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Algonquian

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), 1881-1950  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Cheyenne language  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Miami  Search this
Mohegan  Search this
Pequot  Search this
Montauk  Search this
Montagnais Innu  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Piscataway (Conoy)  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Vocabulary
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains John P. Harrington's Algonquian research. It consists primarily of material he collected; there is very little original data, most of which are undated. The topics covered are Cheyenne grammar, Fox linguistic notes, Menominee grammar, Miami-Peoria grammar, Mohegan-Pequot-Montauk vocabulary, Montagnais miscellaneous notes, Nanticoke-Conoy-Unalachtigo linguistic notes, Ojibwa linguistic notes, Potawatomi linguistic notes, and comparative and miscellaneous notes.

The Cheyenne material consist of two pages of grammatical excerpts from Rodolphe Petter's English-Cheyenne Dictionary (1915).

The Fox notes stem from conversations which Harrington had with Truman Michelson on the Fox syllabary and grammar. One note is dated September 24, 1924; others are undated. One page gives the etymology of the word Chicago and a Potawatomi equivalent. Phonetic material (former B.A.E. MS 6021 pt. and 6025pt.) is based on William Jones's "Algonquian (Fox)" (1911). A bibliography is included, mainly on Michelson's publications and manuscripts which he submitted to the B.A.E.

The Menominee files contain a phonetic key from Leonard Bloomfield's Menomini Texts (1928), a short report on a conversation with Michelson (former B.A.E. MS 6025pt. and 6030), and a brief description of Menominee tentshaking was excerpted from W. J. Hoffman's The Menomini Indians (1896).

Miami-Peoria vocabulary were copied from Albert Gatschet's B.A.E. manuscripts 3025 and 3026b. (Those entries marked 3026b are no longer listed as part of that B.A.E. manuscript.)

An 1890 copy of a 1798 Montauk vocabulary taken by John Lyon Gardiner was loaned to Harrington by Foster H. Saville. There are also a three-page typescript of this manuscript and several pages of a Mohegan-Pequot bibliography.

For Montagnais, there are three bibliographical notes. Two placenames came from J.N.B. Hewitt in November 1926.

Reading notes on Nanticoke, Conoy, and Unalachtigo were taken principally from Speck's The Nanticoke and Conoy Indians . .. (1927) and from Hodge's "Handbook" (1907). Some linguistic and ethnohistoric material is included and there is a brief bibliography.

Ojibwa forms the largest portion of this subseries. It includes notes from a joint interview conducted most likely in 1940 with C. F. Voegelin and his informant, Gregor McGregor, who was technically considered a speaker of Ottawa. There are also notes Harrington took of Voegelin's lecture at the University of Michigan on June 25, 1940 (former B.A.E. MS 6020pt.). There is a slight emphasis on placenames in an otherwise random vocabulary. From James Hammond Trumbull's Notes on Forty Algonkin Versions of the Lord's Prayer (1873), Harrington copied the Southern Chippeway version (pp. 74 -75) and penciled in a slightly different English translation. A final potpourri of undated notes includes a miscellaneous vocabulary from secondary sources and a few pages of grammatical material. The etymologies of several Ojibwa words are briefly developed. Frederic Baraga's A Dictionary of the Otchipwe Language is the most frequently cited source (former B.A.E. MS 6020pt. and 6025pt.).

The Potawatomi files contain material from Harrington's interview with Chief Simon Kahquados in Blackwell, Wisconsin (n.d.) with whom he recorded general ethnographic information, particularly regarding the loss of Potawatomi lands due to Indian Office policies and illegal acts of the Menominee. A brief vocabulary is included. Unrelated to this interview is a Potawatomi phoneme chart.

Comparative material includes reading notes regarding the earliest appearances of certain Algonquian phonetic sounds. Harrington consulted primarily the works of Sir Isaac Pitman, Jean Claude Mathevet (Nipissing, Abnaki), and Silas Tertius Rand (Micmac). Additional peripheral bibliographical information is identified in the notes. The only date recorded is March 26, 1951. There are other scattered reading notes with Menominee, Cree, Fox, and Ojibwa phonetic comparisons, based mainly on Leonard Bloomfield's Menomini Texts (1938) and Plains Cree Texts (1934). One page of Arapaho terms was copied from Kroeber.

In the category of general linguistic and ethnographic notes (former B.A.E. ms. 6025pt.), information results from various conversations with fellow linguists: Truman Michelson and J.N.B. Hewitt on September 24, 1924; Hewitt in November 1924 and November 1926; Michelson in October 1930; and Michelson and Frank G. Speck in May 1934. Under the heading "The Southern Delawares," Harrington arranged random information on the Virginia Indians, touching briefly on history and ethnography. He included some Abnaki, Cree, and Cherokee linguistic terms, as well as a general bibliography. Vocabulary material in this series (former B.A.E. MS 6025pt.) consists of terms from various Algonquian languages, most probably taken from unidentified printed sources. One note gives "The Chief from Mass[achusetts]" as an informant. One group of terms is compared with Natick words and with a vocabulary recorded by Roger Williams.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Algonquian languages  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Cherokee language  Search this
Cheyenne language  Search this
Fox language  Search this
Menominee language  Search this
Miami language (Ind. and Okla.)  Search this
Mohegan language  Search this
Montagnais language  Search this
Nanticoke language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Potawatomi language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Meskwaki; Sauk & Fox  Search this
Genre/Form:
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.1
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw320d52ed8-2a4a-49a7-b5a3-67bbc9806544
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14792

