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The Fort Pillow Massacre

Created by:
Kurz & Allison, American, founded 1880  Search this
Medium:
lithographic ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W: 19 5/16 x 25 7/8 in. (49.1 x 65.7 cm)
Type:
chromolithographs
Place depicted:
Fort Pillow, Henning, Lauderdale County, Tennessee, United States, North and Central America
Place made:
Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1892
Topic:
African American  Search this
Art  Search this
Military  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Slavery  Search this
U.S. History, Civil War, 1861-1865  Search this
United States Colored Troops  Search this
Violence  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Paxton and Rachel Baker
Object number:
2012.172.22
Restrictions & Rights:
Public Domain
Proper usage is the responsibility of the user.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Visual Arts
Slavery and Freedom Objects
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5774225fe-449b-4ef0-8841-c714d0610f87
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2012.172.22
Online Media:

National HIV Testing Day, 2009. [Picture postcard.]

Sponsor:
Center for Disease Control  Search this
Collection Collector:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History  Search this
Collection Donor:
Becker, John M.  Search this
Gay Officers Action League. GOAL  Search this
Heritage of Pride (HOP)  Search this
Rohrbaugh, Richard  Search this
Atlantic States Gay Rodeo Association (ASGRA)  Search this
Collection Creator:
Hirsch, Leonard  Search this
Guest, Barbara  Search this
Barna, Joseph T.  Search this
Guest, Michael E.  Search this
Cruse, Howard, 1944-2019  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Ink on paper., 5.9" x 3.7".)
Container:
Box 34, Folder 57
Culture:
African Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Postcards
Scope and Contents:
Event occurred June 27, 2009 at The Bachelor's Mill, Washington, D.C. Image shows face of African American man.
Local Numbers:
AC1146-0000040.tif(AC Scan No.)
Exhibitions Note:
Displayed in Archives Center exhibition, "Archiving the History of an Epdemic: HIV and AIDS, 1985-2009," June 3, 2011-October 3, 2011. Franklin A. Robinson, Jr., curator.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.

Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audio-visual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow.

Do not use original materials when available on reference video or audio tapes.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Diseases  Search this
HIV and AIDS  Search this
HIV Positive  Search this
Gay rights  Search this
LGBT  Search this
Homosexuality  Search this
Sexuality  Search this
Sexual minorities  Search this
Genre/Form:
Postcards -- 21st century
Collection Citation:
Archives Center Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Archives Center Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Collection
Archives Center Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Collection / Series 3: Community Life / 3.6: HIV and AIDS, Ephemera and Photographs / HIV and AIDS
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep80b7c0b7a-95ab-497d-946b-a7a837a8f7d4
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-1146-ref2740

Solidarity with the African American People

Illustrated by:
Emory Douglas, American, born 1943  Search this
Designed by:
Lázaro Abreu Padrón, Cuban, born 1941  Search this
Published by:
Organization of Solidarity with the People of Asia, Africa and Latin America (OSPAAAL), Cuban, founded 1966  Search this
Medium:
lithographic ink on paper (fiber product)
Dimensions:
H x W: 21 x 14 in. (53.3 x 35.6 cm)
Type:
color lithographs
Place printed:
Cuba, Caribbean, Latin America, North and Central America
Cultural Place:
United States, North and Central America
Date:
1968
Topic:
African American  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Art  Search this
Design  Search this
Graphic design  Search this
International affairs  Search this
Multilingual communication  Search this
Politics  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2012.46.17.2
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
Proper usage is the responsibility of the user.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design
Memorabilia and Ephemera-Political and Activist Ephemera
Movement:
African American - Latinx Solidarity
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5a29b16f1-164a-4d52-9f4a-3edfa4aa38ba
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2012.46.17.2
Online Media:

poster

Measurements:
overall: 26 in x 20 in; 66.04 cm x 50.8 cm
Object Name:
Poster
Subject:
Vietnam War  Search this
Anti-War Movement  Search this
African American  Search this
Blacks  Search this
Credit Line:
Anne B. Zill
ID Number:
1986.0231.107
Accession number:
1986.0231
See more items in:
Political and Military History: Political History
Princeton Posters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ng49ca746b4-d048-704b-e053-15f76fa0b4fa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_535266

