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Old Bethlehem Church 1879-1960

Artist:
Gertrude Jones  Search this
Medium:
oil on canvas board
Dimensions:
Frame: 18 3/4 × 14 13/16 × 1 5/8 in. (47.7 × 37.6 × 4.1 cm)
Type:
painting
Date:
Mid-20th century
Accession Number:
1990.0033.0111
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
See more items in:
Anacostia Community Museum Collection
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/dl8fed48cca-804c-48eb-897a-df5f044b8e33
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:acm_1990.0033.0111
Online Media:

Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film

Creator:
Anderson, Harold M.  Search this
Names:
Eisenhower, Dwight D. (Dwight David), 1890-1969  Search this
Nixon, Pat, 1912-1993  Search this
Nixon, Richard M. (Richard Milhous), 1913-1994  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (1 reel.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Motion pictures (visual works)
Place:
Oklahoma -- Tulsa
Date:
1948-1952
Summary:
Black Wall Street was a vibrant African American community in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Filmed between 1948 and 1952 Reverend Harold Anderson's Black Wall Street Film documents many of the neighborhood's businesses including barber shops, bakers, taxi companies, jewelers, and other stores. Reverand Andserson also captured its citizens in church, at school, participating in parades, and walking around the area. The film includes footage Richard and Pat Nixon as they campaigned in Black Wall Street, the first vice-presidential candidate to visit the African American neighborhood.
Scope and Contents:
A black and white, silent 16mm film documenting the people and businesses of the Black Wall Street section of Tulsa, Oklahoma from 1948-1952.
Arrangement:
Arranged in one series.

Series 1, Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film
Biographical / Historical:
Black Wall Street was a vibrant African American community that was destroyed during a race riot that broke out in 1921. Its businesses were burned to the ground and the residents were displaced. Against the odds, Black Wall Street was reborn and by the 1940s was once again a center for African American life in Tulsa.

Reverend Harold Mose Anderson's film titled Reverend Harold Anderson's Black Wall Street documents evidence of this resurgance. Although Anderson was only a year old when the riots occurred, he grew up hearing stories about life in Black Wall Street before the riot. He was both a witness to and participant in the rebuilding and revival of the community. And, he documented the resulting renewal with his 16mm motion picture camera.

Filmed between 1948 and 1952 Reverend Harold Anderson's Black Wall Street does just that. A successful businessman, Anderson managed and then owned two neighborhood movie theaters, a skating rink, bowling alley, and shopping strip, among other enterprises. He also brought the Golden Gloves boxing tournament to the area, making it accessible to African American fans. Anderson felt that it was critical that Black Wall Street sustain independent African American business, ensuring resident dollars would stay in the community and guarantee its vibrancy.

Almost lost in a devastating house fire, Reverend Anderson's film recognizes the efforts and successes of the community. With his camera he documented many of Black Wall Street's businesses including barber shops, bakers, taxi companies, jewelers, and other stores. He also captured its citizens in church, at school, participating in parades, and walking around the area. The film includes footage Richard and Pat Nixon as they campaigned in Black Wall Street, the first vice-presidential candidate to visit the African American neighborhood.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center by Patricia Sanders on behalf of the heirs of Harold M. Anderson in 2009.
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment. Reference copy in Smithsonian Institution Digital Asset Management System (DAMS) must be used.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. All third party requests to use the film for other than standard museum purposes are to be direced to GettyImages. See repository for information.
Topic:
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Parades -- United States  Search this
Riots -- 1920-1930 -- Oklahoma -- Tulsa  Search this
African American businesspeople  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Citation:
Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film, 1948-1952, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1197
See more items in:
Harold M. Anderson Black Wall Street Film
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1197

Charlene Hodges Byrd collection

Creator:
Byrd, Charlene Hodges, 1929-2009  Search this
Names:
Morgan State College  Search this
Bearden, Romare, 1911-1988  Search this
Cummings, Ida R. (Ida Rebecca), 1868-1958  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Grimké, Francis J. (Francis James), 1850-1937  Search this
Hodges, Joyce Ethel Cummings, 1903-1971  Search this
Shimm, Erminie F. (Erminie Florence), 1867-1936  Search this
Shimm, Sarah A., 1843-1885  Search this
Thomas, Elizabeth N. (Elizabeth Nelson), d. 1932  Search this
Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915  Search this
Extent:
43 Linear feet (35 document boxes and 39 oversize boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
circa 1750-2009
bulk 1880-1960
Summary:
The Charlene Hodges Byrd collection measures 43 linear feet, and dates from circa 1750-2009, with the bulk of the material dating from 1880-1960. The collection documents the personal life and professional career of Charlene Hodges Byrd, an African American teacher from Washington, D.C., along with material for several related families from Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. Family members prominently represented include Sarah A. Shimm, teacher and essayist under the name Faith Lichen; her daughters Erminie F. Shimm and Grace E. Shimm Cummings, both teachers; and Byrd's mother, Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges, also a teacher. Correspondence and writings chiefly discuss family life, religion, race, education, and the relationship with Frederick Douglass and his family. The collection is arranged in 10 series: Biographical Material, Correspondence, Writings, Subject Files, Financial and Legal Records, Printed Material, Volumes, Memorabilia, Textiles, and Photographs.
Scope and Contents:
Series 1. Papers related to biographical and family histories of the Byrd, Cummings, Davage, Dews, Hodges, Shimm, Spruill, and Thomas families. Material includes family trees; school diplomas and certificates; programs; awards; marriage and divorce papers; funeral documents; and obituaries.

