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African art as philosophy / edited by Douglas Fraser

Author:
Fraser, Douglas 1929-1982  Search this
Columbia University Department of Art History and Archaeology  Search this
Physical description:
xii, 140 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Place:
Africa, West
Date:
1974
[1974]
Topic:
Art, West African  Search this
Art, Black  Search this
Art--Philosophy  Search this
Call number:
N7398 .F72X
N7398.F72X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_52299

Presentation spyglass that led to the capture of Spanish slave ship "Vengador"

Manufactured by:
Watkins and Hill, British, 1818 - 1857  Search this
Used by:
Admiral Lord Clarence Edward Paget, British, 1811 - 1895  Search this
Received by:
Sir Llewelyn Turner, British, 1823 - 1903  Search this
Medium:
glass, mahogany, and brass
Dimensions:
H x W: 3 x 36 x 3 in. (7.6 x 91.4 x 7.6 cm)
Type:
optical instruments
Place made:
London, England, Europe
Place used:
Caribbean
Cultural Place:
Spain, Europe
Place depicted:
Cuba, Caribbean, Latin America, North and Central America
Lagos, Nigeria, West Africa, Africa
Bahamas, Caribbean, North and Central America
Date:
1818-1838; presented 1866-1895
Topic:
African American  Search this
Colonialism  Search this
Commerce  Search this
Law  Search this
Military  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Spanish colonialism  Search this
Trans Atlantic slave trade  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2009.33
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Slavery and Freedom Objects
Awards and Medals
Tools and Equipment-Occupational
Exhibition:
Slavery and Freedom
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Concourse 3, C3 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd56677be84-00b1-46fa-9c1b-2a0db0a7db9e
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2009.33

Membership certificate to the American Colonization Society

Issued by:
American Colonization Society, American, 1816 - 1964  Search this
Received by:
Sarah Emlen Cresson, American  Search this
Signed by:
James Madison, American, 1751 - 1836  Search this
Ralph Randolph Gurley, American, 1797 - 1872  Search this
Elliott Cresson, American, 1797 - 1854  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W: 9 x 11 3/8 in. (22.9 x 28.9 cm)
Type:
membership cards
Place made:
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Liberia, West Africa, Africa
Place used:
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, North and Central America
Date:
February 22, 1832
Topic:
African American  Search this
Emancipation  Search this
Free communities of color  Search this
International affairs  Search this
Race relations  Search this
U.S. History, 1815-1861  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2010.77.9
Restrictions & Rights:
Public domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials
Slavery and Freedom Objects
Movement:
Colonization movement
Exhibition:
Slavery and Freedom
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Concourse 3, C3 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5639a3bfc-ccf0-401f-85b4-dd9ae5d24634
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2010.77.9
Online Media:

Introduction to Afro-American Studies: A Peoples College Primer

Written by:
Abdul Alkalimat, American, born 1942  Search this
Published by:
Twenty-first Century Books and Publications  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 9 x 6 1/8 x 3/4 in. (22.9 x 15.6 x 1.9 cm)
Type:
textbooks
Date:
1986
Topic:
African American  Search this
Associations and institutions  Search this
Education  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Dr. Bertha Maxwell Roddey
Object number:
2012.22.11
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Exhibition:
A Changing America: 1968 and Beyond
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Concourse 1, C1 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd543b953b1-c756-4f3c-bf5b-924f1824e807
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2012.22.11
Online Media:

Burl bowl

Created by:
Unidentified  Search this
Medium:
wood, metal
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 7 x 16 7/8 x 16 7/8 in. (17.8 x 42.9 x 42.9 cm)
Type:
bowls (vessels)
Place used:
Mississippi, United States, North and Central America
Cultural Place:
Ghana, West Africa, Africa
Date:
1750-1850
Topic:
African American  Search this
Africa  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
American South  Search this
Cooking and dining  Search this
Design  Search this
Domestic life  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2013.46.2
Restrictions & Rights:
Public domain
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Slavery and Freedom Objects
Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design
Exhibition:
Slavery and Freedom
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Concourse 3, C3 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd56e364d29-8416-4975-be4e-21d72e9acbaa
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2013.46.2

Contemporary manilla

Created by:
Unidentified  Search this
Medium:
bronze
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 2 1/4 × 2 3/8 × 11/16 in. (5.7 × 6 × 1.7 cm)
Type:
money
manillas
Place used:
Ghana, West Africa, Africa
Nigeria, West Africa, Africa
Date:
1800-1968
Topic:
African American  Search this
Africa  Search this
Commerce  Search this
Trans Atlantic slave trade  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of the Family of William & Mattye Reed
Object number:
2014.182.58.1
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
William & Mattye Reed Family Collection
Classification:
Slavery and Freedom Objects
Coins and Currency
Exhibition:
Slavery and Freedom
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Concourse 3, C3 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5850ec506-26d4-4e40-86f0-82c5ddaf205b
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2014.182.58.1
Online Media:

