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Employment Applications - Pennsylvania-Central and Northwestern

Collection Creator:
Gitt, Michael.  Search this
Container:
Box 2, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1939-1940
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Collection Citation:
Captain Michael Gitt Papers, Acc. NASM.2003.0033, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Captain Michael Gitt Papers
Captain Michael Gitt Papers / Series 1: Early Aviation Career
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2d776e753-3783-4e97-abff-0f6f8cceb08d
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2003-0033-ref521
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  • View Employment Applications - Pennsylvania-Central and Northwestern digital asset number 1

Civil Service Exams and Job Applications [Folder 1 of 2]

Collection Creator:
Gitt, Michael.  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 11
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1938-1940
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Collection Citation:
Captain Michael Gitt Papers, Acc. NASM.2003.0033, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Captain Michael Gitt Papers
Captain Michael Gitt Papers / Series 1: Early Aviation Career
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg20627e35d-de84-4300-af94-8337114d00d5
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2003-0033-ref517
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Civil Service Exams and Job Applications [Folder 1 of 2] digital asset number 1

General Benjamin Kelsey Scrapbooks

Creator:
Kelsey, Benjamin Scovill, 1906-1981  Search this
Names:
Acosta, Bert  Search this
Johnson, Walter E.  Search this
Kelsey, Benjamin Scovill, 1906-1981  Search this
Extent:
0.65 Cubic feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Scrapbooks
Date:
1920-1947
1977
Summary:
This collection consists of a photo album and a scrapbook kept by Benjamin Scovill "Ben" Kelsey to document his life and aviation career. The collection also includes Kelsey's U. S. Army Air Forces "Air Route Manual: United States to Great Britain," dated May 25, 1942, prepared for use by the first flights of military aircraft across the North Atlantic in support of Operation Bolero.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of a photo album and a scrapbook kept by Benjamin Scovill "Ben" Kelsey to document his life and aviation career. The photo album measures approximately 12.25 by 9.5 inches and documents Kelsey's early flying career and other aviation activities he was involved in from the period of about 1920 to 1932. Many of the photographs were taken around Garden City, New York or in and around Connecticut. Aircraft depicted in the album include the Curtiss JN-4 Jenny, Standard (NJ) J-1, Bellanca WB-2 Miss Columbia, Dayton Wright DH-4 Mailplane, Irwin Meteorplane C-C-1, Alexander Eaglerock Biplane, Waco ASO, Martin (Glenn L.) MB-2, Ford 2-AT Air Pullman, Air Transport John Wanamaker, Sikorsky Standard-Sikorsky SN-1, Avro 504, Sikorsky S-31, Sperry Messenger, Burnelli (Remington-Burnelli) RB-1, Curtiss Oriole, Curtiss CR-1 Racer, Udet U 12 Flamingo, as well as numerous other models by manufacturers such as Fokker, Curtiss, Boeing, Stinson, and Sikorsky. Besides Kelsey, other notable aviators pictured in the album include Laura Bromwell, Charles S. "Casey" Jones, Lloyd W. Bertaud, Walter E. Johnson, Earl W. Fleet, Robert Stevens Fogg, Gus Graff, Bertrand Blanchard Acosta, Harold T. "Slim" Lewis, Harry Bradford Chin, Thea Rasche, Richard H. Depew, and Leigh Wade. The album also contains aerial photographs.

The scrapbook, which measures 11 by 16 inches, is mainly composed of newspaper clippings, but also includes magazine articles, photographs, correspondence, certificates and other ephemera. It covers the period of approximately 1934 to 1947 and documents Kelsey's military career during this period. Aircraft seen in the scrapbook include the Curtiss P-36 Hawk, Curtiss P-37 (Hawk 75I), Lockheed XP-38/P-38 Lightning, Douglas XB-19 (XBLR-2), Curtiss CW-21 Interceptor-Fighter, Bell XFM-1 Airacuda, and the Douglas C-54 Skymaster.

The collection also contains a U. S. Army Air Forces document, "Air Route Manual: United States to Great Britain," prepared by Air Movements Unit, Operational Intelligence Section AFDIS – A2, May 25, 1942 (Second Revision). This publication is a pilot's briefing document prepared in support of Operation Bolero. It was designed for use by a Lockheed P-38 Lightning pilot and provides detailed radio and navigational information for all airfields en route (U. S. and Canada, Greenland, Iceland, and the British Isles) including aerial photographs, prepared strip maps marked with the magnetic course to be flown, and general information. It also contains eight large sectional maps, two American Airlines Radio Range and Mileage Charts, and six Ordnance Survey of Great Britain Aeronautical Maps.
Arrangement:
The collection materials are grouped into two roughly chronological scrapbooks and one military document.
Biographical / Historical:
Benjamin Scovill "Ben" Kelsey (1906-1981) completed instruction at the Curtiss Flying School in Garden City, New York in 1921 at the age of fifteen. He flew extensively, both commercially and privately, before being commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U. S. Army Air Corps in 1929. Kelsey was initially assigned to Mitchel Field, New York where he worked with the Guggenheim Fog Flying Laboratory. In 1934, Kelsey was transferred to the Materiel Command at Wright Field, Ohio where he served as fighter project officer in the Engineering Section and worked on blind landing and instrument flying development. Kelsey served as assistant military attaché for air in London, United Kingdom for a short time in 1940 and then returned to Wright Field as chief of the Pursuit Branch, Production Engineering Section. In 1942, Kelsey was attached to the Eighth Fighter Command at Dow Field, Maine during which time he served as a Lockheed P-38 Lightning pilot as part of Operation Bolero, the movement of U. S. forces across the Atlantic to the United Kingdom in preparation for the opening of a "second front" in northwest Europe that involved a group of P-38 aircraft following a B-17 Flying Fortress pathfinder aircraft across the North Atlantic. In September 1942, Kelsey returned to Wright Field and in 1943 was named chief of the Flight Research Branch, Flight Test Division. Later that year, Kelsey returned to the United Kingdom as the deputy chief of staff of the Ninth Fighter Command and in 1944 was appointed chief of the Operation Engineering Section of the Eighth Air Force Headquarters. In July 1945, Kelsey again returned to Wright Field and was named chief of the All-Weather Operations Section. In December 1946, Kelsey served as assistant deputy commanding general for personnel at Wright Field moving up to be the chief of personnel and administration before leaving for Air Force Headquarters in early 1948 where he served as chief of the Control Group in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Materiel. Kelsey entered the National War College in August 1948, graduating in June 1949, and then staying on as an instructor. Kelsey was appointed Deputy Director of Research and Development in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Development at Air Force Headquarters until retiring from active duty in December 1955. Kelsey was the recipient of numerous awards and honors and was involved in the development of, and/or test flew, numerous aircraft including the Bell XFM-1 Airacuda, Bell P-39 Airacobra, Curtiss P-36A Hawk, and Lockheed P-38 Lightning. Kelsey was also a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, holding a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering (1928) and a master of science degree in aeronautical engineering (1931).
Provenance:
General Benjamin S. Kelsey, Gift, NASM.XXXX.0026.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Airplanes  Search this
Curtiss JN-4 Jenny Family  Search this
Dayton Wright DH-4  Search this
Alexander Eaglerock Aircraft Family  Search this
Bellanca WB-2 "Miss Columbia"  Search this
Bell XFM-1 Airacuda  Search this
Lockheed P-38 Lightning Family  Search this
Curtiss P-36 Hawk Family  Search this
Technical manuals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Citation:
General Benjamin Kelsey Scrapbooks, Acc. NASM.XXXX.0026, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0026
See more items in:
General Benjamin Kelsey Scrapbooks
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2bd0267ca-60a8-41c7-8bbe-7eeba8f75606
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0026
Online Media:

Rudy Arnold Photo Collection

Creator:
Arnold, Rudy, 1902-1966  Search this
Names:
New York Graphic  Search this
New York Journal-American  Search this
New York School of Photography  Search this
Arnold, Rudy, 1902-1966  Search this
Extent:
10.91 Cubic feet (9,579 photographic items)
25.37 Linear feet (38 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Date:
circa 1920s-1950s
bulk 1920-1940
Summary:
Rudy Arnold (1902-1966) was introduced to photography in 1918. After studying at the New York School of Photography, he worked at the New York Journal-American and the New York Graphic. During his stint at the latter he started to focus on aviation photography. In 1928, Arnold started his own aviation photography business and worked out of the following New York air fields and airports during his career: Roosevelt Field, the old Curtiss Airport, Floyd Bennett Field, and LaGuardia Airport His coverage of a wrecked airliner in upstate New York was the first photograph sent by wire to newspapers across the country. Arnold's work appeared in every aviation magazine, house organs (Douglas, Grumman), and mass circulation magazines as well as many newspapers. He also did motion-picture camera work for Universal and Paramount.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of Rudy Arnold's collection of negatives, glass plates and color transparencies, spanning his career as an aviation photographer. The following subjects are included in this collection: civilian and military aircraft; experimental aircraft; seaplanes; airliners; aerial images; helicopters; aviation events and personalities.
Arrangement:
The Rudy Arnold Photo Collection consists of 25.37 linear feet (10.91 cubic feet) of original photographic material. It contains 9,579 original photographic items: Series I contains 5,303 black and white negatives, Series II contains 3,058 color transparencies, Series III contains 447 black and white glass plate negatives and Series IV contains 769 120 mm format negatives and two 8 x 10 inch color transparencies. Each series is organized alphabetically starting with the aircraft company name and designation followed by personalities and various other subjects. The last item is a 3-ring binder with 369 35mm copy slides of a variety of Arnold's images. While these copy slides are part this collection, they are not counted in the total number of items because they are copies of the Arnold originals.
Biographical / Historical:
Rudy Arnold (1902-1966) was a commercial aviation photographer. He began his career by studying at the New York School of Photography in New York City, New York. Arnold worked for both The New York Journal-American and The New York Graphic as a photographer. By 1928 he had developed an interest in aviation photography and started his photography business. He primarily worked out of Floyd Bennett Field, Roosevelt Field and LaGuardia Airport in New York for aviation magazines and newspapers and aviation industry house organs. Arnold photographed both civil and military aircraft, including airplanes, airships, and helicopters. While Arnold took images on the ground, he used air-to-air photography extensively. Rudy Arnold's photography was and still is considered to be artistic as well as a great documentary source. His photography was widely published during his career and still is today. Rudy Arnold's aviation photography career is documented in the book Images of Flight: The Aviation Photography of Rudy Arnold by E.T. Woodridge (Smithsonian Institution, 1986).

The bulk of the images were taken between circa 1920 through 1940 on Long Island, New York. The majority of these images are of American aircraft. Some of the represented manufacturers are Grumman, Douglas, Lockheed and Curtiss. In addition, the collection contains images Arnold took of aviation personalities including Douglas Corrigan, Amelia Earhart, Wiley Post and Howard Hughes. There are also images of United States military personal, armaments and vehicles, Atlantic coastal defense, as well as aircraft models and civilian vehicles, among other topics.

The collection was held by the Arnold family for many years. It suffered water damage prior to being accessioned by the Archives Division. The damage is more noticeable in the color material where there are color variations. However, in most cases the aircraft in the image is not disfigured. This collection was housed in the Aeronautics Division of the National Air and Space Museum for several years before being transferred the Archives Division. Prior to the Archives Division rehousing the collection, the materials were in acidic paper envelopes and boxes. These envelopes had Arnold's original caption and negative number (when assigned). Most of the envelopes were intact but a few were missing or had been damaged by moisture. After capturing the information on these envelopes, the Archives Division has rehoused the collection and the individual items are now in Mylar enclosures in acid free envelopes and boxes.
Provenance:
Dagmar Arnold-Wahlforss, gift, 1980-1990
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics -- Exhibitions  Search this
Helicopters  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Research aircraft  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aerial photography  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Rudy Arnold Photo Collection, Acc. NASM.XXXX.0356, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0356
See more items in:
Rudy Arnold Photo Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2f7325ac6-1b17-436d-98cf-c70754971a75
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0356
Online Media:

Peenemünde Interviews Project

Topic:
Peenemunde Interviews Project (NASM)
Creator:
Neufeld, Michael J., 1951-  Search this
Names:
Peenemunde Research and Development Station  Search this
Dahm, Werner  Search this
Danneberg, Konrad  Search this
Haeussermann, Walter  Search this
Heimberg, Karl  Search this
Hoelzer, Helmut  Search this
Mueller, Fritz  Search this
Neufeld, Michael J., 1951-  Search this
Oberth, Hermann, 1894-1989  Search this
Rees, Eberhard  Search this
Reisig, Gerhard  Search this
Rudolph, Arthur  Search this
Tessman, Bernhard  Search this
Wiesman, Walter  Search this
von Tiesenhausen, Georg  Search this
Extent:
2.51 Cubic feet (4 records center boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Transcripts
Oral history
Date:
1985-1990
Summary:
This collection consists of the oral history recordings and transcripts for the Peenemünde Interviews Project, which examined the development of the German Peenemünde complex from the early 1930s through World War II.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of 39 hours of interviews with 13 individuals (in both audio cassette and transcript formats).
Arrangement:
The Peenemünde Interviews Project is arranged alphabetically by interviewee. Boxes 1, 2 and 3 contain the interviews on cassette tapes; box 4 contains the edited transcripts of the audio.
Historical note:
The collection consists of the oral history recordings and transcripts for the Peenemünde Interviews Project, which examined the development of the German Peenemünde complex from the early 1930s through World War II. This project constitutes one of several oral history projects conducted within the Department of Space History, NASM. The principal investigator for this project was Michael Neufeld and the following individuals were interviewed: Werner Dahm; Konrad Danneberg; Walter Haeussermann; Karl Heimberg; Helmut Hoelzer; Fritz Mueller; Herman Oberth; Eberhard Rees (with Mrs. Rees); Gerhard Reisig; Arthur Rudolph; Bernhard Tessman (with Karl Heimburg); Georg von Tiesenhausen; and Walter Wiesman.
Provenance:
Space History, NASM, Transfer, 1999, 1999-0038, Varies
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
V-1 rocket  Search this
V-2 rocket  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Airplanes -- Germany  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Airplanes -- Rocket engines  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcripts
Oral history
Citation:
Peenemünde Interviews Project, Acc. 1999.0038, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1999.0038
See more items in:
Peenemünde Interviews Project
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2e745d50c-2bbe-41ce-bd04-3b836de37818
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1999-0038
Online Media:

Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection

Creator:
Davis, Benjamin O., Jr., 1912-  Search this
Names:
Air University (U.S.). Air War College  Search this
United States Military Academy  Search this
United States. Army Air Forces. 332nd Fighter Group  Search this
United States. Army Air Forces. 477th Bombardment Group  Search this
United States. Army Air Forces. 99th Fighter Squadron  Search this
Davis, Benjamin O., Jr., 1912-  Search this
Nixon, Richard M. (Richard Milhous), 1913-1994  Search this
Extent:
75.03 Cubic feet (168 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Publications
Correspondence
Programs
Place:
Tuskegee Army Air Field (Ala.)
Date:
1928-1990
Summary:
This collection consists of 72 linear feet of the papers of Benjamin O. Davis. Included are the following types of material: programs, invitations, certificates, correspondence, published material, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of material gathered by General and Mrs. Davis over the course of their lives to 1993. The bulk of this collection consists of correspondence, newsclippings, and photographs relating to or received by the Davises, especially after General Davis retired from the Air Force. The collection is particularly rich in materials from the black press of the 1940s, documenting the response of the black community to the activities of the 99th Fighter Squadron and 332d Fighter Group during and after World War II, and contains a small amount of material related to the controversy surrounding the units' combat performance and the morale issues raised by the segregated society of the 1940s. Most of the remainder of the material from Davis' military career centers on his own activities. Davis' tenure as the Director of Public Safety in Cleveland coincides with the activities of the Black Panther movement and the term of Mayor Carl Stokes, Cleveland's first mayor of African descent; the newclippings and correspondence from this period highlight police activities and public reaction in this racially-polarized atmosphere. Much of the material from Davis' early tenure at the Department of Transportation deals with civil aviation security, initially to counter the hijacking wave of the early 1970s and later to reduce cargo theft. The material from his later years, particularly during his years as a consultant, deals primarily with attempts to reduce gasoline consumption, especially his work promoting the 55mph National Maximum Speed Limit. The largest blocks of material from Davis' private life relate to his tenure on the President's Commission on Campus Unrest (1970) and the President's Commission on Military Compensation (1977-1978); these contain, respectively, materials on student protests, including the shootings at Kent State, and on issues surrounding military pay and retirement. There is also a significant body of material relating to his association with Tuskegee Airmen, Inc. and his speaking tours to increase public knowledge of the role of black servicemen during World War II.

Materials of a personal nature, particularly correspondence between General and Mrs. Davis, were retained by the Davises and therefore do not figure in this collection. Most official documents relating to Davis' activities in the military or civil service are held by the United States National Archives and Records Administration in Record Groups 18 (Records of the Army Air Forces), 341 (Records of Headquarters United States Air Force (Air Staff)), 342 (Records of United States Air Force Commands, Activities, and Organizations), and 398 (General Records of the Department of Transportation). Official materials remaining in the collection are primarily contemporary copies given to Mrs. Davis relating to General Davis' travel or public appearances.