Series 2: Chiefly letters from family and friends regarding family news, financial matters, school, work, neighborhood affairs, church events, travel and the weather. The majority of the letters are addressed to Charlene Hodges Byrd, Grace E. Shimm Cummings, Ida R. Cummings, Elizabeth Dews Hodges, Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges, Erminie F. Shimm, Sarah A. Shimm, and Elizabeth N. Thomas. Other correspondence includes letters from Booker T. Washington, Bessye Beardon, Charlotte Davage, Amelia Douglass, and Harrell S. Spruill. There are also a number of greeting cards, postcards, and empty envelopes.

Series 3. Writings include essays, speeches, papers written for school, teacher's notebooks, and a diary of Erminie F. Shimm, 1903. Topics include education, Frederick Douglass, religion, race, Africa, and the temperance movement.

Series 4. Subject files on Charlene Hodges Byrd's involvement with Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority; Book Lovers of Charleston, West Virginia, a women's book club organized in 1923; Church Women United radio program; and The Links, Inc., a volunteer service organization. The papers on Liberia relate to missionary work, and were probably gathered by Erminie F. Shimm; and the Shimm-Thomas Collection are papers related to the deposit and later return of family items housed as a collection at Morgan State College.

Series 5. The financial and legal records include invoices and receipts, bank books, real estate tax assessments, deeds, and wills. There is also material related to the estate of Erminie F. Shimm.

Series 6. Printed materials includes books, pamphlets, newspapers, newsletters, clippings, invitations and programs. The books and pamphlets are chiefly school yearbooks and newspapers and other texts related to religion, politics, music, and poetry. Also included is a copy of Frederick Douglass's autobiography and a printed copy of his speech "The Race Problem." The clippings include obituaries, articles about Charlene Hodges Byrd and her husband Charles R. Byrd, essays by Sarah A. Shimm under the name Faith Lichen, and articles on the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. The invitations and programs are primarily for school graduations, weddings, social events, and funerals. Other printed material includes newsletters; business cards; calling cards; postage stamps, chiefly from Liberia; and blank postcards. The binder on Frederick Douglass was prepared by Byrd and her goddaughter for the West Virginia School Studies Fair, and includes copies of Byrd family artifacts.

Series 7. Autograph books, guest books, and scrapbooks. The autograph book of Grace E. Shimm Cummings includes autographs from Amelia Douglass, Lewis B. Douglass, Charles R. Douglass, W. H. Clair, and Francis J. Grimke. The scrapbook of Grace E. Shimm Cummings and Erminie F. Shimm consists primarily of clippings, and was assembled from an old teacher's book with a student registration and punishment pages still intact at the back.

Series 8. Miscellaneous items in the collection including artwork, a coin purse, a piece of handwoven cloth belonging to Catherine Nelson's great grandmother, and leather hair curlers.

Series 9: The textiles are chiefly christening gowns, children's garments, and an apron. Several garments belonged to Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges, Charlene Hodges Byrd, and Elizabeth N. Thomas. There is also a doll that belonged to Amelia Douglass's niece, Kitty Cromwell.

Series 10. Photographs include pictures of Charlene Hodges Byrd, Joyce Ethel Hodges Cummings, Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth Dews Hodges, Charles Gilmor Cummings, Grace E. Shimm Cummings, Erminie F. Shimm, and other friends and relatives of the Byrd, Hodges, Cummings, Douglass, and Shimm families. Subjects are primarily portraits and candids, along with some wedding, baby, and school pictures. While some of the photographs are annotated, many of the individuals are unidentified. Included are vintage photographs, cabinet cards, cartes-de-visites, tintypes, daguerreotypes, and negatives.
Biographical / Historical:
The Shimm, Thomas, Cummings, Hodges, Davage, and related African American families chiefly lived in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. Numerous family members worked as teachers, barbers, or in the service industry. They were active in local churches and service organizations, and had established friendships with local church leaders as well as with Frederick Douglass and his family.

The Shimm and Thomas families were located in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. The Thomas family can be traced back to Philip Nelson, who owned property in Leesburg, Virginia and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Family genealogical papers list Nelson as a descendent of British Admiral Horatio Nelson. This lineage, however, is not supported in publically available family histories of Horatio Nelson. Philip Nelson and his wife Araminta had five children: Catherine (b. 1805?), William, Levi (b. 1820?), Henrietta, and Grayson.

