet music from Benny Carter's prolific career as a jazz composer and musician. The collection also contains newspaper clippings, correspondence, photographs, scrapbooks, awards, posters, commercial sound recordings, a few jazz related journals and some personal ephemera documenting Benny Carter's personal life and career as a composer, arranger, bandleader, trumpeter and alto saxophonist.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into six series

Series 1: Music Manuscripts, 1928-1990s

Series 2: Newspaper Clippings and Magazine Clippings, 1928-2000

Series 3: Photographs, 1928-1998

Series 4: Awards and Proclamations, 1961-1999

Series 5: Sound Recordings, 1958-1989

Series 6: Ephemera, 1952-2000

Series 7: 2004 Photographs Addenda

Series 8: 2004 Ephemera Addenda

Series 9: 2004 Magazine and Newsclippings Addenda

Series 10: 2004 Awards and Proclamations Addenda
Biography:
Bennett Lester Carter, better known as "Benny," was born on August 8, 1907 in New York City. The Carter's were quite a musical family - - Benny's father played guitar, his mother played piano, and a cousin, Theodore ("Cuban") Bennett, played the trumpet professionally - - so it was no surprise that Benny also became a musician, beginning his musical training at the age of ten. He first played the trumpet and then C-melody saxophone before changing to alto saxophone, which became his chief instrument.

Benny Carter began his professional career around the young age of seventeen, when he joined a local group as an alto saxophonist. He subsequently played with various other groups, including Billy Paige and Louis Deppe, until attending Wilberforce College in Ohio to study seminary in 1925. Finding music more enticing than theology, Carter left college and instead toured with Horace Henderson's Wilberforce Collegians intermittently between 1925 and 1928.

Carter's musical talents began attracting widespread attention in 1930 during a year-long stint with Fletcher Henderson's orchestra, to which he contributed many important arrangements. As word of his talent continued to spread, Carter played with such notables as William "Chick" Webb (1931) and served as musical director of William McKinney's Cotton Pickers (1931-1932) in Detroit. Upon returning to New York in 1932, Carter formed his own highly-respected orchestra. In its two years of existence, the Benny Carter Orchestra included several major pioneers in early swing style, such as Bill Coleman, Dicky Wells, Ben Webster, Chu Berry, Teddy Wilson, and Sid Catlett. Months after playing the inaugural show in New York City at Harlem's Apollo Theater in 1934, Carter disbanded the orchestra and, one year later, sailed to Europe to spread jazz across the globe.

After arriving in Europe, Carter first performed with Willie Lewis in Paris, France, and then, during 1936 -1938, served as staff arranger for the BBC Dance Orchestra in London, England. As he continued to tour throughout his stay in Europe (even leading his own interracial band in the Netherlands in 1937), he met with even greater success than in the United States. By this point, Carter was well-known for his arrangements and for his alto saxophone and clarinet playing. He was also recognized for his talented singing and tenor saxophone, trumpet, and piano playing.

In 1938, Carter sailed back to the United States and formed a new orchestra which regularly played at Harlem's Savoy Theater until 1940. He toured the United States during the next few years, both with small groups and with his big band, finally settling in Los Angeles in 1945. There he continued to lead his band (band members included modern jazz greats such as Miles Davis and J. J. Johnson), but turned increasingly to writing and arranging music for films and television productions. His film scores include Stormy Weather (1943), A Man Called Adam (1966), Red Sky at Morning(1970), and Buck and the Preacher (1972). "Ironside," "Bob Hope Presents," and the Alfred Hitchcock show were among the television programs for which he wrote music.

Carter had stopped performing with a regular orchestra by 1946, but he remained active up through the 1960s both by playing at Norman Granz's Jazz at the Philharmonic shows and with Duke Ellington, among others. He also continued to arrange music for various singers, including Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, Ray Charles, Peggy Lee, and Louis Armstrong. During the 1970s he began performing again, touring in Europe, Asia and Australia; in 1976 he toured the Middle East under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of State. Carter also became involved with academia, serving as visiting professor or workshop consultant at universities such as Yale, Cornell, Princeton, and Duke. He remained active in the music business well into the 1990s and still resides in California.

Benny Carter is regarded as "one of the most versatile musicians of his time." As a musician, he made major contributions to several areas of jazz and, as an arranger, he helped to construct the big-band swing style. He has received many awards throughout his career. The more prestigious honors included a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences and a 1994 Grammy Award for the album "Elegy in Blue."