Some of the early material (through approximately 1948) was organized by Mrs. Davis into a series of scrapbooks, each of which contains photographs, correspondence, and newsclippings. The rest of the items in the collection were organized into envelopes by the Davises before donation, with the material generally arranged by posting (duty station) and chronology. The items in any given envelope were generally not organized and neither were the envelopes themselves grouped in any particular manner. Additionally, some military records gathered by General Davis as reference material while writing his autobiography were identified by the period of his posting, although the material itself was generally created after that period. Items relating primarily to Mrs. Davis were not separated by the Davises in any manner; during processing such material was treated in a like manner, remaining interfiled with material relating primarily to General Davis, except as noted below.

The collection as a whole has been organized into four chronological groups: Civilian and Family Life (predating Davis' admission to the US Military Academy at West Point, NY), Military Service, Private Life (post-dating Davis' retirement from the USAF), and Autobiography. The second of these (Military Service) has been organized chronologically by posting, then alphabetically by subject; the remaining groups have been organized alphabetically by broad subject areas, then chronologically.

A number of broad subject areas recur in both the civilian and military sections of this collection. In cases where such broad areas can be applied individually to Davis, Mrs. Davis, or Davis Sr., they have been grouped in that order. The subject areas are as follows:

Awards and Honors -- materials relating to medals, citations, or other awards or honors given to Davis (or other members of his family)

Newclippings -- clippings from newspapers or magazines, or complete newspapers or magazines, except when such clippings were enclosures which had remained with their associated cover letter

Official Duties -- materials relating to Davis' activities connected to his official duties (used in Series II only)

Social -- materials relating to the Davises' activities which are not obviously connected to his official duties

Travel -- materials relating to trips by the Davises which do not appear to be duty-related trips

Other subject areas are generally self-explanatory.

The collection contained two videotapes, one relating to the 50th Anniversary of the Tuskegee Airmen and the other to the 1992 Clinton Campaign, both of which have been transferred to the NASM Film Archives. Cross references to these tapes have been placed in the finding aid in the series or subseries into which they would have fallen had they been documents. A large number of three-dimensional items, particularly plaques, have been transferred to curatorial control. For access to these items, please contact the NASM Aeronautics Department. Oversized items remaining in the collection have been placed in appropriate-sized containers at the end of the document collection; reference to such items occurs in the file lists as "see oversized..." or "see also oversized..." as appropriate.

Researchers should also consult Davis' autobiography, Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., American: An Autobiography (Washington, DC: Smithsonian, 1991).
Arrangement:
Series 1: Education and Civilian Life, to June 1932

Series 2: Military Career, June 1932 to January 1970

Series 3: Civilian Life, February 1970 to 1993

Series 4: Autobiography
Biographical / Historical:
Benjamin Oliver Davis, Jr. was born in Washington, DC on December 18, 1912, the second of three children born to Benjamin Oliver (Sr.) and Elnora Dickerson Davis. At that time Davis Sr.(1) was a First Lieutenant in the United States Army, having worked his way up from an enlisted cavalry trooper. Elnora Davis died from complications after giving birth to their third child (Elnora) in 1916 and three years later Davis Sr. married Sadie Overton, an English professor at Wilberforce University. Davis and his sisters lived with relatives in Washington while Davis Sr. completed his tour of duty in the Philippines with his new bride. The family was reunited in Tuskegee, AL when Davis Sr. taught military science and tactics at the Tuskegee Institute between 1920 and 1924. In 1924 Davis Sr. was assigned as an instructor to a federalized Ohio National Guard unit and the family moved to Cleveland, OH.

Davis finished his schooling in Cleveland, graduating from Central High School in 1929. He then attended Western Reserve University (1929-1930) and the University of Chicago (1930-1932) before gaining admission to the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY. He graduated in the Class of 1936 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Infantry.(2) Upon graduation, he married Ms. Agatha Scott, whom he had met and dated while at the Academy.

After serving in the infantry for several years Davis was posted to the newly-established Tuskegee Army Air Field, AL for pilot training in 1942. He graduated in the first class from the new flying school and was officially transferred to the Army Air Corps. In August 1942 he assumed command of the 99th Fighter Squadron, leading it in combat in North Africa and Sicily. The 99th Fighter Squadron was the first unit of "Tuskegee Airmen," as black(3) units in the segregated Army Air Forces (AAF) have come to be called. Two units of Tuskegee Airmen saw combat during World War II: the 99th Fighter Squadron and the 332d Fighter Group (composed of the 100th, 301st, and 302d Fighter Squadrons). Davis, promoted to Colonel in 1944, commanded both of these units in turn, leading the 99th and 332d in combat in Europe and earning the Air Medal, Distinguished Flying Cross, Legion of Merit, and Silver Star for his own actions and a Distinguished Unit Citation for the 332d Fighter Group.

Davis returned to the United States in June 1945 to assume command of the 477th Bombardment Group (composed of the 616th, 617th, 618th, and 619th Bombardment Squadrons; later redesignated the 477th Composite Group), another segregated black unit, at Godman Field, KY. Davis was expected to prepare the unit for deployment to the Pacific Theater, although the unit's training was badly behind schedule due to racial tensions between the white staff and black operating personnel of the unit. Davis quickly brought the unit up to deployment requirements, but the war ended before the 477th left the United States. Returning elements of the 332d and 99th were merged into the 477th, which was redesignated the 332d Fighter Wing in 1947. As the only remaining black unit in the newly-established, but still segregated, United States Air Force (USAF), the 332d suffered from a surplus of qualified personnel while remaining USAF units were often under manned. The performance of the units under Davis' command had laid to rest questions regarding the abilities of the "negro race" and in 1948 the Air Force determined that the efficient use of its manpower required the integration of its units. As a result the Air Force rapidly complied with President Truman's order for the integration of the United States military. Davis acted as an advisor to the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force in relation to the integration of the armed forces. The integration procedure, however, resulted in the deactivation of Davis' command as its personnel were dispersed among the rest of the Air Force; Davis himself was assigned to attend classes at the Air War College at Maxwell AFB, AL.

After completing the course of study at the Air War College (1949-1950), Davis was posted to a variety of command and staff positions both within the United States and abroad. He served in a number of staff positions in Headquarters, USAF, at the Pentagon.(4) He held both command and staff positions abroad in Korea (5), Japan (6), Taiwan (7), Germany (8), and the Philippines.(9) His final assignment was as Deputy Commander in Chief of United States Strike Command at MacDill AFB, FL.

Davis was promoted to Brigadier General in October 1954 (10), after ten years as a Colonel. He was promoted to Major General in June 1959 and to Lieutenant General in April 1965. Despite persistent rumors of his impending promotion to full General (four stars), no such promotion was pending by the time of his retirement on January 31, 1970.

Throughout his military career Davis took great pains to insure good living conditions and fair treatment for the men under his command. He strove to create good relations between the US military forces and local military and civil authorities. In particular, he negotiated several Status of Forces Agreements and defused several antagonistic situations between US forces and local authorities while commanding units in Asia. In addition, he and Agatha established many personal relationships, which they maintained after their return to the United States.

After his retirement from the military, he served briefly as the Director of Public Safety for the City of Cleveland, OH (February-July 1970), leading the Cleveland Police and Fire Departments in the racially-polarized atmosphere in that city after the riots of the late 1960s. Following his resignation from Cleveland, he took a position as the Director of Civil Aviation Security for the United States Department of Transportation (November 1970-June 1971), where he was responsible for implementing measures to counter the first wave of aerial hijackings of the 1970s. In July 1971 he was appointed Assistant Secretary of Transportation for Safety and Consumer Affairs (July 1971-September 1975), serving both the Nixon and Ford Administrations in that position.

Following his retirement from the civil service, he worked as a consultant to the Department of Transportation in the Ford and Carter Administrations on a number of issues, but was particularly linked to the promotion of the 55mph National Maximum Speed Limit. He served on a number of boards and commissions, including the President's Commission on Campus Unrest, the American Battle Monuments Commission, The President's Commission on Military Compensation, and the Board of Directors of the Manhattan Life Insurance Co. He was also active in a number of clubs and organizations, particularly the Tuskegee Airmen Inc., which awarded him a lifetime membership in 1991.

In the late 1980s he began work on his autobiography, Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., American: An Autobiography (Washington, DC: Smithsonian, 1991). Following its publication, Davis pursued an active speaking career, crossing the country to talk to schools, clubs, and general audiences about his experiences. His book and

es, his contributions to the Black Wings exhibit at the National Air and Space Museum (opened 1983), and the work of Tuskegee Airmen, Inc. did much to lift the veil that had fallen over the activities of black Americans during World War II, both in the air and on the ground. For his contributions, both during and after World War II, he received many awards, including the Order of the Sword (presented by the Non-Commissioned Officers of USAF Tactical Air Command, awarded 1978), designation as an Elder Statesman of Aviation (National Aeronautic Association, awarded 1991), and the Langley Medal (Smithsonian Institution, awarded 1992), as well as numerous lifetime and distinguished achievement awards.