Shawnee/Peoria

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Boxe
Culture:
Shawnee  Search this
Peoria  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
circa 1940-circa 1949
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains Harrington's Shawnee and Peoria research. Most of the material is little more than raw field notes. One section of field notes consists of over 300 pages of Shawnee and Peoria lexical items, copied one word to a page. Maggie Boyd, born at Peoria, Oklahoma, in 1882, and her husband, Sam, provided the terms. A speaker named Amos is mentioned several times in the notes but is not further identified. The Indian names of family members and lists of possible sources are interspersed with the vocabulary. Harrington prepared an "English word-guide" to the vocabulary (former B.A.E. MS 6022pt.).

A brief vocabulary (former B.A.E. MS 6022pt.) from Alice Blalock consists of Shawnee and Peoria terms and includes placenames and notes on persons, probably given after 1943. Scattered Delaware terms copied from Harrington's John Snake notes (see below) are interfiled. A field note suggests that a more comprehensive Shawnee and Peoria vocabulary (former B.A.E. MS 6022pt.) was the work of Maggie Boyd reheard by "B," presumably referring to Blalock. Very little of this category is actually labeled "Mag." or "Maggie Boyd," however, and most notes are attributed to "B."

The few linguistic notes (former B.A.E. MS 6023pt.) include Shawnee terms with Delaware, Miami, Kickapoo, and Abnaki comparisons either given by John Snake or interfiled from other Harrington field notes.

A few additional original notes were evidently C.F. Voegelin's (former B.A.E. MS 6022pt.), and terms extracted from his "Shawnee Stems and the Jacob P. Dunn Miami Dictionary" (1938-1940) are interfiled.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Shawnee language  Search this
Miami language (Ind. and Okla.)  Search this
Delaware language  Search this
Kickapoo language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Illinois  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.2
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3bc99e595-673b-4604-980b-07d322d5ecf3
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14817

Western Abnaki/Eastern Abnaki/Passamaquoddy

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
12 Boxes
Culture:
Abenaki (Abnaki)  Search this
Passamaquoddy  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Place:
New England
Maine
Date:
1949-circa 1952
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains Harrington's Western Abenaki, Eastern Abenaki, and Passamaquoddy research. The bulk of the notes consists of Maine placenames culled from numerous secondary sources ranging from seventeenth-century documents to publications of the 1940s, and also including little known local histories, old maps and atlases, highway and forestry maps, and unidentified newspaper clippings. Located here also are lesser numbers of placenames of other states in the Northeast and the provinces of Quebec and New Brunswick. Most of the material was reheard by St. Francis, Penobscot, and Passamaquoddy speakers, with an occasional Malecite, Micmac, and Menomini comparison.

The Western Abenaki (St. Francis) section contains vocabulary entries semantically arranged in about a dozen categories. The most extensive section (former B.A.E. MS 6029pt.) is that of Maine placenames copied from secondary sources. The most frequently cited sources were Joseph Laurent's New Familiar Abenakis and English Dialogues (1884), and Henry Lorne Masta's Abenaki Indian Legends, Grammar and Place Names (1932). This section also contains placenames of the New England States, New York, and the provinces of Quebec and New Brunswick, along with a few Penobscot and Passamaquoddy equivalences. The notes on tribenames include names found in the texts and maps of seventeenth-century voyages of discovery and in early histories of New England and Canada. Old and New World names and ethnic and race designations are also found in this category. The files also include a typed draft, with related notes (former B.A.E. ms. 6029pt.), dated 1950, titled "The Abnakis and Their Language." According to Harrington's introduction, the dialect is that of St. Francis and is based on terms from Laurent and Masta. There are notes covering phonetics and morphology, the latter arranged according to grammatical word form. Extensive hIstorIcal background material was sent to Harrington by T .R.L. MacInnes, secretary of the Indian Affairs Branch of the Department of MInes and Resources in Ottawa. A Mr. A. E. St. Louis did the actual research of the department's records and included some Huron data.

The Eastern Abenaki (Penobscot) vocabulary is semantically arranged in about ten categories, with occasional Passamaquoddy comparisons and a few Malecite terms. Ethnographic data sometimes accompany the linguistics. Harrington also etymologized certain phenomenal and geographic terms from the placename appendix of Joseph Nicolar published by Fannie Hardy Eckstorm (cited in the notes as "Eckst.") in Indian Place-names of the Penobscot Valley and the Maine Coast (1941). Some of the tribenames were formerly part of B.A.E. manuscript 4463. He also consulted other published sources.

Eastern Abenaki grammatical notes include phonetics and morphology, with great emphasis on the former. Some St. Francis and Passamaquoddy comparisons culled from Harrington's notes are interfiled. There is also a small assortment of random historical and ethnographical reading notes culled from various secondary sources, most of which are identified in a related bibliographical section. A few bits of historical information come from Dana and Watso. There are no linguistic elaborations.