Footnotes

[1 ] Biographical note derived from Benny Carter: A Life in American Music, by Monroe and Edward Berger, and James Patrick (New York: Scarecrow Press and the Institute of Jazz Studies, Rutgers University, 1982).

[2] J. Bradford Robinson, "John Kirby," The New Grove Dictionary of Jazz, vol 1, 1986: 653-54.
Provenance:
The Benny Carter Collection was donated by Bennett Carter in December 2000.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Reproduction restricted due to copyright.
Topic:
African American musicians  Search this
Jazz -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Awards
Clippings -- 20th century
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Scores
Posters -- 20th century
Photographs -- 20th century
Music -- Manuscripts
Manuscripts -- Music -- 20th century
Citation:
Benny Carter Collection, 1928-2000, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0757
See more items in:
Benny Carter Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep839f63d81-a542-41dc-8929-3f0c7f433f2f
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0757
Online Media:

Benny Carter, Dizzy Gillespie, Louis Bellson [color photoprint]

Photographer:
Blair, Paul  Search this
Names:
Jazz Photographs: Composed and Improvised (Archives Center display cases, National Museum of American History, March 28-May 10, 2005).  Search this
Bellson, Louis  Search this
Carter, Benny, 1907-2003  Search this
Gillespie, Dizzy, 1917-1993  Search this
Collection Creator:
Carter, Benny, 1907-2003  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (3-7/16" x 5".)
Culture:
African Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Chromogenic color prints
Photographs
Date:
[ca. 1985.]
Scope and Contents:
Verso contains handwritten notes: "B.C.--Dizzy--Louis" and "Paul Blair--Photos--VDA."
Exhibitions Note:
Shown in exhibition "Jazz Photographs: Composed and Improvised," Archives Center display cases, National Museum of American History, March 28-May 10, 2005.
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Reproduction restricted due to copyright.
Topic:
African American musicians  Search this
Jazz musicians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Chromogenic color prints
Photographs -- 1950-2000 -- Color photoprints
Collection Citation:
Benny Carter Collection, 1928-2000, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Benny Carter Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8d5c97050-371b-4110-9252-4f6acfc4d713
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0757-ref5163

Ford-Deas family papers

Creator:
Ford-Deas family  Search this
Names:
Ford-Deas family  Search this
Extent:
3.42 Linear feet ((10 boxes))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photograph albums
Color photographs
Postcards
Black-and-white photographs
Diplomas
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographic prints
Poems
Sheet music
Drawings
Place:
Brooklyn (New York, N.Y.)
New Jersey
Date:
circa 1900-1969
Summary:
The collection, which dates from approximately 1900-1969 and measures 3.42 linear feet, documents the lives and activities of the Ford-Deas family. The collection is comprised of black-and-white photographs, color photographs, photograph albums, clippings, correspondence, postcards, bankbooks, blankbooks, diplomas, sheet music, scrapbook, poems, sketches and drawings.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
African Americans -- Employment  Search this
African American families  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
African Americans -- History -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photograph albums
Color photographs
Postcards
Black-and-white photographs
Diplomas
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Correspondence
Clippings
Photographic prints
Poems
Sheet music
Drawings
Citation:
Ford-Deas family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Theresa Ford Allen.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-062
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa79ee825b5-ba76-4751-b806-0fc561d5f754
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-062

Music for Harlem Renaissance

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Sam Morgan's Jazz Band  Search this
Armstrong, Louis, 1901-1971  Search this
Bechet, Sidney, 1897-1959  Search this
Blake, Eubie (James Herbert), 1883-1983  Search this
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Johnson, James P. (James Price), 1894-1955  Search this
Morton, Jelly Roll, 1890-1941  Search this
Ory, Kid, 1886-1973  Search this
Waller, Fats, 1904-1943  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Music
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1985
Scope and Contents:
Clips and full sound recordings performed by African American musicians, including Sam Morgan's Jazz Band, Sidney Bechet, Thomas "Fats" Waller, Duke Ellington, Eubie Blake, Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, Edward "Kid" Ory, and James P. Johnson.
Music. Part of The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties Audiovisual Records. AV003437: undated. AV003440: dated 19861110.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties - showcased the evolution and achievements of the Renaissance, which was the explosion of literary, visual, performance, and cinematic creativity generated by black artists between the end of World War I and the early days of the Great Depression. Represented is the creativity of Marian Anderson, Richard Barthe, Countee Cullen, Aaron Douglas, Duke Ellington, Meta Warrick Fuller, Roland Hayes, Zora Neale Hurston, Malvin Gray Johnson, Alain Locke, "Jelly Roll" Morton, Paul Robeson, George Schuyler, and Wallace Thurman, among others. The exhibition, held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, ran from September 1985-December 1986.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003440
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Music  Search this
Jazz  Search this
Blues (Music)  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Music
Citation:
Music for Harlem Renaissance, Exhibition Records AV03-024, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-024, Item ACMA AV003437
See more items in:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-024: The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa727333d5f-82ae-479b-817a-99a4c78b30de
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-024-ref502