On December 9, 1998, Davis was promoted to General on the Retired List, receiving his fourth star from President William Clinton in a ceremony held in the Presidential Hall of the Old Executive Office Building in Washington, DC. The promotion came only after the Tuskegee Airmen approached Senator John McCain of Airzona, who agreed that the promotion was warranted by Davis' service. McCain added the necessary language to a defense-related bill, which was passed by Congress in September 1998.

Agatha died early in 2002 and General Davis, suffering from Alzheimer's Disease, followed shortly after, passing away on July 4, 2002 at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC.

Endnotes 1. For the sake of brevity, "Davis" refers to Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. "Davis Sr." refers to his father, Benjamin O. Davis, Sr.

2. Davis had requested a commission in the Army Air Corps, but was refused due to his race. Davis was the fourth black American to graduate from West Point and the first in the twentieth century. In keeping with his sentiments, his ethnicity will only be mentioned when it has a direct bearing upon his career. See Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., American: An Autobiography (Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991).

3. At the request of General and Mrs. Davis the term "black" or "black American" is used in preference to "African-American". Patricia Williams, Memorandum for the Record, August 21, 1992, NASM Accession File 1992 0023.

4. Staff Planning Officer, Operations and Planning Division/Commands Division, Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations (DCS/O; July 1950-January 1951); Chief, Air Defense Branch/Fighter Branch, DCS/O (January 1951-July 1953); Director of Manpower and Organizations, DCS/Programs and Requirements (August 1961-February 1965); Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff for Programs and Requirements (February-May 1965).

5. Commander, 51st Fighter Interceptor Wing (November 1953-July 1954); Chief of Staff, United Nations Command/US Forces Korea (May 1965-August 1967)

6. Director of Operations and Training, Headquarters, Far East Air Force, Tokyo (July 1954-April 1957)

7. Commanding Officer, Air Task Force 13 (Provisional) and Vice Commander, Thirteenth Air Force (June 1955-April 1957)

8. Chief of Staff, Twelfth Air Force (May-December 1957); Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, USAF Europe (December 1957-July 1961)

9. Commander, Thirteenth Air Force (August 1967-July 1968)

10. Davis was the first black American to achieve flag rank in the United States Air Force. He was the second in the armed forces, the first being his father, who was promoted to Brigadier General in the United States Army in 1940.

1912 December 18 -- Davis born in Washington, DC to First Lieutenant Benjamin O. Davis (Sr.) and Elnora Dickerson Davis

1914 September 1 -- World War I begins

1915 February -- Davis Sr. begins duties as instructor at Wilberforce University, OH

1916 February 9 -- Elnora Dickerson Davis dies

1917 April 6 -- United States declares war on Germany; direct U.S. involvement in World War I begins

1917 (Summer) -- Davis Sr. assigned to 9th Cavalry Regiment, Camp Stotsenburg, Philippine Islands

1918 November 11 -- World War I armistice signed; end of combat operations in Europe

1919 -- Davis Sr. marries Sadie Overton

1920 July -- Family moves to Tuskegee, AL (Davis Sr. instructs at Tuskegee Institute)

1924 July -- Family moves to Cleveland, OH (Davis Sr. instructs 372d Infantry Regiment, OH National Guard)

1929 -- Davis graduates from Central High School, Cleveland, OH

1929 --1930 -- Davis attends Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

1930 --1932 -- Davis attends University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

1931 March -- Davis appointed to United States Military Academy, West Point, NY (fails entrance exam)

1932 March -- Davis passes USMA entrance exam

1932 July 1 -- Davis reports to USMA, West Point, NY (attends July 1, 1932-June 12, 1936)

1936 June 12 -- Davis graduates from USMA, commissioned Second Lieutenant of Infantry

1936 June 20 -- Davis marries Agatha Josephine Scott

1936 September 12 -- Davis reports to Company F, 24th Infantry Regiment at Fort Benning, GA (Company Officer, September 12, 1936-August 27, 1937)

1937 July 7 -- Japanese forces invades China; World War II begins in Asia

1937 August 27 -- Davis reports to the Infantry School at Fort Benning, GA (attends normal course, August 27, 1937-June 18, 1938)

1938 June 18 -- Davis reports to Tuskegee Institute, Tuskegee, AL as Professor of Military Science (instructs June 18, 1938-February 14, 1941)

1939 June 12 -- Davis promoted to First Lieutenant

1939 September 1 -- German forces invade Poland; World War II begins in Europe

1940 October 9 -- Davis promoted to Captain (temporary promotion)

1940 October 25 -- Davis Sr. promoted to Brigadier General and placed in command of the 4th Cavalry Brigade at Fort Riley, KS

1941 February -- Davis assigned as Aide de Camp to Davis Sr. (serves February-May 1941)

1941 May 20 -- Davis reports to Flying School at Tuskegee Army Air Field, AL (student, May 20, 1941-March 7, 1942)

1941 December 7 -- Japanese aircraft attack Pearl Harbor, HI; direct U.S. involvement in World War II begins

1942 March 7 -- Davis is appointed Administrative Officer, Tuskegee AAF, AL (serves March 7-August 27, 1942)

1942 May -- Davis transferred from Infantry to Army Air Corps

1942 May 11 -- Davis promoted to Major (temporary promotion)

1942 May 21 -- Davis promoted to Lieutenant Colonel (temporary promotion)

1942 August 27 -- Davis assumes command of 99th Fighter Squadron, Tuskegee AAF, AL (Squadron Commander, August 27, 1942-October 4, 1943)

1943 April 24 -- 99th Fighter Squadron transferred to Casablanca, French Morocco

1943 April 29 -- 99th Fighter Squadron transferred to Oued N'ja, French Morocco

1943 June 7 -- 99th Fighter Squadron transferred to Fardjouna, Tunisia

1943 July 28 -- 99th Fighter Squadron transferred to Licata, Sicily

1943 September 4 -- 99th Fighter Squadron transferred to Termini, Sicily

1943 September 17 -- 99th Fighter Squadron transferred to Barcellona, Sicily

1943 September -- Davis returns to Continental United States

1943 October 8 -- Davis assumes command of 332d Fighter Group, Selfridge Field, MI (Group Commander, October 8, 1943-June 7, 1945)

1944 February 3 -- 332d Fighter Group transferred to Montecorvino, Italy

1944 April 15 -- 332d Fighter Group transferred to Capodichino, Italy

1944 May 28 -- 332d Fighter Group transferred to Ramitelli Airfield, Italy

1944 May 29 -- Davis promoted to Colonel (temporary promotion)

1945 May 4 -- 332d Fighter Group transferred to Cattolica, Italy

1945 May 7 -- Germany surrenders; World War II ends in Europe

1945 June 10 -- Davis returns to Continental United States

1945 June 21 -- Davis assumes command of 477th Composite Group (Group Commander, June 21-30, 1945)

1945 July 1 -- Davis assumes command of Godman Field, KY, and all tenant units, including 477th Composite Group (Base Commander, July 1, 1945-March 4, 1946)

1945 September 2 -- Japan surrenders; World War II ends in the Pacific

1946 March 4 -- Davis assumes command of Lockbourne AAB and all tenant units, including 477th Composite Group (Base Commander, March 4, 1946-September 15, 1947) All units at Godman Field transferred to Lockbourne Army Air Base, OH

1947 July 1 -- 477th Composite Group redesignated 332d Fighter Wing

1947 July-August -- Davis travels to Liberia with Davis Sr. as a special representative of the United States Government for the establishment of Liberian independence

1947 September 16 -- Davis assumes direct command of 332d Fighter Wing (Wing Commander, September 16, 1947-June 30, 1949)

1947 October 1 -- United States Air Force created as an independent service.

1948 July 2 -- Davis' promotion to Lieutenant Colonel made permanent.

1948 July 26 -- President Truman signs Executive Order 9981 ordering the full integration of the United States armed forces.

1949 May 11 -- USAF issues Air Force Letter 35-3 stating that Air Force policy is equal treatment and opportunity for all persons in the Air Force regardless of race, color, religion, or national origin.