Materials relating to Penobscot and Passamaquoddy placenames primarily center around a proposed paper titled "The Indian Placenames of Maine" (former B.A.E. mss. 4463pt. and 6029pt.). A short introductory draft is followed by a linguistic study of placenames of Maine organized according to its sixteen counties. One brief section organized by regions and trails probably represents a discarded plan of procedure, and there is one group of miscellaneous names. Many terms bear the identification "Pen." for Penobscot and "Pass." for Passamaquoddy. If not identified, they are usually in the Penobscot dialect and given by Dana. There are a few Malecite and Micmac equivalences and one or two Menomini names. Two segments on Maine sites contain no linguistic elaborations. One list, organized by county and generally entered one item to a page, parallels the section described above. It comes from the same secondary sources and evidently was accumulated as a guide to the later rehearings. The second group, collected from various sources, provides historical information only (former B.A.E. ms. 6029 pt.). Placenames from other states and provinces include rehearings on the placename Massachusetts, New Brunswick placenames, and a miscellaneous group of unsorted and discarded notes. There is also linguistic treatment of "Pomole" and "Glooscap" texts, with an emphasis on Maine placenames (former B.A.E. MS 4463 pt.), as well as a typescript titled "A Short History of the Passamaquoddy Indians" in English.

Among Harrington's files are also notes for three proposed papers. One paper is on the name "Tarentine" as applied to native Americans of the East Coast. Harrington found evidence of its use among the records and histories of early voyagers to America. The second paper was to be a commentary on the Abenaki vocabulary compiled in 1605 by James Rosier, a member of the expedition under Captain George Waymouth (Weymouth). Harrington made a copy of the Waymouth terms while in New York City in November 1949. Both sets of notes contain occasional references to Laurent and Masta, but no linguistic data. A third paper was called "Bashaba and Bessabes Are Two Different Words." From numerous accounts of the earliest recorded voyages to the New World, Harrington accumulated reading notes to prove that Bashaba was a general name for a chief and that Bessabes was the personal name of a particular chief. Again there are no linguistic etymologies.
Biographical / Historical:
John P. Harrington accumulated information on these languages between April 24 and October 24, 1949. Most of his time was spent in Old Town, Maine, although he worked also in Bangor, at the State House Library in Augusta, at the Maine Historical Society in Portland, and in Eastport, Maine. He secured linguistic information from St. Francis speakers of Odanak near Pierreville, Quebec, and from a colony of Abenakis in Albany, New York. In November and December of 1949 while on trips between New York City and Washington for other reasons, he carried the notes with him for further sorting and rearranging. Reports indicate that in 1952 he was in the process of assembling an extensive study on the Abenaki, possibly incorporating data on the vocabulary, grammar, history, and ethnography of both Abenaki languages.

The principal St. Francis speakers that he worked with were Oliver Obomsawin (Ol.) and Alfred Miller (Am., AI.) of Odanak, and George Dennis (Geo., Den.) and John Watso of Albany. Watso introduced Harrington to Edwin E. Nagazoa (Ed., Nag., N.) and Maude Benedict Nagazoa, the former described as a perfect Abenaki speaker. Others that he worked with include Thomas Sadoquin, Mrs. Daylight (Mrs. D., D.), Antoine Medzalabolet, Chief Charles Nolet, and Dominico Berni. Berni's role is somewhat uncertain. He may have translated a letter of inquiry to the Bureau of American Ethnology which Harrington was assigned to handle, and which may have had nothing to do with Abenaki. Andrew E. Dana (And.), Frank and Mary Mitchell, and Charles John Saulis provided Penobscot and Passamaquoddy material, yielding extensive placename etymologies. Penobscot and a few Malecite (spelled "Malacite" throughout Harrington's notes) terms came from Harry Francis whose mother, Mary Jean Francis, was a Malecite Indian. Others that he worked with were Lena Mitchell, Laura, and Mr. and Mrs. William Neptune of Pleasant Point, near Eastport, Maine. William Neptune was a Passamaquoddy but Harrington credited him with Wawenock data.

Field notes and correspondence indicate that Harrington consulted with Dr. Frank T. Siebert,Jr., in person and by mail.

Arthur E. Edgerley at the State Highway Commission office in Augusta provided bits of history surrounding the sites as well as names of some of the people who formerly inhabited them.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Abenaki language  Search this
Passamaquoddy language  Search this
Penobscot language  Search this
Micmac language  Search this
Menominee language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.3
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw30137b10b-c325-48ed-8711-7db14aacd449
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14822
Online Media:

Mahican/Stockbridge

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
8 Boxes
Culture:
Mahican  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Place:
Stockbridge-Munsee Reservation (Wis.)
Date:
1930-1952
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains Harrington's Mahican/Stockbridge research. The materials consist of comparative vocabulary, comparative grammar, comparative linguistic notes, and writings.