Oral History Interview with Almore Dale

Names:
Anacostia National Bank  Search this
Birney Elementary School  Search this
Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Howard University  Search this
Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Tuskegee Institute  Search this
Dale, Almore M., 1911-1984  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording ((1 sound disk CD-R (00:46:03). digital, 16-bit 44.1 KhZ))
2 Sound cassettes ((2 sound cassettes))
1 Sound recording ((1 data disk DVD-R digital, 24-bit 96kHz WAV.)))
Container:
Box 1, Folder 29
Box 4, Cassette 6A
Box 4, Cassette 6B
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound recordings
Sound cassettes
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
1970 - 1971 March 19
Scope and Contents note:
Almore Dale, an African American man born in 1911, discusses growing up in Anacostia when the neighborhood unofficially was segregated. Dale says the neighborhood is home to a considerable number of government employees as well as business owners, farmers, and other professionals. Dale, like many of his friends in Anacostia, attended public school at Birney Elementary School. Dale later attended Howard University, and the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. He talks about the typical family structure and dynamic, with most families having two parents with two to three children. Dale remembers how the community worked together to help raise the neighborhood children. Most families attended church, and he names Our Lady of Perpetual Help as the most popular church when he was growing up, and he describes the Anacostia Bank (now the Anacostia National Bank).

Dale talks about how politics was not a huge part of the community; how most of the community did not have the right to vote until a few years before the time of the interview; and how community associations and civic leadership helped shape Anacostia. Dale particularly emphasizes how women in the neighborhood, including Mrs. Webster and Jessie Bray Banks, provided charitable services, and bought property to help the community grow.

Almore Dale was interviewed by Irene White and Marlene Corbin on November 23, 1970. Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for some parts.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
African Americans in business -- 1930-1940  Search this
African American families  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7711a8c40-9882-425a-a9ce-b923d2a96d50
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref2

[Calendar or trade card featuring an African-American shoeshine in New York]

Topic:
Ethnic Imagery Project, Archives Center
Advertiser:
Clarence Brooks and Co.  Search this
Series Creator:
Warshaw, Isadore, 1900-1969  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Ink on paper, 3" x 4-3/4".)
Culture:
African Americans  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Cartoons (humorous images)
Calendars
Date:
[1885?]
Scope and Contents:
Clarence Brooks and Co. trade card showing two African-American men with an African American shoeshine boy. The boy is pointing to the shoes of one man, who wears a red and yellow suit. Caption: "Elderly gent, 'Why does he want to shine 'em up for nuffin? Spect de little nigger tinks deyd be a big advertisement for him.'"
Arrangement:
Series No. Paint, Box No. 2, Folder No. Brooks/Clarence 2.
Local Numbers:
040060112.tif (AC Scan No.)
Series Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Some items may be restricted due to fragile condition.
Series Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Stereotypes (Social psychology)  Search this
Business Advertising -- Calenders  Search this
Racism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Cartoons (humorous images)
Calendars
Series Citation:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Paints, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Paints
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana Subject Categories: Paints / 1: Business Records and Marketing Material / B
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8cc944270-4b76-4d5c-9e5b-c8e2761573f1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0060-s01-01-paints-ref611

[Duke Ellington portrait : photoprint]

Photographer:
Butler, Opisc (photographer)  Search this
Names:
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Collection Creator:
Fitzgerald, Ella, 1917-1996  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (photoprint, Silver gelatin on paper, unmounted, 10 x 8".)
Container:
Box 14, Folder 10
Type:
Archival materials
Portraits
Photographs
Date:
[1923.]
Scope and Contents:
The young Ellington, wearing a hat, suit and tie. Inscribed in ink: "To my darling Mother- / in-Law who always / says, 'Ellington's / right' / Your Son / Duke". "Opisc [?] -Butler / New York" in negative, at lower right Date in pencil on verso, as well as "Washington-- [illegible letter] James."
Local Numbers:
03041502.tif (AC Scan No.)
General:
Another copy of this print, trimmed flush and in worse condition, is in the folder.
Exhibitions Note:
Scan file sold to Historical Society of Washington, D.C. (Laura Schiavo, contact), warm-toned print for exhibition use, 2003/03/13.
Forms part of:
Ruth Ellington Collection Photographs (Series 9).
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research use on site by appointment. Photographs must be handled with cotton gloves unless protected by sleeves.
Collection Rights:
The Archives Center can provide reproductions of some materials for research and educational use. Copyright and right to publicity restrictions apply and limit reproduction for other purposes. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American composers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Portraits -- African American men
Photographs -- 1920-1930 -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin
Collection Citation:
Ella Fitzgerald Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Ella Fitzgerald Papers
Ella Fitzgerald Papers / Series 2: Photographs / 2.4: Ella Fitzgerald with Family, Colleagues, and Friends / Duke Ellington various shots, various dates
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep81e867d68-531e-4872-a0a0-8ec1b84676d7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0584-ref2774