1949 June 30 -- 332d Fighter Wing deactivated

1949 July 1 -- Davis assumes command of Lockbourne AFB, OH (Base Commander, July 1-August 16, 1949)

1949 August 16 -- Lockbourne AFB, OH transferred to Ohio Air National Guard

1949 August 17 -- Davis reports to Air War College, Maxwell AFB, AL (attends course, August 17, 1949-July 4, 1950)

1950 June 25 -- North Korean forces invade South Korea; Korean War begins

1950 July 19 -- Davis reports to Pentagon to serve as Staff Planning Officer, Operations and Planning Division, Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations (DCS/O), Headquarters, United States Air Force, Washington, DC (serves July 19, 1950-January 4, 1951)

1950 July 27 -- Davis' promotion to Colonel made permanent

1950 August 8 -- Davis awarded Croix de Guerre by the French government for his actions during World War II

1950 September 12 -- Operations and Planning Division redesignated Commands Division of DCS/O

1951 January 5 -- Davis begins duty as Branch Chief, Air Defense Branch, Commands Division, DCS/O. (serves January 5, 1951-July 15, 1953)

1951 April 16 -- Air Defense Branch redesignated Fighter Branch, Control Division, DCS/O

1953 February 5 -- Davis reports to Craig AFB, AL for Jet Indoctrination Course (February 5-March 2, 1953); returns to Fighter Branch on completion of course

1953 July 16 -- Davis reports to Nellis AFB, NV for Advanced Jet Fighter Gunnery School (July 16-November 16, 1953)

1953 July 27 -- Korean War armistice signed; end of combat operations in Korea

1953 November 25 -- Davis assumes command of 51st Fighter Interceptor Wing at Suwon, Korea (Wing Commander, November 25, 1953-July 6, 1954)

1954 July 7 -- Davis reports to Headquarters, Far East Air Force, Tokyo, Japan to serve a Director of Operations and Training (serves July 7, 1954-April 1957)

1954 October 27 -- Davis is promoted to Brigadier General (temporary promotion)

1955 June -- Davis reports to Taipei, Taiwan to establish Air Task Force 13 (Provisional) (Commander, June 1955-April 1957), with simultaneous duties as Vice Commander, Thirteenth Air Force and Director of Operations and Training, FEAF

1957 March -- Davis awarded Command Pilot Rating

1957 May -- Davis assigned to Twelfth Air Force

1957 June -- Davises travel from Taiwan to Europe via United States

1957 July -- Davis reports to Headquarters, Twelfth Air Force at Ramstein, Germany (Chief of Staff, May-December 1957)

1957 December -- Davis begins duties as Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations (ADVON) at Headquarters, USAF Europe, Wiesbaden, Germany (serves December 1957-July 1961)

1959 June 30 -- Davis is promoted to Major General (temporary rank)

1960 May 16 -- Davis' promotion to Brigadier General made permanent

1961 -- US military personnel sent to South Vietnam as advisors

1961 August -- Davis reports to Pentagon to serve as Director of Manpower and Organizations, Deputy Chief of Staff for Programs and Requirements, Headquarters, USAF (serves August 1961-February 1965)

1962 January 30 -- Davis' promotion to Major General is made permanent

1965 February -- Davis begins duty as Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff for Programs and Requirements, Headquarters, USAF (serves February-May 1965)

1965 April 30 -- Davis promoted to Lieutenant General

1965 March 2 -- USAF begins "Rolling Thunder" bombing campaign over North Vietnam

1965 May 13 -- Davis reports to Seoul, Korea to begin duties as Chief of Staff to the United Nations Command and United States Forces Korea (serves May 13, 1965-August 1, 1967)

1966 October 25 -- Sadie Overton Davis dies

1967 August -- Davis assumes command of Thirteenth Air Force, Clark Air Base, Philippines (Commanding Officer, August 1967-July 1968)

1968 August 1 -- Davis reports to MacDill AFB, FL to begin duties as Deputy Commander in Chief of United States Strike Command (serves August 1, 1968-January 31, 1970)

1968 January -- Tet Offensive begins in Vietnam

1968 October 31 -- "Rolling Thunder" ends on orders from President Johnson

1969 January 20 -- Richard M. Nixon inaugurated President of the United States

1970 -- USAF begins withdrawing units from South Vietnam

1970 January 31 -- Davis retires from United States Air Force

1970 February 1 -- Davis begins work as Director of Public Safety for the Cleveland, OH (works February 1, 1970-July 27, 1970)

1970 June 13 -- Davis joins President's Commission on Campus Unrest (report issued September 27, 1971)

1970 July 27 -- Davis resigns from Cleveland position, citing lack of support from Mayor Stokes

1970 September 20 -- Davis begins work as a consultant to the United States Secretary of Transportation on air transportation security (works September 20, 1970-November 4, 1970)

1970 November 4 -- Davis begins work a Director of Civil Aviation Security for the United States Department of Transportation (works November 4, 1970-July 1, 1971)

1970 November 26 -- Benjamin O. Davis, Sr. dies

1971 July 1 -- Davis becomes Acting Assistant Secretary of Transportation for Safety and Consumer Affairs (serves July 1, 1971-August 3, 1971)

1971 July 8 -- Nixon Administration nominates Davis to be Assistant Secretary of Transportation for Safety and Consumer Affairs

1971 July 29 -- Senate confirms Davis in Assistant Secretary position

1971 August 3 -- Davis sworn in a Assistant Secretary of Transportation for Safety and Consumer Affairs (serves August 3, 1970-September 20, 1975)

1973 March 28 -- Last US Military personnel leave South Vietnam

1974 August 9 -- Nixon resigns as President of the United States. Vice President Gerald R. Ford becomes President

1975 September 20 -- Davis retires from Civil Service

1976 April -- Davis begins work as Special Assistant to the Secretary of Transportation for the National Maximum Speed Limit

1977 January 20 -- James E. Carter inaugurated President of the United States

1977 June -- Davis joins President's Commission on Military Compensation (report issued March 1978)

1981 January 20 -- Ronald W. Reagan inaugurated President of the United States Davis leaves position as Special Assistant to the Secretary of Transportation

1989 January 20 -- George H. W. Bush inaugurated President of the United States

1991 -- Davis' autobiography – Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., American: An Autobiography – is published by Smithsonian Press

1991 June 30 -- Davis awarded a Lifetime Membership by Tuskegee Airmen Inc

1993 January 20 -- William J. Clinton inaugurated President of the United States

1998 December 9 -- Davis promoted to General (Retired) in a ceremony at the Old Executive Office Building

2001 January 20 -- George W. Bush inaugurated President of the United States

2002 July 4 -- Davis dies at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC

2002 July 17 -- Davis buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA
Provenance:
Benjamin O. Davis and Agatha S. Davis, Gift, various, 1992-0023
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Fighter pilots  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Blacks  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Aerial operations  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Blacks -- United States  Search this
African American air pilots  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics and state  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Publications
Correspondence
Programs
Citation:
Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. Collection, Acc. 1992.0023, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1992.0023
See more items in:
Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2478d6822-702d-43c9-af06-8cc8d8b9fca3
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1992-0023
Online Media:

Jeff Karpiak Photograph Collection

Extent:
0.15 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
Circa 1944-1954
Summary:
This collection consists of 63 black-and-white photographs and eight 35 mm color slides (transparencies) documenting the training of an unidentified United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) pilot in the late World War II period, followed by his service with the United States Air Force (USAF) Alaskan Air Command in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Aircraft featured include the North American P-51H Mustang and the Lockheed F-94 Starfire.
Scope and Contents:
The photographs in this collection fall roughly into three groups; many of the images include an unidentified man who is assumed to be a relative of the donor. The first group consists of 8 x 10 inch black and white print photographs of U.S. Army Air Forces (USAAF) pilot training aircraft and activities at various unidentified locations in the continental United States. Aircraft pictured include a Porterfield Model 50 Collegiate biplane (possibly part of the Civilian Pilot Training Program), Fairchild PT-19 Cornell, Boeing PT-27 Kaydet, Vultee BT-13, North American AT-6 Texan, and Cessna AT-8 Bobcat. The second group of 8 x 10 inch black and white print photographs depicts a U.S. Air Force (USAF) North American P-51H (F-51H) Mustang unit at Ladd Air Force Base—and possibly at Mile 26 Satellite Field (later known as Eielson Air Force Base); this is believed to be the 65th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, who were based in the Fairbanks, Alaska, area and flying P-51s circa 1946-1947. Additional aircraft seen in this group include a Boeing PT-27 Kaydet primary trainer fitted with an enclosed cockpit for cold climate training, Douglas C-47 and C-54 cargo aircraft, Boeing B-29 Superfortresses, and a group of three Sikorsky R-5 helicopters. The third group of eight 35mm color slides (transparencies) depict Lockheed F-94 Starfire fighter jets (and one view of a North American F-82 Twin Mustang); these are believed to be aircraft assigned to either the 65th or 449th Fighter-Interceptor Squadrons, and are seen in low-level flight near Ladd Air Force Base circa 1952-1953. Both squadrons were assigned to the USAF's Alaskan Air Command.
Arrangement:
In 1990, the black-and-white print photographs in this collection were reproduced in negative number order on the second side (Side B) of National Air and Space Museum Archival Videodisc 7, a LaserDisc CAV format 12-inch (30 cm) optical disc published by the Smithsonian Institution. Print numbers applied during videodisc production are used as item-level image numbers (print numbers NASM 7B03406 to NASM 7B03476, videodisc frame capture numbers VD-7B03406 to VD-7B03476) and the black-and-white prints are stored in videodisc number order. Color copies of the 35 mm slides were produced by the Smithsonian Office of Printing and Photographic Services (OPPS) and are stored in negative number order.
Biographical / Historical:
Throughout World War II, military air bases in Alaska provided a vital link in the route ferrying aircraft, troops, and materials from the continental United States to the Pacific Theatre of operations. At the end of World War II, as one of the northernmost military air posts in the country, Ladd Army Air Field, located outside the town of Fairbanks, Alaska, was strategically positioned to play an important role in the Cold War, being mere minutes away by jet from the Siberian coast of the Soviet Union. Renamed Ladd Air Force Base in 1947 when the United States Air Force was formed as a separate service, the field became the Northern Sector headquarters for the newly formed Alaskan Air Command, whose mission included air defense of Alaska, regional support for Strategic Air Command (SAC) and North American Air Defense Command (NORAD) operations, strategic reconnaissance, and arctic research.
Provenance:
Jeff Karpiak, gift, 1989, NASM.1989.0082
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Lockheed F-94 Starfire Family  Search this
North American P-51 Mustang Family  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Korean War, 1950-1953  Search this
Cold War -- 1950-1970  Search this
Citation:
Jeff Karpiak Photograph Collection, Acc. NASM.1989.0082, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.1989.0082
See more items in:
Jeff Karpiak Photograph Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg22cf58512-a0ea-47c7-8d9e-fe766a998ee2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1989-0082
Online Media:

Piaggio Aircraft Photo Albums

Creator:
Piaggio (Industrie Aeronautiche e Meccaniche Rinaldo Piaggio SpA)  Search this
Extent:
0.15 Cubic feet (3 photo albums)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1934-1945
Summary:
This collection consists of three Piaggio & Co. (Italy) photo albums containing photographs of Piaggio aircraft from the period of circa 1934 to 1945, including the Piaggio P.16 bomber; the long-distance transport prototypes Piaggio P.23M and P.23R (also known as the P.123); the prototype Piaggio P.32-I bomber; the Piaggio P.50-I and P.50-II bombers; the four-engine Piaggio P.108B, P.108C, and P.108T aircraft; the Piaggio P.111 high-altitude research aircraft; and the prototype Piaggio P.119 fighter. Also included are photographs of aircraft built by Piaggio from designs by two other Italian companies: the Nardi FN.305 and the Nardi FN.315, the Cant (CRDA) Z.501, and the Cant (CRDA) Z.506 family.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of three photo albums produced by Piaggio & Co. circa 1943. The first album, "Piaggio Aircraft Projects, 1st Series," covers a period from circa 1934 to 1938, and includes photographs of the Piaggio P.16 bomber, the long-distance transport prototypes Piaggio P.23M and P.23R (also known as the P.123), the prototype Piaggio P.32-I bomber, and the Piaggio P.50-I and P.50-II bombers. The second album, "Velivoli Costruti In Serie Dalla Piaggio Su Progetti Di Altre Ditte" [Aircraft produced in Series by Piaggio of Other Companies' Designs], covering a period from circa 1934 to 1943, presents photographs of aircraft built by Piaggio from designs by two other Italian companies (Nardi and Cant) which were too small to produce the number of aircraft ordered by the Italian government. Fratelli Nardi models include the Nardi FN.305 and the Nardi FN.315 (an improved version of the FN.305). Cantieri Riuniti dell'Adriatico (CRDA, commonly called Cant) models designed by Filippo Zappata include the Cant (CRDA) Z.501, and the Cant (CRDA) Z.506A (civil version), Z.506B (military version), and Z.506S (air-sea rescue version). The third album, "Piaggio Aircraft Projects, 2nd Series," dated October 22, 1945, and includes photographs of the four-engine Piaggio P.108B, P.108C, and P.108T aircraft; the Piaggio P.111 high-altitude research aircraft; and the prototype Piaggio P.119 fighter.
Arrangement:
The three photo albums are presented in original order.

In 1979, all photographs were copied in the original order and assigned Smithsonian Institution (SI) negative numbers (SI 79-7688 through SI 79-7788).

In 1990, all items in this collection were reproduced on the first side (Side A) of National Air and Space Museum Archival Videodisc 7, a LaserDisc CAV format 12-inch (30 cm) optical disc published by the Smithsonian Institution. Print numbers applied during videodisc production (keeping to the original order) are used as item-level image numbers (print numbers NASM 7A36888 to NASM 7A36990, videodisc frame capture numbers VD-7A36888 to VD-7A36990).
Biographical / Historical:
Founded in Genoa, Italy, in 1884, Rinaldo Piaggio SpA manufactured interiors for ocean liners, later branching out into the construction of rolling stock for railroads at the beginning of the twentieth century, and moving their works to a large factory space at Finalmarina (later Finale Ligure), Italy. During the first World War, Piaggio expanded his company to include aircraft design and manufacturing (Industrie Aeronautiche e Meccaniche Rinaldo Piaggio SpA) and rebranded as Piaggio & Co. By the end of the 1920s, Piaggio had brought on more aircraft designers, and established an aeronautical research laboratory at the Finale Ligure works, the Cantieri Aeronautici Piaggio di Finale Ligure Marina. In the Italian Fascist period of the mid 1930s and early 1940s leading up to World War II, Piaggio worked on a number of designs for the Regia Aeronautica (Italian Royal Air Force) including several prototype aircraft. Piaggio's facilities were heavily bombed during the war, but the company was able to recover and rebuild in the post-war period (having a notable commercial success with their Vespa motor scooter), and continued to produce aircraft into the twenty-first century.
Provenance:
Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences, gift, 1960s, NASM.XXXX.1216
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Airplanes -- Italy  Search this
Piaggio P.23R  Search this
Citation:
Piaggio Aircraft Photo Albums, Acc. NASM.XXXX.1216, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.1216
See more items in:
Piaggio Aircraft Photo Albums
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2b50fc824-7e34-448e-852b-a9797277dd2a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-1216
Online Media:

Techniques for data handling in tactical systems : the Avionics Panel XVth Technical Symposium, November, 1968

Author:
North Atlantic Treaty Organization Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development Avionics Panel  Search this
Physical description:
1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 30 cm
Type:
Congresses
Date:
1968
1968]
Topic:
Aeronautics, Military--Data processing  Search this
Call number:
UG632.N67X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_183248

Stealth the secret contest to invent invisible aircraft Peter Westwick

Title:
Secret contest to invent invisible aircraft
Author:
Westwick, Peter J  Search this
Physical description:
xvi, 251 pages illustrations 25 cm
Type:
Books
History
Place:
United States
Date:
2020
20th century
21st century
Topic:
Stealth aircraft--History  Search this
Stealth aircraft--Design and construction  Search this
B-2 bomber--History  Search this
F-117 (Jet attack plane)--History  Search this
Aeronautics, Military--Research--History  Search this
Aeronautics, Military--Research  Search this
B-2 bomber  Search this
F-117 (Jet attack plane)  Search this
Stealth aircraft  Search this
Stealth airplanes  Search this
Military aeronautics  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1117901

Stealth the secret contest to invent invisible aircraft Peter Westwick

Title:
Secret contest to invent invisible aircraft
Author:
Westwick, Peter J  Search this
Physical description:
1 online resource (xvi, 251 pages) illustrations
Type:
Electronic resources
Electronic books
History
Place:
United States
Date:
2020
20th century
21st century
Topic:
Stealth aircraft--History  Search this
B-2 bomber--History  Search this
F-117 (Jet attack plane)--History  Search this
Aeronautics, Military--Research--History  Search this
Aeronautics, Military--Research  Search this
B-2 bomber  Search this
F-117 (Jet attack plane)  Search this
Stealth aircraft  Search this
Call number:
UG1242.S73 W47 2020 (Internet)
Restrictions & Rights:
1-user
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1147389

Il dominio dell'aria saggio sull'arte della guerra aerea con una appendice contenente nozioni elementari di aeronautica

Author:
Douhet, Giulio 1869-1930  Search this
Inscriber:
Douhet, Giulio 1869-1930 DSI  Search this
Former owner:
Air Force Research Laboratory (Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M.),.) DSI  Search this
Physical description:
191 pages 25 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1921
Topic:
Aerial gunnery  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Air power  Search this
Bombing, Aerial  Search this
Call number:
UG630 .D6 1921X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1028928

Carl H. Claudy Photography Collection

Creator:
Claudy, C. H. (Carl Harry), 1879-1957  Search this
Names:
Wright Flyer Army Trials -- Fort Myer, Vir.  Search this
Baldwin, Thomas  Search this
Bell, Alexander Graham, 1847-1922  Search this
Claudy, C. H. (Carl Harry), 1879-1957  Search this
Extent:
1.95 Cubic feet (1 legal document box; 2 flat boxes; 13 clamshells)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
1906-1910
Summary:
This collection consists of nearly 250 glass plates, several folders of prints, and two boxes of glass plate envelopes affixed with small prints of the image formerly contained within them. The subject matter of the photography is primarily concerned with Alexander Graham Bell's tetrahedral experiments of 1906, flights of the Thomas Baldwin dirigible and the United States Signal Corps SC-1 free balloon (1908), and the Wright Flyer Army Trials at Fort Meyer, Virginia (1908 and 1909).
Scope and Content:
The Carl H. Claudy Photography Collection, held by the Archives Division of the National Air and Space Museum, consists of 249 glass plate negatives, mainly 4 x 5 inches in size, taken by Claudy from 1907 to 1909 and photographic contact prints made from the negatives. The subject matter of these images are divided into three main categories: Alexander Graham Bell's tetrahedral kite experiments (1907); the U.S. Army's trial flights of the Wright brothers' Military Flyer at Fort Meyer, Virginia (1908-1909); and lighter than air (LTA) flights including Thomas Baldwin's dirigible Signal Corps No. 1 and free balloon ascents by James C. McCoy's America and A. Leo Stevens' Signal Corps No. 10. The collection includes several prints from negatives broken or lost over time.
Arrangement:
Collection material has been arranged in the following series:

Series I: Photographs of Alexander Graham Bell's Tetrahedral Kite Experiments (1907)

Series II: Photographs of Wright Flyer Army Trials at Fort Meyer, Virginia (1908-1909)

Series III: Photographs of LTA activity, including Baldwin Signal Corps No. 1 airship flights and several free balloon ascensions (1907-1908)

Series IV: Claudy's original glass plate negatives. Due to the fragile condition of the negatives, this series is not available to researchers.