The Renaissance: Black Arts of the South Exhibit Tape

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Black Swan (Sound recording label)  Search this
Connie's Inn (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Cotton Club  Search this
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People  Search this
National Urban League  Search this
Savoy Ballroom (Harlem, New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Small's Paradise (Nightclub : Harlem, New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Universal Negro Improvement Association  Search this
Barthé, Richmond, 1901-1989  Search this
Bledsoe, Jules, 1898-1943  Search this
Burleigh, H. T. (Harry Thacker), 1866-1949  Search this
Cullen, Countee, 1903-1946  Search this
Douglas, Aaron  Search this
Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963  Search this
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Fauset, Jessie Redmon  Search this
Fuller, Meta Warrick, 1877-1968  Search this
Garvey, Marcus, 1887-1940  Search this
Gilpin, Charles S. (Charles Sidney), 1878-1930  Search this
Hayes, Roland, 1887-1977  Search this
Henderson, Fletcher, 1897-1952  Search this
Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967  Search this
Johnson, Charles Spurgeon, 1893-1956  Search this
Johnson, Georgia Douglas, 1886-1966  Search this
Johnson, James Weldon, 1871-1938  Search this
Johnson, Sargent, 1888-1967  Search this
Johnson, William H., 1901-1970  Search this
Jones, Lois Mailou, 1905-1998  Search this
Larsen, Nella  Search this
Locke, Alain, 1885-1954  Search this
McKay, Claude, 1890-1948  Search this
Motley, Archibald John, 1891-1981  Search this
Randolph, A. Philip (Asa Philip), 1889-1979  Search this
Richardson, Willis, 1889-1977  Search this
Robeson, Paul, 1898-1976  Search this
Smith, Bessie, 1894-1937  Search this
Smith, Mamie  Search this
Still, William Grant, 1895-1978  Search this
Thurman, Wallace, 1902-1934  Search this
Toomer, Jean, 1894-1967  Search this
Van Vechten, Carl, 1880-1964  Search this
Walker, C. J., Madam, 1867-1919  Search this
White, Walter, 1893-1955 (President, N.A.A.C.P)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Harlem (New York, N.Y.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1985
Scope and Contents:
During the audio tour of exhibition, The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties, narrator Robert Hall presents the evolution and achievements of black creative expression beginning in Harlem and spreading across the United States during th 1920s. Literary, visual, performance, and cinematic achievements are profiled. Including brief biographical histories and achievements by Marcus Garvey, James Weldon Johnson, Jessie Fauset, A. Philip Randolph, Claude McKay, Nella Larson, Carl Van Vechten, Countee Cullen, Alain Locke, Harry T. Burleigh, Paul Robeson, Roland Hayes, Lois Mailou Jones, Jules Bledsoe, Fletcher Henderson, Bessie Smith, and Mamie Smith.
Self guided audio tour narration. Part of The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties Audiovisual Records. AV001362: master. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties - showcased the evolution and achievements of the Renaissance, which was the explosion of literary, visual, performance, and cinematic creativity generated by black artists between the end of World War I and the early days of the Great Depression. Represented is the creativity of Marian Anderson, Richard Barthe, Countee Cullen, Aaron Douglas, Duke Ellington, Meta Warrick Fuller, Roland Hayes, Zora Neale Hurston, Malvin Gray Johnson, Alain Locke, "Jelly Roll" Morton, Paul Robeson, George Schuyler, and Wallace Thurman, among others. The exhibition, held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, ran from September 1985 - December 1986.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001362
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Dramatists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
African American poets  Search this
Poets  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Sculpture  Search this
Painting  Search this
African Americans in the performing arts  Search this
Musical theater  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Spirituals (Songs)  Search this
Jazz  Search this
Blues (Music)  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Citation:
The Renaissance: Black Arts of the South Exhibit Tape, Exhibition Records AV03-024, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-024, Item ACMA AV002682
See more items in:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-024: The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa746520b90-c038-45f4-9af3-a5d974c2cec2
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-024-ref503