RealStory: African-American Man/RealStory: African-American Woman/RealStory: Latino (comic books)

Collection Creator:
Kondratas, Ramunas A.  Search this
Ott, Katherine  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 23
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1996
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use. Researchers must handle unprotected photographs with gloves. Researchers must use reference copies of audio-visual materials. When no reference copy exists, the Archives Center staff will produce reference copies on an "as needed" basis, as resources allow. Please ask staff to remove any staples before copying.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Reproduction permission from Archives Center: reproduction fees may apply.
Collection Citation:
Division of Science, Medicine, and Society HIV/AIDS Reference Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
See more items in:
Division of Science, Medicine and Society HIV/AIDS Reference Collection
Division of Science, Medicine and Society HIV/AIDS Reference Collection / Series 1: Educational Material and Advertisements / 1.4: Government of the District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/ep8a226fd7b-6544-4bfc-83f5-02a934c8ad53
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-1134-ref77

Oral History Interview with Norris Scott and Claudine Trivers Scott

Names:
Anacostia National Bank  Search this
Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scott, Claudine Trivers, 20th century (active)  Search this
Scott, Norris, 1888-1976  Search this
Trivers, George, 1907 - 1997?  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
3 Sound cassettes (1 box)
2 Sound discs ((1 sound disk CD-R (01:17:01). digital, 16-bit 44.1 KhZ))
4 Digital files ((1 data disk DVD-R digital, 24-bit 96kHz WAV.)))
Container:
Box 2, Folder 26
Box 4, Cassette 14A
Box 4, Cassette 14B
Box 4, Cassette 14C
Box 5, Disk 14A & 14B
Box 5, Disk 14C
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound cassettes
Sound discs
Digital files
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
1970- 19 Mar 1971
2007 September 14
Scope and Contents:
Norris Scott, an African American man born on November 13, 1888, and his wife Claudine (née Blires) Trivers Scott, an African American woman born around 1893, discuss what Anacostia was like throughout their marriage, with Norris being from the area. They talk about the changing demographics of the neighborhood; what recreation was available for African American residents then, such as Eureka and Green Willow Parks for playing sports (baseball and rugby) as well as Ottaway Holmes for boating; what typical occupations, such as laborers and domestic workers; how the biggest churches at that time were Campbell AME Church and Bethlehem Baptist Church; and about banking at the only bank in the neighborhood, the Anacostia Bank (now Anacostia National Bank).

The Scotts also speak about the construction of public housing and Suitland Parkways starting in the 1940s and how those projects changed Anacostia. Additionally, they discuss how segregation and integration impacted the community, particularly how different administrations, such as the Wilson Administration, made racial tension worse. They conclude the interview providing information about the current problems of the neighborhood: transportation, sanitation, and crime.