Catherine Nelson married Elias E. Thomas (b. 1816?) of Virginia in 1840. They wed in Philadelphia and had five children: Levi Nelson (b. 1841), Sarah (1843-1885), Edward (b. 1844), Elizabeth (1848-1932), and Charles (b. 1851).

Sarah Thomas married William Y. Shimm (b. 1841), a barber in Reading, Pennsylvania, on July 26, 1863. They had 2 daughters, Erminie (1867-1936) and Grace (1865-1910). The Shimms lived in Pennsylvania and Ohio, but had moved to Washington, D.C., around 1871. Sarah was a teacher and a writer who published under the name "Faith Lichen." Her writings, primarily essays and commentaries about race and politics, were printed in several newspapers including The National Republican, The Celtic Weekly, The People's Advocate, and The Sunday Morning Gazette.

Sarah's sister Elizabeth was also a teacher in Maryland. Her brother Charles was a lawyer in Washington, D.C., and a graduate of the first class at Howard University's law school.

Erminie and Grace Shimm became teachers in the Washington, D.C., public school system. Erminie was active in her church and supportive of missionary work in Liberia. Grace married Charles Gilmor Cummings, a pastor in Alexandria, Virginia, on July 9, 1902. They had one daughter, Joyce Ethel (1903-1971), and second child in 1905 who died in infancy. Grace died in 1910 of heart failure. After her death, Grace's sister Erminie and Charles's family helped raise Joyce Ethel in Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland.

Joyce Ethel Cummings Hodges graduated from Morgan College in 1924, and received her master's degree from Howard University in 1931. She taught at Douglass High School in Baltimore from 1924-1964. Joyce Ethel married Charles E. Hodges (1900--975) in 1927 and they divorced in 1953. The couple had one daughter, Charlene (1929-2009).

Charlene Hodges Byrd grew up in Washington, D.C., but attended the Northfield School for Girls in East Northfield, Massachusetts, for high school, graduating in 1946. She received her bachelor's degree from Connecticut College in 1950, and her master's degree in English Language and Literature from the University of Chicago in 1951. She married Charles R. Byrd (1919-2004) in 1952. They had one son in 1954, but he died four days after birth. Byrd soon began a career as a teacher and education administrator, eventually working for Kanawha County Schools in Charleston, West Virginia. She was also active in her local community as a member of the Book Lovers of Charleston, West Virginia; Church Women United; and The Links, Inc.

Charles E. Hodges was born Bridgewater, Virginia, where his father was a minister. He graduated from Morgan College in 1923 and received his master's degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1943. He was a teacher and served as principal of the North Street School in Hagerstown, Maryland. After he and Joyce Ethel divorced in 1953, he married Elizabeth Dews (1913-1999) in 1955.

Elizabeth Dews Hodges, born Elizabeth Virginia Waumbeeka, was adopted by James Edward (1889-1954) and Sarah Virginia Dews (1888?-1964) in Washington, D.C., in 1920. She graduated from Miner Teachers College in 1939, and worked as a teacher in Annapolis, Maryland, at Wiley H. Bates High School for 34 years. She was awarded a medal for her work there by the Freedom Foundation of Valley Forge in 1959. Elizabeth was active in local organizations in Maryland and Washington, D.C., including the SE/NE Friends of the Capitol View Branch Library; Eastern Star Chapter 4; Mount Ephraim Baptist Church; National Museum of Women in the Arts; National Association for the Advancement of Colored Peoples; and the Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind.

The Davage family is descended from Sidney Hall (b. 1818?) and Charles Davage (b. 1815?). Sidney was a former slave at the Perry Hall mansion in Baltimore, and was manumitted by 1840. She married Charles, a coachman, on April 12, 1842. They had five children: Eliza Jane (1843-1913), Sophia (b. 1847), Charlotte (b. 1849), Charles (b. 1854), and Hester (b. 1845). Their daughter Eliza Jane married Henry Cummings (b. 1830?). They had seven children: Harry Sythe (1866-1917), Charles Gilmor (1870-1924), William (b. 1882), Ida R. (1868-1958), Estelle (1874-1944), Carroll (b. 1875), Francis (b. 1872), and Aaron (1864?-1932).

Harry Sythe Cummings, a lawyer in Baltimore, became the city's first African American City Council member. He was first elected in 1890 and served intermittently until his death in 1917, often working on issues related to education. Cummings also delivered a speech at the Republican National Convention in 1904 seconding the presidential nomination of Theodore Roosevelt. He married Blanche Conklin in 1899, and they had three children: Harry S. Jr. (b. 1905), Lucille (d. 1906), and Louise.

Charles Gilmor Cummings graduated from Drew Theological Seminary in 1898, and was a pastor in Alexandria, Virginia and elsewhere. After the death of his wife Grace in 1910, he married Rosa Catherine Bearden, grandmother of artist Romare Bearden, in 1912.