Contemporary manilla

Created by:
Unidentified  Search this
Medium:
bronze
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 2 3/8 × 2 3/8 × 11/16 in. (6 × 6 × 1.7 cm)
Type:
money
manillas
Place used:
Ghana, West Africa, Africa
Nigeria, West Africa, Africa
Date:
1800-1968
Topic:
African American  Search this
Africa  Search this
Commerce  Search this
Trans Atlantic slave trade  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of the Family of William & Mattye Reed
Object number:
2014.182.58.2
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
William & Mattye Reed Family Collection
Classification:
Slavery and Freedom Objects
Coins and Currency
Exhibition:
Slavery and Freedom
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Concourse 3, C3 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5481f3db5-160d-457e-bbb4-757702d4a01a
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2014.182.58.2
Online Media:

Contemporary manilla

Created by:
Unidentified  Search this
Medium:
bronze
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 2 5/16 × 2 3/8 × 11/16 in. (5.9 × 6 × 1.7 cm)
Type:
money
manillas
Place used:
Ghana, West Africa, Africa
Nigeria, West Africa, Africa
Date:
1800-1968
Topic:
African American  Search this
Africa  Search this
Commerce  Search this
Trans Atlantic slave trade  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of the Family of William & Mattye Reed
Object number:
2014.182.58.3
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Collection title:
William & Mattye Reed Family Collection
Classification:
Slavery and Freedom Objects
Coins and Currency
Exhibition:
Slavery and Freedom
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Concourse 3, C3 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd559be3b4d-e9c9-4b10-b5fa-ec762f9e04c6
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2014.182.58.3
Online Media:

Wood hair comb from Ghana

Created by:
Unidentified  Search this
Owned by:
Mattye Marie Reed, American, 1918 - 2003  Search this
Dr. William E. Reed, American, 1914 - 2006  Search this
Medium:
wood
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 4 3/4 × 2 5/8 × 3/16 in. (12.1 × 6.7 × 0.5 cm)
Type:
combs (grooming tools)
Place made:
Ghana, West Africa, Africa
Date:
1950s
Topic:
African American  Search this
Africa  Search this
Hair  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of the Family of William & Mattye Reed
Object number:
2014.182.99
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Personal Effects and Items
Exhibition:
A Changing America: 1968 and Beyond
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Concourse 1, C1 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5913eac7f-0420-47cd-9999-1a69bf0835cb
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2014.182.99
Online Media:

Academic robe worn by Dr. Johnnetta B. Cole at Bennett College

Designed by:
Barbara Nicholson, American  Search this
Worn by:
Dr. Johnnetta Betsch Cole, American, born 1936  Search this
Subject of:
Bennett College, American, founded 1873  Search this
Medium:
synthetic fiber, cowrie shells, paint, metal zipper, tassels, and Velcro (TM)
Dimensions:
H x W (flat): 56 1/2 × 39 1/2 in. (143.5 × 100.3 cm)
Type:
robes
Place used:
Greensboro, Guilford County, North Carolina, United States, North and Central America
Cultural Place:
Ghana, West Africa, Africa
Date:
2003
Topic:
African American  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Clothing and dress  Search this
Design  Search this
Education  Search this
Fashion design  Search this
HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities)  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Johnnetta Betsch Cole
Object number:
2015.209.4
Restrictions & Rights:
No Known Copyright Restrictions
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Clothing-Historical
Exhibition:
Cultural Expressions
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Culture/Fourth Floor, 4 050
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd528d50130-4fe3-435f-bb64-1ae14c2e1914
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2015.209.4
Online Media:

I Go To Prepare A Place For You

Created by:
Bisa Butler, American, born 1973  Search this
Subject of:
Harriet Tubman, American, 1822 - 1913  Search this
Medium:
cotton, silk and velvet
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 90 3/4 × 64 1/2 × 1/4 in. (230.5 × 163.8 × 0.6 cm)
Type:
quilts
Cultural Place:
Ghana, West Africa, Africa
Congo River, West Africa, Africa
United States, North and Central America
Date:
2021
Topic:
African American  Search this
Activism  Search this
Africa  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Art  Search this
Craftsmanship  Search this
Design  Search this
Freedom  Search this
Identity  Search this
Self-liberation  Search this
Slavery  Search this
Spirituality  Search this
Textile design  Search this
Women  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, purchased through the American Women's History Initiative Acquisitions Pool, administered by the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative
Object number:
2021.38
Restrictions & Rights:
© Bisa Butler
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Visual Arts
Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design
Textiles-Quilts
Exhibition:
Reckoning: Protest. Defiance. Resilience.
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Culture/Fourth Floor, 4 052
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5ccbe181b-262f-4564-b229-e19e664ae8fd
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2021.38
Online Media:

Togu Na and Cheko (Outtakes)