Series V: Additional material, including Claudy's original negative envelopes and contact prints, copy negatives, and copies of scans of the original negatives on compact discs.
Biographical/Historical note:
Carl Harry Claudy (1879-1957) was a journalist, a talented photographer, and the author of books on photography, aircraft modeling, Freemasonry, science fiction, and children's books. His books and articles include The First Book of Photography: a Primer of Theory and Practice for the Beginner (1918), Beginner's Book of Model Airplanes (1930), and Prize Winners' Book of Model Airplanes (1931). Claudy also wrote a comic strip, Adventures in the Unknown.

During the early 1900s, Claudy photographed several important aeronautical events - Alexander Graham Bell's tetrahedral kite experiments; flights of the airship Signal Corps No. 1, the U.S. Army's first powered aircraft; and the Wright Military Flyer trials at Fort Meyer, Virginia.

Attending these events were well-known figures of the day, and Claudy photographed many of them: Orville and Wilbur Wright, Glenn Curtiss, Alexander Graham Bell, President William Howard Taft, Thomas Baldwin, and Alice Roosevelt. Claudy's photographs are a valuable record of the early days of aeronautics and of the people who played a part in them.
Provenance:
Carl H. Claudy, gift, 1957, XXXX-0549, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, Please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
U.S. Signal Corps SC-1 free balloon  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Balloons  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Research aircraft  Search this
Kites  Search this
Airships  Search this
Citation:
Carl H. Claudy Photography Collection, Acc. XXXX-0549, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0549
See more items in:
Carl H. Claudy Photography Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2f4fe84fb-1ec6-4b51-b98b-17fce59a1728
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0549
Online Media:

Captured German Aeronautical Documents (CGD) Microfilm

Extent:
7 Microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Microfilms
Date:
1945-1946
Summary:
Collection of microfilmed translations of captured German documents mainly relating to supersonic research, swept-back wings, jet-propulsion, patents, explosives, ballistics, missiles, compressors, and other aeronautical subjects.
Scope and Contents:
This collection is an incomplete set of microfilmed translations of captured German documents mainly relating to supersonic research, swept-back wings, jet-propulsion, patents, explosives, ballistics, missiles, compressors, and other aeronautical subjects. This set contains rolls 1, 3-4, 6, 8-9, and 14.

Note: The digital images in this finding aid were repurposed from scans made by an outside contractor for a commercial product and may show irregular cropping and orientation in addition to color variations resulting from damage to and deterioration of the original objects.
Arrangement:
Documents are filmed in Army Air Forces Air Technical Services Command (AAF ATSC) Translation File Number order. Files numbers are in the form "CGD-#".
Biographical / Historical:
In the final days of World War II, the advancing Allied armies captured a large number of documents from the German and Japanese governments. These documents were taken to various sites in Europe and the United States for evaluation and appraisal. Those documents considered valuable were microfilmed for preservation.
Abbreviations:
AAF -- [United States] Army Air Forces

ADRC -- Air Document Research Center, USSTAF (later T-2)

AEL -- Aeronautical Engine Laboratory, Bureau of Aeronautics, United States Navy

ATSC -- Air Technical Service Command, United States Army Air Forces

AVA Göttingen -- Aerodynamische Versuchsanstalt Göttingen E.V.

BuAer -- Bureau of Aeronautics, United States Navy

BuOrd -- Bureau of Ordnance, United States Navy

BuShips -- Bureau of Ships, United States Navy

DAL -- Deutsche Akademie für Luftfahrtforschung [German Academy for Aeronautical Research]

DFS -- Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Segelflug "Ernst Udet" [Ernst Udet German Glider Research Institute]

DVL -- Deutsche Versuchsanstalt für Luftfahrt E.V. [German Avaition Research Institute]

FB -- Forschungsbericht [Research Report]

FKFS -- Forschungsinstitut für Kraftfahrwesen und Fahrzeugmotoren Stuttgart [Research Institute of Automotive Engineering and Vehicle Engines Stuttgart]

GDV -- Gasdynamische Versuchsanstalt [Gas Dynamics Research Institute]

HVP -- Heeres Versuchsanstalt Peenemünde [Army Experimental Institute, Peenemünde]

KWIS -- Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut für Strömungsforschung [Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Flow Research]

LFA -- Luftfahrtforschungsanstalt Hermann Göring E.V. [Hermann Göring Aviation Research Institute]

NAA -- North American Aviation

NavOrd -- Bureau of Ordnance, United States Navy

NavShips -- Bureau of Ships, United States Navy

NOL -- Naval Ordnance Laboratory, United States Navy

ONI -- Office of Naval Intelligence, United States Navy

RLM -- Reichs Luftfahrtministerium (Aviation Ministry)

UM -- Untersuchungen und Mitteilungen [Investigations and Communications]

USSTAF -- United States Strategic and Tactical Air Forces, United States Army Air Forces

VDE -- Verband Deutscher Elektrotechniker [Association of German Electrical Engineers]

VDM -- Vereingte Deutsche Metallwerke

WAC -- Wright Aeronautical Corporation

WVA -- Wasserbau-Versuchsanstalt [Hydraulics Research Institute]

ZWB -- Zentrale für wissenschaftliches Berichtswesen der Luftfahrtforschung des Generalluftzeugmeisters [Central Office for Scientific Reporting of Aviation Research]
Provenance:
United States Navy?, unknown, unknown, XXXX.0408, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Jet propulsion  Search this
Airplanes -- Wings, Swept-back  Search this
Aerodynamics, supersonic  Search this
Airplanes -- Germany  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Genre/Form:
Microfilms
Citation:
Captured German Aeronautical Documents (CGD) Microfilm, Acc. XXXX.0408, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0408
See more items in:
Captured German Aeronautical Documents (CGD) Microfilm
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg262dbec6a-0063-4252-9b34-e3903e76e2ea
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0408
Online Media:

Major Alford Williams Syndicated Aviation Column

Creator:
Williams, Alford Joseph, 1896-1958  Search this
Names:
Scripps-Howard Newspapers  Search this
Williams, Alford Joseph, 1896-1958  Search this
Extent:
0.45 Cubic feet ((9 folders))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Clippings
Date:
[ca. 1930s-1940s]
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of newspaper clippings, which have been copied onto acid-free paper. These clippings were from Williams' syndicated columns for Scripps-Howard Newspapers including the New York World Telegram and Washington Daily News during the late 1930s to early 1940s. These columns discuss aviation technology, flying techniques, and the European situation during World War II.
Biographical / Historical:
Alford Joseph Williams (1896-1958), who was nicknamed Al, was born in New York City on July 26, 1896. In 1917, he learned to fly with the U.S. Navy and in 1923, he won a Pulitzer Trophy for the Navy by establishing the world's speed record, at 266,51 miles an hour. Williams was promoted to a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy and played an active role as a research and test pilot. In 1935, Williams was promoted to a Major in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. During the late 1930s and early 1940s, Williams inspected European Air Forces and reported on the European situation during World War II and his accurate and absorbing syndicated columns for Scripps-Howard had an impact on American thought and perception regarding aviation's role in World War II. Besides his work as an aviation writer, Williams was also involved in business aviation as he was a manager at Aviation Department of Gulf Oil Corporation beginning in 1933.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Unknown, unknown, unknown, XXXX-0601, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Airplanes -- Piloting  Search this
Airplanes -- Design and construction  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Aerial operations  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0601
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2341fd10b-9f29-4af2-b497-927e1e7598cd
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0601