Ida R. Cummings graduated from Morgan College in 1922, and was the first African American kindergarten teacher in Baltimore. She was also active in local organizations, and was president of the Colored Fresh Air and Empty Stocking Circle; chairman of the Woman's Section Council of Defense in Baltimore during the World War, 1914-1918; and president of the Woman's Campaign Bureau of the Colored Republican Voters' League of Maryland.
Provenance:
The Charlene Hodges Byrd collection was donated to the National Museum of African American History and Culture by Herbert S. Garten, co-personal representative of the Estate of Charlene H. Byrd, in 2010.
Restrictions:
Access to collection requires appointment.
Rights:
This collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
African Americans -- Maryland  Search this
African Americans -- Photographs  Search this
African American families  Search this
African Americans -- Pennsylvania  Search this
African American newspapers  Search this
African American -- Social life and customs  Search this
African American women journalists  Search this
African Americans -- Education  Search this
African American churches  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Citation:
Charlene Hodges Byrd collection, circa 1750-2009. National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAAHC.2010.26
See more items in:
Charlene Hodges Byrd collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmaahc-2010-26
Online Media:

Plymouth Church Men's Day, Feb[ruary] 1949 [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Names:
Plymouth Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on cellulose acetate film sheet, 10" x 8")
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Date:
February 1949
Scope and Contents:
Three negatives mounted on glass. No ink on negative. Further ink on envelope: "M. File 6 - T2 11 x 14 Glass". No edge imprint.

First image: Group of six men standing in a line. Two are in robes.

Second image: Group of men sitting in church.

Third image: Man preaching from lectern.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Series 8: Business Records, Subseries 8.1: Studio Session Registers are restricted. Digital copies available for research. See repository for details.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American churches  Search this
African American men  Search this
African American clergy  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1940-1950 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.10: Glass Plate Negatives
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.10: Glass Plate Negatives / 4.10: Glass Plate Negatives / 10: Plymouth Church
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-10-ref837
Online Media:

Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters Oral History Collection

Creator:
Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters  Search this
Names:
Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters Oral History Collection  Search this
Sixteenth Street Baptist Church (Birmingham, Ala.)  Search this
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968  Search this
Extent:
159 Video recordings (U-matic 3/4" video recordings)
1 Video recording (VHS 1/2" video recording)
15 Linear feet (15 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Videocassettes
Place:
United States -- Race relations
United States -- Rural conditions
Date:
1989-1994
Scope and Contents note:
The collection, which dates from 1989 to 1994 and measures 15 linear feet, documents the reminiscences of elderly members of various African-American churches in the Atlanta area, as well as individual church histories, outstanding personalities of the South, religious expression in the South, and styles of singing and worship. The collection is comprised of audiovisual materials.
Biographical/Historical note:
Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters, Inc. is the nation's largest regional interfaith cable network. AIB has been providing faith-based communities and nonprofit service organizations access to a larger audience since 1969. AIB remains a destination for international dignitaries and media representatives due to its unique programming platform, which promotes dialogue between all faiths, cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds. Seen in over 1,000,000 homes across 19 metro area counties, AIB is a self-supporting organization and does not allow the solicitation of funds or attacks on other faiths. Viewers can find Christians, Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus and others presenting their views.
Provenance:
Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters Oral History Collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Negro leagues  Search this
Spirituals (Songs)  Search this
Women clergy  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- African Americans  Search this
Choirs (Music)  Search this
Civil rights movements -- United States  Search this
African American clergy  Search this
African American churches  Search this
African American journalists  Search this
African American educators  Search this
African American poets  Search this
African American lawyers  Search this
African American soldiers  Search this
African American social reformers  Search this
African Americans -- Religious life  Search this
African Americans -- Music  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
African Americans -- Social conditions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Videocassettes
Citation:
Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters oral history collection exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.09-001
See more items in:
Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters Oral History Collection
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-09-001

Bladensburg Union Burial Association records

Creator:
Bladensburg Union Burial Association  Search this
Names:
Plummer, Henry Vinton, 1844-1905  Search this
Plummer, Nellie Arnold, 1860-ca. 1920  Search this
Extent:
3.64 Linear feet (4 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Membership lists
Papers
Receipts (financial records)
Place:
Bladensburg (Md.)
Date:
1874–1978
bulk 1920-1970
Summary:
The collection, which dates from 1874 to 1978 and measures 3.64 linear feet, documents the history of the Bladensburg Union Burial Association. The records include the Association's constitution, by-laws, treasurer reports, receipts, and correspondence.
Scope and Content Note:
The collection is arranged into four main categories: Administration, Finances, Correspondence and Writings. Material in each folder is arranged in chronological order by date.

Series Description

1. Administration: The series contains constitution amendments, by-laws, applications, forms, roll calls, minutes and business related to the operation of the Bladensburg Union Burial Association.

2. Finances: The series contains materials related to funding the organization, to include treasurer reports, financial notebooks and expense receipts, which document membership dues and taxes.

3. Correspondence: The series consists primarily of correspondence generated by members of the Bladensburg Union Burial Association.