Filmmaker:
Staniski, Stanley  Search this
Extent:
Film reels (color sound; 19,000 feet, 16mm)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Dogon (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Film reels
Sound films
Place:
Africa, West
Mali
Date:
1989
Scope and Contents:
Collection consists of outtakes from the edited videorecording "Togu na and Check: Change and Continuity in the Art of Mali." The film documents two forms of art of the Dogon and Bamana peoples in Mali, West Africa, in 1989. The edited videorecording was used in the National Musuem of African Art exhibition entitled, "Icons: Ideals and Power in the Art of Africa," which was held from October 25, 1989 to September 3, 1990.
Related Materials:
The Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art holds the edited vdeorecording "Togu na and Cheko Change and Continuity in the Art of Mali" video, EEPA 1989-030, 1989.
Provenance:
Transferred from the National Museum of Africa Art in 2004.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the Human Studies Film Archives may not be played.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Sound films
Citation:
Togu Na and Cheko (Outtakes), Human Studies Film Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
HSFA.2004.15
Archival Repository:
Human Studies Film Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pc9dab9c845-b591-4152-9979-8f4adf7f45db
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-hsfa-2004-15

BLK Vol. 4 No. 2

Published by:
Alan Bell, American  Search this
Edited by:
Alan Bell, American  Search this
Subject of:
Lisa Mitchell  Search this
Titia Ingram  Search this
Joseph F. Beam, American, 1954 - 1988  Search this
Essex Hemphill, American, 1957 - 1995  Search this
Sabrina Sojourner, American, born 1952  Search this
Assotto Saint, Haitian American, 1957 - 1994  Search this
Barbara Smith, American, born 1946  Search this
Jewelle Gomez, American, born 1948  Search this
Dr. Ron Simmons, American, 1950 - 2020  Search this
African-American Lesbian and Gay Alliance, American, founded 1986  Search this
Black Men's Xchange, American, founded 1989  Search this
Michelle Parkerson, American  Search this
Marlon Riggs, American, 1957 - 1994  Search this
Blackberri, American, 1945 - 2021  Search this
Phill Wilson, American, born 1956  Search this
Black Gay and Lesbian Leadership Forum, American, 1988 - 2003  Search this
Alan Bell, American  Search this
Dr. Marjorie Hill, American  Search this
Pat Parker, American, 1944 - 1989  Search this
Audre Lorde, American, 1934 - 1992  Search this
Magic Johnson, American, born 1959  Search this
Minority AIDS Project, American, founded 1985  Search this
Salsa Soul Sisters, American, founded 1974  Search this
University of San Francisco, American, founded 1855  Search this
Gay Men of African Descent, American, founded 1986  Search this
Rev. James Cleveland, American, 1931 - 1991  Search this
Unity Fellowship Church, American, founded 1982  Search this
Ayofemi Stowe Folayan, American, born 1950  Search this
Jewel's Catch One, American, founded 1973  Search this
Rue's House, American, 1989 - 1997  Search this
New York Shakespeare Festival, American, founded 1954  Search this
Los Angeles Times, founded 1881  Search this
President Bill Clinton, American, born 1946  Search this
Rev. Jesse Jackson, American, born 1941  Search this
Whitney Houston, American, 1963 - 2012  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper (fiber product)
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 10 13/16 × 8 1/4 × 1/8 in. (27.4 × 20.9 × 0.3 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
Place made:
Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, United States, North and Central America
Place depicted:
Oakland, Alameda County, California, United States, North and Central America
Dakar, Senegal, West Africa, Africa
San Francisco, San Francisco county, California, United States, North and Central America
Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, United States, North and Central America
Virgin Islands of the United States, United States, Caribbean, North and Central America
Tulsa, Tulsa County, Oklahoma, United States, North and Central America
Lagos, Nigeria, West Africa, Africa
New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, North and Central America
Saint Louis, Saint Louis County, Missouri, United States, North and Central America
Saint Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota, United States, North and Central America
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, North and Central America
Malibu, Los Angeles County, California, United States, North and Central America
New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, United States, North and Central America
San Diego, San Diego County, California, United States, North and Central America
Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, United States, North and Central America
Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, United States, North and Central America
Date:
May 1992
Topic:
African American  Search this
Activism  Search this
Associations and institutions  Search this
Black Press  Search this
Communities  Search this
Hate crimes  Search this
Health  Search this
Identity  Search this
International affairs  Search this
LGBTQ  Search this
Literature  Search this
Mass media  Search this
Nature  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Recreation  Search this
Sexuality  Search this
Spirituality  Search this
Theatre  Search this
U.S. History, 1969-2001  Search this
Violence  Search this
Women's organizations  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Alan Bell
Object number:
2018.108.36
Restrictions & Rights:
© BLK Publishing Company, Inc.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Movement:
HIV/AIDS Activist Movement
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd5476ab9f1-3de3-4620-b058-75162110d4e1
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2018.108.36

Letter to Andy Stroud from Nina Simone

Written by:
Nina Simone, American, 1933 - 2003  Search this
Received by:
Andy Stroud, American, died 2012  Search this
Subject of:
American Society of African Culture, American, 1956 - 1969  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W (letter): 10 1/4 x 8 in. (26 x 20.3 cm)
H x W (envelope): 4 1/16 x 8 3/4 in. (10.3 x 22.2 cm)
Type:
letters (correspondence)
Place made:
Lagos, Nigeria, West Africa, Africa
Date:
December 1961
Topic:
African American  Search this
Africa  Search this
Composers (Musicians)  Search this
Correspondence  Search this
Families  Search this
Instrumentalists (Musicians)  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Popular music  Search this
Singers (Musicians)  Search this
Travel  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2011.132.3a-e
Restrictions & Rights:
Unknown - Restrictions Possible
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials
Exhibition:
Musical Crossroads
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Culture/Fourth Floor, 4 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd58ec74b95-e684-48c6-abe7-2bcf007b1507
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2011.132.3a-e