Claudine (née Blires) Trivers Scott and Norris Scott were interviewed on December 5, 1970, by an unnamed volunteer or staff member at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum). Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for most parts.
General:
Claudine's maiden name is Blires. Her first husband's last name is Trivers (she is the mother of George J. Trivers) and Norris Scott is her second husband.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American women  Search this
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Banks and banking  Search this
Segregation -- United States  Search this
Community development  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7b796e9f8-d95d-4c28-8a68-5bae70095fcd
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref597

Oral History Interview with Pierre McKinley Taylor

Names:
Anacostia National Bank  Search this
Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home  Search this
Saint Elizabeths Hospital (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Bradshaw, John  Search this
Crocker, Caroline Taylor, 1902-1996  Search this
Dyson, Robert H.  Search this
MacArthur, Douglas, 1880-1964  Search this
Shipley, Rezin, Dr., 1865-1924  Search this
St. Philip's Episcopal Church  Search this
Taylor, Pierre McKinley, 1898-1996  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Digital files (1 data disk DVD-R digital, 24-bit 96kHz WAV.)
1 Sound disc ((1 sound disk CD-R (01:05:44). digital, 16-bit 44.1 KhZ)(1 sound disk CD-R (00:28:41). digital, 16-bit 44.1 KhZ))
2 Sound cassettes ((1 sound cassette (01:05:44))(1 sound cassette (00:28:41)))
Container:
Box 2, Folder 28
Box 4, Cassette 26A
Box 4, Cassette 26B
Box 5, Disk 26
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Digital files
Sound discs
Sound cassettes
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
1970- 19 Mar 1971
2007 September 14
Scope and Contents note:
Pierre McKinley Taylor, an African American man born in 1898, recounts his experiences in Anacostia growing up, describing the housing and shacks that were built under Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur and his memories of raising farm animals on Cedar Hill and selling milk around the neighborhood. He provides detailed information about prominent families and community members (such as the Dale and Douglass families), local businesses (such as Dr. Shipley's Pharmacy and Dyson's Barbershop), and important landmarks (such as Douglass Hall, the Frederick Douglass Home, and Eureka and Green Willow Parks).

He talks about church-going and the closest three major churches growing up, Campbell AME Church, Bethlehem Baptist Church, and St. Philip's Church, as well as what transportation was available then. Other topics of discussion include the geographical boundaries of Anacostia and how they were segregated, typical employment and incomes, and the Anacostia newspaper.

Taylor also describes the political involvement, community organizing, and banking at the Anacostia Bank (now Anacostia National Bank). He recalls what it was like growing up in the Frederick Douglass Home with his sister, Caroline Taylor Crocker, including details about the history and maintenance of the home after the death of Helen Pitts Douglass.

Pierre McKinley Taylor was interviewed by John Bradshaw on December 31, 1970. His wife, Sarah Davis McKinley, was also present for the interview and answered a few questions under the name "Sarah" in the transcripts. Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for most parts.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African American women  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Frederick Douglas  Search this
Segregation -- United States  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7241aff64-28da-4f12-8707-63d60f167593
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref603

Oral History Interview with Raymond Bumbry

Names:
Birney Elementary School  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
St. Teresa of Avila Catholic Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Bumbry, Raymond E., 1893-1990  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Digital file ((1 data disk DVD-R digital, 24-bit 96kHz WAV. )))
1 Sound cassette ((1 sound disk CD-R (00:26:26). digital, 16-bit 44.1 KhZ))
Container:
Box 2, Folder 29
Box 4, Cassette 12
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Digital files
Sound cassettes
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
3 Dec 1970- 6 Apr 1973
Scope and Contents note:
Raymond Bumbry, an African American man, describes what life was like in Anacostia when he was growing up, what schools people attended (Birney Elementary School and Dunbar High School), what jobs most people had (laborers, domestic workers, and schoolteachers), what churches people attended (St. Teresa's Catholic Church, Our Lady of Perpetual Help), and what parks people went to (Green Willow Park and Eureka Park).

Bumbry mentions that he and his neighbors began voting after the Kennedy administration. He also discusses being a part of the Masonic order and doing church work, as well as working for the federal government and passing the civil service examination. He ends the interview talking about popular transportation, such as horses and buggies or streetcars, and recommending other people in Anacostia to interview.