4. Writings: The series contains writings by Union members to include: the history of the Bladensburg Union Burial Association, bible verses, poetry and writings which are miscellaneous in nature.
Biography of the Bladensburg Union Burial Association:
In 1870 undertaker Francis Gasch refused to conduct a burial because the family of the decease could not afford to pay the exorbitant cost of the funeral. This plight was quite common for newly freed African Americans. Recognizing the need for action Henry Vinton Plummer intervened on the behalf of the family and assumed the financial responsibility. Thereafter, in an effort to empower members of his race to establish their own resources he called a meeting where he proposed a society which the members in attendance named the Bladensburg Burying Association. Funds were raised by collecting membership dues which ensured its members a proper funeral.

The Bladensburg Union Burial Association is a fine example of black enterprise during the period of reconstruction. By utilizing self help methods to propel themselves out of difficult and turbulent time's beneficent societies were able to take care of their own by providing financial resources to its members who paid dues. Through self empowerment the Bladensburg Union Burial Association would go on to respond to its members needs through active community involvement for many years to come by providing for the needs of formerly enslaved, newly freed and future generations.
Biography of Henry Vinton Plummer:
The Bladensburg Union Burial Association's founder, Mr. Henry Vinton Plummer was a man of integrity and remarkable character. He was the eldest son of Adam Francis Plummer and Emily Saunders who were enslaved in Maryland on separate plantations for twenty two years. Plummer was one of eighteen children born from this union into slavery on July 31, 1844 on Sarah Ogle Hilleary's Three Sisters Plantation in Lanham, Maryland. He escaped slavery in 1862 by running away to the District of Columbia to join the Union Navy during the Civil War, where he served as chaplain for the Union forces before being honorably discharged in 1865. After being honorably discharged Plummer enrolled in Wayland Seminary, which provided education and training for Freedmen to enter into the Baptist ministry. Upon the completion of his theological studies he became the Pastor of the St. Paul Baptist Church in Bladensburg, Maryland, which was founded by his sister Sarah Miranda Plummer on October 19, 1866. Plummer married July Lomax of Virginia in 1867 and their marriage produced nine children. In 1884, Plummer was appointed as the first black chaplain in the 9th Calvary, which was one of the Buffalo Soldiers units of the Regular Army. Amidst controversy, Plummer was accused of conduct unbecoming an officer and dishonorably discharged from his post in Fort Robinson, Nebraska by a military court in 1894. In 2005, Plummer's descendants successfully petitioned the Army Board for Correction of Military Records to eradicate his dishonorable discharge.
Related Materials:
This collection contains artifacts catalogued in ACM's Object collection.

Some Plummer family papers are located within the Plummer-Arnold Family collection at Anacostia Community Museum Archives.

The Adam Francis Plummer Diary is within ACM's Oject collection.

Plummer, Nellie Arnold. Out of the Depths: or, the Triumph of the Cross, 1997.
Provenance:
The Bladensburg Union Burial Association records were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum on October 14, 2004 by Reverend L. Jerome Fowler.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for unrestricted research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Bladensburg Union Burial Association records are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
African American churches  Search this
African American clergy  Search this
African American clergy -- History  Search this
Funeral rites and ceremonies  Search this
Genre/Form:
Membership lists
Papers
Receipts (financial records)
Citation:
Bladensburg Union Burial Association records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Reverend L. Jerome Fowler.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-025
See more items in:
Bladensburg Union Burial Association records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-025
Online Media:

Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Lowe, Gail Sylvia  Search this
Extent:
14 Linear feet (17 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Correspondence
Administrative records
Bibliographies
Floor plans
Exhibit plans
Exhibit scripts
Newspaper clippings
Posters
Slides (photographs)
Transcripts
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1995-1999
Summary:
An exhibition examining the faith and spiritual traditions in African American religious life in the 1990s. The exhibition features members of Christian churches as well as those of other faiths. Special attention is given to the ways that African American congregations are responding to contemporary challenges affecting their families, neighborhoods, and communities. Curated by Gail Lowe, the show wa displayed in the Smithsonian Arts & Industries Building from May 1998 to December 1999.
Scope and Contents note:
These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, brochures, notes, exhibit script, brochures and exhibit reviews.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Religion  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Correspondence
Administrative records
Bibliographies
Floor plans
Exhibit plans
Exhibit scripts
Newspaper clippings
Posters
Slides (photographs)
Transcripts
Citation:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-037
Online Media:

Climbing Jacob's Ladder: the Rise of Black Churches in Eastern American cities, 1740 - 1877 Exhibition Records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Smith, Edward D.  Search this
Extent:
27.63 Linear feet (63 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographic prints
Catalogs
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Exhibition records
Brochures
Date:
1987 October - 1988 October
Summary:
An exhibition on the growth of African American churches in the eastern United States. The exhibit was organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from October 1987 to October 1988. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Catalogs
Exhibit scripts
Correspondence
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Brochures
Citation:
Climbing Jacob's Ladder: the rise of Black churches in Eastern American cities, 1740 - 1877 exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-036
See more items in:
Climbing Jacob's Ladder: the Rise of Black Churches in Eastern American cities, 1740 - 1877 Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-036
Online Media:

Footsteps from North Brentwood Sound Bites

Creator:
North Brentwood Historical Society (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture  Search this
Howard University  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Brentwood A.M.E. Zion Church (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
First Baptist Church (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
North Brentwood Elementary School (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
Beverly, Lillian K.  Search this
Dock, Arthur J.  Search this
Fitzhugh, Marion Patricia Hawkins  Search this
Fleming, Elsie Johnson  Search this
Green, Delores  Search this
Hobbs, Addison  Search this
Hodge, Thelma  Search this
Jennings, Georgia  Search this
Palmer, William  Search this
Randall, Henry  Search this
Randall, Peter  Search this
Thomas, James Curtis  Search this
Thomas, William Hammond  Search this
Vaden, Lillie  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
North Brentwood Historical Society (North Brentwood, Md.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
Segregation  Search this
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
North Brentwood (Md.)
Prince George's County (Md.)
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1993
Scope and Contents:
Former and present residents of North Brentwood speak about growing up and raising their families in North Brentwood. They discuss education, schools, churches, family histories, incorporation of the town, desegregation, and community as a family. They reminiscence about a time when the area was rural, everyone knew everyone, and neighbors disciplined each other's children.
Interview clips. Part of Footsteps from North Brentwood Audiovisual Records. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
The exhibition, Footsteps from North Brentwood, included an oral, pictorial and artifact collection of life in North Brentwood from the 1900s to 1930. It was developed by the North Brentwood Historical Society and the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum; and on display at the Anacostia Museum from April 1996 through December 1996, North Brentwood Community Center from February 1997 through May 1997, and Lowe House of Delegates in Annapolis, Maryland from June 1997 through December 1997. The exhibition used pictures, documents, and artifacts to document the history of the first black incorporated town in Prince George's County. The oral histories describe North Brentwood's social history as told by 23 families who were either residents or descendants of residents who lived there during the 1920 U.S. Manuscript Census; they were collected by students in Dr. Elizabeth-Clark Lewis' public history class at Howard University between November 10, 1993 and November 29, 1993.
General:
Title created by ACMA staff from transcription on physical asset and title of related exhibition.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Communities  Search this
Neighborhoods  Search this
African American neighborhoods  Search this
African American churches  Search this
African American families  Search this
Education  Search this
Schools  Search this
Social history  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Footsteps from North Brentwood Sound Bites, Exhibition Records AV03-019, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-019, Item ACMA AV000925
See more items in:
Footsteps from North Brentwood exhibition records
Footsteps from North Brentwood exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-019: Footsteps from North Brentwood audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-019-ref696

The Church in the Southern Black community [electronic resource]

Title:
Documenting the American South : the Church in the Southern Black community
Author:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Documenting the American South (Project)  Search this
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library  Search this
Subject:
African Methodist Episcopal Church History  Search this
African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church History  Search this
African Union Methodist Protestant Church (U.S.) History  Search this
Colored Methodist Episcopal Church History  Search this
Type:
Electronic resources
Biography
Place:
Southern States
United States
Date:
1999
1999-
Topic:
African Americans--Religion  Search this
African American Baptists  Search this
African American Methodists  Search this
African American clergy  Search this
African American missionaries  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Slavery and the church  Search this
Church history  Search this
Call number:
BR563.N4 C487
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_649752

George Corley Wallace

Artist:
Boris Chaliapin, 1904 - 1979  Search this
Sitter:
George Corley Wallace, 25 Aug 1919 - 13 Sep 1998  Search this
Medium:
Watercolor, gouache and graphite pencil on paperboard
Dimensions:
Board (Verified): 34.9 x 24.4cm (13 3/4 x 9 5/8")
Mat (Verified): 55.9 x 40.6cm (22 x 16")
Type:
Painting
Date:
1963
Topic:
Architecture\Window\Stained glass  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Tie\Necktie  Search this
George Corley Wallace: Male  Search this
George Corley Wallace: Law and Law Enforcement\Lawyer  Search this
George Corley Wallace: Politics and Government\Presidential Candidate  Search this
George Corley Wallace: Law and Law Enforcement\Crime Victim  Search this
George Corley Wallace: Politics and Government\Governor\Alabama  Search this
George Corley Wallace: Politics and Government\State Legislator\Alabama  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Time magazine
Object number:
NPG.78.TC806
Restrictions & Rights:
Usage conditions apply
Copyright:
© Chris Murphy
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/sm43e314e9a-238f-4693-baf6-b754f79ef5f1
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_NPG.78.TC806

Covers Pearis' family background and experiences in Anacostia, c. 1863-1986, including: her great-grandparents' arrival in Anacostia in 1863; construction of the Howard family house in 1876 with financial assistance from the Freedmen's Bureau; St. Eliz...