Peenemunde Document Collection

Creator:
Peenemunde Research and Development Station  Search this
Names:
Peenemunde Research and Development Station  Search this
Dornberger, Walter, 1895-  Search this
Oberth, Hermann, 1894-1989  Search this
Von Braun, Wernher, 1912-1977  Search this
Extent:
0.45 Cubic feet ((1 legal document box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Correspondence
Telegrams
Reports
Memoranda
Date:
1941-1944
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of Peenemunde documents, including the following: memorandums, correspondence, telegrams, and reports. These documents are in German, and some of the documents have signatures of General Dornberger, Wernher von Braun, and Hermann Oberth. This collection also contains a few translated documents from the Wright Field Collection.
Biographical / Historical:
The Peenemunde Research and Development Station, Germany, was established in the mid-1930s. By the late 1930s, the research station was dedicated to the study and development of rocket driven projectiles, notably the V-2. Peenemunde was also the location of the V-1 test flying program and the test site for several other secret projects including the Messerschmitt 163 rocket-propelled aircraft.
General:
NASMrev
Provenance:
Various sources, gift/transfer, 1994, 1991-0083, unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
V-2 rocket  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
V-1 rocket  Search this
Messerschmitt 163 Komet (Comet) Family  Search this
Rockets (Aeronautics)  Search this
Rocketry  Search this
Airplanes -- Rocket engines  Search this
Airplanes -- Germany  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Telegrams
Reports
Memoranda
Identifier:
NASM.1991.0083
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg26bfc5c57-7bda-4dfe-a99b-73f3f687d7c2
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1991-0083

Martin Aircraft Company Photograph Collection

Creator:
Glenn L. Martin Company  Search this
Names:
Glenn L. Martin Company  Search this
Martin, Glenn L., 1886-1955  Search this
Extent:
119.9 Cubic feet ((110 records center boxes))
114.4 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Photographs
Manuals
Date:
1932-1972
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 84 cubic feet of negatives and 22 cubic feet of photographs chronicling the history of the Martin Company, including the following subjects: aircraft plants; historical themes; people; aircraft programs: historic, US Army, US Navy, civilian export; experimental or projected designs; research and development programs; structures and materials; manufacturing processes; space tools; nuclear power programs; missile programs; and space programs. The collection also contains photograph log books which have information about the images.
Biographical / Historical:
The Martin Company was founded by aviation pioneer Glenn L. Martin during World War I. Martin was mainly a producer of military airplanes for the US Army, Air Force, and Navy. Martin has also built several commercial types, including the model M130 Clipper, with which Pan American Airways opened transpacific commercial air service. Since the 1950s, Martin has been active in the development and production of a wide variety of rocket, missile and space programs, including lifting-body vehicles. Martin was also a pioneer in nuclear power units for remote sites.
General:
This collection also contains 26 photo logs and tech manuals.
NASMrev
Provenance:
Martin Marietta Aero and Naval Systems, 1989, 1989-0141, Unknown
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Martin Model 130 Clipper  Search this
Aircraft industry  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Aeronautics, Commercial -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Manuals
Identifier:
NASM.1989.0141
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg29d05a3cf-e0bd-4db3-af6f-7c71d550e1c7
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-1989-0141

Captured German and Japanese Aviation Technical Documents

Creator:
Germany  Search this
Japan  Search this
United States. Army Air Forces  Search this
Extent:
3,732 Microfilm reels
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Microfilm reels
Microfilms
Date:
[ca. 1939-1945]
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the Air Force master microfilm of captured German and Japanese documents pertaining to aviation. The documents cover a wide variety of subjects, including aircraft and engines, flight test reports, proposals, and engineering studies. English translation is provided for some documents.
Biographical / Historical:
In the final days of World War II, the advancing Allied armies captured a large number of documents from the German and Japanese governments. These documents were taken to various sites in Europe and the United States for evaluation and appraisal. Those documents considered valuable were microfilmed for preservation. Aviation-related documents were turned over to the United States Army Air Force and microfilmed by the Air Documents Division, Technical Information Section (T-2), Air Material Command at Wright Field, OH [now Wright-Patterson AFB].
General:
All documents in this collection are unclassified.
NASMrev
Provenance:
Defense Documentation Center, Transfer, 1966, XXXX-0431, Public Domain
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Airplanes -- Germany  Search this
Airplanes -- Japan  Search this
Airplanes -- Motors  Search this
Airplanes, Military -- Flight testing  Search this
Research aircraft  Search this
Genre/Form:
Microfilms
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0431
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2f0217f51-1b1e-4fce-a301-c183499c5df6
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0431

Curtiss NC-4 Design, Construction, and Testing Reports

Creator:
United States. Navy  Search this
Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company  Search this
Names:
Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company  Search this
United States. Navy  Search this
Extent:
1.51 Cubic feet (2 records center boxes)
2.27 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Financial records
Drawings
Date:
1918-1969
bulk 1919-1919
Summary:
This collection consists of reports on the design, construction, and testing of the NC series flying boats and photographs of NC-4's construction and transatlantic flight.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of reports on the design, construction, and testing of the NC series flying boats and photographs and 3 negatives of the NC-4's construction and transatlantic flight. The collection is set up in a series of books with two copies of each book, except books 11 and 13. There is some water damage to book 10. Due to the fact that book 5 contained oversize materials, both copies of this book are filed out of sequence in box 4.
Arrangement:
The collection is set up in a series of books with two copies of each book, except books 11 and 13. There is some water damage to book 10. Due to the fact that book 5 contained oversize materials, both copies of this book are filed out of sequence in box 4.
Biographical/Historical note:
In 1917, during World War I, the United States Navy sent out specification for a flying boat of sufficient range to cross the Atlantic Ocean by air to Great Britain, where it would serve as an anti-submarine patrol aircraft. The Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, in conjunction with the United States Navy, developed a three-engine aircraft to meet these specifications. The first of the new aircraft was the NC-1 that flew for the first time on October 4, 1918. This was followed by the NC-2 whose maiden flight took place on April 12, 1919 with four engines in tandem pairs. The engine arrangement of the NC-2 had been declared unsatisfactory for the mission and the wings were removed and installed on the NC-1 to replace the originals that had been damaged in a storm. By this time, World War I had ended, but the Navy decided to continue the program in an effort to make the first transatlantic flight crossing by air. The new NC-3 and NC-4 models reverted to the three-engine format, although the NC-4 had a fourth engine mounted as a pusher behind the center engine. On May 16, 1919 the NC-1, NC-3 and NC-4 assembled at Trepassy Bay, Newfoundland, under the command of Commander John H. Towers, to begin the 1400-mile flight to the Azores. The NC-1 was forced down short of the island and sank. Naval vessels stationed along the flight path rescued the crew of the NC-1. The NC-3 landed two hundred miles short and taxied the remaining distance to the island. Only the NC-4 completed the flight successfully, reaching Plymouth, England, via Lisbon, Portugal, on May 31, 1919. Following publicity tours of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States, the Curtiss NC-4 was given over to the Smithsonian Institution and is now part of the National Air and Space Museum collection.
Provenance:
Lee Pearson, XXXX-0422, Unknown.
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Topic:
Seaplanes  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Curtiss NC-4 (P2N-1)  Search this
Curtiss NC-Boat Family  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Genre/Form:
Financial records
Drawings
Citation:
Curtiss NC-4 Design, Construction, and Testing Reports, Acc. XXXX-0422, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0422
See more items in:
Curtiss NC-4 Design, Construction, and Testing Reports
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg2dc82368c-f25a-4738-bfef-00fd2ed97574
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0422
Online Media:

United States Navy Nava lAir Propulsion Center Technical Publications

Creator:
United States. Navy  Search this
Extent:
43.6 Cubic feet ((40 box))
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Reports
Date:
bulk 1923-1979
Scope and Contents:
This accession consists of forty (40) boxes of technical publications from the United States Navy Naval Air Propulsion Center. The collection consists of mostly AEL/AED Formal Reports. There are also some Letter Report Numbers and miscellaneous files containing reports on Lycoming and Wasp engines.
Biographical / Historical:
The Naval Air Propulsion Center was established by the merger of the Naval Air Turbine Test Station (NATTS) and the Aeronautical Engine Laboratory (AEL). The AEL, established in 1915, was responsible for testing small gas turbine engines, auxiliary power units and engine starters. The NATTS's mission was the testing and evaluation of the turbojet, turboprop, ramjet, and pulsejet engines, accessories and components
Provenance:
Capt. Edward Sturm / Naval Air Propulsion Center, Gift, 1982
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Propulsion systems  Search this
Airplanes -- Turbine-propeller engines  Search this
Engines  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Aeronautics, Military  Search this
Naval aviation  Search this
Aeronautics -- Research  Search this
Lycoming engines  Search this
Pratt & Whitney Wasp engines  Search this
Genre/Form:
Reports
Citation:
United States Navy Naval Propulsion Center Technical Publications, Accession number XXXX-0526, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.XXXX.0526
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/pg29e9c5854-4220-4887-b005-c7d25bcd997a
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-xxxx-0526

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