Yolele! Recipes from the Heart of Senegal

Published by:
Lake Isle Press, American, founded 1990  Search this
Written by:
Pierre Thiam, Senegalese  Search this
Photograph by:
Adam Bartos, American, born 1953  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper, cardboard
Dimensions:
H x W x D (closed): 10 5/16 × 8 5/16 × 7/8 in. (26.2 × 21.1 × 2.2 cm)
H x W x D (open): 3 × 16 15/16 × 10 5/16 in. (7.6 × 43 × 26.2 cm)
Type:
cookbooks
Place depicted:
Senegal, West Africa, Africa
Date:
2008
Topic:
African American  Search this
Africa  Search this
African diaspora  Search this
Cooking and dining  Search this
Foodways  Search this
Literature  Search this
Photography  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Chef Pierre Thiam
Object number:
2016.42
Restrictions & Rights:
Recipes copyright © 2008 by Pierre Thiam/Photography copyright © 2008 by Adam Bartos. Permission required for use.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Exhibition:
Cultural Expressions
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Culture/Fourth Floor, 4 050
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
GUID:
http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/fd529d52248-cebb-441c-b858-2fad16389c52
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2016.42

Henry John Drewal and Margaret Thompson Drewal Collection

Creator:
Drewal, Henry John  Search this
Drewal, Margaret Thompson  Search this
Extent:
10,000 Slides (color)
10,617 Copy slides
Container:
Item 10000
Volume 1
Volume 2
Volume 3
Volume 4
Volume 5
Volume 6
Volume 7
Volume 8
Volume 9
Volume 10
Volume 11
Volume 12
Volume 13
Volume 14
Volume 15
Volume 16
Volume 17
Culture:
Ewe (African people)  Search this
Yoruba (African people)  Search this
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Slides
Copy slides
Color slides
Place:
Togo
Africa
Nigeria
Ghana
Sierra Leone
Date:
1970-1989
Summary:
Both Henry John Drewal and Margaret Drewal traveled to Nigeria, Ghana and Togo (West Africa) for extended periods from 1967-1986. During their trips to Nigeria they conducted research into the ritual performance, masking traditions, and traditional sacred rites of the Yoruba people as well as Mami Wata devotes of Togo, Ghana, and Nigeria. They are the co-authors of Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba (1993).Both Henry John Drewal and Margaret Drewal traveled to Nigeria, Ghana and Togo (West Africa) for extended periods from 1967-1986. During their trips to Nigeria they conducted research into the ritual performance, masking traditions, and traditional sacred rites of the Yoruba people as well as Mami Wata devotes of Togo, Ghana, and Nigeria. They are the co-authors of Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba (1993).

Photographs taken by Henry John and Margaret Thompson Drewal during the 1970s and 1980s of Yoruba and Ewe art and culture.
Scope and Contents:
The Drewal collection is a photographic documentation of several trips made to the West African countries of Ghana, Nigeria, and Togo to conduct field research. This collection, which consists of over 10,000 color slides (35mm), represents a major portion of the photographs taken by the Drewals during their visits to West Africa from 1967-1986 to conduct field work.

There are several subjects present in this collection. The most prominent being the Egúngún and Gelede rituals and festivals of the Yoruba people of Nigeria. Other subjects found in the collection are Ifá initiation, Òrìsà and Mami Wata festivals, Òrìsà shrines, sacred arts, beading techniques, and traditional and modern architecture. There is a large selection of images specifically of shrines and festivals for Òrìsà such as Sango, Ògún, Agemo, Eyinle and others. Details of implements like the ose Sango, opa Osanyin, and opa Osun can also be seen in the collection.

The Drewals also photographed and documented Yoruba sacred art (i.e. shrine objects; masks) in a number of international museums in Africa, Europe and the United States. Their collection contains images of Yoruba art in the British Museum, London; Nigeria National Museum, Lagos; National Museum of African Art, Washington, D.C.; Everton Museum, New York; and Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago. For a complete listing of slides depicting museum collections see pages 28-33. These images are restricted and can not be reproduced without permission of the copyright holder.
Organization of the Finding Aid:
Drewal, Margaret Thompson. "Symbols of Possession: A Study of Movement and Regalia in an Anago-Yoruba Ceremony." -- Dance Research Journal -- 7, no. 2 (1975).

Drewal, Margaret Thompson and Henry John Drewal. "Gelede: Dance of the Western Yoruba," -- African Arts -- 8, no. 2 (Winter 1975).

Drewal, Henry John. "Efe: Voiced Power and Pagenatry." -- African Arts -- 7, no. 1 (Autumn 1973).