The vocabulary is arranged according to numerous semantic categories designated by Harrington. The basic source is Truman Michelson's Stockbridge Manuscript 2734, information from which was reheard with Mahican speakers, and compared with secondary sources and with Abenaki material rewritten or removed from his own field notes. Harrington interfiled Menominee information secured later in Washington from Al Dodge. The "Persons" category is quite rich in biographical information. Webb Miller apparently identified for Harrington the subjects of some of his old photographs, although the prints were not found with the notes. There are two pages taken from an old family record listing the names Pye, Bennett, Moon, and Turkey, the dates ranging from 1845 to 1865. Harrington evidently began another (possibly later) semantic organization of the Michelson notes. Other secondary sources used as a basis for comparison are Brinton and Anthony (1888), James Trumbull's Natick Dictionary (1903), and Frederic Baraga's A Dictionary of the Otchipwe Language (1853).

A set of grammatical notes is also based on MS 2734 but it is not as well developed as the vocabulary material. Only a few notes deal with phonetics. There is more information on verbs and numerals than on any other morphological category.

The comparative linguistic notes are from Harrington's two 1949 interviews with Bernice Robinson Huntington and encompass vocabulary, grammar, ethnography, ethnohistory, and some miscellaneous information on Stockbridge persons, including something of her own background. One group is arranged alphabetically by main entry in Mahican, with Delaware, St. Francis Abenaki, Natick, Ojibwa, and Cree equivalences (if any) placed immediately following the related Mahican term. The unmarked main entries are apparently Huntington's original terms; those in ink marked Brinton and Anthony are from their 1888 dictionary; the pencil notes are St. Francis Abenaki obtained in the field and are identified by informant "codes" Am. (Alfred Miller), Den. (George Dennis); Watso (John Watso); (Oliver Obomsawin). The significance of the numbered divider pages was not documented. Another group designated "B2" probably refers to the fall rehearing with Bernice Huntington and is confined chiefly to St. Francis Abenaki and Menominee equivalences. Some new information from Huntington, especially changes in orthography, may have been interfiled. A third group contains Huntington's comments on Mathew S. Henry's Vocabulary. ... It represents an attempt to organize Henry's material according to a semantically arranged vocabulary and a brief grammar touching on phonetics and morphology. Harrington crossed out St. Francis Abnaki comparisons and, according to a field note, copied them for use elsewhere. He also incorporated some of Huntington's (B2) terms.

This subseries also contains a draft and notes relating to his unpublished manuscript, "Seven Mahican Texts Recorded by Truman Michelson". Harrington excerpted the texts verbatim from the Michelson MS 2734, including Michelson's interlinear Mahican translations and free English versions. The draft contains a short vocabulary culled from the texts which Harrington arranged semantically. He provided some Mahican historical background and explained certain orthographic changes made to update Michelson's spelling and to facilitate pronunciation. An eighth text in English only was given to Michelson by Sterling Peters. There is informative bibliographical material both in the body of the draft and in the separate section devoted to this category.
Biographical / Historical:
The first evidence of John P. Harrington's interest in studying the Mahican language surfaced in January 1930 correspondence. (At this time, he used the names Mahican and Mohegan interchangeably.) In September 1930 he tried to interest Bernard Hoffmann of Santa Barbara, California, to fund a Wisconsin field trip in a search for Stockbridge vocabulary, legends, songs, placenames, tribenames, history, etc. He hoped to find native speakers who could rehear terms from early manuscripts and publications.

Between 1930 and 1949, Harrington secured copies of or made reading notes from some of these manuscripts, most of which are clearly identified in the field notes. The most exhaustively reheard and reorganized body of material consists of terms and text copied from the Stockbridge linguistic notes and texts recorded by Truman Michelson in 1914 (B.A.E. MS 2734). Harrington's notes and correspondence reveal a diligent search for those informants of Michelson who might still be living in the Stockbridge, Wisconsin, area in the hope that they would be willing to work with him.

In 1949, Harrington arrived at the Stockbridge Reservation on April 16 and remained there until April 23. Mr. Arvid E. Miller drove him around the area and introduced him to numerous other Millers, most of whom supplied linguistic and ethnohistoric information. His first introduction to Bernice Metoxen Robinson Huntington (sometimes erroneously spelled Robertson) took place at this time. In 1914, at the age of about thirty-seven, she had been one of Michelson's informants. She had also worked with Frank T. Siebert,Jr., in 1935 and 1936. She was a black adopted by the Mahicans with whom she lived from earliest childhood; she learned Menominee in school. Harrington's first meeting with her was unsuccessful, the second more cordial and fruitful, and about the last week of October 1949, on a subsequent trip to Wisconsin, he was able to hear and rehear with her a substantial amount of Mahican linguistics. He found another excellent informant in Webb Miller. Most of the notes are of a comparative nature, particularly comparisons with the two Abenaki dialects and with Delaware. This fell into place rather easily as Harrington was in various cities of Maine, in Quebec, and in Albany, N.Y., between April 24 and October 24 taking notes from St. Francis and Penobscot Abenaki speakers. He extracted Delaware terms from Daniel G. Brinton and Albert S. Anthony's A Lenape-English Dictionary (1888), and from the unpublished manuscript of Mathew S. Henry, Vocabulary of Words in Various Indian Dialects of the United States (ca. 1861). In November and December while traveling between New York and Washington for other reasons, he carried most of these notes with him and began the work of sorting and rearranging, which continued on and off in Washington at least until 1952. Other equivalent terms are in Menominee and were supplied by interviews in Washington with Al Dodge, an employee of the Interior Department. Ojibwa and Pequot terms are mainly from secondary sources.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Mahican language  Search this
Menominee language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Mohegan language  Search this
Massachuset language  Search this
Delaware language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.5
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3dab14dc9-d14e-4ac2-b02d-2bed09dbe1a7
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref14955
Online Media:

Delaware (Oklahoma and Ontario)

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Voegelin, C. F. (Charles Frederick), 1906-1986  Search this
Siebert, Frank T. (Frank Thomas), 1912-1998  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Boxes
Culture:
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Munsee Delaware  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Correspondence
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Date:
1940
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains Harrington's research on two Delaware languages, now distinguished by linguists as Unami (in Oklahoma) and Munsee (in Ontario). Harrington, following local usage, referred to both as Delaware.