Harlem Renaissance Exhibit Tape

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Cotton Club  Search this
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People  Search this
Roseland Ballroom (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Savoy Ballroom (Harlem, New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Small's Paradise (Nightclub : Harlem, New York, N.Y.)  Search this
United States.. Army. Infantry Regiment, 369th  Search this
Barthé, Richmond, 1901-1989  Search this
Blake, Eubie (James Herbert), 1883-1983  Search this
Cullen, Countee, 1903-1946  Search this
Douglas, Aaron  Search this
Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963  Search this
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Fauset, Jessie Redmon  Search this
Garvey, Marcus, 1887-1940  Search this
Henderson, Fletcher, 1897-1952  Search this
Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967  Search this
Johnson, Charlie, 1891-1959  Search this
Johnson, James Weldon, 1871-1938  Search this
Johnson, Malvin Gray, 1896-1934  Search this
Johnson, William H., 1901-1970  Search this
Locke, Alain, 1885-1954  Search this
McKay, Claude, 1890-1948  Search this
Randolph, A. Philip (Asa Philip), 1889-1979  Search this
Robeson, Paul, 1898-1976  Search this
Sissle, Noble, 1889-1975  Search this
Smith, Bessie, 1894-1937  Search this
Toomer, Jean, 1894-1967  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (open reel, 1 inch)
3 Sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Narration
Place:
Harlem (New York, N.Y.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1985
Scope and Contents:
Harlem Renaissance Exhibit Tape provides a brief overview of the exhibition, The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties, which presents the evolution and achievements of black creative expression beginning in Harlem and spreading across the United States during th 1920s. Literary, visual, performance, and cinematic achievements are highlighted. Including Marcus Garvey, James Weldon Johnson, Jessie Fauset, A. Philip Randolph, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Alain Locke, Paul Robeson, Fletcher Henderson, Bessie Smith, and Duke Ellington. Exhibit Tape also provides historical context of Harlem and the Renaissance, and highlights educational offerings provided by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, including artifacts, film footage, and programs.
Short exhibition film. Part of The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties Audiovisual Records. AV003431: outtakes. AV003439: narration. AV003430: narration outtakes. AV003325 and AV003431: undated. AV003439 and AV003430: dated 19861110.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties - showcased the evolution and achievements of the Renaissance, which was the explosion of literary, visual, performance, and cinematic creativity generated by black artists between the end of World War I and the early days of the Great Depression. Represented is the creativity of Marian Anderson, Richard Barthe, Countee Cullen, Aaron Douglas, Duke Ellington, Meta Warrick Fuller, Roland Hayes, Zora Neale Hurston, Malvin Gray Johnson, Alain Locke, "Jelly Roll" Morton, Paul Robeson, George Schuyler, and Wallace Thurman, among others. The exhibition, held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, ran from September 1985 - December 1986.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003431

ACMA AV003439

ACMA AV003430
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Occupation:
Artists  Search this
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American women  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
African American authors  Search this
African American women authors  Search this
Authors  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Sculpture  Search this
Painting  Search this
African Americans in the performing arts  Search this
Musical theater  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Jazz  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Narration
Citation:
Harlem Renaissance Exhibit Tape, Exhibition Records AV03-024, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-024, Item ACMA AV003325
See more items in:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-024: The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7898671df-3cfc-40e1-a81c-8520921174e6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-024-ref504