Drewal, Margaret Thompson and Henry John Drewal. "More Powerful than Each Other: An Egbado Classification of Egungun." -- African Arts -- 11, no. 3 (April 1978).

Drewal, Margaret Thompson. "Projections from the Top in Yoruba Art." -- African Arts -- 11, no. 1 (October 1977).

Drewal, Henry John. "Gelede Masquerade: Imagery and Motif." -- African Arts -- 7, no. 4 (Summer 1974).

Drewal, Henry John. "Pageantry and Power in Yoruba Costuming." Justine M. Cordwell and Ronald M. Schwarz, ed. -- The Fabrics of Culture -- . Hauge: Mouton, 1979.

Drewal, Margaret Thompson. "Art and Trance Among Yoruba Sango Devotees." -- African Arts -- 20, no. 1 (November 1986).

Drewal, Henry John. "Flaming Crowns, Cooling Waters: Masquerades of the Ijebu Yoruba" -- African Arts -- 20, no. 1 (November 1986).

Drewal, Henry John. "Mermaids, Mirrors, and Snake Charmers: Igbo Mami Wata Shrines" -- African Arts -- 21, no. 2 (February 1988).

Drewal, Henry John. "Performing the Other: Mami Wata Worship in Africa" -- TDR -- 32, no. 2 (Summer 1988).

Drewal, Henry John. "Beauty and Being: Aesthetics and Ontology in Yoruba Body Art." Arnold Rubin, ed. -- Marks of Civilization: Artistic Transformation of the Human Body -- . Los Angeles, CA, 1988.

Drewal, Henry John, John Pemberton III, Rowland Abiodun. -- Yoruba: Nine Centuries of African Art and Thought -- . NY: Center for African Art in Association with H.N. Abrams, 1989.

Homberger, Lorenz ed. -- Yoruba Art and Aesthetics -- . Zurich: Museum Rietberg; New York: Center for African Art, 1991.

Drewal, Margaret Thompson. -- Yoruba Ritual: Performers, Play, Agency -- . Bloomington and Indianapolis, IN: Indiana University Press, 1992.

Drewal, Henry John and Margaret Thompson Drewal. -- Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba -- . Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1993.

Abiodun, Rowland, Henry J. Drewal, and John Pemberton III, editors. -- The Yoruba Artist: New Theoretical Perspectives on African Arts -- . Washington DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994.

Drewal, Henry John. "Yoruba Beadwork Beauty Brightness." -- Faces -- 12, no. 1 (September 1995).

This finding aid was organized according to the inherent value of the Drewal collection to art historians, ethnographers, anthropologists, and cultural historians. It has been kept simple but made as detailed as possible while still providing the researcher with references to the images and other valuable research information. The finding aid has been organized into three principal sections:

A. Bibliography of Drewal publications with image numbers; B. Primary keyword subjects: Field images; C. Primary keyword subjects: Art images; and D. Restricted images: B/W copy slides and non-Drewal color slides

A. Bibliography of Drewal publications: The first section contains a bibliography of primary Drewal publications and lists the image numbers for reproductions that appear in either black-and-white or color. These publications are listed chronologically with a corresponding list of image numbers. For the researcher's convenience, all images from the Drewal collection that have been published are listed in a separate column beside the publication in which the picture appears. Due to space restrictions, only the last five digits of the accession numbers are listed in the Image # column.

**Please note that some of the color slides in the collection have been reproduced as black-and-white images in several Drewal publications. A separate column in the bibliographic section indicates whether the image was reproduced in black-and-white or color in the publication. The Elisofon Archives does not currently possess any of the Drewal's black-and-white negatives. For additional information on these images, please contact Drs. Henry John Drewal and Margaret Thompson Drewal.

Example:

Publication Title Image # Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba, 1993

To further assist researchers, two additional columns have been created to indicate if the image is published in color or black/white.

Example: Publication Title Image # Color Gelede: Art and Female Power among the Yoruba, 1993 • 00000 

B & C. Primary keyword: Field and Art images The second section contains a complete list of images available in the collection, subdivided by field and art images. Field images refer to cultural or natural landscapes shot in Africa and Art images refer to images of objects in museums (or photographed in the field as an object by itself). These images have been categorized by primary keywords (i.e. artisan; leadership; masquerade) and subdivided into subcategories or type within these general keyword subjects (i.e. carvers; chiefs; Egungun).

Example:

Primary Keyword Subcategory Image # Architecture • Modern • 00000

D. Restricted images: The final section lists restricted images in the collection: b/w copy slides from publications and color slides not produced by the Drewals. These images are for study purposes only and not for reproduction.
Arrangement note:
The slides were sent to the Elisofon Archives in several batches. They were arranged according to the Drewals' own system of classification and field notes (see below). This arrangement is roughly by subject and further subdivided by subcategory or type. Slides of museum objects are grouped with field images of similar subject matter. For instance, museum object related to Sango worship can be found with the field images of Sango devotees and shrines.