His Unami linguistic notes consist of a randomly accumulated vocabulary with some phonetic and grammatical structures interspersed. Included also are historical and cultural comments. The largest single group was apparently collected by C. F. Voegelin and is labeled "Voeg." Other smaller groups represent collections by Voegelin from individually named informants, followed by Harrington's notes from the same informants. Harrington's material consists of both new and reheard terms, with a general emphasis on developing the etymology of state names and placenames. Voegelin inserted some Munsee, Shawnee, Kaw, and Ojibwa equivalences. The Munsee terms may have been those of Frank T. Siebert, Jr., as notes indicate that Voegelin was in possession of some of Siebert's vocabulary lists, which had been collected in June 1938 from Nicodemus Peters at Smoothtown. The most substantial placename information concerns the name Wyoming.

A selection of extracts from Brinton and Anthony (1888) and a few from Truman Michelson's "Preliminary Report on the Linguistic Classification of Algonquian Tribes" (1912) contain comments by Voegelin. Scattered Abenaki comparisons were probably inserted at least a decade later. Filed with this 1940 collection are three pages of notes heard from "the old woman west of Anadarko" in June 1939.

There are also four untitled texts (former B.A.E. ms. 6023pt.) collected by Voegelin in April 1940 with partial interlinear translations by Jesse Longbone. Harrington made handwritten copies of fifteen short songs also collected by Voegelin. Although there are wide variations between Voegelin's orthography and Harrington's, these songs were apparently incorporated into Voegelin's "Word Distortions in Delaware Big House and Walam Olum Songs" (1942). There are scattered notes in English but no translations.

The Unami files also contain miscellaneous notes consisting of a few grammatical notes, correspondence, and names of persons. There are also several pages relating to the Swedish author Amandus Johnson.

Harrington also collected a variety of linguistic notes from Delaware speakers of Ontario. Raw field notes obtained from Josiah Montour and Jesse Moses in the area of Smoothtown, Ontario, include general vocabulary, tribenames, names of persons, and a few grammatical constructions. Montour also contributed Munsee origins associated with the name Wyoming. There are also materials from when Voegelin gave Harrington a list of Walam Olum terms to rehear with Josiah Montour, which Harrington presumably did in the first days of that month. Another small section of field notes contains material from Jane Pattice, Josiah Montour's sister. In addition, there are a few undated pages dealing mainly with the location of the Munsee Reserve in Canada and how to get there.
Biographical / Historical:
In April 1940, John P. Harrington and C. F. Voegelin were in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, on a joint field trip where they interviewed a number of Delaware-speaking Indians. The exact itinerary is difficult to reconstruct. Field notes and correspondence indicate that they were together in Bartlesville at least between April 8 and 20, and early in May, they were in Greencastle, Indiana, where Voegelin gave Harrington a list of Delaware terms to investigate in Smoothtown, Ontario on Six Nations Reserve. Of the two notes that locate Harrington in that vicinity, only one is dated (May 4, 1940-see "Mohawk Linguistic Notes"). It must have been a brief stop as he was in Seattle en route to Alaska on May 7.

In June 1940 Harrington and Voegelin made another trip to Oklahoma. They visited May Haas at Eufaula and Frank T. Siebert,Jr., at Oklahoma City and Norman. On that occasion they worked with a number of Delawares, Shawnees, Otoes, and others. During the first week of August, after his return to Washington, D.C., Harrington reorganized the notes for which Voegelin had requested clarification.

In Oklahoma, Harrington visited the city of Bartlesville; the towns of Dewey and Copan; and Claremore, the location of the Indian Health Services Hospital. Among the people he interviewed were Mabel Bobb Beaver (Mabel) and Henry Duncan Beaver (Duncan); Sally and John Fallleaf (spelled "Fall-Leaf" by Harrington); Annie (Mrs. Lb.) and Jesse Longbone (Jesse, Jes) and his brothers Roy and William (William Lb.); Jake Parks; and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Washington and their son Fred (Mrs. Wash., Fred Wash.). In Ontario, those he interviewed included Josiah Montour, his seventy-five-year-old sister Jane Pattice, and Jesse Moses.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Delaware language  Search this
Shawnee language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Toponymy  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Phonetics  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Field notes
Vocabulary
Songs
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.8
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31bd6d541-c4e2-4688-bb63-0595d46f8fdc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15032

Powhatan

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Names:
Strachey, William, 1572?-1621  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
3 Boxes
Culture:
Powhatan  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains Harrington's research on Powhatan for his monograph "The Original Strachey Vocabulary of the Virginia Indian Language," which was published by the Smithsonian in 1955. The monograph is based on the vocabulary contained in William Strachey's Historie of Travaile into Virginia Britannia, a manuscript in the possession of the Bodleian Library. A British Museum manuscript of a slightly different version of the Strachey vocabulary was printed and published in 1849 by the Hakluyt Society. Harrington utilized microfilm and photocopies of the two manuscripts and the Hakluyt publication in his work.