Race Movies: The Popular Art of the Black Renaissance

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Foster, William D., 1884-  Search this
Johnson, James Weldon, 1871-1938  Search this
Micheaux, Oscar, 1884-1951  Search this
Smith, Bessie, 1894-1937  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/2 inch)
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
2 Video recordings (VHS)
1 Video recording (MiniDV)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Place:
Harlem (New York, N.Y.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1985
Scope and Contents:
Short film in which narrator provided the history of African American contributions to the film industry and portrayal of African Americans in film from the silent film era through the Harlem Renaissance. Includes images and clips from The Birth of a Nation, The Birth of a Race, By Right of Birth, The Homesteader, and The Scar of Shame. Includes work and contributions of Bessie Smith, Duke Ellington, James Weldon Johnson, Oscar Micheaux, and Bill Foster, also known as William D. Foster, to the film industry.
Short film. Part of The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties Audiovisual Records. AV003253-1 and AV003253-2: music only, no sound and/or very low volume sound between songs. AV003253-3: narraton only. AV003253-4: repetitious sound. AV003253-5: narration and music. Dated 19850906. AV003452: narration only, undated. AV002130 and AV002141: image and sound (narration and music) including movie clips, undated. AV005152: image and sound, original Dub from 3/4" [U-Matic] tape - remastered version, dated 19850905.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition - The Renaissance: Black Arts of the Twenties - showcased the evolution and achievements of the Renaissance, which was the explosion of literary, visual, performance, and cinematic creativity generated by black artists between the end of World War I and the early days of the Great Depression. Represented is the creativity of Marian Anderson, Richard Barthe, Countee Cullen, Aaron Douglas, Duke Ellington, Meta Warrick Fuller, Roland Hayes, Zora Neale Hurston, Malvin Gray Johnson, Alain Locke, "Jelly Roll" Morton, Paul Robeson, George Schuyler, and Wallace Thurman, among others. The exhibition, held at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, ran from September 1985 - December 1986.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003253-2

ACMA AV003253-3

ACMA AV003253-4

ACMA AV003253-5

ACMA AV003452

ACMA AV002130

ACMA AV005152

ACMA AV002141
General:
Title transcribed from contents of recording.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Harlem Renaissance  Search this
African Americans in the performing arts  Search this
Motion picture producers and directors  Search this
African American motion picture producers and directors  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Race films  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Race Movies: The Popular Art of the Black Renaissance, Exhibition Records AV03-024, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-024, Item ACMA AV003253-1
See more items in:
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records
The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-024: The Renaissance: Black arts of the Twenties audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa71b1b718f-fa04-4b60-8420-4d7bb50a977b
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-024-ref505

Sullivan family papers

Creator:
Sullivan family  Search this
Names:
Sullivan family  Search this
Extent:
2.25 Linear feet (7 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Autograph albums
Books
Correspondence
Certificates
Tintypes (prints)
Ephemera
Financial records
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Place:
Long Island (N. Y.)
Washington (D.C.)
Warsaw (Poland)
Boston (Mass.)
New Brunswick
Date:
1860-1994
bulk 1920-1960
Summary:
The Sullivan Family papers, which date from 1880 to 1994 and measure 2.25 linear feet, document the personal lives of four generations in the Sullivan Family. The papers are comprised of personal correspondence, school materials, legal documents, financial records, clippings, books, posters, and photographs.
Scope and Contents note:
These papers, which date from 1880 to 1994, bulk dates 1920–1960, document the lives of four generations of the Sullivan family. They contain material relating to a great number of Sullivan family members descended from Livinia and Abraham Sullivan. The papers especially offer insight into the family's life and involvement during the Second World War through a particularly abundant collection of correspondence and photographs. The papers also include books, legal documents, financial records, and school materials.
Arrangement note:
The papers are organized into four series. Folders are arranged alphabetically within series, while documents within folders are organized chronologically. Oversized material appears in the series: Biographical Files, Printed Materials and Photographs. Non archival materials associated with the papers are housed in the Collections Department.

Series I: Biographical Files

Series II: Correspondence

Series III: Printed Materials

Series IV: Photographs
Biographical/Historical note:
In 1883 Abraham Sullivan welcomed his wife, Livinia and four children, Charles, Nynetta, Emma, and Theodore to Boston, Massachusetts. Emigrating from New Brunswick, Canada, the family would remain in the Boston area for many generations to come. After the move to Boston, oldest son Charles H. Sullivan would rise to prominence in the New England music scene. He became a skilled craftsman in instrument-making and founded the Boston Victorian Orchestra, a multi-racial orchestra.

Charles Sullivan never married, which perhaps contributes to the lack of information on his life. His brother Theodore married Anne Vann of Nova Scotia, Canada. Together they raised two daughters from Anne's previous marriage, Sadie and Rosa Jones (later Sadie Thompson and Rosa Miller). They also had four children of their own, Theodore M., twins Mary (later Mary Walters) and May, and Frances (later Frances Mendez).