The Drewals donated copies of their field notes (Red and Blue Books) which correspond to most of the slides found in the collection. The Red and Blue books are arranged in reverse chronological order starting with Blue Book 1977-78.1. Reference numbers to these books appear on the upper left hand corner of the slide (e.g. 78.34.6; 28-11). The majority of the field notes give the date and place where the photos were taken as well as a brief descriptive of the subject of the image related to the note. In some cases, the Òrìsà of a particular town was recorded in addition to how many Òrìsà are worshipped. The Drewals attended several private ceremonies and there are some descriptions of their experiences, however, in most cases not in extensive detail.

There is an additional notebook containing more field notes for years prior to 1975. This notebook has information about the images of museum objects and is a collection of Xeroxed copies of notes on index cards. There are no dates on the copies, but there are reference numbers as with the Red and Blue Books.

Images indexed by negative number.
Biographical / Historical:
Art historian Henry John Drewal received his BA from Hamilton College and two Masters' degrees and a PhD from Columbia University (1973). In between college and graduate school, Drewal served in the Peace Corps, where he taught French and English, organized arts camps in Nigeria, and apprenticed himself to a Yoruba sculptor.

He taught at Cleveland State University (Chair of the Art Department), and was a Visiting Professor at UC-Santa Barbara and SUNY-Purchase. Since 1991 he has been the Evjue-Bascom Professor of Art History and Afro-American Studies at UW-Madison. He has published several books, edited volumes, exhibition catalogues, and many articles and produced a number of films documenting African and African Diaspora arts, and lectured widely on these topics. He has received several NEH and NEA grants, three Fulbright Research Awards (Brazil, Benin, Morocco), a Metropolitan Museum of Art Fellowship, and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Dr. Margaret Thompson Drewal is an ethnographer, performance theorist, and dance historian. She has conducted extensive research on Yoruba and Afro-Brazilian ritual dance with a special interest in the poetics and politics of performance discourse. She is the author of Performers, Play, and Agency: Yoruba Ritual Process (1989). She has also authored numerous articles that have appeared in such journals as TDR: A Journal of Performance Studies, African Arts, and The Journal Ritual Studies. She is also a trained dancer and choreographer. At present, Dr. Drewal is the Chair of the Department of Performance Studies at North Western University.

There are also video productions by Henry John Drewal and Margaret Thompson Drewal available in the Warren M. Robbins Library. The videos available are "Ẹfẹ/Gẹlẹdẹ Ceremonies among the Western Yoruba," by Henry John Drewal; "Yoruba Performance," by Henry John Drewal; and "Yoruba Ritual: A Companion Video," by Margaret Thompson Drewal.
Cultural Information and Background:
The information found here goes slightly beyond the notes of the Red/Blue Books and index card that accompany the images. Because the Drewal Collection primarily centers on the Yoruba and Mami Wata spiritual traditions and material cultures, the focus of images are of specific implements of the deities and priests, such as staffs, pots, stools, thrones, statues, and bells. Also included in the collection are images of divination, sacrifice, and other important rituals, festivals and ceremonies. What is given here is pertinent background information on the cosmology of the Yoruba and Mami Wata spiritual traditions as it relates to the iconographical focus of the slides.

In Yoruba cosmology, there is a supreme being commonly referred to as Ọlọdumare. Ọlọdumare is essentially understood as being genderless or androgynous. There are no shrines or spiritual implements dedicated to Ọlọdumare. The Yoruba believe that Ọlọdumare is too vast and its power too strong to be channeled into one building or space. Everything is a part of or expresses an aspect of Ọlọdumare. Through the appeasement of the Òrìsà Ọlọdumare is served. The Òrìsà are the emissaries of Ọlọdumare sent to the world to assist their devotees in every day life. There are hundreds of Òrìsà within the Yoruba pantheon. Deities such as Ọbatala, Ifá, Èshù, Ọshún, Shango, Ọsanyin, Yemọja and Oya are worshipped throughout Yorubaland; there are also deities that are specific to particular locations and are not as popular as the aforementioned eight.

Implements of the priests are classified as sacred art. These spiritual tools are not only instruments of the priests, but ultimately, they are tools for the Òrìsà. It is important to understand that the shrines are not the Òrìsà. This very prominent misconception has plagued traditional practitioners both in and out of Yorubaland for centuries. The emphasis of reverence is placed on the spirit associated with the materials used to construct a shrine or ceremonial item and not the item itself. The shrine and other sacred tools serve as vortices to channel the ashe or power of the Òrìsà into the physical world.

Ifá is a term that has been used to refer to the Yoruba traditional spiritual system. However, Ifá also refers to the Òrìsà of divination, Ọrunmila, as well as the system of divination used by the priests of Ọrunmila. Ifá's role as a diviner is so important in Yoruba cosmology that he is referred to as Ẹlẹri ipin, ibikéjì Ọlọdumare (witness to all destinies, second only to Ọlọdumare). The Drewals were allowed to follow the process of three initiations and other sacred rituals performed by priests. Certain rituals cannot be witnessed by non-initiates; however the Drewals were able to photograph many of the sacred rites of the initiation process. The roles of the Ifá priest vary. Divining is a very important role of the Ifá priest, and the tools used to divine are also sacred. There is a section of the collection dedicated to images of divination tools and the Ifá shrine.