A typed draft of the article is followed by related notes (former B.A.E. ms. 6024), not all of which found their way into the final publication. Most noteworthy is a comparison of John Smith's vocabulary from A Map of Virginia (1612) with the Hakluyt version of Strachey's vocabulary. A short vocabulary of Pamunkey collected by the Reverend Mr. Dalrymple (Dalrimple) in 1844 and published by "C. C" in 1858 is compared with A Lenape-English Dictionary (1888) by Brinton and Anthony.

Harrington arranged Strachey's vocabulary one term to a page in the same alphabetic order as in the original manuscript. He copied Brinton and Anthony's translations for the same words, if such existed, and made note of divergences between the Bodleian Library and British Museum manuscripts. References to the British Museum are often preceded by the designation "Brit."; "1849" identifies terms from the Hakluyt publication. Included are the notes for Harrington's semantic arrangement of Strachey's terms found on pages 197 to 202 in "The Original Strachey Vocabulary." The label "Strachey" followed by a number indicates the number of the facsimile sheet on which the entry appears. The facsimile sheets are placed between pages 196 and 197. Strachey also copied the song of the Indians and Harrington compared some of the terms with those of Brinton and Anthony. A very brief morphological arrangement was begun by Harrington but apparently abandoned. Likewise, there is the mere beginning of a section comparing terms from Strachey vocabulary with those of the Abenaki, Delaware, and Natick languages. Miscellaneous notes include preliminary partial drafts and related notes, some general bibliographical information, and material marked "Rejects" by Harrington.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Powhatan language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Delaware language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 6.9
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 6: Native American History, Language, and Culture of the Northeast & Southeast
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw302fcb648-49ae-4525-b95c-373bf5f628a0
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15043

Supplemental Material on the Northeast/Southeast

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Collection Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody, 1884-1961  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (box)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Fox Indians  Search this
Cree  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Massachusett  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Conoy Indians  Search this
Nanticoke  Search this
Narragansett  Search this
Shawnee  Search this
Abenaki (Abnaki)  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Muskogee (Creek)  Search this
Seminole  Search this
Alabama Indians  Search this
Choctaw  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Wyandot  Search this
Powhatan  Search this
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
circa 1907-circa 1957
Scope and Contents:
This subseries of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series contains material that supplement Harrington's Northeast/Southeast field notes.

The file on Algonquian includes three slips of Fox, Cree, Ojibwa, and Massachusett (labeled "Natick") vocabulary in the hand of Truman Michelson; typed copies of the above; notes on Cree and Ojibwa from secondary sources; information on the growing of wild rice by the Menominee; and miscellaneous notes on placenames and tribenames regarding the Cree, Ojibwa, Conoy, Nanticoke, and Narraganset.

The Shawnee/Peoria section consists of six pages of notes on Shawnee tribal divisions.

Among the miscellaneous material on the Abnaki languages is a page of Penobscot vocabulary obtained from Frank Siebert in April 1940. The remaining material was compiled during fieldwork on Western Abnaki at St. Francis in 1949. There are four pages on possible informants from Charles Nolet and a page of vocabulary from "Am"; bibliographic references; and lexical and grammatical notes excerpted from the works of Joseph Laurent and Masta.

For Massachusett there are three pages of miscellaneous notes with references to Trumbull's Natick Dictionary.

The bulk of the file on Iroquoian consists of a typed copy of an unidentified historical text from the 1880s. It discusses the relations of the Iroquois with the Spanish, French, and English settlers in the New World. Special mention is made of Gy-ant-va-chia (Cornplanter), chief of the Seneca. The spacing of the lines of text suggests that Harrington was planning to add a translation or annotations of some kind. There are also three pages of miscellaneous notes in his hand.

Most of the file on Delaware consists of information on placenames and tribenames obtained from Frank Siebert, Carl F. Voegelin, and a number of Oklahoma residents in 1940. Siebert gave both Delaware and Penobscot terms, and Unami words were given by Roy Longbone, Salley Fallleaf, and Jake Parks. Munsee forms were obtained from Josiah Montour and Jane Pattice of the Six-Nations Reserve in Ontario, Canada. Also included are a carbon copy of a typed list of possible informants and several pages of miscellaneous notes from the works of Brinton, Strachey, and Zeisberger.

The section on Creek/Seminole/Alabama/Koasati/Choctaw contains twenty-one pages of vocabulary (mostly on tribenames) which Harrington obtained in an interview with James Feagin Sylestine, a speaker of the Alabama language, on April 25, 1940. The informant's home was in Livingston, Texas, although he was at the Shawnee Sanatorium at the time Harrington worked with him. The remaining miscellaneous notes were excerpted from various published and manuscript sources. They include references to Creek, Cherokee, Seminole, Alabama, and Choctaw.