Theodore and Anne's son Theodore M. began his family's military tradition by enlisting in the army in 1917, during the First World War. He spent two years fighting in Europe before being honorably discharged at the end of the conflict in 1919. In the early 1930s Theodore was awarded the Purple Heart by United States Secretary of War George Dern for eleven different wounds sustained in 1918.

Theodore M.'s example was followed by his immediate and extended family members during the Second World War. Many of the women volunteered in war efforts at home and all three of Theodore M.'s sons, Lewis, Earle, and Edwin (Eddy) enlisted for service in the armed forces. In 1943 Earle Sullivan was accepted into the Tuskegee Institution's program for training the first African American military pilots (now famously known as the "Tuskegee Airmen") and was well into his training before his death at the end of 1943.

The Sullivan family continued their tradition of service for many decades through memberships with the Red Cross and American Legion. In 1954 Sadie Thompson, Theodore M. Sullivan's half sister, was honored with an award for forty years of service in her Boston Chapter of the American Red Cross, and again in 1971 for fifty five years of active involvement.

Although the Sullivan family retained ties to the Boston area they originally settled in, several branches have spread throughout the northeastern United States. After his marriage, Theodore M. Sullivan began working for the Bureau of Engraving in Washington D.C. Still connected to his Boston home, Theodore split his time between the two cities until his death in 1969. Upon her marriage to Thomas Mendes, Ethylene Mendez, daughter of Francis Sullivan Mendez moved to Long Island, N.Y. She was eventually followed by her mother and sister, Lillian, where they lived until their deaths in the 1980s and 90s.
Provenance:
The Sullivan Family papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in April 2005 by Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Sullivan Family papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
American Legion  Search this
African American military personnel  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
African American families  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- African Americans  Search this
American Red Cross  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- African Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Autograph albums
Books
Correspondence
Certificates
Tintypes (prints)
Ephemera
Financial records
Negatives (photographic)
Photographic prints
Citation:
The Sullivan Family papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Savina Martin, Dominga Martin and Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-035
See more items in:
Sullivan family papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa790713327-dd0a-4a8f-81fb-e9d772c97b37
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-035
Online Media:

Ebony Mag[azine] series Rev[erend] Williams & son [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Creator:
Eastman Kodak Company (film manufacturer)  Search this
Names:
Ebony Magazine  Search this
Williams Rev  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on cellulose acetate film sheet, 2.5" x 2.5" (#120 film).)
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Reverend Williams's son and unidentified woman playing saxophone and piano. "Discards do not print" on original envelope. "KODAK SAFETY FILM" edge imprint. No ink on negative, no Scurlock number.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American musicians  Search this
Music -- Performance  Search this
Piano  Search this
Saxophone  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client / 4.6.1: Black and White Negatives Part 1 / Ebony Magazine Series
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep85c62b84f-51f5-400e-83ca-100530249214
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-06-ref27371

Goins Music School [Music Arts Studio] Group, Feb. 1960 [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Creator:
Eastman Kodak Company (film manufacturer)  Search this
Names:
Music Arts Studio  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on cellulose acetate film sheet., 4" x 5".)
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Washington (D.C.) -- 1960-1970 -- Photographs
Date:
February 1960
Scope and Contents:
Location identified March 2012 as Muisc Arts Studio by Ms. Elsie Goins. Girl playing violin, boy pointing at sheet music on a music stand. No ink on negative, no Scurlock number. Ink on envelope: caption. "KODAK -- SAFETY -- FILM" edge imprint.
Biographical / Historical:
Gregoria Fraser Goins founded the Corda Club in Washington, D.C. and was a piano teacher at the Washington Conservatory of Music and School of Expression. However it is not known if the Goins referred to in this caption is Gregoria Fraser Goins. (Information taken from "New Perspectives on Music: Essays in Honor of Eileen Southern", Review author[s]: Marsha J. Reisser, American Music, 1993, University of Illinois Press).
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Violin  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
African American children  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1960-1970 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client / 4.6.1: Black and White Negatives Part 1 / Goins Music School
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8ac395e5b-eac6-484f-8e0a-352695fa3cd5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-06-ref27444