Collection Creator::
Pearis, Ella B. Howard., interviewee  Search this
Container:
Interviews
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9540, Ella B. Howard Pearis Oral History Interview
See more items in:
Ella B. Howard Pearis Oral History Interview
Ella B. Howard Pearis Oral History Interview / Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru9540-refidd1e238

19th century African-American Literature Collection

Names:
African Methodist Episcopal Church  Search this
First African Baptist Church (Savannah, Ga.)  Search this
Knights of Pythias  Search this
Douglass, Frederick, 1817?-1895  Search this
Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879  Search this
Extent:
3.4 Linear feet ((30 books))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Books
Date:
circa 1800 - circa 1898
Summary:
This collection, which dates from the 19th century, contains 30 books written by or concerning African-Americans. The books are largely non-fiction and include material relating to African-American churches and evangelists, fraternal organizations, prominent members of the African-American Community, former slaves, education and self-improvement. Also present are several volumes of poetry, a tax ledger and a volume concerning patents.
Formatted Contents note:
Life and times of Frederick Douglass, written by himself -- Duplicate copy of the souvenir from the Afro-American league of Tennessee to Hon. James M. Ashley of Ohio... -- Myrtilla Miner, a memoir -- A narrative of the life and travels of Mrs. Nancy Prince -- A list of patents granted by the United States from April 10, 1790... -- Comly's spelling and reading book -- Poems written during the progress of the abolition question in the United States... -- The Black phalanx -- Progress of a race; or, the remarkable advancement of the Afro-American Negro from the bondage of slavery... -- Africa and America; addresses and discourses -- A discourse, delivered on the death of Capt. Paul Cuffe -- An apology for African Methodism -- History of the Knights of Pythias -- The college of life; or, practical self-educator, a manual of self-improvement for the colored race... -- The Rev. J.W. Loguen, as a slave and as a freeman -- Behind the scenes -- The story of Archer Alexander from slavery to freedom, March 30, 1863 -- From slave cabin to pulpit: the autobiography of Rev. Peter Randolph -- Uncle Tom's story of his life from 1789-1877 -- Poems on various subjects, religious and moral -- Men of mark: eminent, progressive and rising -- [Tax ledger] -- A memorial discourse by Rev. Henry Highland Grant -- My recollections of African M.E. Ministers -- William Lloyd Garrison: the abolitionist -- Annals of the First African church in the United States of America... -- How to get and keep churches out of debt... -- Code and the discipline of the African Methodist Episcopalian Zion Church -- History of the First African Baptist Church -- An autobiography: the story of the Lord's dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith, the colored evangelist.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans -- Social conditions  Search this
African American religious leaders  Search this
Slavery -- United States  Search this
Freedmen  Search this
Slaves  Search this
American poetry -- African American authors  Search this
African Americans -- Social life and customs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Books
Citation:
19th century African-American literature collection, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-107
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-107

Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Lowe, Gail Sylvia  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
56 Sound recordings (56 audio cassette sound recordings)
14 Video recordings (7 U-matic 3/4" video recordings ; 7 VHS 1/2" video recordings)
1.5 Linear feet
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1995-1999
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual materials created for an exhibition examining the faith and spiritual traditions in African American religious life in the 1990s. The exhibition features members of Christian churches as well as those of other faiths. Special attention is given to the ways that African American congregations are responding to contemporary challenges affecting their families, neighborhoods, and communities. This collection includes video and sound recordings of interviews and services at various churches that were used within the exhibit as well as recordings of talks and workshops related to the exhibit.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Religion  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Citation:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Series ACMA AV03-037
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref652

Speak To My Heart: Exhibition Talk with Gail S. Lowe, Ph.D

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1996
Scope and Contents:
Gail S. Lowe, Ph.D. talked about the center of African American life and community - the Black Chruch. She detailed the significance and work of the Black Church in communities, and provided an introduction to the upcoming exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life.' Lowe discussed each section of the exhibition, and the types of materials and information the museum planned to include in the exhibit. The talk was part of a meeting for the Friends for the Preservation of African American History and Culture.
Exhibition talk. Related to exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life.' Dated 19961016.
Biographical / Historical:
'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life' examined the faith and spiritual traditions in African American religious life in the 1990s. The exhibition featured members of Christian churches as well as those of other faiths. Special attention was given to the ways that African American congregations were responding to contemporary challenges affecting their families, neighborhoods, and communities. The exhibition was developed by the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, and held at The Arts and Industries Building, North Gallery, 900 Jefferson Street, SW, Washington, D.C. from February 1998 to August 1999.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Churches  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Communities  Search this
Religion  Search this
Spirituality  Search this
Choirs (Music)  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Speak To My Heart: Exhibition Talk with Gail S. Lowe, Ph.D., Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Item ACMA AV001049
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-037: Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref654