Miscellaneous material relating to the East consists of brief notes which Harrington copied from a number of secondary sources. There are mentions of the Huron, Wyandot, Powhatan, and Cherokee tribes, among others. Three of the pages consist of a partial typed list (alphabetically arranged K to M) of "Carolina and Virginia Algonquian" words. This list is based on that given in the commentary on the map of Raleigh's Virginia, pages 852 to 872 of The Roanoke Voyages, which was published by the Hakluyt Society in 1955.
Local Numbers:
Accession #1976-95
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Algonquian languages  Search this
Fox language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Wampanoag language  Search this
Nanticoke language  Search this
Narragansett language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Penobscot language  Search this
Delaware language  Search this
Munsee language  Search this
Creek language  Search this
Cherokee language  Search this
Alabama language  Search this
Choctaw language  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Names, Geographical  Search this
Names, Ethnological  Search this
Creek (Muskogee)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Collection Citation:
John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
The preferred citation for the Harrington Papers will reference the actual location within the collection, i.e. Box 172, Alaska/Northwest Coast, Papers of John Peabody Harrington, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

However, as the NAA understands the need to cite phrases or vocabulary on specific pages, a citation referencing the microfilmed papers is acceptable. Please note that the page numbering of the PDF version of the Harrington microfilm does not directly correlate to the analog microfilm frame numbers. If it is necessary to cite the microfilmed papers, please refer to the specific page number of the PDF version, as in: Papers of John Peabody Harrington, Microfilm: MF 7, R34 page 42.
Identifier:
NAA.1976-95, Subseries 8.6
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington Papers
John Peabody Harrington Papers / Series 8: Notes and Writings on Special Linguistic Studies
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw3cd9617a0-28a5-4c9d-a745-4da9c52b91fc
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-1976-95-ref15294

MS 2703 Notes on Algonquian languages collected by Truman Michelson at Carlisle Indian Industrial School

Creator:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Belgarde, Mary  Search this
Groesbeck, Bruce  Search this
Allen, Grover  Search this
Kachicum, Louise  Search this
Azure, Patrick  Search this
Masta, Flora  Search this
Morse, Dorothy  Search this
Names:
United States Indian School (Carlisle, Pa.)  Search this
Extent:
43 Pages
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Algonquin (Algonkin)  Search this
Cree  Search this
Anishinaabe (Chippewa/Ojibwa)  Search this
Inunaina (Arapaho)  Search this
Abenaki (Abnaki)  Search this
Kickapoo  Search this
Potawatomi  Search this
Menominee (Menomini)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Field notes
Vocabulary
Date:
1911-1912
Scope and Contents:
Truman Michelson's handwritten linguistic notes on various Algonquian languages from his work with students at Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania during the winter of 1911-1912. The notes include information about the students he worked with, vocabulary, grammar, and an Arapaho text. Mary Belgarde and Patrick Azure provided information on Turtle Mountain Chippewa (which Michelson determined is Cree); Dorothy Morse on Northern Chippewa (near Duluth); Flora Masta on Abenaki; Grover Allen (a Kickapoo) on Potawatomi; Louise Kitchikum (likely Kachicum) on Menominee; and Bruce Groesbeck on Northern Arapaho.
Arrangement:
Notes are organized by language.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2703
Local Note:
Title changed from "Materials relating to various Algonquian languages" 4/15/2014.
Topic:
Cree language  Search this
Ojibwa language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Potawatomi language  Search this
Menominee language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Citation:
Manuscript 2703, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2703
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw30530495f-5af9-404b-8f66-0f0086463d01
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2703
Online Media:

MS 2806 Edward Sapir notes on vocabularies of Algonquian languages

Creator:
Sapir, Edward, 1884-1939  Search this
Collector:
Michelson, Truman, 1879-1938  Search this
Extent:
28 Pages
Culture:
Cree  Search this
Lenape (Delaware)  Search this
Maliseet (Malecite)  Search this
Montagnais Innu  Search this
Mi'kmaq (Micmac)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Abenaki (Abnaki)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Vocabulary
Date:
circa 1911
Scope and Contents:
Edward Sapir's typed notes on the vocabularies of various Algonquian languages that he collected in 1911. List of languages covered: Delaware, pages 1-6; Abnaki (Pierreville), page 7-12; Malecite (Riviere du Loup, Thomas Paul), pages 13-17; Micmac, pages 18-23, Cree (Rupert's House), pages 24-25; Montagnais (Louis Clairie, Pointe Bleue), pages 26-28. There are annotations and corrections in ink in Sapir's handwriting (identified by Mary Haas, 4/58). There are also pencil additions signed by Michelson; perhaps all of the pencil additions are his.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2806
Local Note:
Title changed from "Vocabularies" 5/1/2014.
Topic:
Algonquian languages  Search this
Munsee language  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Passamaquoddy language  Search this
Micmac language  Search this
Cree language  Search this
Montagnais language  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Lenape  Search this
Mi'kmaq  Search this
Maliseet-Passamaquoddy  Search this
Abnaki  Search this
Genre/Form:
Vocabulary
Citation:
Manuscript 2806, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2806
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw31caadc41-55ec-4b08-acc8-d99252281777
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2806
Online Media:

MS 1167 Abenaki (Algonquian) vocabulary

Creator:
Paine, George W.  Search this
Former owner:
Vetromile, Eugene, 1819-1881  Search this
Extent:
6 Pages
Culture:
Abenaki (Abnaki)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Pennacook  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Pages
Date:
1902
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1167
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1167, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1167
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
GUID:
https://n2t.net/ark:/65665/nw305b47972-2273-45af-81d8-2972893b859e
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1167

Grammatical sketch of the ancient Abnaki outlined in the dictionary of Fr. Sebastian Râle, S.J. Part I.--The Abnaki noun ... Read at the meeting of the ... Society, at Portland, December 23, 1882

Author:
O'Brien, Michael Charles 1842-1901  Search this
Rasles, Sébastien 1657-1724  Search this
Physical description:
1 p. l., 34 p. 23 x 19 cm
Type:
Electronic resources
Date:
1887
Topic:
Abenaki language  Search this
Call number:
PM551.A6O2 1887
PM551.A6O2 1887
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_268819

Indian good book made by Eugene Vetromile ... for the benefit of the Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, St. John's, Micmac, and other tribes of the Abnaki Indians. This year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-seven. Old-town Indian village, and Bangor

Author:
Vetromile, Eugene 1819-1881  Search this
Subject:
Catholic Church  Search this
Physical description:
449, [1] p. front., plates. 17 cm
Type:
Texts
Prayers and devotions
Date:
1857
Topic:
Abenaki language  Search this
Call number:
PM551.Z71 V4 1857
PM551.Z71 V4 1857
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_268820

Indian good book, made by Eugene Vetromile ... for the benefit of the Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, St. John's, Micmac, and other tribes of the Abnaki Indians. This year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight. Old-town Indian village, and Bangor

Author:
Vetromile, Eugene 1819-1881  Search this
Subject:
Catholic Church  Search this
Physical description:
4 p. l., [7]-586 p. front., plates. 17 cm
Type:
Texts
Prayers and devotions
Date:
1858
Topic:
Abenaki language  Search this
Call number:
PM551.Z71 V4 1858
PM551.Z71 V4 1858
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_268821

Indian good book, made by Eugene Vetromile for the benefit of the Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, St. John's, Micmac, and other tribes of the Abnaki Indians. This year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six. Old-town Indian village, and Bangor

Author:
Vetromile, Eugene 1819-1881  Search this
Subject:
Catholic Church  Search this
Physical description:
449 p. front., plates. 17 cm
Type:
Texts
Prayers and devotions
Date:
1856
Topic:
Abenaki language  Search this
Call number:
PM551.Z71 V4 1856
PM551.Z71 V4 1856
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_342232

Kagakimzouiasis ueji uo'banakiak adali kimo'gik aliuitzo'ki Za Plasua

Author:
Wzokhilain, P. P (Peter Paul)  Search this
Desfossés, Basilide  Search this
Former owner:
Siebert, Frank T (Frank Thomas) 1912-1998 DSI  Search this
Subject:
Catholic Church Abenaki  Search this
Physical description:
44 p. ; 17 cm
Type:
Texts
Prayers and devotions
Date:
1832
Topic:
Abenaki language  Search this
Call number:
PM551 .K33 1832
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_832114

New familiar Abenakis and English dialogues the first ever published on the grammatical system / by Jos. Laurent

Author:
Laurent, Joseph  Search this
Physical description:
230 p. ; 17 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Canada
Date:
1884
Topic:
Abenaki language  Search this
Languages  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_748293

The modern dialect of the Canadian Abenakis / J. Dyneley Prince

Author:
Prince, John Dyneley 1868-1945  Search this
Physical description:
20 p. ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Canada
Date:
1901
Topic:
Abenaki language  Search this
Call number:
PM551 .P95 1901
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_500676

The Wabanaki Collection and the William Wallace Tooker Papers in the Huntington Free Library : a guide to the microfilm edition / compiled by Mary B. Davis

Author:
Huntington Free Library  Search this
Davis, Mary B  Search this
Huntington Free Library  Search this
Subject:
Tooker, William Wallace 1848-1917 Manuscripts Microform catalogs  Search this
Huntington Free Library and Reading Room Microform catalogs  Search this
Physical description:
32 p. : 1 ill. ; 22 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1991
Topic:
Manuscripts--Microform catalogs  Search this
Abenaki language--Manuscripts--Microform catalogs  Search this
Algonquian languages--Manuscripts--Microform catalogs  Search this
Call number:
E99.A13 D29 1991
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_509281

Abenaki Indian legends, grammar and place names [microform] / by Henry Lorne Masta

Author:
Masta, Henry Lorne 1853-1943  Search this
Physical description:
110 p. : music, ports. ; 22 cm
Type:
Microforms
Folklore
Date:
1992
1932
Topic:
Legends  Search this
Abenaki language  Search this
Call number:
mfc 5048.01
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_451660

A study in the etymology of the Indian place name Missisquoi [microform] / by George McAleer

Author:
McAleer, George 1845-1923  Search this
Physical description:
102, 39 p. : port., maps ; 23 cm
Type:
Microforms
Date:
1993
1906
Topic:
Abenaki language--Etymology  Search this
Missisquoi (Name)  Search this
Call number:
mfc 006506.02
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_463085

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