Goins Music School [Music Arts Studio] Group, Feb. 1960 [text on original storage envelope] [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Creator:
Eastman Kodak Company (film manufacturer)  Search this
Names:
Music Arts Studio  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on cellulose acetate film sheet., 4" x 5".)
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Washington (D.C.) -- 1960-1970 -- Photographs
Date:
February 1960
Scope and Contents:
Location identified March 2012 by Ms. Elsie Goins as Music Arts Studio. A boy is seated with a guitar and a man is bending down holding neck of the guitar. There is a musical score on a music stand in front of them and an upright piano with a metronome on top of it. No ink on negative, no Scurlock number. Ink on envelope: caption. "KODAK -- SAFETY -- FILM" edge imprint.
Biographical / Historical:
Gregoria Fraser Goins founded the Corda Club in Washington, D.C. and was a piano teacher at the Washington Conservatory of Music and School of Expression. However it is not known if the Goins referred to in this caption is Gregoria Fraser Goins. (Information taken from "New Perspectives on Music: Essays in Honor of Eileen Southern", Review author[s]: Marsha J. Reisser, American Music, 1993, University of Illinois Press).
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Guitar  Search this
Piano  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
African American music teachers  Search this
African American children  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1960-1970 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client / 4.6.1: Black and White Negatives Part 1 / Goins Music School
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep817eeb546-b519-4db8-8e7d-6bd81f8b21fe
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-06-ref27445

Goins Music School [Music Arts Studio] Group, Feb. 1960 [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Creator:
Eastman Kodak Company (film manufacturer)  Search this
Names:
Music Arts Studio  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on cellulose acetate film sheet., 4" x 5".)
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Washington (D.C.) -- 1960-1970 -- Photographs
Date:
February 1960
Scope and Contents:
Location identified March 2012 as Muisc Arts Studio by Ms. Elsie Goins. Boy playing an upright piano. Sign on door reads, "Studio A". No ink on negative, no Scurlock number. Ink on envelope: caption. "KODAK -- SAFETY -- FILM" edge imprint.
Biographical / Historical:
Gregoria Fraser Goins founded the Corda Club in Washington, D.C. and was a piano teacher at the Washington Conservatory of Music and School of Expression. However it is not known if the Goins referred to in this caption is Gregoria Fraser Goins. (Information taken from "New Perspectives on Music: Essays in Honor of Eileen Southern", Review author[s]: Marsha J. Reisser, American Music, 1993, University of Illinois Press).
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Piano  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
African American children  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1960-1970 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client / 4.6.1: Black and White Negatives Part 1 / Goins Music School
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep88fbda5b4-9bbd-42ad-8f15-ce1492b6c7c5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-06-ref27446

WPFW 89.3: Interview with Arthur Crier

Creator:
WPFW (Radio station : Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Kendall Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
New York (N.Y.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1998
Scope and Contents:
Arthur Crier talked about the upcoming event 'Salute to the Pioneers of Rhythm and Blues, and Doo-Wop Presentation at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem' in which Doo-Wop and Rhythm and Blues artists from 1940s and early 60s will pose for a historical photograph in New York City. The photograph donated to Schomburg Center and Smithsonian Center for African American History and Culture. Crier also talked about Doo-Wop music; and Doo-Wop music was played throughout the program.
Radio Program. Part of the Teenarama Collection. Dated 19981109.
Biographical / Historical:
The documentary 'Dance Party: The Teenarama Story' examined the popularity of 1950s and 1960s teen dance television shows, including 'The Teenarama Dance Party,' 'American Bandstand,' 'The Buddy Dean Show,' and 'The Milt Grant Show.' 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was an all-black teen dance show produced and broadcasted in Washington, D.C. The show aired from March 7, 1963 to November 20, 1970 on WOOK-TV Channel 14, which was the nation's first Black TV station. The show was produced live six days a week; and hosted first by Bob King and later by a rotation of hosts. In addition to being a dance show, 'The Teenarama Dance Party' was a training ground for teens. Production staff mentored the teenagers in the art of broadcast production. The teens trained as camera operators, floor directors, and technical engineers; and served as production assistants.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Musicians  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Doo-wop (Music)  Search this
Rhythm and blues music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
WPFW 89.3: Interview with Arthur Crier, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-055, Item ACMA AV005302_B
See more items in:
Kendall Productions Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f043bb73-a522-4df5-8f27-5497300a76ae
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-06-055-ref387

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