Èshù is another one of the most important deities within Yoruba cosmology. Èshù is the keeper of ashe and the inspector of all sacrifices. His image is carved into the top of the Ifá divination tray (ọpọn Ifá) because he is a witness to all actions, thoughts, and events. According to Yoruba cosmology, he is an unbiased observer who will convey only the truth of any subject. Both Ifá and Èshù assist devotees in overcoming unsavory circumstances and bad luck, according to the Yoruba. There are many roads (aspects) of Èshù, each performing a specific duty in a devotee's life. Shigidi is one of the more powerful aspects of Èshù. One can see the noticeable differences between the Shigidi and the yangi (laterite or sculpted clay used to create an Èshù shrine).

The implements that are found on traditional Òrìsà shrines are based on Yoruba mythology. For instance, the odo Shango, ritual mortar, is found on almost all shrines dedicated to this particular Òrìsà. The legend goes that he used an inverted mortar to kill a leopard that was terrorizing the people of Enpe. The odo Shango is sometimes used to support the container that holds the "thunderstones" (lightning struck stones) of Shango's shrine. The inverted mortar is also used as a stool for priests or initiates to sit. Shango's priests usually keep their hair braided, even if the priest is male. Equestrian figures are utilized in both Shango and Oya sacred art. Oya is the only female deity in the Yoruba pantheon that has ever been depicted riding a horse. Yoruba mythology states that Oya is a warrior goddess who accompanies her husband, Shango into battle and fights by his side. Together the husband and wife team is associated with thunderstorms. Oya is mythically related to the winds that precede the thunder and lightning that are both said to be associated with Shango.

There are several types of staffs or dance wands seen in the Drewal collection. In the case of dance wands, they are often times utilized during spirit possession. In some instances, the shrine of the Òrìsà is only the staff of that particular deity. Such is the case with the ọpa Osun, a deity associated with Ifá and his devotees and the ọpa Òrìsà Oko, the deity of agriculture.

The Ogboni society (also known as Osugbo) possesses a mixture of spiritual and governmental power within the traditional Yoruba community. It was the foundation of order in traditional Yoruba society. The focus of worship and veneration amongst Ogboni members is Onilẹh, the Owner of the land or Earth. Sometimes one may hear the term Onileh, Owner of the house, instead. Both pronunciations can be used and carry significant meaning in either case. However, the consensus of scholarly research associates Ogboni with the Earth. In that case the term Onilẹh is more suitable.

Egúngún and Gelede festivals are of significant importance amongst the Yoruba. The Egúngún society is dedicated to the veneration and appeasement of honorable ancestors. This can take place in private or public. Families celebrate their deceased relatives' lives and accomplishments privately through sacrifice, prayer and celebration. In a public arena ancestors from the community are given recognition. The Yoruba have long believed that community solidarity and welfare begins with the family. In honoring one's personal ancestors as well as benevolent community ancestors, the family receives the blessings of those that reside in the spiritual realm—those who have become ara ọrun, or the people of heaven. Because the Yoruba believe in reincarnation, it is thought that the ancestors will one day return to the material world in a future lifetime. If proper rituals and prayers are performed, the spirits returning will have a better chance of being assets to society by hopefully making positive contributions to the elevation of the Yoruba people.

Gelede is always a public event. The time of year which the festival will take place is dependent on the locality in which the festival is being held. Gelede focuses mainly on the feminine and the role of women in society. Female deities such as Yemọja, Olókun, and Ilẹh are associated with Gelede. Another aspect of major importance to Gelede is the inclusion of Ìyánla, the Great Mother, which is a reference to Onilè. This reference is but one facet that connects Gelede to the Ogboni society. It is also during the Gelede festival that Awọn Ìyá Wa, Our Mothers or the Mothers, are petitioned and appeased so that they may not interfere with the positive efforts of the community.

Both the Egúngún and Gelede festivals help to ensure prosperity, abundance, and fertility of the people. It is through these festivals that indecent conduct is addressed in hopes of exorcising the root of such behavior. It is believed that bringing any disgraceful and inhumane acts to the forefront encourages individuals to act responsibly in all matters.

The final subject presented in the Drewal Collection is of the Mami Wata traditions in West Africa. Representations of Mami Wata often include foreign images, usually of Indian gods, to describe the attributes of Mami Wata as a deity. The term Mami Wata refers to a water spirit or a collective of water spirits. The names associated with the original African water spirit(s) have long been forgotten in some regions of West Africa where Mami Wata is worshipped. However, in other areas, the term Mami Wata is interchangeable with the indigenous name used to identify the water spirit(s). There are variations to the worship of Mami Wata throughout West Africa, yet similarities prevail. Togo is most popularly associated with the Mami Wata tradition. Most of the slides featuring Mami Wata devotees in the Drewal Collection were taken in Togo.
Related Materials:
Additional photographs by Henry John Drewal held at the EEPA are located within the collection: Henry John Drewal Collection, EEPA 2010-010.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. Copyright held by John and Margaret Drewal. To publish images from this collection, permission must be given by Henry and Margaret Drewal. Contact Archives staff for further information. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Citation:
Henry and Margaret Drewal Photographs, EEPA 1992-028, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
EEPA.1992-028
See more items in:
Henry John Drewal and Margaret Thompson Drewal Collection
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo75d71915f-d8ca-4633-a51c-c73dae691495
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-eepa-1992-028