Speak To My Heart: Exhibition Tour

Creator:
Anacostia Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (VHS)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1998
Scope and Contents:
Dr. Gail Lowe led a tour of the exhibition 'Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life.'
Exhibition tour. Related to Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life. Dated 19981006.
Biographical / Historical:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of Faith and Contemporary African American Life examined the faith and spiritual traditions in African American religious life in the 1990s. The exhibition featured members of Christian churches as well as those of other faiths. Special attention was given to the ways that African American congregations were responding to contemporary challenges affecting their families, neighborhoods, and communities. The exhibition was developed by the Smithsonian Institution's Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, and held at The Arts and Industries Building, North Gallery, 900 Jefferson Street, SW, Washington, D.C. from February 1998 to August 1999.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
Churches  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Religion  Search this
Spirituality  Search this
Choirs (Music)  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Citation:
Speak To My Heart: Exhibition Tour, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-037, Item ACMA AV002190
See more items in:
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records
Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life exhibition records / Series ACMA AV03-037: Speak to My Heart: Communities of faith and contemporary African American life audiovisual records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-037-ref655

Church Exteriors for Guild Inc. Aug[ust] 1957 [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Creator:
Eastman Kodak Company (film manufacturer)  Search this
Names:
Pilgrim Baptist Church. (Choir)  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on cellulose acetate film sheet., 4" x 5".)
Container:
Box 32
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Date:
1957 August
Scope and Contents:
Subject/Sitter: Church Exterior
Exterior view of Pilgrim Baptist Church. No ink on negative, no Scurlock number. "KODAK--SAFETY--FILM" edge imprint.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American churches  Search this
Church buildings -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1950-1960 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client / 4.6.1: Black and white negatives Part 1
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-06-ref10398

Church Exteriors for Guild Inc. Aug[ust] 1957 [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Creator:
Eastman Kodak Company (film manufacturer)  Search this
Names:
Greater New Bethel Baptist Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on cellulose acetate film sheet., 5" x 4".)
Container:
Box 32
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Date:
1957 August
Scope and Contents:
Subject/Sitter: Church Exterior
Exterior view of the Greater New Bethel Baptist Church. "To the glory of God" above the doorway. No ink on negative, no Scurlock number. "KODAK--SAFETY--FILM" edge imprint.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American churches  Search this
Church buildings -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1950-1960 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client / 4.6.1: Black and white negatives Part 1
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-06-ref10401

Church Exteriors for Guild Inc. Aug[ust] 1957 [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Creator:
Eastman Kodak Company (film manufacturer)  Search this
Names:
Ward Memorial Church (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on cellulose acetate film sheet., 4" x 5".)
Container:
Box 32
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Date:
1957 August
August 1957
Scope and Contents:
Subject/Sitter: Church Exterior
Exterior view of Ward Memorial Church. Sign in front of church: "Ward Memorial Church African Methodist Episcopal..." Street signs: "Washington Place N.E." and "N.E. 42st." No ink on negative, no Scurlock number. "KODAK--SAFETY--FILM" edge imprint.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American churches  Search this
Church buildings -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1950-1960 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client / 4.6.1: Black and white negatives Part 1
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-06-ref10410

A. Phillip Randolph at H[oward] U[niversity] Chapel during Citizenship Week, Mar[ch] 1960 [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Photographer:
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Creator:
Eastman Kodak Company (film manufacturer)  Search this
Names:
Howard University -- 1960-1970  Search this
Randolph, A. Philip (Asa Philip), 1889-1979  Search this
Subseries Creator:
Scurlock, Robert S. (Saunders), 1917-1994  Search this
Custom Craft  Search this
Scurlock, Addison N., 1883-1964  Search this
Scurlock, George H. (Hardison), 1919-2005  Search this
Scurlock Studio (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (Silver gelatin on cellulose acetate film sheet., 4" x 5".)
Container:
Box 52
Culture:
African Americans -- Washington (D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Photographs
Place:
Washington (D.C.) -- African Americans
Washington (D.C.) -- 1960-1970 -- Photographs
Date:
1960 March
Scope and Contents:
Subject/Sitter: Randolph, Phillip A. at chapel during citizenship week
Four young women standing with A. Phillip Randolph inside Howard University Chapel. He holds a pamphlet with the title, "The First Annual NACO Citizenship Institute". There is a stage and organ pipes behind them. No ink on negative. Ink on envelope: caption. "KODAK - SAFETY -- FILM" edge imprint. No Scurlock number.
Biographical / Historical:
The NACO referenced may be the National Association of Counties but this has not been confirmed.
Subseries Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Subseries Rights:
When the Museum purchased the collection from the Estate of Robert S. Scurlock, it obtained all rights, including copyright. The earliest photographs in the collection are in the public domain because their term of copyright has expired. The Archives Center will control copyright and the use of the collection for reproduction purposes, which will be handled in accordance with its standard reproduction policy guidelines. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African American women -- 1960-1970  Search this
African American churches  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1960-1970 -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film
Subseries Citation:
Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client
Scurlock Studio Records, Subseries 4.6: Black and white negatives in cold storage arranged by client / 4.6.1: Black and white negatives Part 1
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0618-s04-06-ref14124

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