Raymond Bumbry was interviewed on December 3, 1970, by an unnamed volunteer or staff member at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum). Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for most parts.
General:
Raymond Bumbry is sometimes misspelled as Bombray.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Voting  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7c6835eb4-8be1-4597-967c-4db45a6afc35
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref604

Oral History Interview with Russell Paxton

Names:
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home  Search this
YMCA of the USA  Search this
Banks, James, 1920-2005  Search this
Dale, Almore M., 1911-1984  Search this
Koontz, Wilbur Ledru, 1902-1982  Search this
Paxton, Russell, 1910-1982  Search this
Qualls, Charles E., 1932-1984  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound disc ((1 sound disk CD-R (00:59:43). digital, 16-bit 44.1 KhZ))
1 Sound cassette ((1 sound cassette (00:59:43)))
1 Digital file ((1 data disk DVD-R digital, 24-bit 96kHz WAV.)))
Container:
Box 2, Folder 30
Box 4, Cassette 32
Box 5, Disk 32
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound discs
Sound cassettes
Digital files
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Fort Stanton (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
1970- 19 Mar 1971
2007 September 14
Scope and Contents note:
Russell Lockwood Paxton, an African American man born around 1911, discusses his experiences in Anacostia since moving there in 1948. He recalls his time as a child in Northwest Washington D.C., attending Dunbar High School, visiting his friends in Anacostia, socialization, and recreational centers like the YMCA. He also talks about typical government jobs residents held in the 1940s and 1950s; how Washington D.C. was integrated but has "unwritten rules" for African American residents; how close-knit families and the communities used to be; church-going and Sunday school; and Home Rule and other political involvement of his neighbors.

Paxton discusses important landmarks in the neighborhood, including the Frederick Douglass Home and the Fort Stanton Recreation Center, as well as the different civic associations and community organizations he is a part of, including the Dr. Charles Qualls Anacostia Coordinating Committee and the Police Precinct Advisory Committee. Throughout the interview, he lists community leaders, such as Almore Dale, Ledru Koontz, Ella Foster, and James Banks. He ends the interview speaking about the current problems in Anacostia: crime, sanitation, and public housing and transportation.

Russell Lockwood Paxton was interviewed on January 8, 1971, by an unnamed volunteer or staff member at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum). Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for most parts.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Home rule  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa774044286-795d-440c-81ae-1836e39cb0b3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref605

Oral History Interview with Thomas Taylor

Names:
Bethlehem Baptist Church (1872-) (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Birney Elementary School  Search this
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home  Search this
Dale, John Henry, Jr., 1888-1973  Search this
Shipley, Rezin, Dr., 1865-1924  Search this
Smith, Emma  Search this
St. Philip's Episcopal Church  Search this
Taylor, Thomas  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound cassette (1 box)
Container:
Box 2, Folder 31
Box 4, Cassette 45
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound cassettes
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
1970- 19 Mar 1971
Scope and Contents:
Thomas Taylor, an African American man, talks about his time growing up in Anacostia and the changes he has seen over the years. He discusses common occupation for African American residents at the Navy Yard, St. Elizbeth's Hospital and Boiling Field while others worked jobs such as blacksmiths, farmers, police officers, and postal service workers. He speaks about how he dropped out of high school to work but later high school became compulsory after the 1940s. He recalls important neighborhood businesses at the time, including Dr. Shipley's Pharmacy and the Craig Farms, where they harvest tomatoes, string beans, and watermelons. He recalls typical recreational activities at that time, such as picnicking at Green Willow Park and attending dances at Birney Elementary School. He also provides information about local churches, including Campbell AME Church, St. Philip's Church, and Bethlehem Baptist Church. He recalls geographical boundaries and civic associations in Anacostia.

Taylor recalls the police force and race relations in Anacostia, as well as interactions between business owners. He recalls important historic landmarks, such as the Frederick Douglass Home, the Uniontown train station, and the Garfield Dance Hall. He discusses community organizing and leadership, listing John Henry Dale Jr., Emma Smith, and Mary Smith as notable community leaders. He ends the interview describing current issues in the neighborhood with sanitation, crime, and the lack of proper medical care in Anacostia.