"Togu na and Cheko Change and Continuity in the Art of Mali" video

Creator:
National Museum of African Art (U.S.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording ((28:00 min.) , sound, color)
Container:
Video 6
Culture:
Dogon (African people)  Search this
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Video recordings
Place:
Africa
Date:
1989
Summary:
The videorecording "Togu na and Check: Change and Continuity in the Art of Mali", which documents two forms of art of the Dogon and Bamana peoples in Mali, West Africa, in 1989.
Scope and Contents:
The videorecording "Togu na and Check: Change and Continuity in the Art of Mali", which documents two forms of art of the Dogon and Bamana peoples in Mali, West Africa, in 1989. Accompanying text describes that the film "explores two forms of art in present-day Mali, West Africa. For the Dogon peoples, the meeting house, or toguna, is the centerpiece of each village. Men gather to discuss matters involving the entire community. Its massive millet-stalk roof is supported by columns masterfully sculpted with figures in high relief. The Bamana peoples have developed a unique form of communal theater, called cheko. The principal actors in cheko performances are colorful, animated puppets. Some of these puppets are small enough to be manipulated by hand. Others tower above the rooftops of the village and require two or more people to move them. These fascinating Dogon and Bamana works of art depict both traditional and contemporary themes. They vividly show how art continues to evolve in Africa today."
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Identifier:
EEPA.1989-030
See more items in:
"Togu na and Cheko Change and Continuity in the Art of Mali" video
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/xo73847a461-3930-4bd9-ba08-8bc81aa15d25
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-eepa-1989-030

Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Extent:
9.15 Linear feet (17 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Exhibit scripts
Photographic prints
Exhibition records
Catalogs
Brochures
Correspondence
Place:
Africa, West -- History -- Exhibitions
Date:
1979-02 - 1980-02
Summary:
An exhibition on the history of the transatlantic slave trade, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood and held there from February 1979-February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson. These records document the planning, organizing, execution, and promotion of the exhibition. Materials include correspondence, research files, exhibit scripts, administrative records, brochures, press coverage, education packets, loan agreements, floor plans, and catalogues.
Related Archival Materials note:
Audiovisual materials related to this exhibition located in Anacostia Community Museum Archives.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist.
Topic:
Slave trade -- America -- Exhibitions  Search this
Slave trade -- Africa -- History  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Slave insurrections -- United States -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Exhibit scripts
Photographic prints
Exhibition records -- 1967-1989
Catalogs
Brochures
Correspondence
Citation:
Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization exhibition records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa740fdbbd8-8ff2-4102-8836-483e31d3e19b
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-03-031
Online Media:

Camara Laye: Conversation about Africa

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
2 Sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Place:
Africa, West
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1977
Scope and Contents:
Camara Laye talked about griots who transmit the oral culture of Africa; his work as oral historian; the novel he was writing; the seven African countries that compressed the Empire Mali and the countries' shared culture; Kinte project with Alex Haley; African civilization as a social, humanistic civilization and European civilization as a mechanic civilization; expanded African family versus limited European family; limited independence of Africa; and regrouping of Africa. Following Camara Laye lecture, the remainder of the recording includes a demonstration/conversation about tie dying technique; and two women conversing about an alphabet book of African culture and what they are going to do the following day.
Lecture. Audio Only. French with English interpretation. AV001386: poor audio quality. Dated 19770728.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001375_B

ACMA AV001386_A
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African culture  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Storytelling  Search this
Griots  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Citation:
Camara Laye: Conversation about Africa, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Item ACMA AV001375_A
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa704578ac3-7963-466c-8a3c-1a20574c97f3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1

Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Hutchinson, Louise Daniel  Search this
Extent:
1 Video recording (1 open reel 1/2" video recordings)
9 Sound recordings (5 audio cassette sound recordings ; 4 open reel 1/4" sound recordings)
0.2 Linear feet
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Video recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Africa, West -- History -- Exhibitions
Date:
circa 1978-1980
Scope and Contents note:
Audiovisual materials created for an exhibition on the history of the transatlantic slave trade, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood and held there from February 1979-February 1980. Curated by Louise Daniel Hutchinson. This collection contains the audiovisual output of the exhibit, including narration sound recordings created for use within the exhibit and video and sound recordings of related talks and exhibit tours.
Related Archival Materials note:
Anacostia Community Museum. Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
Slave trade -- Africa -- History  Search this
Slave trade -- America -- Exhibitions  Search this
Slave insurrections -- United States -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Out of Africa: from West African kingdoms to colonization audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-031, Series ACMA AV03-031
See more items in:
Out of Africa: from West African Kingdoms to Colonization exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/qa7e0ae9410-b1ac-4282-9688-fa11f3df19fa
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-031-ref1010

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