Thomas Taylor was interviewed in March of 1971 by an unnamed volunteer or staff member at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum). Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for most parts.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
African American police  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa78f9a7a55-a3b2-49c2-8414-8725aa8d593c
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref606

Oral History Interview with Tracy Campbell

Names:
Post Office Building (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Saint Elizabeths Hospital (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
St. Teresa of Avila Catholic Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Campbell, Tracy Franklin, 1895-1984  Search this
Hoffman, Elzie S., 1872-1946  Search this
Koontz, Wilbur Ledru, 1902-1982  Search this
St. Philip's Episcopal Church  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording ((1 sound disk CD-R (00:22:54). digital, 16-bit 44.1 KhZ))
1 Sound recording ((1 data disk DVD-R digital, 24-bit 96kHz WAV. )))
1 Sound recording ((1 sound cassette (00:22:54)))
Container:
Box 2, Folder 32
Box 4, Cassette 36
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
1970- 19 Mar 1971
Scope and Contents note:
Tracy Franklin Campbell, a white man born around 1895, recalls his time in Anacostia after moving there in 1921. Topics of discussion include neighborhood demographics, public education, recreation, church, and politics. He talks about segregation and racial tension in Anacostia; however, he recalls how everyone had to do business together because the neighborhood was so small. He discusses residents' employment with the government as well as at St. Elizabeth's Hospital, the U.S. Post Office Building in D.C., and the Navy Yard.

Campbell provides information about local churches and their congregations, such as St. Teresa's Church, St. Philip's Church, and Anacostia Methodist Church, as well as about community organizations he was a part of, such as Eastern Star and the Lion's Club. He lists prominent community members, including George Frazier, Elzie Hoffman, Ledru Koontz, George Mayo, and Lorenzo Thompson. He concludes the interview discussing the current problems of Anacostia and how much it has changed since he was younger regarding demographics and crime.

Tracy Franklin Campbell was interviewed on March 10, 1971 by an unnamed volunteer or staff member at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum). Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for some parts.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Community Organizations  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7d8380493-7230-45bd-a670-7bef27b5254d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref608

Oral History Interview with William A. Butler

Names:
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home  Search this
Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
St. Teresa of Avila Catholic Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Butler, William A.  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording ((1 data disk DVD-R digital, 24-bit 96kHz WAV. )))
1 Sound recording ((1 sound disk CD-R (00:31:54). digital, 16-bit 44.1 KhZ))
1 Sound recording ((1 sound cassette (00:31:54)))
Container:
Box 2, Folder 33
Box 4, Cassette 41
Box 5, Disk 41
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Barry Farms (Washington, D.C.)
Congress Heights (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia River (Md. and Washington, D.C.)
Fort Stanton (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
1970- 19 Mar 1971
2007 September 14
Scope and Contents note:
William A. Butler, an African American man, talks about living in Anacostia for over sixty years from 1904 to 1966. He discusses topics such as attending Birney Elementary School, local churches such as St. Teresa's Church, Our Lady of Perpetual Help, and Campbell AME Church, swimming and fishing in Anacostia River, and recreation at Green Willow and Eureka Parks. He also provides information about family structures, church attendance, and politics. He speaks about how Anacostia was segregated; how close knit each community (Barry Farm-Hillsdale, Congress Heights, and Uniontown) was; and his experiences with racial discrimination, including racial slurs. The interview is cut short while Butler is speaking about important landmarks in the neighborhood, including the Frederick Douglass Home and Fort Stanton.

William A. Butler was interviewed in the spring of 1971 by an unnamed volunteer or staff member at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum). Digital audio files include significant white noise and static; interviewee can be heard for some parts; interview is cut short at 00:32:27 due to recording failure. The transcript is also incomplete.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7dee0c512-c441-48af-87df-73451279c2e6
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref609

Oral History Interview with William and Daisy Dyson

Names:
Armstrong High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home  Search this
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People  Search this
Dyson, Daisy  Search this
Dyson, William D., 1899-1992  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording ((1 data disk DVD-R digital, 24-bit 96kHz WAV.)))
1 Sound recording ((1 sound disk CD-R (00:53:09) digital, 16-bit 44.1 KhZ))
1 Sound recording ((1 sound cassette (00:53:09)))
Container:
Box 2, Folder 34
Box 4, Cassette 28
Box 5, Disk 28
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound recordings
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia River (Md. and Washington, D.C.)
Barry Farms (Washington, D.C.)
Congress Heights (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
1970- 19 Mar 1971
2007 September 14
Scope and Contents note:
William Dyson, an African American man born around 1899, and his wife, Daisy Dyson, an African American woman born 1903, talk about what life was like after moving to Anacostia in 1941. They discuss attending local public schools, such as Armstrong High School, and the geographic boundaries of the neighborhood and its communities (Congress Heights, Uniontown, and Hillsdale-Barry Farm), including the Anacostia River and Nicholas Street. They describe what recreation was popular (going to the beach, picnicking, and playing at parks) as well as which denominations people followed. They speak about how close knit the community and families were; racial tension and segregation in Anacostia; the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; and about the police force.

The Dysons recall important neighborhood landmarks, such as Gallinger Hospital, Frederick Douglass Home and Lincoln Park. Other topics of discussion include sanitation, transportation, and newspapers.

William and Daisy Dyson were interviewed by John Bradshaw on January 6, 1971. Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for some parts.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American women  Search this
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Segregation -- United States  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa74f1c4086-e740-47e5-bbaa-e5d2817764af
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref610

Oral History Interview with John Henry Jr. and Lucille Dale

Names:
Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Saint Elizabeths Hospital (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Smoot family  Search this
Dale, John Henry, Jr., 1888-1973  Search this
Dale, Lucille Emma Patterson, 1889-1973  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
4 Sound cassettes (1 box)
2 Sound discs (1 box)
4 Digital files
Container:
Box 2, Folder 18
Box 4, Cassette 7
Box 4, Cassette 7A
Box 4, Cassette 7B
Box 4, Cassette 7C
Box 5, Disk 7 (Tapes 1 & 2)
Box 5, Disk 7 (Tapes 3 & 4)
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound cassettes
Sound discs
Digital files
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Congress Heights (Washington, D.C.)
Barry Farms (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
1970- 1973 September 26, 2007 September 14
Scope and Contents:
John Henry Jr. Dale, an African American man born in 1888, and his wife, Lucille Emma Patterson Dale, an African American woman born in 1890, talk about their experiences growing up and living in the Anacostia neighborhood. Topics of discussion include the geographical boundaries of the communities (including how they were segregated), how the name Anacostia came about, typical occupations and incomes, family structures, and what education was available at various times. They describe various recreational activities, church attendance, and politics. They also discuss the changing race relations between the white and African American residents of Anacostia.

John Henry Jr. and Lucille both recall important neighborhood businesses and landmarks, such as the Anacostia Bank, Campbell AME Church, and Mason's Funeral Home. They include information about community leaders and civic associations. They end the interview noting pressing current issues the neighborhood faces, including employment, sanitation, and transportation.

John Henry Jr. Dale and Lucille Emma Patterson Dale were interviewed by an unnamed volunteer or staff member at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum). Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for most parts.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American women  Search this
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Segregation -- United States  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa72dbe9a62-e8a5-4b73-9fee-098c075a33bf
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref591

Oral History Interview with James Banks

Names:
Birney Elementary School  Search this
Dunbar High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Smoot family  Search this
Banks, James, 1920-2005  Search this
Bradshaw, John  Search this
Dale, Almore M., 1911-1984  Search this
Ellis, Martha  Search this
Shipley, Rezin, Dr., 1865-1924  Search this
Smoot, James  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound cassettes ((1 sound cassette (00:45:17))(1 sound cassette (00:44:02)))
2 Sound discs ((1 sound disk CD-R (00:45:17). digital, 16-bit 44.1 KhZ)(1 sound disk CD-R (00:44:02). digital, 16-bit 44.1 KhZ))
1 Digital file ((1 data disk DVD-R digital, 24-bit 96kHz WAV.)))
Container:
Box 2, Folder 17
Box 4, Cassette 35
Box 4, Cassette 35B
Box 5, Disk 35
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound cassettes
Sound discs
Digital files
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia River (Md. and Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
1970- 1971 March 19
2007 September 14
Scope and Contents note:
James Banks, an African American man born in 1920, discusses growing up in Anacostia for the first 22 years of his life. He discusses topics such as education at Birney Elementary and Dunbar High and playing baseball in the sandlots or swimming in the Anacostia River. He talks about the geographical boundaries of the neighborhood as well as the changing demographics; how most families gardened and raised smaller livestock like chickens and pigs; segregation between the communities; and important landmarks in the area, such as Douglass Hall and Our Lady of Perpetual Help.

Banks mentions the prominent community members, including Elzie Hoffman, Almore Dale, Fannie Shipley, James Smoot, Martha Ellis, and Cora Wilkerson. He also speaks about the issues the neighborhood faces regarding the lack of healthcare, sanitation, and housing for residents.

James Banks was interviewed by John Bradshaw on February 22, 1971. Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for most parts.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7e6fe54ae-a157-4823-81c7-c2e804a02fa0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref593

Oral History Interview with John G. Warner

Names:
Armstrong High School (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Birney Elementary School  Search this
Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Frederick Douglass Memorial Home  Search this
Saint Elizabeths Hospital (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Howard family  Search this
Dale, John Henry, Jr., 1888-1973  Search this
Shipley, Rezin, Dr., 1865-1924  Search this
Warner, John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound disc ((1 sound disk CD-R (00:32:03). digital, 16-bit 44.1 KhZ))
1 Sound cassette ((1 sound cassette (00:32:03)))
1 Digital file ((1 data disk DVD-R digital, 24-bit 96kHz WAV.)))
Container:
Box 2, Folder 19
Box 4, Cassette 33
Box 5, Disk 33
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound discs
Sound cassettes
Digital files
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
1970 - 1971 March 19
2007 September 14
Scope and Contents note:
John G. Warner, an African American man born around 1896, discusses growing up in Anacostia after moving there in 1903 with his family. He provides information about his education at the Birney School, playing at Green Willow and Eureka Park, banking at Anacostia Finance Company, and local landmarks such as the Frederick Douglass Home. He talks about his father, John B. Warner, who was a pastor at Campbell AME Church, and how close-knit the congregation was when he was younger.

Warner also spoke about community organizing, particularly through church gatherings, to help make improvements to the neighborhood, such as paving roads and putting in more streetlights. He describes a few of the major changes he has seen in Anacostia, including crime and the police, religious affiliations, and family structures.

John G. Warner was interviewed by an unnamed volunteer or staff member at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum). Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for most parts.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Community Organizations  Search this
Community development  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7f0264530-a43e-4b75-8c1a-3bd4e3d40e60
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref594

Oral History Interview with Leonard G. and Geraldine Ford

Names:
Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Saint Elizabeths Hospital (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Ford, Geraldine Reynolds, 1905-2003  Search this
Ford, Leonard G., 20th century (active)  Search this
Shipley, Rezin, Dr., 1865-1924  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound cassette (1 box)
Container:
Box 2, Folder 20
Box 4, Cassette "Tape #5 (1 of 2)"
Type:
Archival materials
Audio
Sound cassettes
Oral histories (document genres)
Place:
Anacostia River (Md. and Washington, D.C.)
Anacostia Community Museum
Date:
1970 November 23 - 1971 March 19
Scope and Contents:
Leonard Jr. Ford, an African American man born around 1903, and his wife, Geraldine Ford, an African American woman born around 1905, they discuss the geographic boundaries, education, and community of Anacostia was like in the early years of their marriage. They recall how most children attended school through the 12th grade and how many classmates went onto college, despite the lack of public education in their neighborhood for African American children. Geraldine speaks about family structure and church attendance and Leonard recounts memories of fun activities and the racial tension in Anacostia.

Leonard Jr. and Geraldine Ford were interviewed by an unnamed volunteer or staff member at the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum (now the Anacostia Community Museum). Digital audio files include white noise and static; interviewee can be heard clearly for most parts; interview is cut short at 00:17:21 due to recording failure. Transcript is also incomplete.
General:
Leonard G. Ford is sometimes mistaken for his son, Leonard G. Ford Jr. in the materials. Geraldine Ford's full name is Geraldine Mabel Reynolds Ford and is sometimes referred to by her middle name, Mabel, or the nickname "Jerlean."
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American women  Search this
African American men  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Segregation -- United States  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
exhibit  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral histories (document genres)
Collection Citation:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records
Evolution of a Community: 1972 Exhibition Records / Series 2: Interviews
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa71e04cda6-e747-4277-9765-2402f7ba0dc1
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-040-ref595

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